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Volume

PITNEY BOWES INC


ISS Program Management Office & Governance

ProjectManagement
Guide
ISS P R OG R A M M A N AG EM E N T & GOV ER N A N C E O FFIC E

Project Management Guidebook

 37 Executive Drive,
Danbury, CT 06801
Table of Contents
Table of Contents.............................................................................................................i
Introduction.....................................................................................................................1
ISS PMO Work Definitions..............................................................................................2
ISS PMO Functions and Role.........................................................................................4
Applications & ISS interactions.....................................................................................7
Project Categorization.....................................................................................................8
Project Roles and Responsibilities ...............................................................................10
Program Management Office (PMO)......................................................................................10
PMO Representative (PMO Rep)............................................................................................10
Project Team...........................................................................................................................10
Project Sponsor.......................................................................................................................12
Customer.................................................................................................................................13
Stakeholders...........................................................................................................................14
Vendors...................................................................................................................................14
Steering / Stakeholder Committee .........................................................................................14
ISS PMO Project Management Processes....................................................................16
Pipeline Process Flow................................................................................................17
...................................................................................................................................17
Process Definition...................................................................................................................18
Process Objectives.................................................................................................................18
Begins When...........................................................................................................................18
Includes...................................................................................................................................18
Excludes..................................................................................................................................18
Ends........................................................................................................................................18
Post-Pipeline Acceptance process................................................................................20
Initiation Phase...........................................................................................................20
Initiation Phase Flow...............................................................................................................22
Process Definition...................................................................................................................23
Task Deliverables list..............................................................................................................25
RICAP Chart ...........................................................................................................................26
Phase Completion Checklist...................................................................................................27
Planning Phase.............................................................................................................28
Planning Phase Flow..............................................................................................................29
Process Definition...................................................................................................................30
Task Deliverables list..............................................................................................................32
RICAP Chart ...........................................................................................................................33
Phase Completion Checklist...................................................................................................34
Execution & Controlling Phase ..................................................................................35
Execution & Controlling Phase flow........................................................................................36
Process Definition...................................................................................................................37
Task Deliverable List...............................................................................................................39
RICAP Chart............................................................................................................................40
Phase Completion Checklist...................................................................................................41
Close-out Phase ........................................................................................................42
Turnover to Operation.............................................................................................................42
Post-Implementation Review .................................................................................................42
Administrative Closeout..........................................................................................................43
Close-out Phase flow..............................................................................................................44
Process Definition...................................................................................................................45
Task Deliverables List.............................................................................................................46
RICAP Chart ...........................................................................................................................46
Phase Completion Checklist...................................................................................................47
Scope Management......................................................................................................47
Introduction.................................................................................................................48
Priority .......................................................................................................................48
Impact.........................................................................................................................48
Scope Change Process..............................................................................................49
Scope change for Fast track work...........................................................................................49
Scope change for standard & complex work...........................................................................51
Process Definition...................................................................................................................54
Process completion checklist..................................................................................................55
Project Status Reporting...............................................................................................55
Policies....................................................................................................................................56
PMO Guidelines & Policies...........................................................................................56
Pipeline Phase........................................................................................................................57
Post-Pipeline Phase................................................................................................................57
Documents Policy.......................................................................................................59
Document templates Mapped to Phases................................................................................60
1
Chapter

Introduction

T
he project lifecycle describes the tasks that must be completed to
produce a product or service. Different project lifecycles exist for
specific products and services. (For example, the lifecycle followed to
build a house is very different from the lifecycle followed to develop a
software package.) The project management lifecycle defines how to manage
a project. It will always be the same, regardless of the project lifecycle being
employed.

Project tasks and project management tasks are concurrent and ongoing, and can
be associated by project management deliverables. The Project Schedule, for
example, contains both project and project management tasks. Phases in the two
lifecycles will overlap, depending upon the project lifecycle being employed. The
Project Manager needs to be aware of how the inputs and outputs of one lifecycle
affect and shape the other.

The material in this section is organized according to the project management


lifecycle. While no two projects are exactly alike, all projects should progress
through the same five project management phases:

 Project Initiation

 Project Planning

 Project Execution & Controlling

 Project Closeout

This guidebook will explain each of the above phases but before that it is important
to understand the basics of a Project Management Office (PMO).

1
2
Chapter

ISS PMO Work Definitions


The ISS PMO uses certain criteria to distinguish between
Complex, Standard, and fast track projects. The project will have
to follow specific PMO guidelines depending on the scale of the
project.

The criteria for a Complex Projects adhere to any of given


below:

 3 or more towers are involved in the work.

 Work Budget is $100,000 or greater

 Work requires more than 40 person days (2


person months, 320 hours or greater)

 Risk index is more than 6

The criteria for Standard Projects adhere to any of the


given below:

 2 towers are involved in the work.

 Work Budget is more than $10,000 and less than


$100,000

 Work requires approx. more than 10 but less than


40 person days ( i.e. Greater than 80 hours but less
than 320 hours)

 Risk Index is more than 4 but less than or equal to


6

2
I S S P R O J E C T M A N A G E M E N T G U I D E B O O K
The criteria for Fast Track projects
adhere to any of the given below:

 Only 1 tower is involved in the


work.

 Work Budget is less than


$10,000

 Work requires less than 10


Person days.

 Risk Index is less than or equal


to 4

Risk Index calculation table

 Calculate the rating for each


question given below, ie – 1, 2 or
3

 Add the results of all three rows


together to come up with the Risk
Index.

 Compare the Risk Index with


the above definitions for
determining Project Level

1 2

Number of users (N)? N <10 10<N<1 N>


00

Number of systems S < 2 2<S<5 S>


impacted (S)?

Potential business loss About $100K – Mo


($/y)? 100K 1M $1
3
Chapter

IMPORTANT!!!!

If you think the above criteria


misplace the scale/complexity of
your project, please contact the
Project Management Office
(pmo@pb.com) for guidance.

ISS PMO Functions and


Role
The Project Management Office plays several
different roles depending on the size and
domain (ISS or Applications) of the project.

For large/critical ISS projects, the PMO will


assume a managerial role and will be
involved in below mentioned project
management elements. These project
management elements are generally accepted
by and practiced in private industry. Complete
definitions are contained in the PMBOK. The
extent to which they are incorporated into
Management or Project Plans will be dictated

4
by the size, complexity and environmental
considerations of each project. The project
management team has the overall
responsibility for determining what is
ultimately appropriate for any given project,
which would be agreed to by the customer and
stakeholders. Project elements include the
following.

 Project Integration Management


 Project Plan creation
 Plan Execution
 Communications Management
 Project Scope Management -
Developing the work breakdown
structure (WBS) subdivides major project
deliverables into smaller, more
manageable components.
 Project Time Management
 Project Cost Management
 Project Quality Management
 Project Procurement Management
 Project Resource Management
 Project Risk
Management/assessments
For smaller ISS and all Applications projects,
the PMO will play only a mentoring role. The
PMO will not be directly involved with the
planning, executing and controlling the
project deliverables. PMO will only be
involved in the project initiation and the
closeout phase. Through out the life cycle of
small projects, the role of the PMO will be to
provide the tools; templates & training PMs to
do their work using the tools.

Apart from the two roles mentioned above the


PMO also plays a consulting (facilitating) role.

5
The PMO sometimes becomes a change agent
- identifying opportunities for change within the
organization, determining the best approaches,
and introducing the changes to the community.
One PMO task is to look outside the
organization and identify other companies'
ideas and best practices that can be applied.
The PMO can communicate new ways of
thinking, introduce new tools and processes,
refine evaluative metrics, and work to
constantly establish a new baseline of
performance.

The PMO also plays a crucial role in knowledge


management (KM), effectively becoming the
organization's memory by keeping records of
projects, i.e., what works and what doesn't, the
steps through which certain processes must
pass, and so on. Effective KM ensures that
valuable lessons are retained and passed on to
others.

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Applications &
ISS interactions
The Project management office will play liaison
role between application and ISS towers. As a
part of its initiation process, the Project
Management Office assigns a PMO rep for all
projects request that it receive.

If a project performed by an Application tower


doesn’t have an impact on the Infrastructure,
then the PMO Rep provides administrative &
process guidance to the project manager. But
if the project has any sort of infrastructure
impact then the PMO Rep will manage the
infrastructure deliverables of the project.

The PMO Rep will also act as a single point of


contact for ISS resources. The Project Manager
will have to provide requirements of the project
to the PMO rep, who will gather the resources
from various ISS towers. So, instead of
contacting various ISS towers, the project
manager will only have to contact the PMO.

Project Type

Infrastructure & Application


Support service Towers

Supervisory Role Mentoring Role Mentoring Role Supervi


Large/ Critical Small/ Low visibility All projects with no All proj
Projects Projects ISS Impact I

7
Project Categorization

T
hroughout this Guidebook, reference is
made to specific project categorization
and roles that must be performed at
various times throughout the life of the project.
The following section provides an overview of
the Project categorization used by the ISS
Program Management Office. It also discusses
the various roles that are required on projects,
what the responsibilities are for each role.

The involvement of the PMO depends on the


Project categorization given below:

New (A) Upgrade/ Suppo


Enhancement mainten
s (B) (C)

Enterprise 1A (HRT) 1B (Notes 1C (Anti


(1) upgrade) dif file
distribut

Divisional 2A (Main 2B (Upgrade 2C (Upd


(2) Plant SF AV to thin patches
Move) client) commer
servers)

Department 3A (ISS 3B (VPN 3C (SDS


al (3) 2004 upgrade to Install
Training

8
Initiative) Merrill Lynch) process)

9
Project Roles and
Responsibilities

Program Management Office (PMO)


Program Management Office (PMO) includes all
members of the organization’s management
team that may exert influence on Project Team
members or be affected by and involved in the
development and implementation of the
product of the project. The committees that
are formed to evaluate and select proposed
projects for the Performing Organization are
comprised of members of the Performing
Organization Management.

PMO Representative (PMO Rep)


PMO Rep will provide project management
support functions in the form of training,
software tools, and standardized procedures.
Each project will have a PMO Rep assigned but
the PMO rep is not be responsible for achieving
the project objectives.

Project Team
The Project Team is a group that is responsible
for planning and executing the project. It
consists of a Project Manager and a variable
number of Project Team members, who are
brought in to deliver their tasks according to
the Project Schedule.

 Project Manager

The Project Manager is the person who is


responsible for ensuring that the Project

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Team completes the project. The Project
Manager develops the Project Plan with the
team and manages the team’s performance
of project tasks. It is also the responsibility
of the Project Manager to secure
acceptance and approval of deliverables
from the Project Sponsor and Stakeholders.

 PMO Project Manager (PMO PM)

The Program Management office will


only directly manage projects that are
classified as 1A, 1B or 2A. If required,
exceptions are made to this policy.
The director of the Project
Management Office makes such
decisions and assigns a PMO Project
Manager.

 Non PMO Project Manager

Any project which is not a 1A, 1B or


2A will have a project manager
from the performing organization
(definition on next page). A PMO rep
is always assigned to the project to
assist the project manager.

New (A) Upgrade/ Suppo


Enhanceme mainten
nts (B) (C)

Enterprise (1) 1A – PMO 1B - PMO 1C – PMO


PM PM

Divisional (2) 2A – PMO 2B - PMO 2C - PMO


PM Rep

Departmental 3A - PMO 3B - PMO 3C - PMO


(3) Rep Rep

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 Performing Organization / Team
Members

Performing
organization is the The Team Member
group whose may or
may not
employees are be from
most directly performin
involved in doing g
the work of the organizati
project. The Project on.
Team Members
are responsible for executing tasks and
producing deliverables as outlined in the
Project Plan and directed by the Project
Manager, at whatever level of effort or
participation has been defined for them. On
larger projects, some Project Team
members may serve as Team Leaders,
providing task and technical leadership.

Project Sponsor
The Project Sponsor is a manager
The Project Sponsor provides with demonstrable interest in the
support for the
outcome of the project and who is
Project Manager,
approves major responsible for securing spending
deliverables, and authority and resources for the
signs off on project. Ideally, the Project
approvals to Sponsor should be the highest-
proceed to each
ranking manager possible, in
succeeding project
phase. proportion to the project size and
scope. The Project Sponsor
initiates the Project Proposal process, champions the project in
the Performing Organization, and is the ultimate decision-maker
for the project. The Project Sponsor provides support for the
Project Manager, approves major deliverables, and signs off on
approvals to proceed to each succeeding project phase. The
Project Sponsor may elect to delegate any of the above
responsibilities to other personnel either on or outside the Project
Team.

12
Customer
Customers comprise the business units that identified the need
for the product or service the project will develop. Customers can
be at all levels of an organization, from Commissioner to entry-
level clerk. Since it is frequently not feasible for all the Customers
to be directly involved in the project, the following roles are
identified:

 Customer Representatives are members of the


Customer community that are identified and made
available to the project for their subject matter expertise.
Their responsibility is to accurately represent their business
units’ needs to the Project Team, and to validate the
deliverables that describe the product or service that the
project will produce. Customer Representatives are also
expected to bring back to the Customer community the
information about the project. Towards the end of the
project, Customer Representatives will test the product or
service the project is developing, using and evaluating it
while providing feedback to the Project Team.

 Customer Decision-Makers are those members of the


Customer community who have been designated to make
project decisions on behalf of major business units that will
use, or will be affected by, the product or service the
project will deliver. Customer Decision-Makers are
members of the POM responsible for achieving consensus
of their business unit on project issues and outputs, and
communicating it to the Project Team. They attend project
meetings as requested by the Project Manager, review and
approve process deliverables, and provide subject matter
expertise to the Project Team. On some projects, they may
also serve as Customer Representatives.

Consumers

Consumers include all the people that will use the


product or service that the project is developing.
Consumers internal to the Performing Organizations
may also be Customers.

13
Stakeholders
Internal Stakeholders include all the people that are in
any way affected by the new product or service within the
Performing Organization. This may include the Project
Team, the Performing Organization Management,
Customers, as well as Customer co-workers who will be
affected by the change in Customer work practices due to
the new product or service; Customer managers affected
by modified workflows or logistics; Customer
correspondents affected by the quantity or quality of newly
available information; and other similarly affected groups.

External Stakeholders include all the


Consumers may
people outside the Performing also be
Organization that are in any way Extern
al
affected by the new product or service. Stakeh
Within the context of New York State olders.
Government, this group may include the
Legislature, the Executive Chamber, other agencies, the
media, and the citizens.

Vendors
Vendors are contracted to provide additional products or services
the project will require and may be members of the Project Team.

Steering / Stakeholder Committee


A project Steering/stakeholder committee is the key body which is
responsible for the business issues associated with the project
that are essential to ensure the delivery of the project outputs
and the attainment of project outcomes. For large project, this
committee is known as Steering committee where as for small
projects, its called as stakeholder committee. Its
responsibilities includes approving the budget, defining and
realizing benefits, quality and timelines, making policy and high
level resource decisions, and assessing requests for changes to
the scope of the project.

The membership is determined by the Project Sponsor and may consist of:

14
 The Project Sponsor, who normally chairs the meetings;

 The Customers;

 Representatives from selected key stakeholders

The Project Manager is not a member of the Steering Committee.


He/she is 'contracted' by the Steering Committee to ensure the
work of the project is undertaken as agreed, whereas the Steering
Committee provides support, guidance and the executive over
sighting of progress.

The Project Manager will normally attend meetings of the


Steering Committee to speak to their reports and answer any
questions raised by members.

Steering Committee vs. Stakeholder committee

For complex projects, a steering committee is explicitly


defined in the project charter where as for standard
and small project; the steering committee can be put
together on a need basis.

15
3
Chapter

ISS PMO Project Management


Processes
The ISS PMO has divided its Project Management Process into two
high level sections

 Pipeline process (Before the project is approved)

 Post-pipeline acceptance process (After the project is


approved)

16
Pipeline Process Flow

Assign PM Request PM notifies requestor ,


Review Boad
Submit Request Categorize approved/ PMO rep uploads
reviews the Is it a Project? Yes Yes
using web form Assign PMO Rep approved fast project plan and
incoming requests
Update Status track ? updates status to Final

No NO
Request Status :
Follow Apps SDLC Is it an
Approved Open Helpdesk PM gathers Process & PMO Yes Application
Approved Fast track Request
ticket or Service required Yes guidelines project ?
pending info ?
Rejected request information
Deferred
Pending Add 'l Info No
Cancelled by BU No
Final
END
Inform requestor & Follow PMO
Request Reviewed Request guidelines
The Review Board : This board update request
monthly
Yes
Deffered?
status
will have people representing all
avenues of TechCentral .

END

Follow Std.
Change Process

No

END

Yes
Rejected/
Cancelled by BU
Process Definition

Process Objectives
The objective of the pipeline process is to review all the project
requests submitted to the ISS PMO and identify valid project
requests to work on.

Begins When
A project request form is submitted to the PMO

Includes
 Review project requests

 Approve/Reject project requests.

 Categorize projects

 Assign Project Manager

 Assign PMO Rep

Excludes
 Project Initiation/planning/execution

Ends
When a project request is approved or rejected.
RICAP Chart for Project Pipeline Process

R – Review P – Perform I – Information A - Approve

Project Pipeline Process - RICAP Chart


PMO
Key activities Requester PMO Rep

Fill Project Request Form P

Send Form to PMO P

Upload Form to Pipeline P

Conduct pipeline meeting P

Decide if it's a project P

Categorize request P

Assign status to the request P

Assign PM and PMO rep P

Assess size of the project P

Upload project plan template P

Notify requestor of request status P

Gather add'l info on request I P


Update status comments for the
request I R P

Change status of a request P

Review deferred requests P


Post-Pipeline Acceptance
process

Initiation Phase
Once the project request is
Usually for ISS Projects, the
approved, a project manager is customer has
assigned. Further more for large already completed
projects, a budget or further the task of
management commitment is preparing a
required. The PMO might also reject business case. But
for a few Projects
a project proposal for many like the UK Data
reasons. A list of popular reasons is Centre Move, the
given below: business case as
well the proposal is
 Project objective can prepared by the
ISS PMO.
be achieved by a project
in-progress

 Project objective doesn’t satisfy the strategic


objective of the company

 A duplicate request has been submitted

 The request is not a project but a service request.


The project manager defines the overall parameters of a project
and establishes the appropriate project management
environment required to complete the project.

Also during Project Initiation, a high-level project schedule is


developed as the roadmap to more detailed project planning and
project execution and control. This high-level schedule will be
refined over time, and will serve as the primary source of
information regarding project status and progress. An accurate,
realistic, and complete schedule, rigorously maintained, is
essential to the success of a project.

Sponsorship of the project must be confirmed or gained during


Project Initiation.

The completion of this process is marked by the Project Kick-off


Meeting, in which the project manager presents the project
charter.
Initiation Phase Flow
Initiation Phase

Define CSSQ
Define Project Budget
CSSQ : Cost Define High Level Schedule
Schedule Define High level Scope Project Budget
Scope Define Quality Objectives High Level
Quality Schedule
Scope Statement
Quality Parameters
Perform Risk Identification

Identify Risk
Document Risk

Develop initial Project Plan Risk


Management
plan
Stakeholder Involvement
Produce Initial Project Plan
Project
Request
Form

Prepare For Project


Identify Project Team Project
Develop Project Charter Charter
Conduct Kick-off meeting

Confirm Approval to proceed


Review Project Documents
Gain approval Signature Phase
Go- No Go Decision Completion
Approval
Form
Process Definition

Process Objectives

The objective of the initiation process is to start project work and


define high level requirements for the project

Begins When

A project request form is approved by the PMO

Includes (The list includes but is not limited to the following tasks)

 Identify Project Sponsor

 Identify Initial Project Team

 Develop Project Charter

 Conduct Project Kick-off Meeting

 Define Project Scope

 Develop High-Level Schedule

 Identify Quality Standards

 Establish Project Budget

 Identify Risks

 Document Risk

 Develop Communications Plan

 Compile initial project plan

 Prepare formal acceptance package

 Gain Approval signature from Sponsor

Excludes
Any detailed project planning activities.

Ends

When a “Go - No Go” decision on project is made.


Task Deliverables list
High level
Tasks Task Deliverable
Processes
Prepare for the Identify Project Sponsor Project Sponsor
Project
Identify Initial Project Team Project Team

Develop Project Charter Project Charter

Conduct Project Kick-off Meeting Kick-off Meeting


Define CSSQ Define Project Scope Scope Statement
High-level Project
Develop High-Level Schedule
Schedule
Quality Management
Identify Quality Standards
Plan
Preliminary Budget
Establish Project Budget
Estimate
Perform Risk Identify Risks Risk and Impacts
Identification
Document Risk List of risks
Develop Initial Develop Communications Plan Communications Plan
Project Plan
Compile initial project plan Initial project plan
Confirm approval Prepare formal acceptance package Approval form
to proceed to next
phase Gain Approval signature from Sponsor Signed approval form
RICAP Chart
R – Review P – Perform I – Information A – Approve

C- Co-ordinate

RICAP Chart
Tasks Sponsor/Client Project Project PMO
Manager Team
Identify Project Sponsor A P C
Identify Initial Project
A P C/A
Team
Develop Project Charter I P I C
Conduct Project Kick-off
R P R C
Meeting
Define Project Scope I P C
Develop High-Level
R P I R
Schedule
Identify Quality Standards R P R

Establish Project Budget R P I R

Identify Risks P I R

Document Risk P I R
Develop Communications
I P I R
Plan
Compile initial project
R P R R
plan
Prepare formal
P R
acceptance package
Gain Approval signature
A P R
from Sponsor
Phase Completion Checklist
The main measurement of success for Project Initiation is the
decision to proceed with – or to halt – the project. While in the
majority of cases, a well-executed Project Initiation leads to a
transition to Project Planning, in some cases the organization is
best served by deciding that the project should not continue.
Before the final sign-off, however, the Project Manager can assess
how successfully the project is proceeding through its processes
by utilizing the measurement criteria outlined below. More than
one “No” answer indicates a serious risk to the continued success
of your project.

Questions Yes No

Do you have a committed and interested Project Sponsor attached to the project?
Did you verify that your Project Charter reflects the vision of the areas of the
Performing Organization affected by/involved in the project?
Did you identify specific benefits the product or service
developed by your project will bring to the Customer?
Has your Scope Statement been reviewed and accepted
by Customer Representatives who will benefit from
your project?
Has your Quality Management Plan been approved by
the member of your organization responsible for
quality assurance?
Did you review the impact your project costs will have
on upcoming fiscal year budgets with the Finance office?
Have your staff and materials acquisition plans been
reviewed with the Performing Organization who will be
paying for the staff and products being acquired?
Has the Project Sponsor reviewed your list of risks?
Do you have an approval form signed by your to Proceed to Project Sponsor
authorizing you to proceed to Next Phase Project Planning, or halting the project?
Have you provided sufficient information in your Initial project Plan to allow the Project
Sponsor to take the necessary action?
Planning Phase
The purpose of Project Planning is to define the exact parameters
of a project and ensure that all the pre-requisites for Project
Execution and Control are in place.

Project Planning builds upon the work performed during Project


Initiation. The project definition and scope are validated with
appropriate Stakeholders, starting with the Project Sponsor and
Customer Decision-Makers. Project Scope, Schedule and Budget
are refined and confirmed, and risk assessment activities
advance to the mitigation stage. The Initiation deliverables –
CSSQ and Initial Project Plan – are further developed, enhanced,
and refined, until they form a definitive plan for the rest of the
project.

Project Planning is an opportunity to identify and resolve any


remaining issues and answer outstanding questions that may
undermine the goals of the project or threaten its success. It is an
opportunity to plan and prepare, as opposed to react and catch
up.

Project sponsorship and commitment are re-confirmed at the end


of the phase, with approval signifying authorization to proceed
and commit funds for Project Execution and Control.
Planning Phase Flow

Initiation Phase Planning Phase


Prepare For Project Conduct Planning kick off
Identify Project Team Project Orient new Team members
Develop Project Charter Charter Review project Material
Conduct Kick-off meeting Kick off Project Planning

Define CSSQ Refine CSSQ


Define Project Budget Refine Project Budget
Define High Level Schedule Refine Project Schedule
Define High level Scope Preliminary Project Refine Project Scope Project Budget
Define Quality objectives Budget Refine Project Quality
High Level Project Schedule
Schedule Scope Statement
High Level Scope Quality Parameters
Perform Risk Identification Statement Perform risk Assesment
Quality Parameters
Identify Risk Quantify Risk
Document risk Create Risk Management Plan
Risk
Management
Plan
Develop initial Project Plan List Of Risks
Refine Project Plan
Stakeholder involvement
Produce Initial Project Plan
Establish Time/Cost Baselines
Establish Procurement Requirements
Develop Implementation Plan
Develop Change Control Tasks
Confirm Approval to proceed
Develop Transition Plan
Define Communications Plan
Review Project Documents Project
Gain approval Signature Plan

Confirm Approval To Proceed


Gain Schedule Commitment
Review Project Plan w / Team
Gain Approval Signature
Phase
Completion
Approval
Form Phase
Completion
Approval
Form
Process Definition

Process Objectives

The objective of the planning process is to start build project


details and build a project plan for implementation.

Begins When

A project request form is approved by the PMO

Includes (The list includes but is not limited to the following


tasks)

 Orient New Project Team Members Team

 Review Outputs of Project Initiation and Current Project


Status

 Kick Off Project Planning

 Conduct Project Kick-off Meeting

 Refine Project Scope

 Refine Project Schedule

 Refine/Define Quality Standards and Quality Assurance


Activities

 Refine Project Budget

 Establish Project Budget

 Identify New Risks, Update Existing

 Quantify Risk

 Develop Risk Management Plan

 Establish Time/Cost Baselines


 Establish Procurement Requirements

 Develop Implementation Plan

 Define Communications Plan

 Compile initial project plan

 Review Project Plan w/ Team

 Gain Schedule and cost commitment

 Gain Schedule and cost commitment from stakeholders

 Gain Approval signature from Sponsor

Excludes

Any detailed project execution activities.

Ends

The baselined project plan is approved by team members and


project sponsor
Task Deliverables list
Processes Tasks Task Deliverable
Conduct Project Orient New Project Team Members
Planning Kick-off Members Oriented
Team
Review Outputs of Project Initiation
Project Outputs Reviewed
and Current Project Status
Kick-off Meeting Agenda
Kick Off Project Planning
Kick-off Meeting Notes
Conduct Project Kick-off Meeting Kick-off Meeting
Refine CSSQ Refine Project Scope Project Scope Statement

Refine Project Schedule Project Schedule


Refine/Define Quality Standards and
Quality Management Plan
Quality Assurance Activities
Project Budget Refined
Refine Project Budget Staff/Materials
Acquisition Strategy

Preliminary Budget
Establish Project Budget
Estimate
Perform Risk Risk Management
Assessment Identify New Risks, Update Existing
Worksheet
Risk Management
Quantify Risk
Worksheet
Risk Management
Develop Risk Management Plan
Worksheet
Refine Project Plan Establish Time/Cost Baselines Final project plan

Establish Procurement Requirements Purchase Requirements

Develop Implementation Plan Implementation Plan

Define Communications Plan Communication Plan

Compile initial project plan Initial project plan


Confirm approval Review Project Plan w/ Team Baselined project plan
to proceed to next
phase Gain Schedule and cost commitment Agreement to plan
Gain Schedule and cost commitment
Agreement to plan
from stakeholders
Gain Approval signature from
Signed approval form
Sponsor
RICAP Chart
R – Review P – Perform I – Information A – Approve

C- Co-ordinate

RICAP Chart
Sponsor Project Project PMO
/Client Manage Team
Tasks r
Orient New Project Team
Members P
Review Outputs of Project
Initiation and Current Project
Status P P
Kick Off Project Planning P P C
Conduct Project Kick-off
Meeting R P P C
Refine Project Scope R P
Refine Project Schedule P P
Refine/Define Quality
Standards and Quality
Assurance Activities P P
Refine Project Budget P
Establish Project Budget R P R
Identify New Risks, Update
Existing R P
Quantify Risk R P
Develop Risk Management Plan R P
Establish Time/Cost Baselines P
Establish Procurement
Requirements R P
Develop Implementation Plan P I
Define Communications Plan P
Compile initial project plan P
Review Project Plan w/ Team R P R R
Gain Schedule and cost
commitment A C A C/I
Gain Schedule and cost
commitment from Stakeholder C C/I
Gain Approval signature from
Sponsor A P
Phase Completion Checklist
The ultimate measurement of success for Project Planning is the
successful Project Execution that follows, or a decision to stop the
project as, once again, the organization may be best served by
deciding that the project should not continue. Nevertheless, the
Project Manager can still assess how successfully the project is
proceeding by utilizing the measurement criteria outlined below
as it proceeds through Planning. More than one “No” answer
indicates a serious risk to the continued success of your project.

Questions Yes No

Do your team members have skill sets to perform tasks?

If not, have you obtained authorization to provide them with necessary and timely
training?

Have the supervisors of all resources assigned to tasks on your project agreed to
release those resources on the dates your project is expecting them?

Does your Project Sponsor agree with your risk prioritization?

Do the other decision-makers agree with your risk mitigation actions?

Have you verified that the people responsible for signing off on scope changes and
deliverable approval forms actually have authority, and are willing, to approve the items
of expected magnitude and type?

Do your Customers understand the pre-determined acceptance criteria for all


deliverables?

Have the persons you identified as steering committee for issue/risk/change escalation
agreed to serve in that capacity?

Has the business sponsor signed off/agreed on risk management plan?

Do you have an approval form signed by your Project Sponsor authorizing you to
proceed to Project Execution and Control, or halting the project?
Execution & Controlling
Phase
The project execution and the controlling phase is the longest
phase of the project management lifecycle, where most resources
are applied. Project Execution and Control utilizes all the plans,
schedules, procedures and templates that were prepared and
anticipated during prior phases.

The execution and the controlling phase take place


simultaneously with the project team executing the tasks as
outlined by the project manager. The project manager also
controls the CSSQ through regular project status meetings. The
project manager has to make sure that all the major stakeholders
are present during such weekly project status meetings.

This stage is also most vulnerable to scope changes. In case of a


scope change in the project, the project manager has to initiate a
scope change process. This process is defined in detailed in the
next chapter.
Execution & Controlling Phase flow
Executing &
Planning Phase Controlling Phase
Conduct Planning kick off Conduct Phase kick off
Orient new Team members Orient new Team members
Review project Material Review project Material
Kick off Project Planning Kick off Project Execution

Refine CSSQ Manage CSSQ


Refine Project Budget Manage Project Budget
Refine Project Schedule Manage Project Schedule
Refine Project Scope Project Budget
Manage Project Scope
Refine Project Quality High Level Project
Implement Project Quality
Schedule Infomration
Scope Statement
Quality Parameters
Perform risk Assesment Monitor & Control Risk
Manage Scope Change
Quantify Risk Monitor Risk
Create Risk Management Plan Control Risk
Risk Monitor Impact on CSSQ Scope Change
Management Form
Plan
Refine Project Plan Manage Project Plan

Establish Time/Cost Baselines


Manage Time/Cost Baselines
Establish procurement Requirements
Manage Procurement Requirements
Develop Implementation Plan
Execute Implementation Plan
Develop Change Control Tasks
Conduct Status Meetings
Develop Transition Plan
Execute Change Control Tasks
Define Communications Plan All Project
Execute Transition Plan
Manage Communications Plan Docs
Project
Plan

Confirm Approval To Proceed

Review Project Plan w / Team Gain Project Acceptance


Gain Approval Signature
Conduct Final Status Meeting
Gain Approval Signature

Phase
Completion
Approval Project
Form Acceptanc
e Form
Process Definition

Process Objectives

The objective of the Executing & Controlling process is to


implement the project plan and make sure that the project is on
schedule.

Begins When

A project plan is baselined and approved by the sponsor

Includes (The list includes but is not limited to the following


tasks)

 Orient New Project Team Members Team

 Review Outputs of Project Planning phase and provide


Project Status

 Kick Off Project Execution

 Conduct Kick-off Meeting

 Manage Project Scope

 Manage Project Schedule

 Implement Quality Standards

 Manage Project Budget

 Monitor New Risks, Update Existing

 Manage Scope Change

 Monitor impact of scope change on CSSQ

 Manage Time/Cost Baselines

 Manage Procurement Requirements


 Execute Implementation Plan

 Create Communications Plan

 Conduct Project Status meetings

 Execute Change Control Tasks

 Conduct Final status meeting

 Gain Approval signature from Sponsor

Excludes

Any project Close-out activities.

Ends

When the sponsor accepts the project deliverables


Task Deliverable List
Processes Tasks Task Deliverable
Conduct Project Orient New Project Team Members
Execution Kick-off Members Oriented
Team
Review Outputs of Project Planning
Project Outputs Reviewed
phase and provide Project Status
Kick-off Meeting Agenda
Kick Off Project Execution
Kick-off Meeting Notes
Conduct Kick-off Meeting Kick-off Meeting
Manage CSSQ Manage Project Scope
Manage Project Schedule
Implement Quality Standards
Manage Project Budget
Monitor & Control Risk Management
Risk Monitor New Risks, Update Existing
Worksheet

Manage Scope Change Scope Change Form

Monitor impact of scope change on


CSSQ
Manage Project Manage Time/Cost Baselines
Plan
Manage Procurment Requirements

Execute Implementation Plan

Create Communications Plan Communication Plan

Conduct Project Status meetings Meeting Minutes

Execute Change Control Tasks Initial project plan


Confirm approval Meeting Minutes &
Conduct Final status meeting
to proceed to Lessons learned
Closeout phase Gain Approval signature from
Signed approval form
Sponsor
RICAP Chart
R – Review P – Perform I – Information A – Approve

C- Co-ordinate

RICAP Chart
Sponsor/ Project Project PMO
Tasks Client Manager Team
Orient New Project Team
Members Team P
Review Outputs of Project
Planning phase and provide
Project Status R P R
Kick Off Project Execution P C
Conduct Kick-off Meeting R P R C
Manage Project Scope P
Manage Project Schedule P
Implement Quality Standards P
Manage Project Budget P
Monitor New Risks, Update
Existing R P I R
Manage Scope Change I P I R
Monitor impact of scope
change on CSSQ R P I
Manage Time/Cost Baselines P
Manage Procurement
Requirements P
Execute Implementation Plan R P
Create Communications Plan R P I
Conduct Project Status
meetings P P P R
Execute Change Control
Tasks R P
Conduct Final status meeting R P R R
Gain Approval signature from
Sponsor A P
Phase Completion Checklist
The ultimate measurement of success for Project Planning is the
successful Project Execution that follows, or a decision to stop the
project as, once again, the organization may be best served by
deciding that the project should not continue. Nevertheless, the
Project Manager can still assess how successfully the project is
proceeding by utilizing the measurement criteria outlined below
as it proceeds through Planning. More than one “No” answer
indicates a serious risk to the continued success of your project.

Questions Yes No
Did you receive confirmation from ALL Project Team members that they agree with
their role descriptions, and that they understand and agree with the project objectives,
risks and timetables as recorded in the kick-off meeting notes?

Do your team members agree that the estimates to complete for all open tasks are
accurate?

Is the Project Sponsor aware of the latest total current budget for the project?

Is your schedule current?


Have you adjusted the risk priority level for any risks on the Risk Management
Worksheet?

Were all changes to the scope, schedule, cost or quality parameters of the project
made with a signed scope change request?

Have all deliverables been presented to decision makers with prior preview of the
deliverable in progress?

Are all project issues recorded in the Issue Log in the Project Status Report?

Is the Status Meeting being held as often as indicated in the Communications Plan?

If any Customer Decision-Makers are consistently absent from the status meetings,
have they designated a replacement?

Do you have a Project Acceptance Form signed by your Project Sponsor accepting the
project?
Close-out Phase
Closeout begins when the user accepts the project deliverables
and the project sponsor or the customer concludes that the
project has met the goals established. The purpose of project
closeout is to assess the project and derive any lessons learned
and best practices to be applied to future projects. Project
Closeout contains the following high level tasks:

 Turnover to Operations

 Post implementation Review

 Administrative Close-out

Turnover to Operation
The most important aspect of project The turnover &
closeout is the physical turnover of acceptance
control of the product, or service activities
delivered by the project. All project include but
are not limited
deliverables will need to be to knowledge
maintained and supported after the transfer,
project team disbands. An operational documentatio
unit of the organization (for which the n transfer,
deliverable is developed) assumes and physical
transfer of the
responsibility for the support of the deliverable.
deliverable.

Post-Implementation Review
The review starts with a survey designed to solicit feedback on
the project from the Project Team, Customers, Consumers and
other stakeholders. This survey is available on the project
SharePoint site to all the team members.
Administrative Closeout
Project Closeout ends with administrative closeout. The
administrative close-out involves completing a signed Project
Close-Out Form which has to be approved by the project Sponsor.
Project team also collaboratively documents the lessons learned
during the project.

 Lessons Learned

Lessons learned typically provide: a brief discussion of the


problem to identify its nature, source, and impact; site any
references that provide additional detail (references may include
project reports, plans, issue logs, change management
documents); and general literature or guidance used from
another source; and, recording the corrective actions taken and
results.

Problems that were encountered should be prioritized with focus


on the top five to ten problems. It is not necessary to document
every small thing that happened. However, all legitimate
problems and issues should be discussed as requested by
customers or management.
Close-out Phase flow

Executing & Close-out Phase


Controlling Phase
Conduct Phase kick off Turnover to productioon

Orient new Team members Identify production support team


Review project Material Complete turnover to production
Kick off Project Planning support team

Manage CSSQ
Manage Project Budget Conduct post implementation
Manage Project Schedule review
Manage Project Scope
Project
Implement Project Quality Conduct Project Performance Survey
Infomration
Assess results of survey
Document Lessons learned
Monitor & Control Risk Sharepoint
Survey
Monitor Risk Result
Control Risk
Monitor Impact on CSSQ
Perform Administrative Close out
Complete Project Close -out Form
Document lessons learned
Manage Project Plan Archive Project Information Signed
Manage Time/Cost Baselines Project
Manage Purchase Requirments Close-out
Manage Implementation Plan Form
Manage Testing Plan
Conduct Status Meetings
Manage Change Control Tasks
Manage Transition Plan All Project
Manage Communications Plan Docs

Gain Project Acceptance

Conduct Final Status Meeting


Gain Approval Signature

Project
Acceptanc
e Form
Process Definition

Process Objectives

The objective of the Close-out process is to complete the transfer


responsibility to the production support, complete project survey
and document lessons learned

Begins When

The project sponsor accepts the project deliverables

Includes (The list includes but is not limited to the following


tasks)

 Identify Production support team

 Complete turnover activities

 Conduct Project Performance survey

 Assess survey results

 Complete Project Close-out Form

 Document Lessons learned

 Archive Project Information

Excludes

Any project executions activities.

Ends

When all the project data is archived.


Task Deliverables List
Processes Tasks Task Deliverable
Turnover to
Production Identify Production support team Team identified
Knowledge/ Document
Complete turnover activities
Transfer
Conduct Post- Survey completed by
Conduct Project Performance survey
Implementation project team
Review Assess survey results Survey results
Close-out Phase
Complete Project Close-out Form Project close-out form

Lessons Learned
Document Lessons learned
Document
Archive information in
Archive Project Information
server

RICAP Chart

R – Review P – Perform I – Information A – Approve

C- Co-ordinate

RICAP Chart
Sponsor/ Project Project PMO
Tasks Client Manager Team
Identify Production support
team P
Complete turnover activities R R P
Conduct Project Performance
survey R P P R
Assess survey results P
Complete Project Close-out
Form A P
Document Lessons learned P P P R
Archive Project Information P
4
Chapter

Phase Completion Checklist


The ultimate measurement of success for Project Closeout will
probably never be known. That’s because it is impossible to
assess now how much future projects will benefit from best
practices and lessons learned derived from this project; the only
thing certain is that no one will benefit at all if the best practices
and lessons learned are not documented and communicated.
Meanwhile, the Project Manager can still assess how successfully
the project is proceeding through Closeout by utilizing the
measurement criteria outlined below. More than one “No” answer
indicates a lesser probability that your experiences will help with
the eventual success of other projects.

Questions Yes No

Was the survey presented in a way to encourage active participation?

Were feedback results meaningful?

Were best practices and lessons learned appropriately identified and documented in
such a way as to facilitate their application to all types of projects?

Did people read and provide feedback on the Post-Implementation survey?


Was all project information readily available and easy Closeout to consolidate in the
project repository?

Scope Management
Introduction
A scope change is where a request is considered to change the
agreed scope and objectives of the project to accommodate a
need not originally defined to be part of the project.

Priority
There are different priority levels for change requests, based on
their impact to the project. The following are the priority levels by
the PMO.

 High/Critical: This scope change is required for the


project to be successful on day one. The implementation of
the new system is in jeopardy if the scope change request
is not resolved.

 Medium/Important: The scope change is necessary


for the project to be successful long term and would
materially benefit the user community.

 Low/Desirable: The scope change is not necessary for


the project to be successful, but it will be good to have the
change.

Impact
The effort required to implement a given change request is not
constant throughout the project. As the project progresses
towards implementation, its ability to absorb scope changes
decreases and the likelihood of cost and/or schedule impact
increases. For example, it is more difficult to accept and
implement a functional change during testing than it is to accept
and implement the same change during design.
Depending on the phase of the project, a change in scope can
potentially impact the project schedule, cost, and risk. Hence, a
change can even change the project categorization and a small 2-
day work might turn into a big project.

Scope Change Process


There are two separate processes for Standard/Complex work
and Small work. The project manager will have to adhere to the
process depending on the scale of the project.

Scope change for Fast track work


Small projects typically do not have scope change requests, and if
they do, they are typically also small in nature. Scope changes
can be surfaced by anyone on the project team.

The following process should be able to be performed quickly.

 The project manager validates that the request is, in


fact, a scope change. If so, the rest of this process is
executed.

 The project manager determines the impact of the


scope change to the project in terms of cost, effort and
duration. If there are other viable options, the project
manager determines their impact as well.

 If the change request can be accommodated within the


original project cost, effort and duration, the project
manager and customer representative have the flexibility
to make the decision on whether the change should be
approved. However, the sponsor must have agreed to
delegate this responsibility – usually up to a certain
threshold of dollars or effort.

 The appropriate analysis, impact and alternatives are


taken to the Project Sponsor for resolution (if the request
was not already approved in step 4 above.) If the sponsor
does not approve the request and the corresponding
impact, the scope request is not pursued.

 Once a resolution is agreed upon, the appropriate


activities are added to the project plan to ensure the
change is implemented. (Note : Don’t forget to baseline
your project plan after making the schedule and task
changes)

 The request, current status and resolution should be


documented in the Project Status Report.

Scope Change process flow for small work

Determine impact
Determine
on cost , time ,
Scope change Does it impact cost , alternatives to
Valid Request ? Yes effort, risk & Yes
initiated time,effort ? accommodate
inform project
change
sponsor

NO No

Continue project
Scope change as planned &
request not implement scope
pursued change

Analysis , impact &


Add changes to Sponsor
Document the alternatives
the work plan and Yes agrees to
scope change presented to
implement change impact?
project sponsor

No

Scope change is
not pursued
Scope change for standard & complex work
A major difference in a scope change process for complex work
compared to small work is the requirement of a Scope Change
Request Form. A potential scope change requests can be filed
by any project stakeholders, including the project team, clients,
sponsors, etc. The scope change can be surfaced through verbal
or written means, but it will be formally documented using a
Scope Change Request Form.

The process for incorporating a scope change in a complex work


is elaborated below:

 Enter the request into the Scope Change Log for


tracking purposes.

 Assign the scope change to a project team member for


investigation. (The project manager could assign it to
himself or herself.) The team member will investigate the
impact on budget and schedule for various viable options.

 The team member will first determine how much time it


will take to investigate the scope change request. If the
time required to perform the analysis will cause deliverable
dates to slip, the request must first be taken to the Project
Sponsor to determine whether the request should be
investigated or not. If the sponsor gives the initial approval
to proceed, the project plan and budget may need to be
updated to reflect this new work. The options are
documented on the Scope Change Request Form. If the
Sponsor does not agree to investigate the change request,
then the request should be placed closed as 'not approved'
on the Scope Change Log.

 If the impact on project cost, effort and duration falls


below a threshold (say less than 20 hours) and the project
will still be completed within the agreed upon cost, effort
and duration, then the project manager and client manager
may approve the scope change request. This threshold
needs to be identified and approved by the project sponsor.
The purpose is to keep from surfacing many small changes
to the Sponsor for approval. However, the sponsor must
have agreed to delegate this responsibility – usually up to a
certain threshold of dollars or effort.

 Take the scope change request, alternatives and project


impact on the Scope Change Request Form to the Project
Sponsor for a resolution.

 Document the resolution or course of action on the


Scope Change Request Form.

 Document the resolution briefly on the Scope Change


Log. If the Sponsor does not agree to the change request,
then the request should be closed as 'not approved' on the
Scope Change Log.

 If the resolution is agreed upon, the appropriate


activities are added to the project plan to ensure the
change is implemented. The project budget should also be
updated, if necessary.

 If an approved scope change results in a substantial


change to the project, the original Project Definition should
be updated.

 Communicate scope change status and resolution to


project team members and other appropriate stakeholders
through the Manage Communication process, including the
Project Status Report.

Scope Change process flow for small work


Enter request in
Assign someone Will the
Scope change Scope change log
to investigate the investigation
initiated and inform
request take long?
customer rep No

Yes

Does sponsor Inform project


Close scope
No agree to sponsor of the
change request
delay? potential delay

Yes

Update project
Perform
plan to include this
investigation
work

Analysis , impact &


Add changes to Sponsor Is the impact of
Document the alternatives
the work plan and Yes agrees to Yes change
scope change presented to
implement change impact? significant ?
project sponsor

No

Scope change is No
not pursued

No change to
Close scope
project schedule
change request
or cost
Process Definition

Process Objectives

To identify and approved/reject scope change requests submitted


by anyone in the project team

Begins When

A Scope change request is submitted

Includes (The list includes but is not limited to the following


tasks)

 Assess scope change requests

 Investigate change requests

 Get sponsor approval for change

 Re-organize project plan

Excludes

Any post scope change approval.

Ends

When the sponsor accepts/rejects a project scope change


request.
5
Chapter

Process completion checklist


The ultimate measurement of success for Scope management
process is when all the scope changes are approved, rejected or
closed in a way defined in the process. At the end of the project
none of the scope changes should be in the “open” status.
Meanwhile, the Project Manager can still assess how successfully
the project is proceeding through the scope change management
process by utilizing the measurement criteria outlined below.
More than one “No” answer indicates a lesser probability that
your experiences will help with the eventual success of other
projects.

Questions Yes No

Are all scope changes being registered in the scope change log?

Is the sponsor communicated about all high impact scope change?

Has the sponsor or the customer decision-maker approved all the scope changes
included in the project plan?

Is the project plan changed and baselined after each scope change?

Project Status Reporting


5
Chapter

Apart from the weekly project status meeting that might take
place within the project team and the performing organization,
the PMO has certain guidelines for status reporting using the MS
Project Server 2003.

The PMO has built a few views like the Project Health Scorecard
view which provide the senior management a quick view to
status of all the projects within TechCentral. The PMO has also
created a view called the TechCentral Project Review Meeting on
the Project Server which is used for Monthly Project Review
Meeting with the CIO. All project presentations during this
meeting are required to be in a specific PowerPoint format. The
template for this PowerPoint slide is available in the Templates
and Forms folder under documents section of the PMO Website.
Please contact the PMO rep for instructions on updating the
project status in the Project Server.

Policies
 It is the responsibility of the project manager to update
the project status and also ensure that the current status of
the project reflects on the project server.

 The project manager has to use the Project Status


Review meeting template for the TechCentral Project
Review Meeting.

PMO Guidelines & Policies


This chapter contains general guidelines and policies set by the
ISS Project Management Office. The guidelines and policies below
are divided according to the various phases defined earlier. Your
duties as a project manager include but are not limited to the
points mentioned below.

Pipeline Phase
 A Project Request Form has to be submitted to the
PMO to initiate any sort of project.

 The requestor should have approval prior to


submitting a project request to the PMO

 The requestor must have a business case if the


project is more than $100,000 and should submit it
to the PMO along with the Project Request Form.
Project managers should also ask for a business case
from the requestor if the project is estimated to be
more than $100,000.

Post-Pipeline Phase
 All complex projects must have a project charter
which has been approved by the project sponsor.

 All the risks and issues should be documented


using the project server tool. Anybody from the
project team can raise an issue/risk.

 A phase approval form should be signed by the


sponsor or customer representative before moving to
the next phase.

 The baselined project plan has to be approved by


the sponsor or customer representative.

 Ensure that the project plan on the project server


is regularly updated

 Note all scope changes in the scope change log.


 Update the project status on the project server
when ever something in the project changes.

 All project documents (Non-configuration items)


should be maintained in the SharePoint document
repository.

 All project status reporting during senior


management meeting will be done in the format and
template provided by the PMO.

 If any support is required from the SDSC, the


project manager has to inform the SDSC at least 2-
weeks before the Go-Live date.

 A project close-out form has to be filled by the


project manager and approved by the project
sponsor.
Documents Policy
The PMO has compiled a list of document required to be
completed for effective project management. The project
manager is required to comply with the list of documents
mentioned below.

The requirement for documentation depends on the scale of the


project. A Fast track project has lesser documentation compared
to a Standard or a Complex Project

Document Name Fast Track Standard Complex


Business Case Template
Project Request Form
Project Charter Document
Lite Project Charter Document
ISS Project Cost Estimate Spreadsheet
Risk Management Workbook
ISS PMO Complex Project Plan
ISS PMO Fast Track Project Plan
ISS PMO Standard Project Plan
Meeting Minutes Template
Project Scope Change Log
Scope Change Request Form
Purchase Summary
Project Performance Feedback
Lessons Learned Template
Project Acceptance (Close-out) Form

=Optional = Required
Document templates Mapped to Phases

ISS ProgramManagement Office Document Template Guide

Executing
Executing&&
Initiation
InitiationPhase
Phase Planning
PlanningPhase
Phase Closeout
Closeoutphase
phase
Controlling
Controlling

TechCentral Project Close-out


Project Charter Base lined project
Project Request Form
Plan
Form

Business Case High-level Project Scope Change Project


Template Plan Form Performance
survey

ISS Project Cost


Meeting Minutes
Estimate
Template Lessons Learned
spreadsheet
Template

Risk Management IT Project Review


Plan Meeting template

Scope Change
Form

Sources for the above mentioned templates:

 TechCentral Project Request Form: Available in


Forms Central Section of PBWeb and PMO Website.

 Business Case Template: Templates and Forms folder


under shared documents section of the PMO Website

 Project Charter: Templates and Forms folder under


documents section of the PMO Website
 Project Plan Template: Templates and Forms folder
under documents section of the PMO Website

 Project Cost Estimate Spreadsheet: Templates and


Forms folder under documents section of the PMO Website

 Meeting Minutes Template: Templates and Forms


folder under documents section of the PMO Website

 Project Scope Change Form: Templates and Forms


folder under documents section of the PMO Website

 Scope Change Log: Templates and Forms folder


under documents section of the PMO Website

 IT Project Review Status Template: Templates and


Forms folder under documents section of the PMO Website

 Administrative Closeout Template: Templates and


Forms folder under documents section of the PMO Website

 Project Performance Survey: Project Team Website


in SharePoin
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