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Building a Global Community

Committed to Process Safety

2 0 0 7
PROCESS SAFETY REPORT
Process Safety
Report 2007

CONTENTS CCPS MISSION


1 Management Report JUST AFTER MIDNIGHT on December 3, 1984, water contamination
of a tank of methyl isocyanate in Bhopal, India initiated a series of
events that led to a catastrophic toxic release, killing more than
2 Operations Report
3,000 residents and injuring over 100,000. In February of 1985,
17 chemical industry leaders asked the American Institute of
3 Milestones of 2006 Chemical Engineers (AIChE) to lead a collaborative effort to
eliminate catastrophic process incidents by:
4 Upcoming Projects
■ ADVANCING state-of-the-art process safety technology and
and Events
management practices
■ SERVING as a premier resource for information on process
6 Process Safety safety
at a Glance ■ FOSTERING process safety in engineering and science education
■ PROMOTING process safety as a key industry value
8 CCPS Members:
On March 25, 1985, AIChE formed the Center for Chemical Process
A Powerful Alliance
Safety and by the end of 1985 had enlisted 39 charter member compa-
nies. CCPS and its member companies quickly published CCPS’ first
10 CCPS Organization book, Guidelines for Hazard Evaluation Procedures, and by 1990
and Structure more than a dozen books had been published along with CCPS’ call
to action publication, A Challenge to Commitment. In these initial
publications, CCPS first codified the critical elements of process
12 Project Committees safety and provided key tools to manage, implement, and continually
improve process safety programs. Focused workshops and annual
international conferences provided additional opportunities for
17 CCPS Staff
communal learning and formal discussion regarding process safety.

18 Members Still following this approach 22 years later, CCPS continues to


address the most important process safety needs and encourage an
overall culture of process safety. Over 85 corporate members from
around the world now participate in CCPS, including most of the
world’s leading chemical, petroleum, and pharmaceutical companies.
CCPS’ body of work reflects the great strides made in the area of
process safety. CCPS continues to expand its catalog of over 100
books and products, build on its legacy of 21 successful international
conferences, and cultivate its Safety in Chemical Engineering
Education (SACHE) university curriculum program.

CENTER FOR
CHEMICAL PROCESS SAFETY
3 Park Avenue
New York, New York 10016-5991 USA
Tel: 212.591.7319 Fax: 212.591.8883 AIChE is a 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit educational organization.
www.ccpsonline.org Annual member dues contributions to CCPS may be tax-deductible.
E-MAIL: ccps@aiche.org Consult a tax advisor for further information.

©2007 American Institute of Chemical Engineers


AIChE #1656 01.07
Management Report
Process Safety:The Cornerstone of a
Global Economy

CCPS’ FOUNDERS ENVISIONED that the CCPS process safety


mission would be world-wide. They demonstrated this commitment in
the international nature of CCPS conferences and the support that
CCPS lends other organizations around the world interested in promoting
process safety. Additionally, from our earliest days, a significant
percentage of CCPS book sales have been outside the United States.

In the last few years, though, CCPS leaders have recognized that CCPS
must become more than a US-based organization serving the world;
it must be a global organization.
Scott Berger
CCPS Director
The globalization of CCPS began in 2004 with the publication of the
Process Safety Beacon in numerous languages. In 2006, CCPS made its
global presence physical, running programs and events in Mumbai, In the last few years,
India and Qingdao, China, including training. We are expanding our
activities in China and India to include additional membership and proj-
CCPS leaders have
ect activities, and we continue to seek partners to help CCPS and our recognized that CCPS
process safety culture take root in other regions of the world.
must become more
While the world of CCPS expands, we face new challenges in the field than a US-based
of process safety. The rapid expansion in the pharmaceutical industry,
particularly in biopharmaceuticals, is adding a new dimension to organization serving
process safety, demonstrated by the recent doubling of the number of
pharmaceutical company members of CCPS. While most traditional
the world; it must be a
process safety fundamentals apply, we expect to see our pharmaceuti- global organization.
cal members spawn new and interesting projects in the coming years.

Smaller companies, whether in the US or abroad, present a significant need for additional process safety
resources. CCPS continues to support process safety in smaller companies through its Occupational
Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) Alliance on chemical reactivity hazard management, on-going
recruiting efforts, and participation in meetings of key state chemical industry trade organizations.

In 2006, CCPS also established an online process safety community to facilitate member-to-member
interaction and to put the CCPS experience on our members’ desktops. This new technology, featuring
blogging, bulletin boards, news feeds, and other important tools, will bridge global time zones and make
it easier than ever for smaller companies to participate in CCPS. CCPS sponsors also believe this
investment will engage the increasing number of younger chemical engineers who are assuming
process safety responsibilities.

We thank you for your continued dedication to process safety and for your support of CCPS.

Building a Global Community Committed to Process Safety 1


Operations Report

SINCE ITS INCEPTION, CCPS has been the leading source of


process safety information. In 2006, however, CCPS took the distribu-
tion of its process safety resources to a whole new level, launching an
ambitious project to make CCPS content available online in a fully
searchable, topic driven format. This approach differs from the
traditional book format and offers multiple levels of detail available
at the click of a mouse. This new CCPS Web Community also includes
a process safety blog, bulletin board, and news feeds. CCPS members
are holding real-time, online technical discussions, presenting
benchmarking data, asking questions and providing feedback—
all in a secure, informal forum.
Karen Person
Project Engineer and
Industry Liaison
More importantly, this technology will be a primary catalyst for the
productive discussions that occur between and among CCPS members
as they interact on project committees and in meetings.
We value your input
As CCPS begins its 22nd year and becomes a truly global organization, and hope that, with
increased accessibility to CCPS materials and to other CCPS members
has become a top priority. Using these new web services, CCPS is our increasing online,
reaching parts of companies that may not have previously been able to
global reach, we can
fully participate. Smaller companies, in particular, are now using CCPS
resources online more easily and cost effectively, while CCPS’ global help you achieve your
companies are using the new web tools to integrate CCPS best prac-
tices into their facilities and workforces abroad.
process safety goals
more effectively.
As CCPS begins new projects on diverse topics including process
safety metrics, independent protection layers, hazard identification
and vapor clouds explosions, it is imperative that CCPS members have
immediate access to project documents and to each other. Employees of member companies who once
might not have participated in CCPS are now finding it easy and beneficial and are discovering the true
value of CCPS project work.

In 2007, CCPS will continue to make process safety resources available online. Our goal is to establish
a single, interactive website that incorporates the full CCPS library and that serves the industry
for most, if not all, process safety needs. The CCPS Web Community can be accessed by going to
www.ccpsonline.org and logging in with your company information.

We invite all employees of CCPS member companies to become active in CCPS and welcome the
opportunity to discuss ways you might become involved.

If your company is not a CCPS member, we encourage you to consider membership. CCPS members
and volunteers are the key to our success.

2 2007 CCPS Process Safety Report


Milestones of 2006
■ PROCESS SAFETY BEACON
Now in its sixth year, the Process Safety Beacon continues to extend its reach and impact
as the world’s leading monthly process safety publication. With a growing editorial board
and expanding network of volunteer translators, the Beacon is bolstering process safety
awareness among operating personnel worldwide. To receive the free Beacon email each
month, register at www.aiche.org/ccps/publications/beacon/index.aspx.

■ PERIODICALS FEATURING THE BEACON:


Chemical Engineering Progress
Chemical News (India)
Safety, Health and Environment (Sinopec-China, Mandarin)

■ LANGUAGES AVAILABLE:
Arabic, Dutch, English, French, German, Gujarati, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean,
Mandarin, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Thai

■ SUCCESSFUL INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOPS


CCPS held highly attended workshops in China, partnering with
the China University of Petroleum, and in India, partnering
with the Indian Chemical Council. These workshops represent
the first steps in international growth activities for CCPS.

■ ADVANCING PROCESS SAFETY


During 2006, CCPS continued to add to its large body of process
safety knowledge that now includes over 100 books, software and other products. We completed the
following projects in the past year:

■ Human Factors Methods for Improving Performance in the Process Industries:


As process complexity increases, it’s more important than ever that design engineers understand
how humans and equipment interact so they can design user-machine interfaces that are resistant to
human error. This basic, easy-to-read reference should be part of the standard toolbox for process
and design engineers throughout industry.

■ Guidelines for Management of Change for Process Safety: CCPS has updated guidance
on this cornerstone principle of process safety. Including case studies and real-life examples plus
CD-based support tools, this new book details the methods for measuring, auditing, and improving
the efficiency and effectiveness of process safety.

■ Guidelines for Safe and Reliable Instrumented Protective Systems: This detailed
implementation guide for IEC 61508, IEC 61511, and ISA-84 standards explains the decision-making
and work processes for the management and implementation of instrumented protective systems
(IPS) throughout a project’s life.

■ Process Safety and Risk Management of Chemical Parks: This report, developed in
collaboration with the European Process Safety Centre (EPSC), addresses the challenges inherent
to manufacturing locations where multiple companies operate on sites that were once owned by a
single company. In such situations, disputes over ownership of issues may interfere with resolution,
while cross-company impacts may be missed. The report may be downloaded from either the
EPSC or CCPS website.

We welcome project suggestions at any time. For more information, contact


CCPS at ccps@aiche.org.

Building a Global Community Committed to Process Safety 3


Upcoming Projects and Events
ONGOING PROJECTS
Join us in bringing these important projects to fruition:

■ Placement of Remote Sensors to Detect


Catastrophic Chemical Release: Early detection of a ■ Guidelines for Risk-Based Process
catastrophic release is critical for rapid mitigation and Safety: Process safety practices and
emergency response. CCPS is partnering with the formal safety management systems have
American Industrial Hygienists Association to develop been in place in some companies for more
principles and strategies for chemical sensor placement to than 20 years. These practices are widely
help protect the community and the environment against credited with reducing major accident risk
such releases. and actual incidents. Nevertheless, stag-
nant process safety results and continuing
■ Inherently Safer Processes, 2nd Edition: CCPS pub- pressures on resources still challenge many
lished the “Gold Book” on inherently safer design (ISD) in organizations. This new book will establish
1996. This publication took a conceptual and retrospective a paradigm shift for industries that manu-
approach since the number of successful examples of ISD facture, consume, or handle chemicals, with
at the time was limited. Now, with ten years of experience, a focus on new ways to design, correct and
we are updating this book, including detailed design guid- improve process safety management prac-
ance and practical examples such as retrofitting inherently tices. This new framework for thinking
safer concepts into operating plants. about process safety builds on original PSM
ideas, integrates industry lessons learned
■ Guidelines for Chemical Transportation Risk and over the intervening years, and uses appli-
Security Analysis, 2nd Edition: We are currently cable total quality principles. The contents
updating the 1995 publication Guidelines for Chemical are organized in a way that will be useful to
Transportation Risk Analysis to make it easier to under- organizations of any size and with any
stand and use, and to include important new content on degree of hazard throughout the lifecycle.
transportation security.

■ Guidelines for Performing Effective Pre-Startup Safety Reviews: Start-up remains one of the
highest-risk phases of plant operation. A well-executed pre-startup safety review is critical to maintaining
safety during this period. This new publication will guide engineers through the pre-startup review
process, complete with customizable checklists.

■ Incidents that Define Process Safety: It is critical that the next generation of engineers under-
stands both the “how” and the “why” of process safety. This new publication will use historical
accounts to illustrate critically important aspects of process safety.

■ Guidelines for Hazard Evaluation Procedures, 3rd Edition: This update of the CCPS classic will
showcase lessons learned since the 2nd edition was published in 1992, including new hazard evaluation
procedures and a refinement of the detailed PHA checklists included in the previous two editions.

PROCESS SAFETY INCIDENT DATABASE


CCPS established the Process Safety Incident Database (PSID) to capture high-value lessons from process
safety incidents. PSID combines anonymously submitted incident reports and important lessons learned
with a search mechanism that allows retrieval of specific
data in areas such as process design, hazard analysis, and
PROCESS EQUIPMENT
incident investigation. As participation in PSID increases, the
number of lessons learned grows while the cost of participa-
RELIABILITY DATABASE
tion decreases. To learn more or to obtain a demonstration, CCPS PERD project technology allows collection
contact Adrian Sepeda at psid@aiche.org. of high-quality reliability data using definable
and reproducible taxonomies and provides a
secure internet application that allows immediate
analysis. With a solid foundation of standard
taxonomies and successful data integration
pilots, we will begin steps to bring PERD
online in 2007.

4 2007 CCPS Process Safety Report


Upcoming Projects and Events
SAFETY IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION PROGRAM
CCPS members strongly believe that graduating chemical engineers should begin their careers with a
solid foundation of process safety knowledge and process safety engineering fundamentals. CCPS’ Safety
in Chemical Engineering Education (SACHE) program provides engineering faculty around the world with
process safety curricular materials. SACHE modules may be used in process safety courses or incorpo-
rated into basic engineering courses (e.g. thermodynamics, kinetics, unit operations, and design). More
than 140 universities worldwide use SACHE lecture materials and problem sets,
delivered through SACHE’s secure website www.sache.org. SACHE also trains
chemical engineering faculty in total-immersion workshops, focusing on the
engineering and management challenges of implementing process safety in a
working chemical plant.

The 2007 SACHE workshop will again be hosted by Rohm and Haas, Arkema,
and Chilworth Technology.

NEW PROJECTS
CCPS has begun its third decade with new projects that build on its legacy of thoughtful, pacesetting guidelines.
CCPS also continues to apply practical experience to improve and expand many of its signature works.

■ Guidelines for Developing Risk Tolerance Criteria: This project is establishing quantitative safety
risk criteria. The book will show how to develop criteria reflecting company-specific operating needs,
while maintaining consistency with industry-wide practices.
■ Guidelines for Evaluating the Characteristics of Vapor Cloud Explosions,
Flash Fires, and BLEVES, 2nd edition: This project is an update to the classic 1994 CCPS book.
The new edition will include many new technologies and approaches proven over the past 12 years.
■ Guidelines for Pressure Relief and Effluent Handling Systems, 2nd edition: This update is
being written in conjunction with the Design Institute for Emergency Relief Systems (DIERS) and will
include new data gained since original publication.
■ Guidelines for Process Safety Metrics: The
objective of this project is to work with a broad range 2007 INTERNATIONAL
of domestic and international organizations to develop CONFERENCE
a small, common set of process safety metrics to The 22nd CCPS International Conference,
improve monitoring and communication of the success April 23–25, in Houston, Texas, will again be a
and progress of process safety initiatives. cornerstone of the Global Congress on Process
■ Tools to Enhance Hazard Identification: This Safety. The theme of this year’s conference is
project will provide guidance to enhance awareness Case Histories: Advancing Process Safety through
and identification of process safety hazards by front Design and Operations. Sessions will include:
line personnel. The tool will address the general con-
■ Risk Based Process Safety and Risk Tolerance
cept of process safety hazard identification as well as
Criteria
provide for ongoing activity to target awareness in
■ Process Safety Management Systems
more focused areas of process safety.
■ Inherent Safety
■ Non-SIS Independent Protection Layers: This ■ Standards, Codes, and Regulations, and
publication will be a companion to both the CCPS Criteria for Retroactive Implementation
Layers of Protection Analysis (LOPA) concept book ■ Reliability and Process Safety including
and Guidelines for Safe and Reliable Instrumented Mechanical Integrity, Risk-Based Process
Protective Systems. It will address issues such as how Safety and Turnaround Considerations
to ensure the effectiveness and maintain reliability for
Running in conjunction with the AIChE Spring
administrative controls or “inherently safer, passive”
Meeting, the CCPS program will include strong
concepts.
technical papers addressing issues related to
■ Guidelines for Auditing Process Safety design and operations and will explore the most
Management Systems, 2nd edition: This update of current thinking and approaches as demonstrated
the 1992 CCPS book will update the fundamental skills, through case histories and lessons learned.
techniques, and tools of auditing, including integration
into risk-based process safety. For more information on the CCPS Conference,
please go to www.aiche.org/ccps and select
We invite new participants and peer reviewers to join Conferences.
these projects, as well as new projects we launch in 2007.

Building a Global Community Committed to Process Safety 5


Process Safety at a Glance
PROCESS SAFETY STANDARDS
20 CCPS ELEMENTS OSHA EPA TECHNICAL AREAS
29 CFR 1910.119 40 CFR 68 (SEE FACING PAGE)
■ Process Safety Process Safety Management
Culture
PROCESS SAFETY

■ Standards, Codes, (o) Compliance audits .58 Compliance audits Process Safety Management
COMMIT TO

Regulations and Laws

■ Process Safety Process Safety Management;


Competency Safe Design; Venting and
Emergency Relief

■ Workforce (c) Employee participation .83 Employee participation Process Safety Management
Involvement

■ Stakeholder .150 Submission Process Safety Management


Outreach
HAZARDS & RISK

■ Process Knowledge (d) Process safety .48 Safety information Process Safety Management
UNDERSTAND

Management information

■ Hazard Identification (e) Process hazard .67 Process hazard Hazard Analysis, Risk Analysis
and Risk Analysis analysis analysis and Reliability; Consequence
Modeling; Chemical Reactivity
Hazards

■ Operating Procedures (f) Operating procedures .52 Operating procedures Process Safety in Operations
.69 Operating procedures

■ Safe Work Practices (k) Hot work permit .85 Hot work permit Process Safety in Operations;
Safe Design; Venting and
Emergency Relief

■ Asset Integrity and (j) Mechanical integrity .73 Mechanical integrity Process Safety in Operations
Reliability
MANAGE RISK

■ Contractor (h) Contractors .87 Contractors Process Safety in Operations;


Management Process Safety Management

■ Training and (g) Training .54 Training Process Safety in Operations


Performance (o) Compliance audits .58 Compliance audits
Assurance

■ Management of (l) Management of .75 Management of Process Safety Operations


Change change change

■ Operational Process Safety Operations


Readiness
■ Conduct of Process Safety Operations
Operations
■ Emergency (n) Emergency planning Subpart E: Emergency Process Safety Operations;
Management and response response Consequence Modeling
.180 Emergency response
program

■ Incident Investigation (m) Incident investigation .60 Incident investigation Process Safety Management
.81 Incident investigation
LEARN FROM
EXPERIENCE

■ Measurement and .42 Five year accident Process Safety Management


Metrics history

■ Auditing (o) Compliance audits .58 Compliance audits Process Safety Management
.79 Compliance audits
.220 Audits

■ Management Review .42 Five year accident Process Safety Management


and Continuous history
Improvement

6 2007 CCPS Process Safety Report


Process Safety at a Glance
CCPS RESOURCES
TECHNICAL AREAS

HAZARD ANALYSIS,
CONSEQUENCE CHEMICAL VENTING AND
RISK ANALYSIS, AND
MODELING REACTIVITY HAZARDS EMERGENCY RELIEF
RELIABILITY

Evaluating Process Safety Concentration Essential Practices for Deflagration and


in the Chemical Fluctuations and Managing Chemical Detonation Flame
Industry: A User’s Guide Averaging Time in Vapor Reactivity Hazards Arrestors
to Quantitative Risk Clouds G/L for Chemical G/L for Pressure Relief
Assessment Estimating the Flammable Reactivity Evaluation and Effluent Handling
G/L for Analyzing and Mass of a Vapor Cloud and Application to Systems
Managing the Security G/L for Consequence Process Design RELEASE: A Model with
Vulnerabilities of Fixed Analysis of Chemical G/L for Safe Storage and Data to Predict Aerosol
Chemical Sites Releases Handling of Reactive Rainout in Accidental
G/L for Chemical Process Understanding Explosions Materials Releases
Quantitative Risk Wind Flow and Vapor
Analysis, 2nd Ed. Cloud Dispersion at UNDERSTANDING Essential Practices
EXPLOSIONS for Managing
G/L for Chemical Industrial and Urban Chemical Reactivity
Transportation Risk Sites Guidelines for DANIEL A. CROWL Hazards
Safe Handling Robert W. Johnson
Analysis of Powders Steven W. Rudy
Stephen D. Unwin
G/L for Hazard Evaluation and Bulk
Solids
Procedures, 2nd Ed.
G/L for Improving Plant
Reliability Through Data
Collection and Analysis
CENTER FOR
CHEMICAL PROCESS SAFETY

G/L for Process Equipment


Reliability Data, with
Data Tables PROCESS SAFETY PROCESS SAFETY IN
SAFE DESIGN
Layers of Protection MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS
Analysis: Simplified
Process Risk Assessment Avoiding Static Ignition Contractor and Client G/L for Mechanical
Revalidating Process Hazards in Chemical Relations to Assure Integrity Systems
Hazard Analysis Operations Process Safety G/L for Post-Release
Electrostatic Ignitions of G/L for Auditing Process Mitigation in the
Tools for Making Acute
Fires and Explosions Safety Management Chemical Process
Risk Decisions G/L for Engineering Systems Industry
G/L for Risk-Based Process Design for Process G/L for Implementing G/L for Process Safety
Safety (2007) Safety Process Safety Fundamentals in
G/L for Performing G/L for Evaluating Process Management Systems General Plant
Effective Pre-Startup Plant Buildings for G/L for Integrating Operations
Safety Reviews (2007) External Explosions Process Safety G/L for Safe Handling of
and Fires Management, Powders and Bulk Solids
G/L for Design Solutions Environment, Safety, G/L for Safe Process
to Process Equipment Health, and Quality Operations and
Failures G/L for Investigating Maintenance
G/L for Preventing Human Chemical Process G/L for Safe Warehousing
Error in Process Safety Incidents, 2nd Ed. of Chemicals
G/L for Safe Automation G/L for Process Safety in G/L for Technical Planning
of Chemical Processes Batch Reaction Systems for On-Site Emergencies
Inherently Safer Chemical G/L for Process Safety G/L for Writing Effective
Guidelines for Processes: A Life Cycle Documentation Operating and
Investigating Approach G/L for Process Safety in Maintenance Procedures
Chemical
Process Loss Prevention on CD, Outsourced Human Factors:
Incidents 3rd Ed. Manufacturing Methods for Improving
2nd Edition
Making EHS an Integral Operations Performance in the
Part of Process Design Practical Compliance with Process Industries
CENTER FOR
CHEMICAL PROCESS SAFETY
Piper Alpha — Spiral to the EPA Risk LEPC Guidebook:
Disaster Management Program Understanding the EPA
G/L for Safe Design and ProSmart: Performance Risk Management
Operation of Process Measurements of Program Rule
Vent Headers Process Safety Incidents that Define
G/L for Safe and Reliable Management Systems Process Safety (2007)
Instrumented Protective G/L for Management of
Systems (2007) Change for Process
Inherently Safer Design Safety (2007)
(2007)

Building a Global Community Committed to Process Safety 7


CCPS Members: A Powerful Alliance
WORKING TOGETHER, CCPS corporate members pool the resources, expertise, and knowledge needed
to develop superior process safety management and technology. Members guide research initiatives and
enjoy access to the latest findings by participating in the development of CCPS Guidelines, Concept books
and Safety Alert publications. Members also contribute to and benefit from CCPS’ extensive databases of
process safety information in areas such as incident analysis and equipment reliability.

Member representatives may serve on project subcommittees to develop content and attend Technical
Steering Committee meetings in which they can participate in project selection, help define areas of
study, and provide overall technical guidance to CCPS activities. CCPS participants join a network of
peers with whom they can confidentially discuss safety concerns and benchmarking programs.

COMPANIES THAT ARE SERIOUS ABOUT PROCESS SAFETY


FOLLOW THESE 20 BASIC ELEMENTS:

A COMMIT TO PROCESS SAFETY


■ Process Safety Culture
■ Standards, Codes, Regulations and Laws
■ Process Safety Competency
■ Workforce Involvement
■ Stakeholder Outreach B UNDERSTAND HAZARDS AND RISK
■ Process Knowledge Management
■ Hazard Identification and Risk Analysis

C MANAGE RISK
■ Operating Procedures
■ Safe Work Practices
■ Asset Integrity and Reliability
■ Contractor Management
■ Training and Performance Assurance
■ Management of Change
■ Operational Readiness D LEARN FROM EXPERIENCE
■ Conduct of Operations
■ Incident Investigation
■ Emergency Management
■ Measurement and Metrics
■ Auditing
■ Management Review and
Continuous Improvement

To see how CCPS products can assist you in addressing these process safety elements,
please see www.aiche.org/ccps/resources.

8 2007 CCPS Process Safety Report


CCPS Members: A Powerful Alliance
CCPS MEMBERSHIP MAKES GOOD BUSINESS SENSE
Corporate members of the CCPS community substantially leverage their investment. The annual value
of CCPS research that members receive averages $1.5 million. In joining this international alliance of
industry leaders, CCPS members enjoy a return of 70:1 on the resources they have committed.

Members of CCPS include major petroleum, chemical and pharmaceutical companies, as well as other
manufacturers and users of chemicals, engineering contractors, safety consultants, insurance firms and
government agencies. In recent years, CCPS membership has grown to include manufacturers based
outside North America, as well as small specialty manufacturers.

See the back cover for a complete list of members.


Membership dues depend on the world value of the BENEFITS OF
member’s applicable chemical or petroleum sales. CCPS MEMBERSHIP INCLUDE:
Because AIChE is a tax-exempt educational/scientific
■ Your employees would receive the member registration
organization under IRS code 501 (c) (3), some rate to the CCPS International Conference. And
companies choose to fund CCPS participation upon registration for the CCPS conference, your
through their charitable giving foundations. employees may also attend sessions at the AIChE
Spring meeting, which is in the same hotel at the
To become a CCPS member or receive more same time.
information, contact CCPS at (212) 591-7319
■ Your employees receive the CCPS member book
or ccps@aiche.org. discount of 20%, plus you have access to additional
discounts on bulk purchases.

■ Your company can receive a discount on subscription


to CCPS books on-line at www.knovel.com.

■ You will have free access to the CCPS member-only


Web Community containing meeting minutes and
project documents.

■ By participating in CCPS projects, your employees


can learn from colleagues in other companies and
industries — equivalent to free training.

I M P O R TA N T DAT E S F O R 2 0 0 7
EVENT D AT E

Technical Steering Committee Web Conference February 6

Advisory Board Meeting March 8

Global Congress on Process Safety / CCPS Conference April 22-25

Technical Steering Committee Meeting April 26

Technical Steering Committee Web Conference June 26

Managing Board Meeting November 5

Technical Steering Committee Meeting November 7-8

Building a Global Community Committed to Process Safety 9


CCPS Organization and Structure
CCPS ACTIVITIES are monitored and directed by a Managing Board, an Advisory Board, and a
Technical Steering Committee. Additionally, members of the Technical Steering Committee and other
member company representatives serve on subcommittees that oversee CCPS projects.

The Managing Board includes members of the Executive


Committee and Board of Directors of AIChE, as well as the MANAGING BOARD
CCPS Director. It is chaired by the Executive Director of AIChE John A. Sofranko
and oversees CCPS fiscal and management operations. AIChE Executive Director
CCPS Managing Board Chair
The Advisory Board brings together senior executive represen- Scott Berger
tatives of member companies to review CCPS’ mission and AIChE
strategies, support its initiatives, and provide guidance on CCPS Director
CCPS projects. Lawrence Evans
Aspen Technologies
The Technical Steering Committee (TSC), CCPS’ primary AIChE President
operating group, provides technical direction to CCPS activities Dale Keairns
and selects its projects. TSC members serve voluntarily on SAIC
CCPS project subcommittees and provide the technical AIChE President Elect
expertise evident in CCPS publications. All member Scott Love
companies have one voting representative on the Technical ConocoPhillips
Steering Committee. AIChE Secretary

David Rosenthal
Rohm and Haas
AIChE Treasurer

John Chen
Lehigh University
AIChE Past President

Amos Avidan
Bechtel
AIChE Director

Deborah Grubbe
BP
AIChE Director

Liese Dallbauman
Pepsico-Qtg
AIChE Director

November 2006 Technical Steering Committee, San Francisco, CA.

10 2007 CCPS Process Safety Report


CCPS Organization and Structure
■ ADVISORY BOARD ■ PLANNING COMMITTEE

Larry Allen Kevin Kuck The planning committee is


Vice President, EH&S and Corporate General Manager responsible for developing CCPS’
Engineering 3M Company strategic plan and creating
Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.
John Licata project proposals that meet
Thomas Archibald Head, Health, Safety, Environment CCPS goals. To submit
Vice President, Engineering & Quality a proposal, contact Karen
Rohm and Haas Company Syngenta Crop Protection Person at karep@aiche.org.
Scott Berger Carolyn Merritt
CCPS Director Chairman of the Board Gregory Keeports (Chair)
AIChE U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Rohm and Haas Company
Investigation Board
Joseph Castrale Scott Berger
General Manager, EH&S Emer Obroin CCPS
GE Plastics Vice President, EH&S
Monsanto Company
Kathy Anderson
Debbie Dietrich Vertellus, Inc
Director, Chemical Emergency Hermann Ortega
Prevention and Planning Office Vice President, Integrated
Walter Frank
ABS Group, Inc.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Supply Chain
Honeywell Cheryl Grounds
Deborah Grubbe
BP
Vice President – Group Safety and Tom Polton
Industrial Hygiene Senior Director, John Herber
BP Global EHS-Health, and Safety 3M Company
Pfizer
Doug Hefferin Greg Hounsell
Vice President EH&S – NAFTA James B. Porter, Jr. Pfizer
Ciba Specialty Chemicals Vice President, Engineering and
Operations, Chief Engineer Shakeel Kadri
Linda Hicks DuPont Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.
Director of Technology
Vertellus, Inc. Bob Ridge Peter Lodal
Vice President, Health, Environment, Eastman Chemical Company
John Hodgson and Safety
Vice President, Environment, Safety, Neil Maxson
ConocoPhillips Bayer MaterialScience
and Health
Degussa Corporation Edward Ryczek Jack McCavit
Director, EHS CCPS Emeritus
Craig Huffman Merck & Company, Inc.
Director, Safety, Health, and Security Americo Neto
International Specialty Products John Sofranko Braskem
Executive Director
Kou Jianchao AIChE Tim Overton
Deputy Director, Safety and The Dow Chemical Company
Environment Bureau Donald Stelling
SINOPEC Operational Excellence Manager Karen Tancredi
Chevron DuPont Company
Robert Kelley
Vice President, Environmental Safety Prasad Tipnis
and Communication Chief, Centre for HSE Excellence, GMS
Formosa Plastics Corporation (USA) Reliance Industries Ltd.
Steve Kemp Gary Veurink
Vice President, Health, Environment, Executive Vice President, Operations
and Safety The Dow Chemical Company
Occidental Chemical Corporation
Susan Voigt
Joachim Krueger Vice President, Environment,
Vice President Safety, and Health
Celanese Chemicals Bristol-Myers Squibb
Ken Woodring
Vice President, Engineering
Nova Chemicals

Building a Global Community Committed to Process Safety 11


Project Committees
■ PROCESS EQUIPMENT ■ PROCESS SAFETY ■ SACHE
RELIABILITY DATABASE INCIDENT DATABASE
(PERD) (PSID) The SACHE program develops
curriculum materials that are
This committee oversees The PSID database tracks used by over 140 universities to
development and operation of industrial incidents, permitting introduce process safety into
a fundamentally and technically sharing of lessons learned chemical engineering courses.
sound database for use in among members. The PSID For more information or to
quantitative risk analysis (QRA), project is open to both CCPS make an industry contribution
availability analysis, and members and non-members. to the workshop or the pro-
predictive maintenance. The For more information, gram, contact Joe Louvar at
PERD project is open to both CCPS contact Adrian Sepeda at jlouvar@ameritech.net. For
members and non-members. psid@aiche.org. membership and product infor-
For more information, mation, contact Karen Person
contact Dave Belonger at Laurie Brown at karep@aiche.org.
dave@djbassoc.com. Eastman Chemical Company
Paul Butler Stephen Coe
Hal Thomas (Chair) Buckman Laboratories Irving Oil Limited
Air Products & Chemicals, Inc.
C. Curtis Clements Dan Crowl
Ted Bennett DuPont Company Michigan Technological University
The Dow Chemical Company
Giby Joseph Ron Darby
Kumar Bhimavarapu ExxonMobil Texas A&M University
FM Global
Dave Krabacher Stan Grossel
David Dylis Cognis Corp Process Safety & Design, Inc.
Alion Science & Technology
Michael Morris Dave Moore
Tom Folk Bayer Corporation AcuTech Consulting Group
Rohm and Haas Company
Al Ness John Murphy
Rich Gauvin Rohm and Haas Company CCPS Emeritus
General Physics
Li Qi Joseph. Louvar
William Goble Sinopec CCPS/AIChE
Exida.com
Mike Rogers Michael Perron
Tommy Martin Syncrude Canada Ltd. Aon Risk Consultants
Texaco
Fran Schultz Ralph W. Pike
Luis Nino GE Plastics Louisiana State University
Transition Management Consultants
John Stoney Thomas O. Spicer
Chip Rauth Rhodia, Inc. University of Arkansas
Rosemount Corporation
Dan Wiff Wendy Smades
Stephen Shaw NOVA Chemicals, Ltd. The Dow Chemical Company
DNV
Steve Wolf Steve Selk
Bernie Weber AKZO Nobel Chemicals, Inc. US Chemical Safety Board
Capstone Engineering
Johnny Wright Amy Theis
Stan Urbanik BP Fauske & Associates
DuPont Company
Vince Van Brunt
Brian Zachery University of South Carolina
SIS-Tech Solutions
Jan Wagner
Oklahoma State University

J. Reed Welker
University of Arkansas

Ronald J. Willey
Northeastern University

Bob Johnson
Unwin Company

12 2007 CCPS Process Safety Report


Project Committees
■ INHERENTLY SAFER DESIGN ■ PRE-STARTUP SAFETY
REVIEW
This subcommittee is preparing an update of the 1995 “Gold Book”
to address experience gained in the last 10 years including expanded This book will provide guidance
practical guidance and tools. For more information, contact Dennis to those having responsibility
Hendershot at dchendershot@comcast.net. for scheduling and executing a
pre-startup safety review by
Steve Meszaros (Chair) George King outlining a protocol and tool for
Wyeth The Dow Chemical Company
use by project or turnaround
Mike Broadribb Pete Lodal teams. For further information,
BP Eastman Chemical Company
contact Dan Sliva at sliva@capi-
David Clark Bill Marshall tal.net.
DuPont Company Eli Lilly
Don Connolley Craig Matthiessen Perry Morse (Chair)
BP US EPA DuPont Company
E. Mark Davis Dave Moore Angela Summers
Eli Lilly Acutech SIS-Tech
Art Dowell Michael Morris Larry Bowler
Rohm and Haas Company Bayer Materials Science GE Plastics
Lanny Duvall Americo Neto Don Connolley
Celanese Braskem
BP
Bill Hague Karen Person
Honeywell CCPS/AIChE
Susan Cowher
Sunoco
Blair Hamerski Richard Pickup
Sartomer Schering-Plough William Cowherd
International Specialty Products, Inc.
Lou Higgins Randy Sawyer
Rhodia, Inc. Contra Costa County HSD Jonathan Gast
Wyeth
Doug Hobbs Jan Windhorst
Advantica NOVA Chemicals John Herber
3M Company

Steve Marwitz
Formosa Plastics Corp. (USA)
■ TRANSPORTATION RISK AND SECURITY Michael Moriarty
AKZO Nobel Chemicals, Inc.
This subcommittee is writing a book to provide introductory trans-
port risk considerations for process engineers when determining via- Lisa Morrison
BP
bility of project. The project includes providing guidance on route
selection, equipment factors and materials that may affect public risk Cedric Pereira
as well as guidance on transportation security risk issues and indus- BP
try practices to mitigate them. For more information, contact Brian Glen Peters
Kelly at kellybd@telus.net. Air Products & Chemicals, Inc.

Cherry Burke (Chair) Bob Hollenbeck Mike Rogers


The Dow Chemical Company 3M Company Syncrude Canada Ltd.

Lou Castiglioni Gary Staton Jim Slaugh


Arkema DuPont Company Basell

Mark Connolly Stephen Urschel Bob Stankovich


AKZO Nobel Chemicals, Inc. GE Plastics Eli Lilly and Company

Brian Dunbobbin Ed Waley


Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. Lyondell Chemical Company

Donna Edminster Henry Ward


Rhodia, Inc. The Dow Chemical Company

Randy Freeman Nico Versloot


CCPS Emeritus TNO Initiative for Industrial Safety

Mike Green
BP

Building a Global Community Committed to Process Safety 13


Project Committees
■ PROCESS SAFETY BEACON ■ CCPS WEB COMMUNITY

This committee is responsible for the Beacon, a monthly one-page This subcommittee is developing
process safety newsletter for plant operators. For more information, CCPS content and resources in
contact Dennis Hendershot at ccps_beacon@aiche.org. a fully searchable, topic driven
online format. This project also
John Herber (Co-Chair) Jack McCavit includes a process safety blog
3M Company CCPS Emeritus
and bulletin board through
George King (Co-Chair) Bill Olsen which CCPS members can
The Dow Chemical Company Merck & Company, Inc.
interact and have technical
Don Abrahamson Cathy Pincus discussions in real time.
Occidental Chemical Corporation ExxonMobil For more information on this
Dave Cummings Mike Rogers project, contact Robert Coulter
DuPont Company Syncrude Canada, Ltd. at robert@rbcoulter.com.
Frederic Gil Roy Sanders
BP PPG Industries, Inc. Christie Arseneau (Chair)
PPG Industries
Daniel Horowitz Adrian Sepeda
US Chemical Safety Board CCPS/AIChE Don Abrahamson
Henry Ingram John Stoney Occidental Chemical Corporation
Shell Chemical Company Rhodia, Inc. Steve Arendt
Dave Krabacher Tony Thompson ABS Group, Inc
Cognis CCPS Emeritus
Susan Cowher
David Leggett Dan Wiff International Specialty Products
Baker Engineering and Risk Nova Chemical Ltd.
Consultants Chris Devlin
Nico Versloot Celanese
Bill Marshall TNO Initiative for Industrial Safety
Eli Lilly and Company John Herber
3M Company
Mike Marshall
OSHA Greg Keeports
Rohm and Haas Company

Americo Neto
■ INCIDENTS THAT DEFINE PROCESS SAFETY Braskem

Tim Overton
This project is using actual incidents to describe how the various The Dow Chemical Company
components of process safety came into being and to underscore
Karen Person
why they are important. For more information, contact Bob Perry at CCPS/AIChE
BobGPerry@comcast.net.
Pat Ragan
Albert Ness (Chair) Dave Jones Bayer Crop Science
Rohm & Haas Company Chevron Jatin Shah
Habib Amin Christy Franklyn Baker Engineering and Risk
Contra Costa County Health Services Risk Reliability and Safety Consultants
Engineering
Mike Broadribb Steve Sigmon
BP Jack McCavit Honeywell, Inc.
CCPS Emeritus
Paul Butler Karen Tancredi
Buckman Laboratories Jim Slaugh DuPont Company
Basell
Sergio Castro
Servatis Steve Smolen
Solutia, Inc.
Robert Dupree
Basell Nico Versloot
TNO Initiative for Industrial Safety
Dan Isaacson
The Lubrizol Corporation

14 2007 CCPS Process Safety Report


Project Committees
■ RISK BASED PROCESS SAFETY ■ HAZARD EVALUATION
PROCEDURES, 3rd Edition
Process safety practices and formal safety management systems
have been in place in some companies for more than 20 years. This project will update this
These practices are widely credited for reducing major accident risk classic CCPS book to incorpo-
and actual incidents. Nevertheless, stagnant process safety results rate developments since 1992.
and continuing pressures on resources still challenge many organi- This new book will address new
zations. This book will establish a paradigm shift for industries that analysis tools, the impact of
manufacture, consume, or handle chemicals, with a focus on new current management practices,
ways to design, correct and improve process safety management and emerging industries to
practices. For further information about this project, contact Bob which process safety applies.
Perry at bobgperry@comcast.net. For more information on this
project, contact Bob Ormsby at
Jack McCavit (Chair) Pete Lodal rormsby@tampabay.rr.com.
CCPS Emeritus Eastman Chemical Company

Don Abrahamson Bill Marshall Ken Harrington (Chair)


OxyChem Eli Lilly and Company ChevronPhillips

Steve Arendt Darren Martin Steve Arendt


ABS Group, Inc. Shell Chemical Company ABS Group, Inc.

Tim Blackford Neil Maxson John Babcock


Chevron Bayer Material Science Eli Lilly and Company

Bill Bradshaw Lisa Morrison Kumar Bhimavarapu


ABS Group, Inc. BP FM Global

John Herber Karen Tancredi Christine Browning


3M Company DuPont Company Eastman Chemical Company

Dan Isaacson Tony Thompson Paul Butler


The Lubrizol Corporation CCPS Emeritus Buckman Laboratories

Shakeel Kadri Scott Wallace Wayne Jamison


Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. Olin Corporation Intel

Greg Keeports Roy Winkler Jim Johnston


Rohm and Haas Company INEOS Olefins and Polymers US Wyeth

Jim Klein Gary York Freddie Kootstra


DuPont Company Rhodia, Inc. TNO

Bob Lenahan
Bayer Materials Science

Dave Moore
Acutech Consulting

Michael Moriarty
AKZO Nobel Chemicals, Inc.

John Murphy
CCPS Emeritus

Narayanan Sankaran
UOP

John Stoney
Rhodia

Angela Summers
SIS-Tech

Tim Wagner
Scott Berger and Simon The Dow Chemical Company
Xu welcome Mu Shanjun
Joe Wilson
and Li Qi of Sinopec to
Syngenta
their first Technical
Steering Committee
meeting.

Building a Global Community Committed to Process Safety 15


Project Committees
■ ESTABLISHING RISK TOLERANCE CRITERIA ■ MEASURING PROCESS
SAFETY PERFORMANCE
This subcommittee is working on a Guidelines series book providing
a framework for establishing quantitative safety risk tolerance crite- This project subcommittee is
ria. The book will not “set” industry criteria, but rather show (in the developing a CCPS Guideline
absence of US regulatory guidance), how to develop criteria reflect- for measuring process safety
ing company-specific operating needs, while maintaining consistency performance. It will define a
with industry-wide practices. For further information on this project, process for developing metrics
contact Dennis Hendershot at dchendershot@comcast.net. appropriate to company goals,
and recommend less than ~10
Dave Jones (Chair) Bill Marshall metrics that can be generally
Chevron Eli Lilly and Company
agreed upon for common use
Wayne Chastain Jack McCavit across industry. For further
Eastman Chemical Company CCPS Emeritus
information, contact Dan Sliva
Curtis Clements Scott Ostrowski at sliva@capital.net.
DuPont Company ExxonMobil
Don Connolley Tim Overton
BP The Dow Chemical Company
Tim Overton (Chair)
The Dow Chemical Company
Mike Considine Cathy Pincus
BP ExxonMobil Mike Broadribb
BP
Les Cunningham Bayan Saab
Merck & Company, Inc. Lyondell Chemical Corporation Sergio Castro
Servatis
Tom Dileo Jatin Shah
Albemarle Baker Engineering and Risk Susie Cowhen
International Specialty Products
Bob Gale Mike Schmidt
Emerson Process Management Emerson Process Management Walt Frank
Ken Harrington Cynthia Spitzenberger ABS Consulting
ChevronPhillips DNV Harry Glidden
Doug Hobbs Angela Summers DuPont Company
Advantica SIS-Tech Solutions
Dennis Hendershot
Shakeel Kadri Karen Tancredi CCPS/AIChE
Air Products and Chemicals DuPont Company
John Herber
Greg Keeports John Wincek 3M Company
Rohm and Haas Company Croda
Bill Marshall
Kevin Klein Mike Yurconic Eli Lilly
Solutia, Inc. Intel
Darren Martin
Shell

■ VAPOR CLOUD EXPLOSIONS Jack McCavit


CCPS Emeritus
This project is an update to the classic 1994 CCPS book, Guidelines Jeff Philiph
for Evaluating the Characteristics of Vapor Cloud Explosions, Flash Monsanto Company
Fires, and BLEVEs. The new edition will include many new technologies
Bill Ralph
and approaches proven over the past 12 years. For more information,
BP
contact John Davenport at john.davenport@worldnet.att.net.
Randy Sawyer
Larry Moore (Chair) Doug Hobbs Contra Costa
FM Global Advantica

Chris Buchwald Phil Partridge


ExxonMobil Dow

Gary Fitzgerald Steve Sigmon


ABS Consulting Honeywell, Inc.

Steve Hall Jim Slaugh


BP Basell

David Herrman Jan Windhorst


DuPont Company NOVA Chemicals

16 2007 CCPS Process Safety Report


CCPS Staff
CCPS STAFF CCPS STAFF CONSULTANTS
Scott Berger joined David J. Belonger Joe Louvar retired
CCPS in 2001 after 5 came to CCPS in 1996 from BASF where he
years at Owens Corning, as staff consultant for was the Director of
where he held a range PERD. Dave is a gradu- Chemical Engineering
of Environment, Health, ate chemical engineer R&D, which included
and Safety (EHS) assignments from the University of Wisconsin. He the small-scale production of spe-
including Director of EHS Strategic spent most of his career in various cialty chemicals. He has a PhD from
Management. Scott also worked for assignments with Rohm and Haas Wayne State, where he teaches
18 years at Rohm and Haas Company Company, including Corporate safety and risk analysis as a part-
in R&D, engineering, and EHS. Scott Safety Director and Plant Manager. time visiting professor.
received his BS and MS from the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Robert B. Coulter Robert W. Ormsby
joined CCPS in August joined CCPS as a staff
Karen Person, Project 2006 as staff consultant consultant in 2003
Engineer, joined AIChE and web master for the after 27 years of service
in 2002 in the Govern- CCPS Web Community with Air Products and
ment Relations Depart- Project. Robert is a chemical engineer Chemicals, Inc. While at APCI, Bob
ment. In Fall 2003, graduating from Auburn University. served as Manager of Process Safety,
Karen assumed technical and Robert worked for Reichold North America, and Global Leader.
operational responsibilities for CCPS, Chemicals, Inc., in environmental Bob has a BS in chemical engineering
the Design Institute for Physical and safety compliance. from Penn State University and an
Properties, and the Design Institute MS from Lehigh University.
for Emergency Relief Systems. In John A. Davenport
2006, Karen assumed responsibility retired in 1998 as Bob G. Perry retired as
for AIChE’s Energy Commission. Assistant Vice President Managing Director of
Karen holds a BS in Chemical and Director-Research AIChE in 1997. Previously,
Engineering from the University at HSB Industrial Risk Bob had a 37-year career
of Mississippi. Insurers after 35 years of service. He with Union Carbide,
joined CCPS in early 1999. John gradu- retiring in 1993 as Vice President of
Shami Nayak returned ated from Virginia Polytechnic Institute Manufacturing and Engineering. Bob
to CCPS in 2006 with a BS in chemical engineering. is a BS chemical engineering graduate
supporting the CCPS of the University of Texas.
Dennis Hendershot
Mumbai office. Shami
retired in 2005 as Adrian L. Sepeda
worked at the AIChE
Senior Hazard Analysis joined CCPS in early
New York office from 1999-2003,
Fellow at Rohm and 2002 as a staff con-
most of that time with CCPS. Shami
Haas Company after 35 sultant after 33 years
graduated from the University of
years of service. Dennis has dedicated of service with
Bombay and received a post-graduate
most of his career to process safety Occidental Chemical Corp. During
degree in business management
and risk management, and is one of those years, he held positions in a
from St. Xavier College.
the world’s foremost champions of variety of technical and management
inherently safer design. Dennis has a positions, retiring as the Director of
BS in chemical engineering from HES Risk Management. Adrian holds
Lehigh University and an MBA from a BS in mechanical engineering from
the University of Pennsylvania. Lamar University.

Brian Kelly graduated Daniel E. Sliva joined


from the University of CCPS after he retired
Ottawa (Canada) with from GE, where he held
William J. Minges, BASc and MASc a variety of positions
1921 to 2006, a degrees in Chemical over his 30-year career.
chemical engineering Engineering. He completed 34 years Dan received his BS and PhD in
graduate of Notre of service with Imperial Oil and chemical engineering from Rensselaer
Dame, retired from Syncrude Canada Ltd. where he held Polytechnic Institute and an MS in
Union Carbide in 1978 and joined a number of senior positions in engi- chemical engineering from the
CCPS in 1986. Bill was one of the neering, operations, business devel- University of Rochester.
initial four CCPS engineers, along opment and loss management. He is
with Tom Carmody, Les Wittenberg, very active in the field of risk man-
and Sandy Schreiber. His attention agement and process safety in both
to detail made him a proof reader Canada and the US and has served
par excellence, and the early books on numerous boards and committees
owe their absence of error to dealing with safety in the chemical
Bill’s diligence. industry. He is a registered Professional
Engineer in the Province of Alberta.

Building a Global Community Committed to Process Safety 17


CCPS Members 2007
3M COMPANY INTEL
ABB LUMMUS GLOBAL INTERNATIONAL SPECIALTY PRODUCTS, INC.
ABBOTT LABORATORIES IOMOSAIC
ABS GROUP INC. JOHNSON AND JOHNSON
ACUTECH CONSULTING JOHNSON DIVERSEY
ADVANTICA KBR
AIG GLOBAL MARINE & ENERGY KOREA GAS SAFETY CORPORATION
AIR PRODUCTS & CHEMICALS, INC. LANXESS
AKZO NOBEL CHEMICALS, INC. THE LUBRIZOL CORPORATION
ALBEMARLE LYONDELL CHEMICAL COMPANY
ARKEMA CHEMICALS, INC. MARSULEX INC.
BAKER ENGINEERING AND RISK MERCK & COMPANY, INC.
CONSULTANTS MONSANTO COMPANY
BASELL NOVA CHEMICALS LTD.
BAYER MATERIAL SCIENCE OCCIDENTAL CHEMICAL CORPORATION
BOEHRINGER-INGELHEIM OLIN CORPORATION
BP PETRONAS
BRASKEM PFIZER, INC.
BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB COMPANY PIONEER
BUCKMAN LABORATORIES PPG INDUSTRIES, INC.
CELANESE CHEMICALS PRIMATECH, INC.
CHEVRON PROCTOR AND GAMBLE
CHEVRON PHILLIPS CHEMICAL COMPANY RELIANCE INDUSTRIES LTD.
CIBA SPECIALTY CHEMICALS COMPANY RHODIA, INC.
COGNIS RISK RELIABILITY AND SAFETY ENGINEERING
CONOCOPHILLIPS ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY
CONTRA COSTA COUNTY HEALTH SERVICES SARTOMER
CRODA SCHERING PLOUGH
CYTEC INDUSTRIES SCIENTIFIC PROTEIN LABORATORIES
DEGUSSA CORPORATION SERVATIS, S.A.
DNV SHELL CHEMICAL COMPANY
THE DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY SINOPEC
DUPONT COMPANY SIS-TECH SOLUTIONS
EASTMAN CHEMICAL COMPANY SOLUTIA INC.
ELI LILLY AND COMPANY STARR TECHNICAL RISKS AGENCY, INC.
EMERSON PROCESS MANAGEMENT SUNCOR
EXXONMOBIL SUNOCO
FLUOR ENTERPRISES SYNCRUDE CANADA LTD.
FM GLOBAL SYNGENTA CROP PROTECTION
FORMOSA PLASTICS CORPORATION USA TNO INITIATIVE FOR INDUSTRIAL SAFETY
GE PLASTICS US CHEMICAL SAFETY BOARD
GULF PETROCHEMCIAL INDUSTRIES US EPA/OEM
CORPORATION VERTELLUS, INC.
HONEYWELL, INC. WASHINGTON SAVANNAH RIVER COMPANY
INEOS OLEFINS AND POLYMERS US WYETH

CENTER FOR CHEMICAL PROCESS SAFETY


3 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10016-5991 USA ■ Tel: 212.591.7319 ■ Fax: 212.591.8883
www.ccpsonline.org ■ E-MAIL: ccps@aiche.org