t, you also need might.

"

age Campaign Success
I Do Research and Set Goals .

rs to prepare living wage campaign. ths to get by with a limited preparation living wage campaign.
Our members:

r's surveys. What church, temple, synagogue, mosque is their place of worship? What do the members want in their agreement? What are members willing to fight for?

*

What problems have members had on the job?

Strengths and weaknesses of the union and the employer: Critical analysis of the past - both failures and successes. How did members react to those successes and failures?
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What are the things we do well? What are the things we do well and our members like? ns are negotiating with the same employer? e a coordinated bargaining strategy with those unions?

eir expected expenditures? ing" places for surplus revenue? include all of the information requested by the union? s and benefits compare to others in the area? res on the humans th Employer's likely goals and objectives:
o

Ask members about inside information

.

a information on all those who call the shots, and know that 1 11 as you know your members' information.

e bickering going on internally at the school board? chemicals being used to clean, fertilize? all the contracts signed with suppliers and vendors? the suppliers make deliveries? Are they union? qu~pment being used and the manufacturing malfunctions? es the employer comply with fire and safety hazard guidelines?
o o

Do we know the people responsible for making the inspections? Most likely they are union members. Do we know the entire operation as well as the school board and the administration?

o

Do we know them so well that we can anticipate their next move?

Create a theme:

An inspiring theme can move the members to action. The poetry of the movement. Dignity and respect get more member mobilization than a 2% wage increase. the dream.... "The work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives, and m shall never die."

izing the Campaign

tting pressure on the employer and resisting employer tactics may require sacrifice nd risk taking by the members. embers will take the they feel they were involved.

" members in their workplace.

t home and ask them to identify "respected" members in their building, t, job classification, etc. members to come on board because their co-workers have identified nt and respected people in the workplace.
4. Train "respected members on Living Wage Campaigns and collective action.

pected" members become the part of the organizing committee.
6. The committee reaches out to their constituency to inform and solicit feedback.

7. The committee and volunteers begin carrying out surveys of the membership.

Issues begin to be identified and proposed solutions are reviewed. These issues and the proposed solutions will become part of the union's proposals.
9. In order to involve members the committee:
o

Appeal to self interest. Appeal for the support of a larger cause. Remind a potential volunteer of skills or experience he she has to contribute, Be honest about the work involved. Recruit people from all subgroups. Start with specific easy tasks and then gradually encourage greater involvement. Match volunteers to tasks based on skills, interests, and time. Provide training for volunteers. Teach people how to get others involved in sharing the work. Make it fun to participate. Point out every small victory to prove that involvement pays off. Arrange recognitions for work volunteers do. Check on people to see if they need help.

o

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o
o
o

o

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countable, and shift them to another bers know the campaign is theirs.

ressuring the Employer:
Develop worksite tactics. Involve the community - be sure to inclu slative and political campaign. ia campaign ing pressure tactics: aign many members do not believe that they have the at other co-workers and the community will join them. begin to get involved many will join and begin to see the members of their union. ure tactics enables the committee to identify weaknesses and up the pressure.

Develop worksite tactics:
Use a tactic that is simple as a petition signed by all the members requesting the prompt resolution of a pending issue. Best if it is an issue management can resolve quickly. Have the committee claim victory immediately. Wearing the same apparel or not wearing what is required. Have a one minute meeting. The sole purpose is to show the degree of organization and participation within the bargaining unit. Encourage members to create, prepare, and plan the tactics to be used.
o

The ultimate power move is when committees of members begin addressing grievances without involvement of staff.

Involve the Community: Rank and file members generally have more credibility than union officials when reaching out to the community and the press. We now know all the organizations and churches our members belong to. Those are the first community groups we ask to join us. Additionally we seek out the support of:
o
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Other unions, AFL-CIO, Central Labor Councils Renters organizations Civic Groups (League of Women voters) Environmental organizations Professional Associations Students, parents

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o

o College Students

Develop a legislativelpolitical campaign: Develop a legislative strategy that would enjoy wide community support. Education is the hottest item in any politician's agenda. Who knows better than education support professionals how to improve our schools? Mobilize members to meetings:
o o

To a politician's rally. Friend or foe. Use information gathered in the "who calls the shots research" to apply pressure on individuals. Participate in the electoral process.

o

Develop a media campaign: Recruit amongst the membership the "poster child" members, prepare bios for release. Train members on how to give interviews and stay on point. Train members on how to put together a media package. Befriend reporters months and months before they receive your first press release. Use the time to educate them on the issues. Train members on how to write press releases and do follow up after the release to ensure coverage. Make use of free press:

o o

letters to the editor public service air time in radio radio call-in shows

o public service airtime on cable television
o

4. Bargaining during the Living Wage Campaign:
Key Points: Involve a representative from each employee category in the Negotiating Committee. -Train all Negotiating Committee members on the subject of Collective Bargaining (costing, mandatory, permissible, etc.). -Disseminate information after every bargaining session. Keep the membership involved. Members should clearly understand that bargaining is being conducted bv them, and not for them. Use tactics throughout the negotiating process:
o

Beginning when proposals are first presented. First presentation of management's counter-proposals.

o

o The point at which each side is waiting for the other side to blink.
o

The end of negotiations when the major issues are about to be settled.

Work from the Union's proposals. Own the discussion. Do not make empty threats - d o what you said you would do. Challenge management to prove their claims and make a campaign issue of its failure to do so. Celebrate for having had the courage to try something new.

"A Dream is just a dream. A Goal is a Dream with a Plan and a Deadline."

Put on the Pressure

Other Unions

Board Actions

Support Civil Rights-Style Tactics

For More Information:
ACORN www.acorn.org Jobs with Justice www.iwi.orq Grass Roots Policy www.grassrootspolicv.orq Wider Opportunities for Women www.wowonIine.org American Prospect www.prospect.orq Economic Policy Institute www.epinet.org Midwest Academy www.midwestacademv.com Wayne State University www.laborstudies.wavne.edu Responsible Wealth www.responsibleweaIth.orq United for a Fair Economy www.faireconomv.orq WEAC, Fran McNett 800-362-8034 mcnettf@weac.orq

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