Bmc Event Manager Administration Guide | Trademark | Technical Support

BMC® Impact Solutions: Administration

Administrator Guide

Supporting
BMC Impact Manager 7.0 BMC Impact Explorer 7.0 BMC Impact Portal 7.0 BMC Impact Publishing Server 7.0 BMC Impact Service Model Editor 7.0
April 2007

www.bmc.com

Contacting BMC Software
You can access the BMC Software website at http://www.bmc.com. From this website, you can obtain information about the company, its products, corporate offices, special events, and career opportunities.

United States and Canada
Address BMC SOFTWARE INC 2101 CITYWEST BLVD HOUSTON TX 77042-2827 USA Telephone 713 918 8800 or 800 841 2031 Fax 713 918 8000

Outside United States and Canada
Telephone (01) 713 918 8800 Fax (01) 713 918 8000

© Copyright 2007 BMC Software, Inc. BMC, BMC Software, and the BMC Software logo are the exclusive properties of BMC Software, Inc., are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and may be registered or pending registration in other countries. All other BMC trademarks, service marks, and logos may be registered or pending registration in the U.S. or in other countries. All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation. All other trademarks belong to their respective companies. BMC Software considers information included in this documentation to be proprietary and confidential. Your use of this information is subject to the terms and conditions of the applicable End User License Agreement for the product and the proprietary and restricted rights notices included in this documentation.

Restricted rights legend
U.S. Government Restricted Rights to Computer Software. UNPUBLISHED -- RIGHTS RESERVED UNDER THE COPYRIGHT LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES. Use, duplication, or disclosure of any data and computer software by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions, as applicable, set forth in FAR Section 52.227-14, DFARS 252.227-7013, DFARS 252.227-7014, DFARS 252.227-7015, and DFARS 252.227-7025, as amended from time to time. Contractor/Manufacturer is BMC SOFTWARE INC, 2101 CITYWEST BLVD, HOUSTON TX 77042-2827, USA. Any contract notices should be sent to this address.

Customer support
You can obtain technical support by using the BMC Software Customer Support website or by contacting Customer Support by telephone or e-mail. To expedite your inquiry, see “Before contacting BMC.”

Support website
You can obtain technical support from BMC 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at http://www.bmc.com/support_home. From this website, you can
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read overviews about support services and programs that BMC offers find the most current information about BMC products search a database for issues similar to yours and possible solutions order or download product documentation report an issue or ask a question subscribe to receive proactive e-mail alerts when new product notices are released find worldwide BMC support center locations and contact information, including e-mail addresses, fax numbers, and telephone numbers

Support by telephone or e-mail
In the United States and Canada, if you need technical support and do not have access to the web, call 800 537 1813 or send an e-mail message to customer_support@bmc.com. (In the subject line, enter SupID:yourSupportContractID, such as SupID:12345). Outside the United States and Canada, contact your local support center for assistance.

Before contacting BMC
Have the following information available so that Customer Support can begin working on your issue immediately:
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product information — — — product name product version (release number) license number and password (trial or permanent)

s

operating system and environment information — — — — — machine type operating system type, version, and service pack or other maintenance level such as PUT or PTF system hardware configuration serial numbers related software (database, application, and communication) including type, version, and service pack or maintenance level

s s s

sequence of events leading to the issue commands and options that you used messages received (and the time and date that you received them) — — — product error messages messages from the operating system, such as file system full messages from related software

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4

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Contents
About this book 31 Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Syntax statements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Part 1

General configuration and administration
Chapter 1 General Configuration Information

37
39

General configuration overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Enabling integration between BMC Impact Solutions applications and other BMC applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Chapter 2 Managing BMC Impact Manager cells 43 44 44 46 47 48 48 48 49 51 52 54 55 58 61 62 63 67 69 70 72 72 74 74 75
5

BMC Impact Manager overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager Knowledge Base (KB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager event repository and State Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager command line interface (CLI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting or stopping the cell - mcell and mkill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stopping or starting a cell on UNIX computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting or stopping a cell on Windows computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cell configuration tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring mcell.conf parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating cell-specific configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring cells to communicate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring event slot propagation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring passive connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring slots for time stamping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reloading cell configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring event performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring client to cell interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring cell tracing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the trace configuration file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring cell tracing parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event processing errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interpreting cell execution failure codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents

Using the BMC IX Administration view to manage cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecting or disconnecting a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing cell information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Controlling cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reloading cell configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Propagating events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registering for SIM notification events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collecting metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 3 Managing the BMC Impact Portal

76 76 77 77 78 79 80 83 85

Accessing the BMC Impact Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Starting and stopping the BMC Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Starting and stopping the BMC Portal on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Starting and stopping the BMC Portal on UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Configuration tasks for BMC Impact Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Registering production and test cells in the BMC Impact Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Customizing BMC Impact Portal configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Configuring Dashboard Table View columns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Configuring Events Table columns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Changing the Console Navigation Tree icons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Configuring Status Table columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Configuring object link synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Configuring reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Configuring the number of events displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Changing the maximum number of recent items displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Configuring the general properties displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Setting up Image Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Modifying connection settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Configuration file and parameter definitions for BMC Impact Portal. . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 smsIwc/application.properties file and parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 smsConsoleServer/application.properties file and parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 ixs.properties file and parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 BMC Impact Portal admin utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 admin utility syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 admin utility options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 admin utility examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Chapter 4 Managing the BMC Impact Explorer (BMC IX) console 107 108 109 109 110 111 114 115 116 117

Connecting BMC IX to a BMC Impact Portal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Specific configuration tasks in BMC IX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining a user’s home directory on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining property files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining console-wide policy files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring display and connection settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining global event severity and priority color values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event group configuration files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XML files that define user interface elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Contents

6

Chapter 5

Configuring StateBuilder and gateways

119 120 121 121 122 127 127 128 129 131 132 132 133 134 135 136 136 138 139

Understanding the StateBuilder and gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . StateBuilder configuration file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . statbld return codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gateway configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exporting events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modifying a statbld.conf file to export events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modifying a gateway.export file to export events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring tracing for StateBuilder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 6 Defining presentation names

Presentation names overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Presentation name resource file locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Default presentation name definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating a new presentation name resource file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Presentation name resource files search order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining presentation names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating or modifying presentation name keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Digitally signing a .jar file with a digital test certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling or disabling presentation names in BMC Impact Explorer tool tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Part 2

Event management administration
Chapter 7 Event management overview

141
143 143 144 144 146 148 148 149 149 151 152 152 152 154 154 154 157 158 159 159 159
7

Event management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event collection sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event management in BMC Impact Explorer console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event flow for service impact management and event management . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Explorer Administration View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event management policy definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dynamic data definition using the Dynamic Data Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager cell management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 8 Working with the Dynamic Data Editor

About data classes and dynamic data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Navigating the Dynamic Data Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Navigation pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Toolbar functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Filtering and sorting the Data List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Filtering slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sorting data fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with data instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Extended Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internals tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Data instance context menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents

Adding a new data instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Editing slots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Exporting data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Chapter 9 Implementing event management policies 165

What is an event management policy? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 How an event management policy differs from a rule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 When to use an event management policy rather than a rule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Event management policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 How standard event management policies differ from dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Out-of-the-box event management policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 How event management policies work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Event management policy workflow overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Event selectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Event selector groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Timeframes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Evaluation order of event policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Compiling event policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 How dynamic data enrichment event management policies work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 External enrichment data sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 How to create a new local timeframe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 How to add a notification service (notification policies only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment source file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Creating new standard event management policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Creating a new standard blackout policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Creating a new closure policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Creating a new correlation policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Creating a new enrichment policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Creating a new escalation policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Creating a new notification policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Creating a new propagation policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Creating a new recurrence policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Creating a new suppression policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Creating a new threshold policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 Creating a new timeout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Enabling and disabling out-of-the-box standard event management policies . . . . . 226 Creating a new dynamic data enrichment event management policy . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event management policies . . . 238 Enabling a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Enabling a dynamic data enrichment location policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Enabling a dynamic data enrichment service contact policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation policy . . . . 249 Importing dynamic data enrichment source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Verifying that the policy is running. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
8 BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Trouble-shooting event management policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Problem: The policy is not running . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Problem: I receive an invalid data error when running a dynamic data enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Problem: I receive an error message when running a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Trouble-shooting tools for dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Editing event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Deleting an event selector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 Chapter 10 Creating and implementing user-defined policies 259 260 260 260 260 261 262 262 262 264 265 267 268 268 269 270 270 271 272 273 273 274 275 276 276 277 277 280

Understanding user-defined event policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Understanding event processing rules (MRL) for policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Format of event processing rules for policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How a rule for a policy type is processed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sources of information about rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . User-defined event policy type creation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating user-defined policy types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining the policy data class for a new policy type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining presentation names for a new policy type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating the event processing rule(s) for a new policy type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 11 Building event groups and image views

Understanding event groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Types of event groupings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event group configuration files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event tree hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event tree objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Understanding image views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Planning event groups and image views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with event groups and image views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating an event group (event tree top-level) node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating an event group subnode (event tree node) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting an event group subnode (event tree top-level node) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hiding a collector in an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Showing a hidden collector in an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Putting an event group into production or development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a custom image view to an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Granting user access to event groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Part 3

Service model administration
Chapter 12 Service model administration overview

281
283

Service model overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 BMC Impact Publishing Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285

Contents

9

Chapter 13

Building a service model—quick start

287

Before you begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 Launching BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 Creating new component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 Creating relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290 Associating events with component instances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291 Promoting the service model—quick start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 Chapter 14 Understanding the service model 295

The service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 The BMC Atrium Configuration Management Database—the datastore . . . . . . 296 Service model and the Common Data Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297 Required service model data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 Sandboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 BMC Impact Service Model Editor datasets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Service model publishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 Service model execution on cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 Service components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Component classes and types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Service component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 In-model and not-in-model component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308 Component status and substatus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308 Component status computation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Service model component types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 Component relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 Service consumers and providers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 Relationship states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319 Status propagation in relationships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 How relationship control occurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 How dynamic status mapping occurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 Event associations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 Bringing events from the resource into the cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323 Component aliases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323 Event alias associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324 Service schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 Timeframes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 Service schedules example with exceptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327 Importing Business Time Segments from BMC Remedy AR System . . . . . . . . . 327 Chapter 15 Designing a service model 329

Service model design process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330 Defining business goals for the service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 Decomposing a business service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 Defining the service catalog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 Defining the service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334

10

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Defining a component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining a new component class for a component type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analyzing a component’s critical failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining a component’s relationship and dependencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining the organization of the modeled relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Identifying a component’s critical events and their sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service model design considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining cell topology for the service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component property updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component deletions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 16 Building a service model

335 335 336 337 338 338 340 341 342 342 343 345 345 345 350 351 352 352 355 356 356 357 365 366 366 370 371 372 373 379 379 380 384 387 388 389 390 390 391 391 391 392 393 395 395 400 400 402
11

Service model creation process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with service component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating service component instances in BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . Switching View modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing properties for a component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editing component instances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Performing actions on multiple objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Copying component instances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hiding a component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting a component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Finding component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining relationships between component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About relationship creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating a component relationship in BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . Assigning related component instances to cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Updating relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associating events with a component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with timeframes and service schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Icons used in the service schedule and timeframes editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with timeframes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with service schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assigning components to service schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Granting access to service model objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Granting permissions to individual service model objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing the service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing component relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing event associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Promoting the service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About the publishing process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Before you promote. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Submitting a promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Verifying promotion status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Organizing service component instances for monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with BMC Impact Service Model Editor Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saving, opening, renaming, and deleting Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Understanding visual cues in a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents

Repositioning objects in a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 Controlling what you see in a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 Exploring consumer and provider paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405 Refreshing the View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406 Repositioning the dockable windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Showing topology views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Exporting and importing service model data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408 Exporting class definitions from the BMC Atrium CMDB to a cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409 Chapter 17 Component and relationship status propagation 411

About component and relationship status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411 Dynamic prioritization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 Self priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 Impacts priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413 Determination of final priority. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 How component status propagation works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 About status computation models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 Status computation functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 Anatomy of a status computation model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417 The internal status NONE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417 Status computation algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 How status computation algorithms work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 Quorum algorithm examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419 Relationship status propagation concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 How status propagation works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 Status propagation models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 Default status propagation models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 What is a valid status propagation model? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423 Chapter 18 Managing BMC Impact Service Model Editor 425

Setting BMC Impact Service Model Editor options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 BMC Impact Service Model Editor log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 430 Configuring the topology view in BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . . . . . . . . 435 Using a firewall with BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436 BMC Atrium CMDB Class Manager authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436 Adding new classes to the BMC Atrium CMDB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436 Making your changes visible to applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437 Creating a new service model component class in the BMC Atrium CMDB . . . 438 Associating a custom icon with a service model component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 439 Documenting your extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442 smeserver properties file and parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443 Chapter 19 Managing the BMC Impact Publishing Server 445

Managing the BMC Impact Publishing Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446 Starting and stopping the BMC Impact Publishing Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446 How publishing works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 449 Automated publishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451

12

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Publish environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Production environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Test environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advanced staging and testing environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cell aliases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating additional publish environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling automated publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Initializing a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Initializing the BMC Atrium CMDB with SIM data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ServiceModelSet attribute values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . InitEffectively parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Source Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example scenario for working with baroc files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Atrium CMDB purges and hard deletions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshooting publication failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server service or daemon fails to start . . . . . . . . . . . . . No publication after successful promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server doesn't reply to any requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with publication logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagnosing publication failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Another publish request is ongoing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring BMC Impact Publishing Server with BMC Impact Manager events. . . Generating BMC Impact Publishing Server log information and events . . . . . . Enabling generation of BMC Impact Manager events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event slot descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server error events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trace files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the BMC Impact Publishing Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the Notify ARDBC plugin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

453 453 453 454 455 456 458 458 459 459 460 461 463 464 466 467 467 467 468 469 472 478 479 479 481 481 487 488 489 491

Part 4

Appendixes
Appendix A BMC SIM and EM CLI Reference

493
495 496 497 498 499 501 503 504 510 513 515 519 521 522 527
13

BMC Impact Manager CLI commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mccomp—Compiling rules in the Knowledge Base. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcell—Starting a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcfgtrace—Configuring tracing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mclassinfo—Requesting class information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcollinfo—Getting information about a specific collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcontrol—Performing cell control operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcrtcell—Creating a new cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcstat—Returning cell status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mdelcell—Deleting a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mgetinfo—Retrieving information about a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mgetrec—Obtaining a global record value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents

mkb—Updating the Knowledge Base. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 528 mkill—Stopping a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 531 mlogchk—Performing consistency checks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 533 mpkill—Stopping mposter and msend server processes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535 mposter and msend—Managing data, global records, and events . . . . . . . . . . . 536 mquery—Retrieving objects from a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542 mrecover—Recovering from a catastrophic data loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 547 mrextract—Extracting cell state files to create new state files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 549 mrmerge—Merging event objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550 msetmsg—Modifying an event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552 msetrec—Setting the value of a global record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 553 BMC Impact Manager CLI configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554 Configuring tracing for BMC Impact Manager CLI commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556 BMC Impact Manager CLI trace configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 557 Appendix B mcell.conf file parameters 559

Action result event parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560 Cell configuration parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560 Client communication parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562 Encryption parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 Event repository cleanup parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 Heartbeat parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567 Internal cell monitors parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570 KB parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570 Propagation parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Reporting client connection parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 572 StateBuilder parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573 Trace parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573 Appendix C BMC Microsoft Windows services and UNIX processes 575

BMC Microsoft Windows services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576 BMC UNIX processes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576 Appendix D Environment variables 579

Microsoft Windows environment variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580 Recreating environment variables on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580 UNIX environment variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 581 Recreating environment variables on UNIX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 581 Appendix E Default service model hierarchy 583

Service model data structures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 Service model data class overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 Service model data class files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 Service model component data classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585 BMC_BaseElement data class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585 BMC_Impact data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 591 BMC_STATUS_COMPUTATION data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594
14 BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SIM data class descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_SEVERITY_TO_STATUS data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_SIM_MATCH_TABLE data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_SIM_ALIAS data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_SLOT_FORMULAS data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_TIME_SCHEDULE data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_TIME_FRAME_TO_SCHEDULE data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_SELF_PRIORITY_MAPPING data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_SERVICE_SCHEDULE_CONFIG data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_STATUS_TO_SEVERITY data class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SIM_TIME_FRAME class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SIM_CellAlias class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SIM_CellInformation class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_PROMOTION_LOG class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service model event classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CORE_EVENT base class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Root event class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . History event class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Impact event class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix F BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI Reference

596 597 599 599 600 600 600 601 601 602 602 602 603 603 603 604 604 604 606 606 607 609 610 610 610 615 616 617 617 619 622 622 623 628 634 637 638 644 646 647 649 655 673

BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI installation and configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation of BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing the BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI on another computer . . . . . . Configuring trace for BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI command options and descriptions. . . . . . . . . Common options of the BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI error exit codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Command summary for BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pclassinfo—Comparing service model classes on cells with the BMC Atrium CMDB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . penv—Set up test environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pinit—Initialize a cell with the BMC Atrium CMDB impact service model . . . plog—Obtaining the XML log for a request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . plogdisplay—Converting the XML log for a request to text format . . . . . . . . . . pscontrol —Sends a command to BMC Impact Publishing Server . . . . . . . . . . . pserver—Starts up the BMC Impact Publishing Server service or daemon . . . . psstat—Status of BMC Impact Publishing Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . publish—Publishing a service model or viewing instances to be published . . . Index Glossary

Contents

15

16

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Figures
Attribute Precedence dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 ConnectionPortRange syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Format of an entry in the mcell.dir file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Example of the mcell.dir file and its entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Distributed event management using event propagation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Passive connection format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Data object specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 mcell.modify file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Masking syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Format of configuration line in mcell.trace file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 admin.bat and admin.sh syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 admin script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Command to list the version of BMC Impact Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 BMC Impact Portal version example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Adding a cell and limiting access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 default.econ.config file contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Operator.econ.config file contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Default policy file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Parameters used to print event in BAROC format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Example of printed events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Command to configure the export file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 gateway.export file format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 gateway.explore file output for new events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 gateway.explore file output for modified events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Listing of the contents of a keystore file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Service impact and event management process flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Dynamic Data Editor Navigation Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Dynamic Data Editor toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Slot Quick Filter dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Unfiltered data list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Type field list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Message bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 New data instance created with the New Copy option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Type field List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Export Data dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Export Data dialog box—Selecting the data format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Contents of mcdata.csv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Export file containing four data instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Event management policy definition workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Event selector group name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Figures 17

Flow of data required to implement a dynamic data enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . 176 Default PMEP event classes and slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Timeframes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Timeframe Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Example edited location.csv file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Sample rows in the TextTranslation.csv file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Variable syntax example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Selector Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Class Chooser dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Selection Definition section of the Add Event Criteria editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Example event selection criteria expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Completed event selection criteria in Selector Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Blackout Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 Closure Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Correlation Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Enrichment Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 Escalation Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Time Escalation Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Rate of Event Arrival Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Notification Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Propagation Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 Propagation cell list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Recurrence Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Suppression Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Threshold Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Hold Events options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Pass Events Through options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Timeout Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 List of event management policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 Import confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 Import confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Import Data Confirmation dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 Import confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Import confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 Import confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 Import tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 History tab showing executed dynamic data enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Invalid data error: dynamic enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Invalid timeframe error: dynamic blackout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Event tree hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270

18

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Image view widgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Custom image view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event Group editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event tree node addition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Image View editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service model objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Impact (status) propagation in relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parts of a simple alias formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of a service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing properties for more than one component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Find Component dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advanced Find dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Conditional Find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Create Relationship dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drawing relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating an alias association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining the events to be processed by the alias formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of match attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Timeframe Edit dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schedule Edit dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schedules Editor section of Edit Component Properties dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing access for an individual component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self priority determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Impacts priority determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Final priority determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Service Model Editor log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Default value for com.bmc.sms.sme.topoviews parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graph definition format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of a graph definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_BaseElement default icon image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using penv to create a publish environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example BAROC file defining components and impact relationships . . . . . . . . . . . Reviewing previous promotion and publication requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server connection events as displayed in BMC IX . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server publish request events as displayed in BMC IX . . BMC Impact Publishing Server classInfo request events as displayed in BMC IX . mccomp syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mccomp example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example output for mccomp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcell syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting a cell as a service on windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting the BMC Impact Manager service on Microsoft Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcfgtrace syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcfgtrace example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mclassinfo syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Raw output format for mclassinfo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Class tree for mclassinfo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of mclassinfo command for a list of classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

271 272 274 275 279 284 318 324 330 354 358 361 363 368 370 374 375 376 380 384 387 389 413 414 415 431 435 435 436 442 456 465 471 483 486 487 499 500 500 501 502 502 502 503 504 505 506 506 508

Figures

19

Example output of mclassinfo command for a list of classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508 Example of mclassinfo command for list of classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508 Example of mclassinfo command output for list of classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508 Example of mclassinfo command for adding slot names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 509 Example of mclassinfo command output for adding slot names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 509 Example of mclassinfo command for adding slot flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 509 Example of mclassinfo command output for adding slot flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 509 mcollinfo syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510 Raw output format for mcollinfo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511 mcollinfo example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512 mcollinfo command for verbose mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512 mcollinfo command for number of events for severity/status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512 mcontrol syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 513 Retrying Pending propagations with mcontrol command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514 Example of mcontrol command output for retrying pending propagations . . . . . . 514 Terminating a cell using the mcontrol command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 Example of mcontrol command output for terminating a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 Reconfiguring a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 Example of mcontrol command output for reconfiguring a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 mcrtcell syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517 Example of mcrtcell command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518 Example of output of mcrtcell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518 Example of mcrtcell command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518 Example output of mcrtcell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518 mcstat syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519 mcstat example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520 Message for cell not running . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520 Message for cell running . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520 mdelcell syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521 Deleting a cell using mdelcell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521 Output for mdelcell if cell is not running . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521 Output for mdelcell if cell is running . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522 mgetinfo syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522 Example of mgetinfo config . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 524 mgetinfo config command output on UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 524 mgetinfo config command output on Microsoft Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525 Example of mgetinfo param . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525 mgetinfo param command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525 Example of mgetinfo services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526 mgetinfo param command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526 Example of mgetinfo services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526 Output of mgetinfo connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526 mgetrec syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527 Example of mgetrec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527 Output of mgetrec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527 mkb syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 528 mkb command on UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530 mkb output on UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530 mkb command on Microsoft Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 531

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mkb command output on Microsoft Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mkill syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of mkill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Output of mkill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mlogchk syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of mlogchk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Output of mlogchk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mlogchk message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mpkill syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of mpkill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Output of mpkill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mposter syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . msend syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of mposter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mposter BAROC-style input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mposter BAROC-style output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mposter BAROC-style input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mposter BAROC-style output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Definition changes using mposter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling persistent buffering using mposter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Supplying a list of cells for mposter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Error message if buffers files are not writable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mquery syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of raw output specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Verbose mode options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . End of form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special BAROC format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of mquery—Select events with severity status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of mquery—Select events from collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting events using mquery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mrecover syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fixing a broken cell using mrecover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mrextract syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of mrextract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mrmerge syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of mrmerge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . msetmsg syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using msetmsg to close an event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . msetrec syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of msetrec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . command to send tracing output to text file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of Heartbeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_BaseElement definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MC_SM_COMPONENT definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MC_SM_DATA definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CORE_DATA definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC_Impact definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MC_SM_RELATIONSHIP definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MC_SM_DATA definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

531 532 532 532 533 534 534 534 535 536 536 537 537 538 538 539 539 539 539 540 540 541 542 543 543 544 544 546 546 546 548 548 549 549 550 551 552 552 553 554 557 569 586 587 587 588 592 592 592

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21

CORE_DATA definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593 BMC_STATUS_COMPUTATION definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595 BMC_SIM_DATA definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595 BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 596 BMC_SIM_DATA definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 597 BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598 BMC_SIM_DATA definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598 SEVERITY_TO_STATUS definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 599 BMC_SIM_MATCH_TABLE definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600 BMC_SIM_ALIAS definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600 BMC_SLOT_FORMULAS definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601 BMC_TIME_SCHEDULE definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601 BMC_TIME_FRAME_TO_SCHEDULE definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601 BMC_SELF_PRIORITY_MAPPING definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602 BMC_SERVICE_SCHEDULE_CONFIG definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602 BMC_STATUS_TO_SEVERITY definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603 SIM_TIME_FRAME definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603 Partial CORE_EVENT definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 605 MC_SMC_ROOT definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 606 SMC_STATE_CHANGE definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 606 MC_SMC_EVENT definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 607 Syntax of BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI common options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617 pclassinfo syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 624 Exporting service model class definitions to standard output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 625 Exporting BMC Atrium CMDB service model class definitions to a file . . . . . . . . . 625 Comparing the SIM class definitions on a cell with the BMC Atrium CMDB . . . . . 626 Output of pclassinfo command with no differences occurring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 626 Output of pclassinfo command, listing differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 626 Comparing the SIM class definitions on another cell with the BMC Atrium CMDB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 627 Comparing the SIM class definitions on all cells with the BMC Atrium CMDB . . . . . 627 penv syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 628
penv info examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 629

pinit syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 634 Initializing a cell having a short host name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 635 Initializing the cell “jana” with the BMC Atrium CMDB production service model data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636 Initializing all registered cells with the BMC Atrium CMDB impact service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636 plog syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637 Viewing the publishing log for a specific publishing in stdout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 638 Viewing the publishing log for a specific publishing as text in stdout . . . . . . . . . . . 638 plogdisplay syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 639 Converting a publishing request log file to text and routing it to stdout . . . . . . . . . 640 Viewing the publishing log for a specific publishing as text in stdout . . . . . . . . . . . 640 Output of a successful publishing request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 641 Output of a failed publishing request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 643 pscontrol syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 644 pscontrol stop example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 645

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pscontrol automated example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pscontrol automated -u example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pscontrol manual example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pserver syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . psstat syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server up with automated publish enabled . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server up with automated publish disabled . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . publish syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Publishing the service model without viewing it . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the service model instances to be published . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Publishing the service model and viewing what is published . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing hard-deleted service model instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing hard-deleted service model instances and publishing deletions . . . . . . . .

645 646 646 646 647 648 648 648 649 650 650 651 651 651

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BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Tables
BMC Impact Solutions configuration process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Cell configuration tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Substitution parameters for %X in path value parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Default mcell.propagate options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 IP Address parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Files for cell reconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 MC_CELL_METRIC slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Default values for client parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 MC_CELL_CLIENT slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 MC_CELL_MODIFIED_EVENT slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Trace configuration file parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 MC_CELL_PROCESS_ERROR slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 BMC Impact Manager exit codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY dialog box fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Event Table column default values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Status table column default values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Report parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 application.properties file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 application.properties file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 aggregator.properties file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 ixs.properties file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 admin options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 admin return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 default.console_policy.prop parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Property descriptions from ix.properties file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Event severity levels and colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Event priority levels and colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Event group configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 xml files that define user interface elements in BMC IX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 StateBuilder file name conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 statbld.conf Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 statbld return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Gateway configuration parameter predefined variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Gateway Configuration Parameter Text Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 gateway.export file parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Presentation names for BMC Impact Solution interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Presentation name key formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 BMC Impact Explorer Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Administration tab navigation pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Standard event management policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
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Out-of-the-box policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Out-of-the-box event selectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Timeframe types and descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Evaluation order of event policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Dynamic data enrichment source files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Enrichment configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Timeframe Edit dialog options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Standard event management policy types and procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Cause Event tab controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event policy types and procedures . . . . 238 Import tab uneditable fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Policy Type Creation process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 Event group configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269 Event tree objects and definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 Sample data for a subset of a service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 Description of relational operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 SIM-qualified subclasses of BMC_Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298 SIM-qualified subclasses of BMC_LogicalEntity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298 SIM-qualified subclasses of BMC_System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299 SIM-qualified subclasses of BMC_SystemComponent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 SIM-qualified subclass of BMC_SystemService . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 SIM-qualified attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 Data required when creating a service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 Service component status definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Service model component types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 Main relationship classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 Parts of an event alias association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 Global and Local timeframe differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 Example business service model spreadsheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333 BMC Impact Service Model Editor values for IT service Sales Logix . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 Severity level index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336 Occurrence level index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336 View mode switch icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350 Default component properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 Description of additional search criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362 Definition of relational operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 Description of conditional operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 Service schedule and timeframes editors icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Timeframe Edit field descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 Schedule Edit field descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385 Default user groups and rights for BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . . . . . . . 388 Icons in Objects-to-be-Published pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394 Topics covered in this section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 Visual cues in a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Adjusting the graphical view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 Understanding expansion handles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406 Status computation functions and computed component statuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 What a function returns when using an available algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419 How status propagation models work in relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423

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BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

smeserver.properties file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parameters for opening a publish environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ServiceModelSet attribute values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determination of ServiceModelSet value for an impact relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . InitEffectivelyMgmtData parameter settings and results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . InitEffectivelyServiceModel parameter settings and results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server failure messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server event generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IPS_CONNECT slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IPS_REQUEST slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IPS_PUBLISH slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IPS_CLASSINFO slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pserver.conf file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ar.cfg file parameter descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager CLI command descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Common options for CLI commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Common return codes for CLI commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mccomp options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcell options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcell return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcfgtrace option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcfgtrace parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mclassinfo options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Type of slot value for mclassinfo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reported facets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Class flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Information amount limitation options for mclassinfo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mclassinfo return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcollinfo options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Information amount limitation options for mcollinfo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcollinfo return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcontrol option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcontrol controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Files for UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcrtcell options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcrtcell return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcstat option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mdelcell options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mdelcell return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mgetinfo option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mgetinfo information options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Information from connect request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mgetinfo return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mgetrec option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mkb options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mkb new file options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mkill option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mlogchk return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mpkill option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

443 457 460 461 462 463 473 479 482 483 485 486 489 491 496 497 498 499 501 502 504 504 505 506 507 507 507 510 510 511 512 513 513 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 523 523 526 527 529 529 532 534 535

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27

mposter and msend options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537 mposter and msend return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542 mquery options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542 mquery query options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 545 mquery return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 547 mrecover option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548 mrecover return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548 mrextract options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 549 mrextract return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550 mrmerge options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 551 mrmerge return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 551 msetmsg options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552 msetmsg return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 553 msetrec options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 553 msetrec return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554 BMC Impact Manager CLI configuration parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554 Action result event parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560 Cell configuration parameter descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560 Client communication parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562 Date and time format parameters for Solaris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 563 Encryption parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 Event Repository cleanup parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 Heartbeat parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567 Heartbeat slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Internal cell monitors parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570 KB parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570 Propagation parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Reporting client connection parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 572 StateBuilder parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573 Cell tracing parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573 BMC Microsoft Windows services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576 BMC UNIX processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576 Microsoft Windows environment variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580 UNIX environment variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 581 Service management data class files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585 Slots that define component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 588 BMC_Impact slot definitions in alphabetical order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593 BMC_STATUS_COMPUTATION slots in alphabetical order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595 Status propagation slots in alphabetical order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 597 BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP slot definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598 BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI installation directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610 BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI configuration parameters (pclient.conf) . . . . . 612 BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI common command options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617 BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI error exit codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 619 BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI command descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 622 pclassinfo options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 624 pclassinfo return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 627 penv options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 628 penv.conf file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 629

28

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

pinit options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pinit return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . plog options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . plog return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . plogdisplay options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . plogdisplay return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pscontrol command options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pserver command options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . psstat command options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . publish command options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . publish command return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . publish.conf file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

634 636 637 638 639 644 645 647 647 649 651 652

Tables

29

30

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

About this book
This book describes how to configure the different components and products in the BMC Impact Solutions and is intended for system administrators who are responsible for maintaining the BMC Software event management and service impact management software in their enterprise. Like most BMC Software documentation, this book is available in printed and online formats. In the BMC Impact Solutions kit, it is located on the documentation CD. Visit the BMC Software Customer Support page at http://www.bmc.com/support_home to request additional printed books or to view online books and notices (such as release notes and technical bulletins). Some product shipments also include the online books on a documentation CD.

NOTE
Online books are formatted as Portable Document Format (PDF) or HTML files. To view, print, or copy PDF books, use the free Acrobat Reader from Adobe Systems. If your product installation does not install the reader, you can obtain the reader at http://www.adobe.com.

Related publications
The following related publications supplement this book:
Category release notes Document BMC Impact Solutions: Release Notes BMC Portal Release Notes Description contains system requirements, last-minute product information, and support information for the BMC® Impact Solutions products and components contains system requirements, last-minute product information, and support information for the BMC® Portal and its components

About this book

31

Related publications

Category installation and system configuration

Document BMC Impact Solutions: Read Me First BMC Impact Solutions: Planning and Installation

Description provides information to help you organize your installation provides an overview for installing the components of BMC Impact Solutions and instructions for installing the BMC® Impact Manager and BMC® Impact Explorer provides an overview of the BMC Portal and instructions for installing the product provides an overview of the BMC Portal and instructions for configuring the product

BMC Portal Installation Guide BMC Portal Getting Started

BMC Atrium CMDB 2.0.01 provides instructions for installing and configuring Installation and Configuration Guide the BMC® Atrium Configuration Management Database BMC Impact Solutions: Event Adapters Installation and Configuration administration BMC Impact Solutions: Administration provides instructions for installing and configuring BMC® Impact Event Adapters, BMC® Impact Event Log Adapter for Windows, and SNMP Adapter Configuration Manager provides instructions for performing the following administrative tasks:
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configuring and maintaining BMC Impact Manager cells configuring the BMC Impact Manager Publishing Server configuring the BMC Impact Explorer and BMC Impact Portal consoles defining event groups, image views, and event management policies in BMC Impact Explorer designing, developing, and maintaining service models in the BMC Impact Service Model Editor

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event management implementation

BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development

provides instructions for creating Knowledge Bases, provides reference information about the Basic Record of Objects in C (BAROC) language for defining events, and provides reference information about the Master Rule Language (MRL) for writing event management rules provides instructions for IT to view and respond to events that impact business services and for service managers to define and manage service models provides instructions for monitoring and managing both the BMC Impact Portal and the BMC Impact Explorer consoles

event monitoring and management service impact monitoring and management

BMC Impact Solutions: Event Monitoring BMC Impact Solutions: Service Monitoring

32

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Related publications

Category reporting

Document BMC Impact Reporting Release Notes BMC Reporting Foundation Release Notes

Description contains system requirements, last-minute product information, and support information for BMC Impact Reporting contains system requirements, last-minute product information, and support information for the BMC® Reporting Foundation

BMC Impact Reporting Installation, provides instructions for installing and configuring Configuration, and User Guide BMC Impact Reporting BMC Reporting Foundation Installation Guide Supervisor’s Guide integrations provides instructions for installing and configuring the BMC Reporting Foundation provides instructions for using Business Objects’ Supervisor product to manage users

Integration for BMC Remedy Service provides instructions for installing and configuring Desk User Guide the Integration for BMC® Remedy® Service Desk, which automatically creates trouble tickets for events and updates the event or trouble ticket when either is modified BMC Impact Integration Web Services Server Installation and Configuration Guide BMC Impact Database Gateway Release Notes BMC Impact Database Gateway User Guide BMC Impact Integration for Tivoli Release Notes BMC Impact Integration for Tivoli User Guide provides instructions for installing, configuring, and maintaining BMC® Impact Integration Web Services Server contains system requirements, last-minute product information, and support information for the BMC® Impact Database Gateway contains information about exporting data from BMC Impact Manager into a database contains system requirements, last-minute product information, and support information for the BMC® Impact Integration for Tivoli provides instructions for installing and configuring the BMC® Impact Integration for Tivoli, which enables the synchronized, bidirectional interchange of EIF events from any Tivoli TEC event source to BMC Impact Manager provides instructions for installing and configuring BMC® Impact Integration for PATROL® (BMC II for PATROL) provides instructions for using BMC II for PATROL to transfer event information generated by PATROL Agents to BMC Impact Manager and discovers PATROL Agents

BMC Impact Integration for PATROL Installation and Configuration Guide BMC Impact Integration for PATROL User Guide

BMC Impact Integration for provides instructions for installing and configuring PATROL Enterprise Manager the BMC® Impact Integration for PATROL® Installation and Configuration Guide Enterprise Manager, which enables the synchronized, bidirectional interchange of PATROL Enterprise Manager alerts to BMC Impact Manager events

About this book

33

Conventions

Conventions
The following conventions are used in this book:
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This book includes special elements called notes, warnings, examples, and tips:

NOTE
Notes provide additional information about the current subject.

WARNING
Warnings alert you to situations that can cause problems, such as loss of data, if you do not follow instructions carefully.

EXAMPLE
An example clarifies a concept discussed in text.

TIP
Tips contain information that might improve product performance or that might make procedures easier to follow.

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In instructions, boldface type highlights information that you enter. File names, directories, Web addresses, e-mail addresses, and names of GUI elements also appear in boldface type. The symbol => connects items in a menu sequence. For example, Actions => Create Test instructs you to choose the Create Test command from the Actions menu.

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34

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Syntax statements

Syntax statements
The following example shows a sample syntax statement:
COMMAND KEYWORD1 [KEYWORD2 | KEYWORD3] KEYWORD4={YES | NO} fileName...

The following table explains conventions for syntax statements and provides examples:
Item Items in italic type represent variables that you must replace with a name or value. If a variable is represented by two or more words, initial capitals distinguish the second and subsequent words. Brackets indicate a group of optional items. Do not type the brackets when you enter the option. A comma means that you can choose one or more of the listed options. You must use a comma to separate the options if you choose more than one option. Braces indicate that at least one of the enclosed items is required. Do not type the braces when you enter the item. Example alias databaseDirectory serverHostName [tableName, columnName, field] [-full, -incremental, -level] (Unix)

{DBDName | tableName} UNLOAD device={disk | tape, fileName | deviceName} {-a | -c} (Unix)

A vertical bar means that you can choose only one of the listed items. In the example, you would choose either commit or cancel. An ellipsis indicates that you can repeat the previous item or items as many times as necessary.

{commit | cancel} {-commit | -cancel} (Unix) columnName . . .

About this book

35

Syntax statements

36

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Part

1

General configuration and administration
Part 1

This part presents the following topics: Chapter 1 General Configuration Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Chapter 2 Managing BMC Impact Manager cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Chapter 3 Managing the BMC Impact Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Chapter 4 Managing the BMC Impact Explorer (BMC IX) console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Chapter 5 Configuring StateBuilder and gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Chapter 6 Defining presentation names. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131

Part 1

General configuration and administration

37

38

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Chapter

1

1

General Configuration Information
This chapter contains general information about configuring the BMC Impact Solutions environment and contains the following topics: General configuration overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Enabling integration between BMC Impact Solutions applications and other BMC applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

General configuration overview
To configure the BMC Impact Solutions environment, you configure the following components after installation:
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BMC Impact Manager cell BMC Impact Explorer (BMC IX) BMC Impact Portal

Table 1 outlines the tasks that must be done to configure these components. Table 1
1 2 3

BMC Impact Solutions configuration process (part 1 of 2)
Component BMC Impact Portal BMC Impact Manager For more information, see BMC Portal Getting Started Chapter 2, “Managing BMC Impact Manager cells” BMC Portal Getting Started

Task Description Configure the BMC Impact Portal. Configure BMC Impact Manager cells.

Define user groups for access to the console BMC Portal functions and objects.

Chapter 1

General Configuration Information

39

General configuration overview

Table 1
4

BMC Impact Solutions configuration process (part 2 of 2)
Component
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Task Description Distribute the BMC Impact Portal URL address so users can get an account and install consoles. BMC Impact Explorer can be deployed as a Java Web Start application from BMC Impact Portal or installed standalone. 5 6 (optional) Customize BMC Impact Portal.

For more information, see BMC Portal Getting Started BMC Impact Solutions: Planning and Installation

BMC Impact Portal BMC Impact Explorer BMC Impact Service Model Editor

BMC Impact Portal

Chapter 3, “Managing the BMC Impact Portal” Chapter 4, “Managing the BMC Impact Explorer (BMC IX) console” Chapter 5, “Configuring StateBuilder and gateways” Chapter 4, “Managing the BMC Impact Explorer (BMC IX) console”

(optional) Customize BMC Impact Explorer. BMC Impact Explorer

7 8

(optional) Configure the StateBuilder, which BMC Impact Manager manages the persistent storage of events. (optional) Customize the labels used in the console interfaces.
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BMC Impact Portal BMC Impact Manager BMC Impact Service Model Editor

After you configure BMC Impact Manager, BMC Impact Portal, and BMC Impact Explorer, you are ready to implement event management and service impact management. For information, consult the following resources:

Event management
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For information about setting up adapters to collect events, see BMC Impact Solutions: Event Adapters Installation and Configuration. For information about setting up dynamic data, event management policies, event groups, and image views, see Part 2, “Event management administration”. For information about defining event data, writing event management rules, defining collectors, or creating actions, see BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

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Service impact management
For information about defining service models, see Part 3, “Service model administration”. Enabling integration between BMC Impact Solutions applications and other BMC applications

40

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Enabling integration between BMC Impact Solutions applications and other BMC applications

Enabling integration between BMC Impact Solutions applications and other BMC applications
If you want to merge and reconcile data between BMC Impact Solutions applications and BMC Asset Management, BMC Topology Discovery and/or BMC Configuration Discovery, you must add the ComponentAliases attribute to the existing precedence groups for these products. To add a the ComponentAliases attribute, follow the procedure for creating a precedence group in the BMC Atrium CMDB Installation and Configuration Guide in the precedent group for each product that you want to use with BMC Impact Solutions applications. The precedence groups for the BMC Asset Management, BMC Topology Discovery and BMC Configuration Discovery products are:
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BMC Asset Management – Sandbox Precedence BMC Topology Import - Precedence Group Configuration Discovery Precedence

The Attribute Precedence dialog box should be filled out for each precedence group as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1

Attribute Precedence dialog box

Chapter 1

General Configuration Information

41

Enabling integration between BMC Impact Solutions applications and other BMC applications

42

BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Chapter

2
44 44 46 47 48 48 48 49 51 54 52 55 58 61 62 63 67 69 70 72 72 74 74 75 76 76 77 77 78 79 80 83
43

Managing BMC Impact Manager cells
2

This chapter describes how to manage and configure BMC Impact Manager cells. BMC Impact Manager overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager Knowledge Base (KB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager event repository and State Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager command line interface (CLI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting or stopping the cell - mcell and mkill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stopping or starting a cell on UNIX computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting or stopping a cell on Windows computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cell configuration tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating cell-specific configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring mcell.conf parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring cells to communicate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring event slot propagation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring passive connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring slots for time stamping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reloading cell configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring event performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring client to cell interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring cell tracing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the trace configuration file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring cell tracing parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event processing errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interpreting cell execution failure codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the BMC IX Administration view to manage cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecting or disconnecting a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing cell information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Controlling cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reloading cell configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Propagating events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registering for SIM notification events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collecting metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 2 Managing BMC Impact Manager cells

BMC Impact Manager overview

BMC Impact Manager overview
BMC Impact Manager provides the core functionality for event management and service impact management. Its functional elements are the
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event processor and service model manager (also known as a cell) Knowledge Base (KB) and compiler event repository and State Builder Command Line Interface (CLI)

BMC Impact Manager cells
A cell is the event-processing engine that collects, processes, and stores events within a single BMC Impact Manager installation instance. If service impact management (SIM) is implemented, the cell associates the events with the service model components and calculates a component’s status. An individual cell can provide local event management or function as part of a larger distributed network of cells using event propagation. Networks of cells can be organized to serve any business hierarchy (such as geographical, functional, or organizational) or configured to meet technical issues (such as network or system limitations).

Event management cell functions
A basic event management (EM) cell performs the following functions:
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receives source event data from an adapter, integration, another cell, API, or the BMC Impact Manager CLI analyzes and processes events according to the event management rules and policies defined in its Knowledge Base responds to events by executing actions, as defined in scripts or programs in its Knowledge Base propagates selected events to specified destinations (typically, other cells) and maintains the currency of propagated events when those events are updated or changed at the event source or event destination records the event operations performed on an event

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BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

BMC Impact Manager cells

Service impact management cell functions
A service impact management (SIM) cell performs the following functions in addition to the event management functions:
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relates an event to the appropriate service model component computes the status of service model components and propagates their status to the related components using the designated status computation models

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Production cells and test cells
A production cell is an EM or SIM cell that service operators and service managers use to monitor the events and services associated with your IT resources in real time. A test EM or SIM cell provides senior service managers and service administrators with a test environment in the following ways:
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SIM cell Enables publishing of service models from a development sandbox to a test environment before promoting them to a production environment. Each BMC Impact Service Model Editor user has one dedicated test environment, which consists of a pair of test CMDB data sets and an alias to a test cell. Promoted service model components include those in a user’s sandbox and in production. For details about test environments and promotion, see Part 3, “Service model administration”.

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EM cell For event management, a test cell provides KB developers with a test environment for defining event classes, event management rules, policies, actions, and collectors and testing their behavior with test event data.

BMC Impact Portal does not collect events from test cells for reporting.

Production and test cell naming and creation
The only way to distinguish a test cell from a production cell is by the cell name. Adopt a naming convention for test and production cells that clearly identifies its purpose.

Chapter 2 Managing BMC Impact Manager cells

45

BMC Impact Manager Knowledge Base (KB)

You name a cell when it is created. One cell is created with each BMC Impact Manager instance that you install. You use the mcrtcell command to create additional production or test cells. The mcrtcell command can only be run on the local computer where the cell is being created. For more information about syntax and options available with mcrtcell, see “mcrtcell—Creating a new cell” on page 515.

Production and test cell configuration
You register test and production cells in BMC Impact Portal. For instructions, see “Registering production and test cells in the BMC Impact Portal” on page 88. In BMC Impact Service Model Editor, each user associates a test cell to a test environment. For further information, see Part 3, “Service model administration”. In BMC Impact Explorer, assign the production and test cells to a group. The default groups are MyTest and MyProduction. For further information, see “Connecting BMC IX to a BMC Impact Portal” on page 108.

Viewing test cell data
You view test data in BMC Impact Explorer.
s

To view test event data, collectors, and actions, select a test cell in the Events view. To view and create test event management policies, select a test cell in the Administration view. To view test service model components, use the Find tool in the Services view and select a test cell.

s

s

NOTE
The navigation tree in the Services view, which is published from BMC Impact Service Model Editor, can contain production service model components only.

BMC Impact Manager Knowledge Base (KB)
A Knowledge Base is a collection of information that enables a cell to perform event management and service impact management. An event management KB includes the following:
s

Event class definitions define the types of events to accept and classify source event data for processing

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BMC Impact Manager event repository and State Builder

s

Data class definitions define the classes and slots of dynamic data instances and service model component instances Dynamic data function as contextual variables that can provide data values to rules and policies during event processing global records are persistent structured global variables that maintain data values across all phases of event processing event management rules are event processing statements that use the BAROC data associated with an event, data instances or records to determine if, when, and how to respond to new events or event modifications event collectors are filters that query the event repository and display the results in a BMC Impact Manager event list in an organized manner actions are executable programs or scripts that perform an automated task on a particular event

s

s

s

s

s

In addition, a service impact management (SIM) KB also includes
s

s

a reference copy of a cell’s service model published by a BMC Impact Publishing Server a reference copy of the BMC Atrium CMDB Common Data Model (CDM) class definitions, which are used in a cell’s service model

The KB files are loaded by a cell at start time. Although many KBs can exist within a distributed BMC Impact Manager environment, each cell can be associated with only one KB at a time. For complete information about the BMC Impact Manager Knowledge Base, see the BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

BMC Impact Manager event repository and State Builder
After a cell receives and processes an event, it stores the event in the event repository as an instance of a particular event class. All events are held in memory and can be viewed in BMC Impact Explorer. The event repository provides persistent storage on disk for events and data instances, including service model components and relationships. The State Builder manages the persistent storage of events.

Chapter 2 Managing BMC Impact Manager cells

47

BMC Impact Manager command line interface (CLI)

BMC Impact Manager command line interface (CLI)
The BMC Impact Manager Command Line Interface (CLI) enables users to execute BMC Impact Manager functions immediately from the OS command line or execute product functions from a script. For more information, see Appendix A, “BMC SIM and EM CLI Reference.”

Starting or stopping the cell - mcell and mkill
The installation process automatically starts a cell’s service. However, as changes are made to a cell’s configuration files or KB, you must stop and start the cell to accept the changes.

Stopping or starting a cell on UNIX computers
By default, a cell runs as a UNIX daemon. You override this behavior with a command line option, not a configuration file parameter.

Before you begin
A cell can be installed as owned by any user. Only users with execute permission on the mcell binary can start the cell. All users with execute permission on the mkill or mcontrol CLIs can stop the cell. However, if a user without root permissions attempts to start the process, the following issues must be considered.
s

External actions run as the user ID that started the process. Those actions are defined in %MCELL_HOME%\etc\CellName\kb\bin on Windows platforms and in $MCELL_HOME/etc/CellName/kb/bin on UNIX platforms. Actions are defined in .mrl files located in the kb/bin directory and listed in .load in that directory. The action programs or scripts can be located in the kb/bin/A or kb/bin/Arch directory. They can also be located anywhere else on the system.

s

The user who starts the cell must be able to write to log and trace files in the directories specified through configuration parameters SystemLogDirName and SystemTmpDirName. Default values for these are the log and tmp subdirectories of MCELL_HOME.

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Starting or stopping a cell on Windows computers

To stop a cell on UNIX computers
To stop a cell, use the mkill command located in the MCELL_HOME/bin directory with the name of the cell you want to stop. If no cell name is provided, mkill attempts to stop a local cell whose name is the same as the local host name. For more information about the mkill command, see “mkill—Stopping a cell” on page 531.

To start a cell on UNIX computers
To start a cell, use the following command:
mcell -n cellName

It is possible to start a cell without specifying a cell name. If you start a cell without any options, the command attempts to start a cell with the same name as the host. You must set the MCELL_HOME environment variable to point to the directory in which the cell is installed. The home directory also can be indicated using the option -l followed by the path to the home, instead of defining it in the environment. To learn more about using the mcell command, see “mcell—Starting a cell” on page 501.

NOTE
You can change all configurable cell parameters by making changes in the configuration file, mcell.conf. When you start the cell, the cell looks for the configuration file in the default location, MCELL_HOME\etc\cellName\mcell.conf. Use the -c option with the mcell command to have the cell look for the configuration file in a specified location.

Starting or stopping a cell on Windows computers
On Windows computers, you can stop a cell by using one of the following options:
s s s

Windows Services the net stop command the mkill command

On Windows computers, you can start a cell by using one of the following options:
s s

Windows Services the net start command from a command prompt window

Chapter 2 Managing BMC Impact Manager cells

49

Starting or stopping a cell on Windows computers

To stop a cell on Windows platforms by using services 1 Open the Services window by choosing Start => Settings => Control
Panel => Administrative Tools => Services.

2 Select mcell_cellName. 3 Click Stop Service. To stop a cell on Windows platforms by using the net stop command 1 Select Start => Programs => Command Prompt. 2 Enter net stop mcell_cellName. To stop a cell on Windows platforms by using the mkill command 1 Select Start => Programs => Command Prompt. 2 Enter mkill -n cellName. NOTE
If you do not use the -n option when stopping a cell, the default cell, named hostName, is stopped.

To start a cell on Windows platforms by using services 1 Open the Services window by choosing Start => Settings => Control Panel =>
Administrative Tools => Services.

2 Select mcell_cellName. 3 Click Start Services. To start a cell on Windows platforms by using the net start command 1 Select Start => Programs => Command Prompt. 2 Enter the following command:
net start mcell_cellName.

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BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Cell configuration tasks

NOTE
When started from the command prompt without the -d option, mcell contacts the Service Control Manager to start itself as a service. It uses mcell_%N as a service name, where %N is the cell name as specified with the -n option. Without the -n option, the hostname is used as the cell name.

Cell configuration tasks
The more you customize your cell to fit your needs, the more efficiently the cell works for you. All configuration tasks are optional. Table 2 describes the cell configuration tasks. Table 2
Task 1

Cell configuration tasks
For more information, see “mcrtcell—Creating a new cell” on page 515

Description (optional) Create additional cells. When you install BMC Impact Manager on a system, one cell is installed. You can create additional cells by running the mcrtcell command.

2 3

(optional) If you created multiple cells for an environment, you can create separate configuration files for each cell.

“Creating cell-specific configuration files” on page 54

(optional) If you created multiple cells for an environment, “Configuring cells to configure the cells so that they can communicate with other cells communicate” on page 55 in the network. (optional) Events can be processed locally or selectively propagated to other cells. To configure the event slots that must be propagated when they are changed, and in which direction (forward/backward), configure the propagation configuration file. (optional) If inbound connections to the cell are disallowed in a protected environment, the connection has to be established within the protected zone to allow a connection between an external client and a cell in the protected zone. “Configuring event slot propagation” on page 58

4

5

“Configuring passive connections” on page 61

6

(optional) To add a time stamp to a slot so that the date and time “Configuring slots for time is recorded when the slot is changed, configure the mcell.modify stamping” on page 62 file. (optional) If desired, you can encrypt communication among the “Configuring encryption” on various BMC Impact Solutions components. page 63 (optional) Set the default client parameters executing CLI commands. “BMC Impact Manager CLI configuration” on page 554

7 8

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51

Configuring mcell.conf parameters

Configuring mcell.conf parameters
The cell is installed with a configuration file, mcell.conf, that allows it to run without any additional configuration. By using a text editor, you can change the configuration parameters in the mcell.conf file to customize the cell for your particular IT infrastructure and environment. You can override some parameters using command line arguments when you start the cell. For more information, see “mcell—Starting a cell” on page 501.

To configure the mcell.conf file using a text editor 1 Open the mcell.conf file in a text editor.
The default location is MCELL_HOME\etc.

2 Create line entries using the format Parameter=Value based on the syntax rules
described in “Rules for cell configuration parameter syntax”.

3 Save the changes. 4 Either reload the cell configuration or restart the cell for the changes to go into
effect. For more information, see “Reloading cell configuration” on page 67.

Rules for cell configuration parameter syntax
The following rules apply:
s

One parameter per line, in the form: Parameter=Value where the Value extends to the end of the line Typically, the value for a parameter is a Boolean value, a string, or a path. The supported Boolean values are Yes/No and On/Off. The Boolean values are not case sensitive, so, for example, On, ON, on, and even oN are equally valid. Do not enclose the value in quotation marks unless you want the quotation marks to be part of the value. Times are stated in seconds unless otherwise specified. By default, all parameter settings are disabled, that is, commented out with a # sign at the beginning of the line of code. Enable a parameter setting by removing the # sign that precedes it.

s

s

s

s

s

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Configuring mcell.conf parameters

For more information on cell configuration parameters, see Appendix B, “mcell.conf file parameters.”

Specification of path values
Parameters that have path values contain the string fileName or dirName, for example TraceConfigFileName or SystemLogDirName. Path values can be stated as:
s

absolute path—starts with slash (/) or backslash (\), or on Windows, with a drive designator (for example, D:) runtime relative path—starts with ./ or ../. The path is relative from the cell’s working directory. The working directory is the root directory (/) when it runs as a daemon or a service. When running in foreground, it is the directory where mcell is started. configuration relative path—all other path values are relative from the cell’s configuration directory, or, for program paths, from the kb\bin directory.

s

s

Path values can contain the substitution parameters $VAR or %X. Any $VAR parameter is substituted by the value of the environment variable VAR. Table 3 lists the possible %X substitution parameters. Table 3
Parameter %H %C %B %L %T %P %N

Substitution parameters for %X in path value parameters
Description cell home directory cell configuration directory Knowledge Base binary directory, kb\bin log file directory temporary file directory program name cell name

Modifying SystemLogDirName, SystemTmpDirName, and KBDirName
With the cell configuration parameters SystemLogDirName and SystemTmpDirName, users can specify alternative path locations for the system defined log and tmp directories. Their default values are %H/log and %H/tmp. To enable file name specifications that refer to these alternative locations, use the substitution parameters %L for the log and %T for the tmp directory. They are substituted by the specified path to the log and tmp directory, respectively.
Chapter 2 Managing BMC Impact Manager cells 53

Creating cell-specific configuration files

If you change the default value for the SystemLogDirName parameter or the KBDirName parameter in the mcell.conf file, you must also change the value in the statbld.conf file. If you fail to do this, the cell loses persistency and the mcdb file is not created, because the StateBuilder is configured from statbld.conf file and has no input from the mcell.conf file. As a result, StateBuilder does not know where to find the log files or the KB directory it requires.

ConnectionPortRange syntax
Figure 2 shows the syntax of ConnectionPortRange. Figure 2 ConnectionPortRange syntax

PortRange = PortSequence{, PortSequence} PortSequence = Port[-Port]

A range is a number of sequences, each of which is a consecutive range of ports. The cell attempts to access all ports in the specified order. The default is to use any of the ephemeral ports. For example,
s s

1828—1840 specifies a range of ports 1828 through 1840 1828, 1829, 1840 specifies the sequence of ports 1828, 1829, and 1840

Creating cell-specific configuration files
By default, one set of configuration files is installed during installation of the BMC Impact Manager. These files are located in the MCELL_HOME\etc directory and multiple cells on a host can use them. You can also create unique configuration files for individual instances (cells) as needed.

To create cell-specific configuration files 1 Copy the configuration file that you want to be unique to the
MCELL_HOME\etc\cellName directory. cellName represents the name of the cell.

2 Using a text editor, edit the configuration file and customize it for that cell and
save it. You can copy and edit any configuration file located in the MCELL_HOME\etc directory.

3 Either reload the cell configuration or stop and start the cell so that the changes
take affect.
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Configuring cells to communicate

When a cell starts, it searches for configuration files in the MCELL_HOME\etc\cellName directory. If no configuration file is found, the cell uses the configuration file in the MCELL_HOME\etc directory. For example, if you copy the mcell.conf file into the MCELL_HOME\etc\cellName directory and modify it, the cell reads that mcell.conf file and all other files in the MCELL_HOME\etc directory.

Configuring cells to communicate
Each cell can function as either a complete event management system or as part of a larger distributed network of cells. After you install a cell, it can run with no additional configuration; however, it cannot communicate with other cells, the BMC Impact Portal, or gateways in a distributed BMC Impact Solutions network. To enable communication between cells and some clients, you must modify the mcell.dir file, which is also known as the cell directory file.

About mcell.dir, the cell directory file
The mcell.dir file is created during product installation. It acts as the cell directory file, contains the list of cells, the BMC Impact Portal, and gateways known on a specific computer. Upon startup, the cell reads the mcell.dir file and associates itself with the appropriate name, encryption key (if encryption is enabled), address information, and port number. In addition, it reads this information for the other cells to which it connects and for the BMC Impact Portal. The mcell.dir file for a cell has an entry for each cell and the BMC Impact Portal to which the cell connect. Figure 3 shows the format of an entry. Figure 3 Format of an entry in the mcell.dir file

# ## One line per component : # <Type> <Name> <EncryptionKey> <IpAddress:Port> # <Type> = cell | gateway.type # # cell ComponentName # gateway.portal bip.fullyqualifiedHostName

EncryptionKey EncryptionKey

Host:1828 Host:3783

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Configuring cells to communicate

Each parameter in the file is defined as follows:
Attribute Type Description type of component. It can be s cell— BMC Impact Manager cell name s gateway.type—Gateway of type type s gateway.jServer - predefined jServer gateway type s gateway.portal - BMC Impact Portal Name is an abstract name for the component. Component names are not case-sensitive and may be any alphanumeric string, including underscores (_). A Portal name is, by convention, the fully qualified host name of the Portal host, prefixed with bip. EncryptionKey String to be used as part of the key for the encryption of the communication between a cell and the component. Default value is 0 (zero). Host name or IP address and port number on which the component is listening. Default port number for a cell is 1828 and for a Portal is 3783.

Name

IPAddress:Port

Example of the mcell.dir file
Figure 4 shows an example of the mcell.dir file with typical component entries. Figure 4 Example of the mcell.dir file and its entries

# ## One line per component : # <Type> <Name> <EncryptionKey> <IpAddress:Port> # <Type> = cell | gateway.type # cell anwar-bos-71 cell local gateway.portal bip.anwar-bos-71.amc.com

mc mc mc

anwar-bos-71:1828 127.0.0.1:1828 anwar-bos-71:3783

Rules for mcell.dir file entries
The following rules apply when creating entries for the mcell.dir file:
s

Cells may be grouped into separate cell files readable only by certain users or groups (domains). A cell must know, at a minimum, the cells to which it propagates events. A cell does not need to know the cell from which it receives events, even for backward propagation. The mcell.dir file may define any number of entries, but each entry must be on a separate line.

s

s

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Configuring cells to communicate

s

You can place mcell.dir files on remote mountable partitions or distribute them using rdist, tftp, or any other distribution mechanism.

Ways to update an mcell.dir file
Update the mcell.dir file in one of the following ways.
s

If adding a new cell on the same computer as the existing cell, run the mcrtcell command. The command updates a master mcell.dir file found in the MCELL_HOME\etc by adding the information for the new cell to the mcell.dir file. For more information, see “mcrtcell—Creating a new cell” on page 515.

s

If you are adding a new cell that is not on the same computer, add the new cell information to the mcell.dir file using a text editor. See “To configure the mcell.dir file using a text editor” on page 57. Also, depending upon how your service model is set up, you may need to modify the mcell.dir file on the computer that contains the cell. For example, you have two computers, computer A and computer B. Cell A is on computer A and cell B is on computer B. For cells A and B to communicate, you would have to enter the information for cell A in the mcell.dir file on computer B and the information for cell B in the mcell.dir file on computer A.

s

If you are setting communications up with a BMC Impact Portal after its installation, you must define the portal connection in the mcell.dir file.

To configure the mcell.dir file using a text editor
You should maintain a master mcell.dir file that contains directory entries for all cells on a computer. The file must be readable by all cells. As an alternative, make copies of this file available to all cells. This enables a cell to contact any other cell based on its cell name.

WARNING
You must maintain each cell’s mcell.dir file to ensure event propagation between cells and the ability to connect to the BMC Impact Portal. Ensure that each directory entry is correct and that every cell has an up-to-date directory file. An error in the mcell.dir file prevents cells from connecting to each other or to the BMC Impact Portal.

1 Open the mcell.dir file in a text editor.
The default location is MCELL_HOME\etc.

Chapter 2 Managing BMC Impact Manager cells

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Configuring event slot propagation

2 Create line entries using the format shown in Figure 3 on page 55. 3 Save the changes. 4 To ensure that the changes take affect, do one of the following:
s

Stop and start the cell; for more information, see “Starting or stopping the cell mcell and mkill” on page 48. Run the mcontrol CLI command to reload only the mcell.dir file:
mcontrol -n cell_Name reload dir

s

For more information on the mcontrol command, see “mcontrol—Performing cell control operations” on page 513.

5 Register the cell with the BMC Impact Portal by doing one of the following:
s

Use the BMC Impact Portal Administrator page to register the cell. For more information, see the BMC Impact Portal online Help.

s

With the BMC Portal running, run the admin utility to register the specified cell.
admin.bat -ac name=cellname:key=key:host=hostname:port=port: usergroups=* (Windows) admin.sh ac name=cellname:key=key:host=hostname:port=port: usergroups=* (UNIX)

Configuring event slot propagation
Events can be processed locally or selectively propagated to other cells. To configure the event slots that must be propagated when they are changed, and in which direction (forward/backward), you configure the propagation configuration file mcell.propagate. The mcell.propagate file lists all of the slots whose modifications will be propagated. In addition, using the BMC Impact Solutions gateways, events can be propagated to a third-party program in a specific format that is described in a gateway configuration file, gateway.GWType. The default location for these files is MCELL_HOME\etc.

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Configuring event slot propagation

When an event has been propagated to a destination and that event is later modified, the modifications are then propagated to the same destination. The event can be propagated through a Propagate rule. If the destination is a gateway, gateway configuration rules also apply. For the mcell.propagate file to be effective, one or more Propagate rules must be running. For information about Propagate rules, see the BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development. The format is Slotname = Value, where:
Slotname = slot name or CLASS for class-specific slots Value = sequence of { b = backward f = forward }

You can specify a slot in the base CORE_EVENT class. However, if you want to specify a slot outside those in the base CORE_EVENT class you must use the CLASS specifier, which means that all class-specific slots are propagated in the direction given. Table 4 on page 59 lists the parameters in the mcell.propagate file and the defaults. Table 4
Parameter
CLASS mc_modhist

Default mcell.propagate options
Action Performed propagates changes to the class-specific slots up (forward) within the cell hierarchy propagates changes to the mc_modhist up (forward) within the cell hierarchy This is a system defined slot that requires such propagation. Default Values f f f

administrator propagates administrator value changes up (forward) within the cell hierarchy

mc_notes repeat_count severity status

propagates changes to notes attached to an event up (forward) within the cell hierarchy propagates changes to repeat_count up (forward) within the cell hierarchy propagates severity value changes up (forward) within the cell hierarchy

f f f

propagates status value changes in both directions, backward and forward, in the bf cell hierarchy

If you have multiple instances of BMC Impact Manager installed, you might want to use event propagation to distribute the event processing load among the cells or to back up events on another cell for failover. Figure 5 on page 60 illustrates a cell network that is collecting and processing numerous events in a distributed environment.

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Configuring event slot propagation

Figure 5

Distributed event management using event propagation
Some events are propagated for management by other cells in the cell network. cell

cell

cell

cell cell cell

cell

event sources

event sources

event sources

event sources

In this illustration, the lower-level cells process the source events and then propagate (or forward) the events on to higher-level cells according to a Propagate rule or an Event Propagation policy. As events pass through a series of cells, the cells discard unneeded events, identify and leave behind unimportant events, and resolve some of the problems reported by other events. To enable event propagation, perform the following tasks:
s s s s

enable cell-to-cell communication in mcell.dir configure propagation parameters in mcell.conf specify the slots whose modification has to propagate in mcell.propagate either write a Propagate rule or define an Event Propagation policy

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Configuring passive connections

Configuring passive connections
If inbound connections to the cell are disallowed in a protected environment, the connection has to be established within the protected zone to allow a connection between an external client and a cell in the protected zone. To connect to the cell, the client issues a passive connection; that is, it waits until the cell establishes the connection to the client.

NOTE
A passive connection is only possible with the “server” type clients, such as the cell and gateway clients.

Configuring the client for passive connections
On the client side, the mcell.dir file has to indicate that the destination cell is located in an isolated protected zone.

To configure the client for passive connections 1 Open the mcell.dir file in a text editor.
The default location is MCELL_HOME\etc.

2 For the destination cell, replace Host:Port with 0 as shown in Figure 6.
Figure 6
cell

Passive connection format
cellName EncryptionKey 0

3 Save the changes. 4 Either reload the cell configuration or stop and start the cell.
When a cell or gateway client needs to connect to an isolated destination cell, it cannot establish a connection because it does not have the IP address and port number of the cell. Instead, the cell or gateway client registers the destination and waits for a connection from it.

Configuring a cell for passive connections
On the cell side, an indication is needed that a client could be waiting on a connection.

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Configuring slots for time stamping

To configure a cell for passive connections
To configure a cell for passive connection, you must create a data object and specify how to control it, as shown in Figure 7. Figure 7 Data object specification

MC_CELL_PASSIVE_CLIENT ISA MC_CELL_HEARTBEAT ; END

The cell slot, as defined in the MC_CELL_HEARTBEAT superclass, gives the name of the passive client. The enable slot in the superclass specifies whether or not monitoring and reconnection is enabled. The cell attempts to connect to passive client targets as configured with the standard connection parameters. As soon as a connection is established, the connection is reversed. At that moment, the client takes up the connection and behaves as an ordinary client.

Monitoring passive targets
The cell may not be aware that a connection has been terminated when a connection from a passive client to a cell is terminated. The passive client cannot try to reestablish the connection, nor can it signal the cell to reestablish the connection. To avoid such situations, the cell monitors the passive client, based on the standard heartbeat monitor mechanism. Then, when a disconnect is detected, the cell attempts to connect to the passive client target.

Configuring slots for time stamping
Each event has an mc_modification_date slot that contains the time stamp of the last modification of the event. Only select slot modifications set this time stamp. To add a time stamp to a slot so that the date and time is recorded when the slot is changed, you must configure the mcell.modify file. The mcell.modify file contains the names of the slots that affect the mc_modification_date slot. When one of the slots listed in the mcell.modify file is modified, the mc_modification_date slot is set with the time stamp of this change.

To configure slots for time stamping 1 Open the mcell.modify file in a text editor.
The default location is MCELL_HOME\etc.

2 Create a line entry containing the name of the slot whose modification is to be time
stamped. Figure 8 shows an example of the mcell.modify file.

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Configuring encryption

Figure 8

mcell.modify file

# Configuration of slots affecting mc_modification_date when modified # Format : # SlotName # Special name : CLASS : specifies all class-specific slots status severity mc_priority repeat_count CLASS

When CLASS is used as a slot name, all class-specific slots or those slots not defined in the base class CORE_EVENT update the mc_modification_date slot with a time stamp.

3 Save the changes. 4 Either reload the cell configuration or stop and start the cell.

Configuring encryption
You can encrypt communication among the various BMC Impact Solutions components. To enable encryption, make the appropriate settings in the following locations:
s s s s

the cell’s configuration file mcell.conf the BMC Impact Explorer configuration files mclient.conf the BMC Impact Portal used by BMC Impact Explorer the cell directory file, which is MCELL_HOME\etc\mcell.dir by default

mcell.conf file settings that control encryption
The primary settings controlling encryption are in the cell configuration file mcell.conf. The following settings control encryption:
s s s

Encryption ForceEncryption EncryptionKey

If Encryption is set to Yes, encrypted communication to and from the cell is enabled, but not required. For example, if a BMC Impact Explorer does not have encryption enabled, then the communication with that particular BMC Impact Explorer console is not encrypted.

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Configuring encryption

ForceEncryption requires encryption for all communications. If the BMC Impact

Explorer attempts an unencrypted connection to the cell, the connection is rejected. The encryption process uses the EncryptionKey value as part of the encoding key. If there is no encryption, the EncryptionKey value has no effect.

mclient.conf file settings that control encryption
All CLIs can use an mclient.conf file to determine encryption functionality. The parameters are
s s

Encryption EncryptionKey

For more information about the CLI configuration parameters, see “BMC Impact Manager CLI configuration” on page 554.

mcell.dir file settings that control encryption
The mcell.dir file contains a field for an EncryptionKey. At installation, the default EncryptionKey value is set to mc. BMC Software recommends that you modify the value for security.

Encryption behavior between cells and components
This section describes the encryption behavior of cells and components during communication. The following actions occur when a BMC Impact Solutions component initiates communication with a cell: 1. The component scans the cell configuration file, mcell.dir, for that cell’s connection information. 2. BMC Impact Explorer retrieves the cell’s connection information from the BMC Portal. 3. The component opens a connection to the cell. If the cell has Encryption=yes, the component can use encrypted or non-encrypted communication. The component must use encrypted communication if the cell has ForceEncryption=yes and Encryption=yes. If the communication is encrypted, both the cell and the component must use the same EncryptionKey values to establish communication.

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Configuring encryption

Information Retrieval
A component must have the address and port of a cell to establish communications with it. To establish encrypted communications, the component must also have the encryption key of the cell. BMC Impact Explorer and the CLI commands determine the information in different ways:
s

BMC Impact Explorer acquires the information from the BMC Impact Portal (cell_info.list). BMC Impact CLI commands obtain the information by determining the server location using one of the following methods: — directly from the CLI command — from CLI configuration parameters in mclient.conf — from mcell.dir if you use the -n cellName option

s

Default values
The default value for cellName is the name of the host (hostName). The default value for the port is 1828. When the mcell.dir file is present, the default value is EncryptionKey=mc at installation. BMC Software recommends that you modify this value for security. If the mcell.dir file is absent on the host and you do not specify an encryption key, the CLI command uses 0 (zero) as the default value for EncryptionKey. This value enables encrypted communications.

NOTE
You can disable encryption by setting the configuration parameter to Encryption=No. You might want to use this setting to disable encryption while tracing.

Mandatory key specification conditions
You must specify the encryption key if the following conditions apply:
s s

you execute the CLI command on a host without an mcell.dir file the cell has an encryption key other than 0 (zero)

These conditions apply with the default installation. However, if the mcell.dir file is present on the host, and the file specifies the encryption key, you are only required to specify the cellName.

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65

Configuring encryption

Limiting cell access
A client is allowed to connect to the cell if its IP address matches the general AllowConnectionFrom as well as the client type-specific Allow*From. Figure 9 shows an example of masking syntax. Figure 9 Masking syntax

AddrMaskList = AddrMask {':' AddrMask} AddrMask = Addr ['/' Mask] Addr = Nr '.' [Nr '.' [Nr '.' [Nr]]] Mask = Addr | Nr Nr = 0..255

The following conventions apply:
s s s s

An abbreviated Addr or Mask is expanded with zeros. A numeric Mask (number without trailing dot) gives the number of 1 bit. An omitted Mask defaults to all bits set to 1. A connection is allowed if the source address ANDed with the Mask matches Addr ANDed with the Mask.

When the Mask is all zeros, any address matches regardless of the value of Addr. For all Mask bits whose value is one (1), the equivalent bits in Addr must match the equivalent bits in the source address. Table 5 lists the IP address parameters. Table 5
Parameter AllowConnectionFrom=0./0

IP Address parameters (part 1 of 2)
Description all systems allowed (same as 0.0.0.0/0)

AllowConnectionFrom=0./32

no system allowed (00.00.00.00 is not a valid IP address)

AllowConnectionFrom=198.12./255.255.

any system from the 198.12.xx.xx network can connect

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Reloading cell configuration

Table 5
Parameter

IP Address parameters (part 2 of 2)
Description allows any host with an IP address lower than 128.0.0.0, because it indicates there is only 1 bit in the mask Only the highest-order bit is considered and must be the same as 127, which is a 0 bit.

AllowConnectionFrom=127.0.0.1/1

AllowConnectionFrom=198.12.33./ 255.255.255.:198.12.92./255.255.255.

systems on the 198.12.33.xx and 198.12.92.xx networks may connect

The default is 0./0, indicating that the server should accept connections from any source. Usually this is useful only for testing or debugging, or for use with a system that is isolated from the network. To specify one single address, specify the address without a mask, or use a 32-bit mask. The following examples are equivalent ways of specifying a single address:
s s s

127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1/32 127.0.0.1/255.255.255.255

When you specify more than one address per mask pair, a system that matches at least one of the pairs can accept a connection.

Connection attempt using invalid encryption key
An attempt to connect to a cell using an invalid encryption key or from an disallowed address generates an internal event MC_CELL_UNALLOWED_CONNECT. This event contains a slot, reason, that includes the reason for the refused connection.

Reloading cell configuration
The cell does not automatically reconfigure itself, but you can customize and reload the configuration after you have made configuration changes.

To reload cell configuration
To trigger the reconfiguration, perform one of the following actions:
s

Send a hang-up signal on UNIX.

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Reloading cell configuration

s

Run the mcontrol command on UNIX or Windows. For information about the mcontrol command, see “mcontrol—Performing cell control operations” on page 513.

Table 6 lists the specific instances in which the reconfigure feature can be used and the effect that results from its use. Table 6
Type cell directory

Files for cell reconfiguration
Name/Directory mcell.dir
a

Result of reconfiguration This internal directory is replaced with new contents from the mcell.dir file. Associated data objects are replaced as well. Connected clients and destinations remain connected, even if the corresponding directory entries are modified. Tracing is adapted and has the same effect as through the mcfgtrace CLI. The cell restarts automatically.

cell tracing cell configuration

mcell.tracea mcell.conf mcell.propagate mcell.modify kb\collectors kb\classes \kb\rules \kb\lib \kb\bin

KB collector KB program

The cell restarts automatically. The cell restarts automatically.

KB data
a

kb\data \kb\records

The cell restarts automatically.

For mcell.dir and mcell.trace, a hang-up signal on a UNIX platform performs maximum reconfiguration without a cell restart. For information about restarting a cell, see “Interpreting cell execution failure codes” on page 75.”

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BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Monitoring event performance

Monitoring event performance
Event processing metrics are internal counts maintained on cell performance categories in connection with event processing. These metrics count the following items:
s s s s s s

number of events received, including erroneous ones number of events containing errors number of events dropped by rules (Filter, Regulate) number of events removed from the event repository during cleanup number of events propagated, including sendto number of events added to the event repository, that is, entering the permanent context

Calculation is performed on a 60-second basis, so every minute the counters are restarted. Counts from the last five minutes are retained. Running counters are reset only on demand. The resulting metrics are:
s s s

short term—total count of the last complete one-minute interval medium term—sum of the five last, completed one-minute intervals long term—running total

Metrics are stored in MC_CELL_METRIC data objects, one object instance for each metric. Each metric mentions the subject. For each of the short-, medium-, and longterm results, it contains the length of the interval, in seconds, and the total count. An average per second is also provided, rounded to an integer. Other averages per second, minute, or hour can be calculated by the application from this information, if needed. Metrics are stored in the Saved State, to ensure persistency. They can be reset explicitly when the cell is restarted, using the -i option with parameter m (-im), which resets the metric counters. A configuration parameter, CellMetricsEnabled, determines whether metrics are collected or not. The mcontrol CLI is used to switch metric collection on and off, and to reset the counters. Short- and medium-term metrics are reset whenever metrics are disabled. Metrics can be retrieved through rules by data object access, or through a command. The BMC Impact Explorer console and the mgetinfo CLI can use that command.

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Monitoring client to cell interactions

The received event counter does not include incoming messages that cannot be parsed as events. It does include events of nonexistent classes or events with erroneous slots. These are added to the erroneous event counter. Internally generated events are counted as received events. Dropped events include those that are dropped when an event with the same universal ID exists. Table 7 lists the metrics data objects MC_CELL_METRIC slots. Table 7
Slot description long_average long_interval long_total medium_average medium_interval medium_total short_average short_interval short_total subject

MC_CELL_METRIC slots
Description metric description long-term average, per second long-term interval lengths, in seconds long-term total count medium-term average, per second medium-term interval lengths, in seconds medium-term total count short-term average, per second short-term interval lengths, in seconds short-term total count metric subject name

Subject names available are:
ReceivedEvents ErrorEvents DroppedEvents StoredEvents RemovedEvents PropagatedEvents

CLI commands for collecting metrics are:
mcontrol metrics on|off|reset mgetinfo [-v] metrics

Monitoring client to cell interactions
Whenever a client connects, disconnects, or modifies an event, the cell generates an internal event to represent this operation. Such events are only generated for certain clients configured by means of the ReportConnectClients and ReportModifyClients settings.

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Monitoring client to cell interactions

The parameter value is interpreted from left to right. Settings that conflict with previous settings override the previous ones. Table 8 lists the defaults for these two parameters. Table 8
Parameter ReportConnectClients ReportModifyClients

Default values for client parameters
Value browser, Console, mcontrol, mkill, mposter, msetmsg, msetrec mposter, msetmsg, msetrec

Every parameter corresponds to a reporting clients set. Such a set has a positive and a negative list. Clients that belong to the positive list will have their operation reported while operations performed by clients on the negative list will not be reported. Clients that are not named in the parameter are considered to be on the default list. The default list initially is the negative list. The default list can be modified through a special setting of the parameter. A value for a reporting configuration parameter consists of a comma separated sequence of client names. Every client name can be prefixed with a minus sign (-) or a plus sign (+). The client name prefixed with the minus sign (-) is added to the negative list. When not prefixed, or prefixed with a plus sign (+), it is added to the positive list. The special value ALL in place of a client name refers to the default. Including ALL or +ALL modifies the default list so it becomes the positive list. With -ALL, the default list is the negative list. Both parameters could include -ALL, as this is the default setting for clients that are not explicitly mentioned. The superclass for client operation related events is MC_CELL_CLIENT. Table 9 lists the slots. Table 9
Slot client_location client_name client_type

MC_CELL_CLIENT slots
Data the location of the client as IPAddress:Port the client's name, as announced by the client, or noname type of client, such as adapter, CLI, console, cell

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71

Configuring cell tracing

There are three subclasses of this class:
s

MC_CELL_ALLOWED_CONNECT to represent successful client connection MC_CELL_UNALLOWED_CONNECT to represent a refused connection

s

An attempt to connect using an invalid encryption key generates an internal event, MC_CELL_UNALLOWED_CONNECT, that contains the slot reason, which details why the connection is refused.
s

MC_CELL_DISCONNECT to represent a disconnect.

Another class, MC_CELL_MODIFIED_EVENT, represents the operation of modification of an event. Table 10 lists the slots. Table 10
Slot event requestor

MC_CELL_MODIFIED_EVENT slots
Data universal event ID of the event being modified identification of the user that performed the modification

Configuring cell tracing
To set up cell tracing, configure
s s

the trace configuration file, mcell.trace tracing parameters in the mcell.conf configuration file

You can also configure cell tracing using the mcfgtrace command. For further information, see “mcfgtrace—Configuring tracing” on page 503.

Configuring the trace configuration file
The trace configuration file, mcell.trace, configures the tracing of the cell’s operation. Tracing messages are divided in several levels. Every module of the cell can be configured differently. An output destination can be determined per message level and per module. Messages also can be disabled at the same granularity. The default location is MCELL_HOME\etc. The configuration commands in mcell.trace are incremental. Every new command adds to the configuration, possibly overriding previous commands either completely or partly.
72 BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Configuring the trace configuration file

Figure 10 shows the format of a configuration line in the mcell.trace file.
.

Figure 10
<Module> SWITCH

Format of configuration line in mcell.trace file
<Level> <Switch> <Destination> <Destination>

Table 11 lists the parameters that must be defined in a configuration line. Table 11
Parameter Destination

Trace configuration file parameters
Description destination file name or predefined value for the selected trace messages or switch predefined values: no—disables these tracing messages console—sends to the console device stderr—sends to standard error stream

Levela

message severity value level predefined values:
s s s

FATAL ERROR WARNING

s s

INFORM VERBOSE

Module

a

name of module, each of which corresponds to a particular category of information, such as filtering or configuration; values are as follows:
s s s s s s s s s s s s s

ACTION COLLECT COLLMAP CONFIG CONTROL DATAPROC DBDATAID DBEVTID DBEVTTM EVTLOG EVTPROC EXPORT FILTER

s s s s s s s s s s s s

HEARTBEAT INTEVT MC2TEC MCBAROC MESSAGES METRIC PROPAGATE QUERY RECOVERY RECTRL REGEX REGULATE

s s s s s s s s s s s s

RESULT ROLES RULES SERVICE SRVMGT STATBLD SVCMGT SVRCOMM SVRDIR SYNCH SYSPROC TRACE

SWITCH Switch
a

keyword that enables access to a sublevel or category of messages for a module switch name

You can also specify ALL or * (wildcard) for these parameters.

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Configuring cell tracing parameters

Configuring cell tracing parameters
You can use the tracing parameters to configure the cell to output information. You configure cell parameters in the mcell.conf configuration file. Table 168 on page 573 lists the cell tracing parameters. If you specify for the trace output to go to stderr, the trace file is truncated every time the cell restarts, and a new trace file is written. The cell keeps the trace file open on both UNIX and Windows systems. On UNIX, any attempt to remove the file will succeed. However, all trace output goes to an invisible file that becomes visible when the cell is restarted. A trace destination file can be located anywhere but the BMC Impact Solutions process must have write access to that location.

WARNING
The MCELL_HOME\tmp\cellName directory is for temporary files only. A trace file placed in that directory will be deleted by the cell when it restarts. To maintain your trace file across cell sessions, place it in a different directory.

Event processing errors
When an error occurs during the processing of an event, the cell’s trace displays an error message. It also generates an internal event of class MC_CELL_PROCESS_ERROR, with the slots listed in Table 12. Table 12
Slot error_code error_goal error_message error_source event

MC_CELL_PROCESS_ERROR slots
Data the error number the part of the processing command that has the error an error description message the position in the rule source where the error occurred the mc_ueid of the event that was being processed

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Interpreting cell execution failure codes

Interpreting cell execution failure codes
When the cell runs as a daemon or a service, it has no standard output or error stream. Tracing that is configured to go to stderr will be redirected to a file in this case. The path for that file can be configured in mcell.conf. The default is MCELL_HOME\tmp\cellName\trace. If the cell service setup fails, an error file, mcell.err, is generated. Additional service setup failures can be appended to the original file, resulting in a file content of multiple lines. Normally, each line corresponds to one failed service setup. This error file contains exit codes specific to BMC Impact Manager. Table 13 lists the exit codes for BMC Impact Manager. Table 13
Code 1 2 3 4 5 16 17 19 27 29 37 39 47 49 57 59 67 69 77 79 97

BMC Impact Manager exit codes
Description invalid command line options used bad home directory specification through option -l no home directory could be determined specified home directory is invalid internal initialization failure tracing configuration failed system process handling module initialization failure logging facility initialization failure service control module initialization failure Knowledge Base load failed message handling module initialization failure internal object initialization failure event processing module initialization failure saved state reload failed query handling module initialization failure service activation failed internal object module initialization failure metrics initialization failed data processing module initialization failure metrics activation failed service setup failed

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Using the BMC IX Administration view to manage cells

Using the BMC IX Administration view to manage cells
You can also manage cells by using a pop-up menu in the navigation pane of the Administration view of BMC Impact Explorer to perform the following tasks:
s s s s s s s s

connect and disconnect a cell view cell information stop and start a cell pause a cell reload cell configuration propagate events register for state change events collect metrics

For more information on using BMC Impact Explorer, see Part 2, “Event management administration” and the BMC Impact Solutions: Event Monitoring user guide.

Connecting or disconnecting a cell
Use the Disconnect and Connect menu commands to connect or disconnect a cell from BMC Impact Explorer.

To connect or disconnect a cell 1 Right-click the cell icon or name. 2 Select Connect or Disconnect from the pop-up menu.
This menu item toggles between Connect and Disconnect, depending on the state of the cell when you right-click it. The result of your action in the Administration view is reflected in the Events and Services views.

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Viewing cell information

Viewing cell information
Use the View Manager Info menu command to view information about and the metrics associated with the cell selected.

To view cell information 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Choose View Manager Info.
The Impact Manager Info dialog box appears with cell property information presented on the Info tab.

3 To refresh the information in the Metrics tab of this dialog box, click Refresh in the
top right corner of the tab.

Controlling cells
Use the Cell Control menu command to pause and resume, restart, and stop cells.

To pause and resume a cell 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Choose Cell Control => Pause.
When a cell is paused, two black vertical bars appear on the cell icon.

3 To resume cell operation after a pause, right-click the cell and choose
Cell Control => Resume.

To restart a cell 1 Right-click a cell. 2 To stop a cell briefly and then restart the operation, select Cell Control => Restart. To stop a cell 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Select Cell Control => Stop.
Chapter 2 Managing BMC Impact Manager cells 77

Reloading cell configuration

3 In the Stop Confirmation dialog box, click Yes to stop the cell’s service.
If a cell has been stopped with this command, you must manually start the cell’s service for the cell to resume operations. For more information, see “Interpreting cell execution failure codes” on page 75.

To perform a StateBuild 1 Right-click a cell. 2 To force a cell to perform a StateBuild immediately, select Cell Control => Build
State.

The cell performs a StateBuild immediately, rather than waiting for the next scheduled StateBuild.

Reloading cell configuration
Use the Reload menu command to access the commands for reloading a cell’s configuration.

To reload all of the cell configuration 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Select Reload => All.
All configuration files and the KB are reloaded.

To reload the knowledge base 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Select Reload => Knowledge Base.
The KB is reloaded.

To reload the directory 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Select Reload => Directory.
The mcell.dir file is reloaded.
78 BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Propagating events

To reload cell configuration 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Select Reload => Configuration.
The configuration files mcell.conf, mcell.propagate, and mcell.modify are reloaded.

To reload trace configuration 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Select Reload => Trace.
The mcell.trace file is reloaded.

Propagating events
The Propagate menu commands are useful when a cell’s propagation target cells are unavailable. The events being propagated are stored in a propagation buffer, pending the target cells’ return to an available status. The Propagate command forces the selected cell to send immediately the contents of the propagation buffers to one or all its destination cells.

To force propagation to all target cells 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Select Propagate => Retry All to force propagation of the buffer contents to all target
cells.

To force propagation to a target cell 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Select Propagate => Retry 3 In the Propagate dialog box, specify the target cell to which you want to propagate
the buffer contents.

4 Click OK.

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Registering for SIM notification events

Registering for SIM notification events
BMC Impact Manager can generate events that notify you of changes to components in the SIM service model. These events are called SIM notification events. The four types of SIM notification events are
s s s s

SIM_COMPONENT_CHANGE SIM_COMPONENT_DELETE SIM_RELATIONSHIP_CHANGE SIM_RELATIONSHIP_DELETE

NOTE
In the mc_sm_notify.baroc file under mcell_home/etc/cellName/kb/classes, you can view the definitions of the SIM_NOTIFICATION_EVENT base class and the event classes SIM_COMPONENT_CHANGE, SIM_COMPONENT_DELETE, SIM_RELATIONSHIP_CHANGE, and SIM_RELATIONSHIP_DELETE.

The SIM_COMPONENT_DELETE and SIM_RELATIONSHIP_DELETE events are generated when you remove a configuration item or an impact relationship from the published service model. The SIM_COMPONENT_CHANGE and SIM_RELATIONSHIP_CHANGE events are generated when you change a configuration item or an impact relationship while modifying the published service model. BMC Impact Manager generates these notification events upon request by a client. For example, the BMC Impact Portal can register to receive notification events just as a gateway client can. Another BMC Impact Manager or even the BMC Impact Manager containing the SIM model can register to receive the notification events. To register for notification events, you create a SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY instance in the cell, telling it which notification events to look for and which clients to forward the events to. You perform this procedure through the BMC IX GUI or through the mposter CLI.

NOTE
Refer to the BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development Reference for mposter examples that show how to register for notification events.

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Registering for SIM notification events

To register for notification events in the BMC IX 1 In the Adminstration tab, expand the cell for which you want to create a
SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY data instance.

2 Expand the DATA folder. 3 Expand the MC_CELL_DATA folder. 4 Right-click SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY. 5 Select New. 6 Fill in the editable fields in the SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY dialog box.
Table 14 explains the dialog box fields. Table 14
Field mc_udid client_data

SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY dialog box fields (part 1 of 2)
Description populated automatically

allows you to define a rule set for the SIM notification events that your client has registered for. For example, the rule could look for the text john in the client_data to determine if it is a state change requested by john.
The content of this slot is copied to the client_data slot of the corresponding SIM notification event. Each SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY data instance must have a different value for this slot. This slot is available only in BMC Impact Manager versions 7.0.x and later.

clients

comma-separated list of clients where the notification must be sent. The clients in the list must be defined in mcell.dir.

By default, the cell name is listed as the client in mcell.dir, so you do not need to change mcell.dir if you are sending events internally.
requested_notifications comma-separated list of SIM notification events for which notification is requested
s s s s

SIM_COMPONENT_CHANGE SIM_COMPONENT_DELETE SIM_RELATIONSHIP_CHANGE SIM_RELATIONSHIP_DELETE

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Registering for SIM notification events

Table 14
Field

SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY dialog box fields (part 2 of 2)
Description specifies how slot values that have not changed are reported in the SIM notification event
s

notification_mode

s

DELTA — the slots whose values do not change are reported with their default values, not their current values. The default value is an empty string for symbolic values and -1 for numer ic values. See the .baroc class definition of the SIM notification event for the default slot values. FULL — the current values of all slots are reported, including those that have not changed

notifications_at_registration

s

instructs the cell [not] to send the current component states at the moment of registration" (with [not] omitted for value YES and inserted for value NO)
YES — instructs the cell to send the current component state at the moment of registration NO — instructs the cell not to send the current component state at the moment of registration

s

s

asset_filter

filter contains one class name. When you specify a class name, only state change notifications for configuration items of this class or a sub-class are generated.

7 Click OK.
In the Administration tab, the new SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY instance is displayed under SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY.

To delete a SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY data instance 1 Right-click the SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY data instance. 2 Select Delete. To modify a SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY data instance 1 Right-click the SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY data instance. 2 Select Edit. 3 Make the necessary changes to the fields in the SIM_NOTIFICATION_REGISTRY
dialog box.

4 Click OK to accept the changes.

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Collecting metrics

Collecting metrics
Use the Metrics menu command to access the commands for working with metrics.

To turn metrics collection off 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Select Metrics => Disable. To reset collection counters 1 Right-click a cell. 2 Select Metrics => Reset.
The collection counts are reset to 0.

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Collecting metrics

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BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Chapter

3

3

Managing the BMC Impact Portal
This chapter describes how to configure the BMC Impact Portal and contains the following topics: Accessing the BMC Impact Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Starting and stopping the BMC Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Starting and stopping the BMC Portal on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Starting and stopping the BMC Portal on UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Configuration tasks for BMC Impact Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Registering production and test cells in the BMC Impact Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Customizing BMC Impact Portal configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Configuring Dashboard Table View columns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Configuring Events Table columns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Changing the Console Navigation Tree icons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Configuring Status Table columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Configuring object link synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Configuring reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Configuring the number of events displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Changing the maximum number of recent items displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Configuring the general properties displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Setting up Image Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Modifying connection settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Configuration file and parameter definitions for BMC Impact Portal. . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 smsIwc/application.properties file and parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 smsConsoleServer/application.properties file and parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 ixs.properties file and parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 BMC Impact Portal admin utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 admin utility syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 admin utility options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 admin utility examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

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Accessing the BMC Impact Portal

Accessing the BMC Impact Portal
Communication between the Web browser and the BMC Portal is encrypted and requires the use of the https:// communication protocol.

To access the BMC Portal 1 In the browser’s address box, type the BMC Portal URL address using the
following syntax:
https://computerName:portNumber
s

computerName—represents the host name of the BMC Portal server portNumber—represents the port number assigned to the BMC Portal; the default port number is 443

s

NOTE
The Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol is used to secure communication between the BMC Portal Application Server and the Web browser.

2 In the security alert window, click Yes to accept the security certificate. 3 In the logon screen, type your logon user name and your password, and then click
Log On.

If you receive the message user name and password invalid after entering a valid user name and password, the BMC Portal server might not be running. Start the BMC Portal and log on to it again.

WARNING
If you leave your BMC Portal session by selecting a different URL and then return to the session before the expiration of the timeout period, the BMC Portal fails to prompt you for your user name and password. To ensure the integrity of the session, log out of the session every time you leave your BMC Portal session.

Starting and stopping the BMC Portal
The installation process does not automatically start the BMC Portal service. The following topics describe how to start and stop the BMC Portal service on both Windows and UNIX.

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Starting and stopping the BMC Portal on Windows

Starting and stopping the BMC Portal on Windows
You can start and stop the BMC Portal by using either of the following methods:
s s

using the Services window using the net start and net stop commands

To start or stop the BMC Portal from the Services window 1 Open the Services window. 2 From the scroll list, select BMC Portal. 3 To start the service, click Start Service. 4 To stop the service, click Stop Service. To start or stop the BMC Portal from the command line
From a command prompt, use the following methods to start and stop the BMC Portal:
s

To start the BMC Portal, enter the following command:
net start “BMC Portal”

s

To stop the BMC Portal, enter the following command:
net stop “BMC Portal”

Starting and stopping the BMC Portal on UNIX
The BMC Portal starts and stops as a daemon on UNIX platforms.

To start or stop the BMC Portal daemon on UNIX
To start or stop the BMC Portal on Solaris, use the BMCPortalAppserver script in the /etc/init.d directory and enter one of the following commands:
s s

./BMCPortalAppserver stop ./BMCPortalAppserver start

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Configuration tasks for BMC Impact Portal

Configuration tasks for BMC Impact Portal
This section contains some of the tasks you perform to configure the BMC Impact Portal.

Registering production and test cells in the BMC Impact Portal
Production and test cells must be registered in BMC Impact Portal so BMC Impact Explorer users can authenticate and access the data defined to cells. Administrators can register a cell by using the BMC Impact Portal Register Impact Managers tab or by using the admin command. For information on registering a cell in BMC Impact Portal, see the online Help or the BMC Portal Getting Started. To register a cell using the admin command, perform the following actions:
s

add an entry to the cell’s mcell.dir file so that the BMC Impact Portal can access the cell For more information, see “Configuring cells to communicate” on page 55.

s

run the command admin to add the cell name and information need to the cell_info.list file, which contains references to all the cells that can be accessed by the BMC Impact Portal For more information, see “BMC Impact Portal admin utility” on page 102.

NOTE
BMC Software recommends that you do not edit the cell_info.list file using a text editor since it requires an encryption key.

Customizing BMC Impact Portal configuration
You customize a BMC Impact Portal by editing the configuration parameters found in the ixs.properties file located in the jboss/server/all/conf/properties/ smsConsoleServer directory. These configuration parameters can affect several services. If you make changes to the ixs.properties file, you will need to stop and start the BMC Impact Portal. For more information about the ixs.properties file and its configuration, see “ixs.properties file and parameters” on page 101.
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Configuring Dashboard Table View columns

Configuring Dashboard Table View columns
You can change the columns displayed in dashboard table views by editing the ..\smsIwc\application.properties file.

To Configure Dashboard Table View columns 1 Open the application.properties file in a text editor. This file is located at
installationDirectory\tools\jboss\server\all\conf\properties\smsIwc\.

2 Edit the file to add or remove columns using the following format:
table_name=comma separated attribute (slot) names

3 Save the application.properties file. WARNING
To preserve the .properties suffix, save as type All Files. Do not save the application.properties file as a .txt file. The configuration changes may not be recognized.

4 Restart the BMC Portal service.

Configuring Events Table columns
You can edit the columns that appear in the table in the Events tab by editing the ..\smsIwc\application.properties file. All columns in the events table are configurable.

To configure Events Table columns 1 Open the application.properties file in a text editor. This file is located at
installationDirectory\tools\jboss\server\all\conf\properties\smsIwc\.

2 Edit the appropriate events table column as shown in Table 15 on page 89.
Table 15
status mc_priority severity date_reception owner_name

Event Table column default values
event status of the selected component value of the possible priorities of the event (values 5, 4, 3, 2, or 1) value of the possible severities of the event (unknown, ok, info, warning, minor, major, or critical) date and time the event was received name of the owner of the component

Column heading Description

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Changing the Console Navigation Tree icons

Table 15
msg mc_smc_id

Event Table column default values (continued)
relevant information related to the event the identifier for this service model component

Column heading Description

3 Save the application.properties file. WARNING
To preserve the .properties suffix, save as type All Files. Do not save the application.properties file as a .txt file. The configuration changes may not be recognized.

4 Restart the BMC Portal service.
For more information on this file, see “smsIwc/application.properties file and parameters” on page 97.

Changing the Console Navigation Tree icons
You can change the default icons displayed in the navigation tree for Recent Items by editing the ..\smsIwc\application.properties file.

To Change the Navigation Tree Icons 1 Open the application.properties file in a text editor. This file is located at
installationDirectory\tools\jboss\server\all\conf\properties\smsIwc\.

2 To change the navigation tree icons, add the relative path to the new icon to
com.bmc.sms.iwc.domain.recentitem.RecentItemsFolderIcon.

3 Save the application.properties file. WARNING
To preserve the .properties suffix, save as type “All Files.” Do not save the application.properties file as a .txt file. The configuration changes may not be recognized.

4 Restart the BMC Portal service.
For more information on this file, see “smsIwc/application.properties file and parameters” on page 97

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Configuring Status Table columns
You can edit some of the columns in the tables in the Status tab by editing the ..\smsIwc\application.properties file. However, not all columns are configurable. The first three columns (status, type, and name) cannot be changed. A smaller version of each primary status table is displayed in the dashboard view, if the Status window is selected for one or more of the dashboard panes. By default, no columns beside the status, type, and name are configured for these smaller tables, but columns can be added in the application.properties file.

To configure Status Table columns 1 Open the application.properties file in a text editor. This file is located at
installationDirectory\tools\jboss\server\all\conf\properties\smsIwc\.

2 Edit the appropriate status table column as shown in Table 16.
Table 16
Table Providers

Status table column default values
Configuration file listing com.bmc.sms.iwc.status.table.providers Default columns last_status_modification description owner_name owner_contact none last_status_modification description owner_name owner_contact

Providers (dashboard view) Consumers

com.bmc.sms.iwc.status.table.providers. small com.bmc.sms.iwc.status.table.consumers

Consumers (dashboard view) Causes

com.bmc.sms.iwc.status.table.consumers. small none com.bmc.sms.iwc.status.table.causes last_status_modification description owner_name owner_contact

3 Save the application.properties file. WARNING
To preserve the .properties suffix, save as type “All Files.” Do not save the application.properties file as a .txt file. The configuration changes may not be recognized.

4 Restart the BMC Portal service.
For more information, see “smsIwc/application.properties file and parameters” on page 97.

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Configuring object link synchronization

Configuring object link synchronization
You can change the objectlinksync values by editing the ..\smsIwc\application.properties file.

To configure object link synchronization 1 Open the application.properties file in a text editor. This file is located at
installationDirectory\tools\jboss\server\all\conf\properties\smsIwc\.

2 To change the object link type, modify the com.bmc.sms.iwc.objectlinksync.types
entry.

3 To change the reconciliation link type, modify the
com.bmc.sms.iwc.reconciliation.type entry.

4 Save the application.properties file. WARNING
To preserve the .properties suffix, save as type “All Files.” Do not save the application.properties file as a .txt file. The configuration changes may not be recognized.

5 Restart the BMC Portal service.
For more information, see “smsIwc/application.properties file and parameters” on page 97.

Configuring reports
You can the following items for reports by editing the ..\smsIwc\application.properties file:
s s s

scheduling value of report goal lines length of time report data is retained

To configure reports 1 Open the application.properties file in a text editor. This file is located at
installationDirectory\tools\jboss\server\all\conf\properties\smsIwc\.

2 Edit the appropriate status table column as shown in Table 17 on page 93.
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Table 17

Report parameters
Parameter Description The frequency, in hours, that the report information is summarized. Default value is 1. The number of seconds that will be added to the starting hour for every scheduled summarization time. Default value is 30.

Parameter type

Report Schedule com.bmc.sms.reportSummarizer.scheduler. frequencyHours com.bmc.sms.reportSummarizer.scheduler. delaySeconds

com.bmc.sms.reportSummarizer.scheduler.is Determines whether or not the setting of StartingNextHour startingHour will be ignored. If set to true, startingHour will be ignored. Default value is true. com.bmc.sms.reportSummarizer.scheduler. startingHour Determines the desired starting hour. No summarization is made until this value is reached. If the startingHour has passed on that day, the summarization will start at that hour the next day. Default value is 0.

Report Goals

com.bmc.sms.reportSummarizer.goal.default Availability report goal line, expressed as a .SMS_CS_RT_AVAIL percentage. Default value is 90.0%. com.bmc.sms.reportSummarizer.goal.default Mean Time to Repair goal line, expressed in .SMS_CS_RT_MTTR milliseconds. Default value is 300000 (5 minutes). com.bmc.sms.reportSummarizer.goal.default Mean Time Between Service Failures goal .SMS_CS_RT_MTBF line, expressed in milliseconds. Default value is 172800000 (2 days). com.bmc.sms.reportSummarizer.goal.default Mean Time Between Service Incidents goal .SMS_CS_RT_MTBSI line, expressed in milliseconds. Default value is 172800000 (2 days).

Retention Age

com.bmc.sms.consoleserver.retention.policy. The number of days Status tab data will be age.SMS_CS_STATUS_EVENT retained. Default value is 395. com.bmc.sms.consoleserver.retention.policy. The number of days Availability data will age.SMS_CS_RT_AVAIL be retained. Default value is 395. com.bmc.sms.consoleserver.retention.policy. The number of days Availability data will age.SMS_CS_RT_MTTR be retained. Default value is 395. com.bmc.sms.consoleserver.retention.policy. The number of days Mean Time Between age.SMS_CS_RT_MTBF Failure data will be retained. Default value is 395. com.bmc.sms.consoleserver.retention.policy. The number of days Mean Time Between age.SMS_CS_RT_MTBSI Service Incidents data will be retained. Default value is 395.

3 Save the application.properties file. WARNING
To preserve the .properties suffix, save as type “All Files.” Do not save the application.properties file as a .txt file. The configuration changes may not be recognized.

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Configuring the number of events displayed

4 Restart the BMC Portal service.
For more information, see “smsIwc/application.properties file and parameters” on page 97.

Configuring the number of events displayed
You can set the maximum and minimum number of events displayed in the Events tab by editing the ..\smsIwc\application.properties file.

To configure the number of events displayed 1 Open the application.properties file in a text editor. This file is located at
installationDirectory\tools\jboss\server\all\conf\properties\smsIwc\.

2 To change the minimum number of events shown on the Events table, edit the
value for com.bmc.sms.iwc.event.table.minimumevents. The default value is 5.

3 To change the maximum number of events shown on the Events table, edit the
value for com.bmc.sms.iwc.event.table.maximumevents. The default value is 50.

4 Save the application.properties file. WARNING
To preserve the .properties suffix, save as type “All Files.” Do not save the application.properties file as a .txt file. The configuration changes may not be recognized.

5 Restart the BMC Portal service.
For more information, see “smsIwc/application.properties file and parameters” on page 97.

Changing the maximum number of recent items displayed
You can change the maximum number of objects displayed in the Recent Items group in the navigation tree by editing the ..\smsIwc\application.properties file.

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To change the maximum number of recent items displayed 1 Open the application.properties file in a text editor. This file is located at
installationDirectory\tools\jboss\server\all\conf\properties\smsIwc\.

2 To change the maximum number of recent items displayed in the navigation tree,
edit the value for com.bmc.sms.iwc.ui.recentitems.maxsize.

3 Save the application.properties file. WARNING
To preserve the .properties suffix, save as type “All Files.” Do not save the application.properties file as a .txt file. The configuration changes may not be recognized.

4 Restart the BMC Portal service.
For more information on this file, see “smsIwc/application.properties file and parameters” on page 97

Configuring the general properties displayed
You can change the general properties in the Configuration tab by editing the ..\smsIwc\application.properties file.

To configure the general properties displayed 1 Open the application.properties file in a text editor. This file is located at
installationDirectory\tools\jboss\server\all\conf\properties\smsIwc\.

2 Add or remove property types associated with
com.bmc.sms.iwc.component.properties.generalProperties.properties.

3 Save the application.properties file. WARNING
To preserve the .properties suffix, save as type “All Files.” Do not save the application.properties file as a .txt file. The configuration changes may not be recognized.

4 Restart the BMC Portal service.
For more information on this file, see “smsIwc/application.properties file and parameters” on page 97

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Setting up Image Views

Setting up Image Views
Image Views provide an alternative method for displaying components contained in a service model. Using a background image, you can organize the service model components to represent an area of your environment. For example, you can create an Image View that illustrates the geographic locations of a service model on a map. The background images used for Image Views are located in the following directory:
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME\appserver\websdk\tools\jboss\server\all\data\ smsConsoleServer\Image\Background

To add a background image, place a copy of the graphic file in this directory. You can use the following types of graphic files for background images:
s s s

GIF JPEG PNG

Use the Configure tab in the BMC Impact Portal to create, edit, and delete Image Views. For more information on setting up image views, see the BMC Impact Portal online Help.

Modifying connection settings
You can modify the settings that BMC Impact Portal server uses when connecting to BMC Impact Manager instances.

To modify BMC Impact Portal connection settings 1 In a text editor, open the
%BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME%\appserver\websdk\tools\jboss\server\all\conf\ properties\smsConsoleServer\application.properties file.

2 Search for the Cell connection configuration stanza, and review the connection
properties. The following figure depicts the default values for the connection properties.
CellName.timeout = 30 CellName.reconnect_attempts = 5 CellName.reconnect_frequency = 30 CellName.polling_frequence = 3600 CellName.encryption = on

3 Modify the connection properties.
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Configuration file and parameter definitions for BMC Impact Portal

4 Save the application.properties file. 5 Restart the BMC Portal service (or daemon) to initialize the file.
The BMC Impact Portal settings are reset.

Configuration file and parameter definitions for BMC Impact Portal
Normally, you make changes to BMC Impact Portal component configurations through the user interface. However, you can manually edit three sets of configuration files that contain configuration information for the BMC Impact Portal module. These files pertain to these components:
s s s

BMC Impact Portal BMC Impact Service Model Editor BMC Impact Publishing Server

smsIwc/application.properties file and parameters
Table 18 describes the application.properties file in the smsIwc folder and its parameters. Table 18
Filename File path Description

application.properties file
application.properties in the ..smsIwc folder BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/webskd/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/properties/smsI wc contains the general BMC Impact Portal configurations for component properties and user interface presentation Description Default value sets the maximum number of objects that can display in 5 the Recent Items group folder in the navigation tree of the BMC Impact Portal Refer to “Changing the maximum number of recent items displayed” on page 94 for more information.

Parameter name
com.bmc.sms.iwc.ui. recentitems.maxsize

com.bmc.sms.iwc.status. table

sets the columns that will display in the status and dashboard table views Refer to “Configuring Dashboard Table View columns” on page 89 for more information.

See the application.pro perties file.

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smsConsoleServer/application.properties file and parameters

Table 18

application.properties file
See the application.pro perties file for Refer to “Configuring the general properties displayed” more information. on page 95 for more information. visible in the BMC Impact Portal module Refer to “Configuring Events Table columns” on page 89 for more information. See the application.pro perties file.

com.bmc.sms.iwc.component. determines which general properties are displayed in properties.generalPropertie the Configure tab for selected components s.properties

com.bmc.sms.iwc.event.table determines which columns in the events table are

com.bmc.sms.iwc.domain. notification.impact.type

sets the impact definitions included in a component notification e-mail You can designate multiple types of impact definitions, separating each by a comma. If no impact type is set explicitly, the default is BMC_BaseElement.

BMC_BaseElem ent

com.bmc.sms.iwc.domain. specifies the default icon for the Recent Items folder recentitem.RecentItemsFolde rIcon com.bmc.sms.iwc.status. table.providers com.bmc.sms.iwc.status. table.consumers com.bmc.sms.iwc.status. table.causes com.bmc.sms.iwc.status. table.existinggroup com.bmc.sms.iwc.status. table.causal.components com.bmc.sms.iwc.status. table.components.small com.bmc.sms.iwc.event. table.minimumevents com.bmc.sms.iwc.event. table.maximumevents

ServiceCompon ent.gif

See the determines which columns that you can add to the tables and dashboards under the Status tab in the BMC application.pro perties file. Impact Portal module Refer to “Configuring Status Table columns” on page 91 for more information.

sets the maximum and minimum number of events retrieved per component instance; this information is displayed on the Events tab

minimum: 5 maximum: 50

smsConsoleServer/application.properties file and parameters
Table 19 describes the application.properties file in the smsConsoleServer folder and its parameters. Table 19
Filename File path Description

application.properties file
application.properties in the ..smsConsoleServer folder BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/webskd/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/properties/smsC onsoleServer contains the configurations for report scheduling, report goals, and report data retention

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smsConsoleServer/application.properties file and parameters

Table 19

application.properties file
Description defines where the user configuration data is stored Default value no value; the location BOSS_HOME/s erver/all/data/s msConsoleServ er is used false; no backup file is saved

Parameter name
com.bmc.sms.configService. dataLocation

com.bmc.sms.configService. keepBackupFile

if configuration data is changed, defines whether a backup file is saved

com.bmc.sms.reportSummarize sets the value of the goal line for the Availability report 90.000% r.goal.default. as a percentage SMS_CS_RT_AVAIL com.bmc.sms.reportSummarize sets the value of the goal line for the Mean Time to r.goal.default. Repair (MTTR) report SMS_CS_RT_MTTR com.bmc.sms.reportSummarize sets the value of the goal line for the Mean Time Before r.goal.default. Failure (MTBF) report SMS_CS_RT_MTBF com.bmc.sms.reportSummarize sets the value of the goal line for the Mean Time Before r.goal.default. Service Impact (MTBSI) report. Goal line value is SMS_CS_RT_MTBSI=172800000 expressed in milliseconds. cellName.timeout

300000 milliseconds (5 minutes) 172800000 milliseconds (2 days) 172800000 milliseconds (2 days) 30 seconds

sets the timeout value for data queries by the BMC Impact Portal to the specified cell The timeout value is measured in seconds.

cellName.reconnect_attempts sets the number of times for the BMC Impact Portal to

60 tries

try to reconnect to the specified cell when it is unavailable cell (such as the cell or host is down)
cellName.reconnect_frequenc sets the polling cycle, measured in seconds, for the BMC 30 seconds y Impact Portal reconnection attempt to the specified cell cellName.polling_frequency <cellname>.encryption com.bmc.sms.icon.webdir

sets the polling cycle, measured in seconds, for the BMC 1800 seconds Impact Portal data query attempt to the specified cell sets whether is encryption is enabled (off or on) for the connection with the specified cell defines the path in which the icon images for service model components are maintained on /smsConsoleSer ver/images/obje cts/

com.bmc.sms.event. maxDelayedHours

defines the maximum number of hours an event can be 24 hours delayed and will still be processed.

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smsConsoleServer/application.properties file and parameters

Table 19

application.properties file
sets the length of time, in days, that report data is retained for each report. 395 days

com.bmc.sms.consoleserver. retention.policy.age. SMS_CS_STATUS_EVENT com.bmc.sms.consoleserver. retention.policy.age. SMS_CS_RT_AVAIL com.bmc.sms.consoleserver. retention.policy.age. SMS_CS_RT_MTTR com.bmc.sms.consoleserver. retention.policy.age. SMS_CS_RT_MTBF com.bmc.sms.consoleserver. retention.policy.age. SMS_CS_RT_MTBSI com.bmc.sms.service.os. unrestricted com.bmc.sms.service.os. restrict.read.access com.bmc.sms.service.os. filtersim com.bmc.sms.remedy. serverHostName com.bmc.sms.remedy. serverPortNumber

sets whether the Object Store communication service should run in unrestricted mode when connecting to the Remedy server sets whether the Object Store communication service filters are read-only objects sets whether the Object Store communication service filters classes and attributes that are marked SIM=false identifies the host computer on which the BMC Portal host resides

true

true true BMC Portal host computer name

lists the port number by which the BMC Portal connects 0 to the Remedy server

Table 20 describes the aggregator.properties file and its parameters. Table 20
Filename File path Description

aggregator.properties file
aggregator.properties BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/webskd/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/properties/smsC onsoleServer contains the configurations for BMC Impact Portal communications with cells, including port number used for cell communications, encryption key, and encryption enablement Description sets the port number through which the BMC Impact Portal communicates with the BMC IM cell Default value 3783

Parameter name
com.bmc.sms. eventaggregator. jserverPortNumber

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ixs.properties file and parameters

Table 20

aggregator.properties file
mc

com.bmc.sms.eventaggregator sets the encryption key used to communicate with the . BMC IM cell jserverEncryptionKey com.bmc.sms.eventaggregator communication encryption indicator (true or false) . jserverEncryptionEnabled

true

ixs.properties file and parameters
Table 21 describes the ixs.properties file and its parameters. Table 21
Filename File path

ixs.properties file
ixs.properties BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/webskd/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/properties /smsConsoleServer contains the configurations for BMC Impact Portal communications with the BMC Impact Explorer console, including the port number used for BMC Impact Explorer communications and parameters for building an IP address in a multi-homed environment. Description Default value sets the port number through which the BMC 3084 Impact Portal communicates with the BMC Impact Explorer console sets whether the BMC Impact Portal can bind an IP false address on a multi-homed (multi NIC card) system specifies the IP address on a multi-homed system to 0.0.0.0 which the BMC Impact Portal is bound

Description Parameter name

com.bmc.sms.ixs.port.number

com.bmc.sms.ixs.enable.bind.ip com.bmc.sms.ixs.bind.ip.address

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BMC Impact Portal admin utility

BMC Impact Portal admin utility
You can use the BMC Impact Portal admin utility to perform various product administration and management tasks. With the admin utility, you can do these things:
s s s s s s s s s s s s s

print help print the version of the product list all cells list all roles and role IDs list all remote users add a cell add user groups for a specified account add a new user modify a cell modify a user group to which an existing user belongs delete a cell delete a user group from a specified account delete an existing user

NOTE
You can use the BMC Impact Portal Administrator tool to perform some of the functions of the admin utility. See the BMC Impact Portal online Help for more information.

admin utility syntax
Figure 11 shows the syntax of the admin utility. Figure 11 admin.bat and admin.sh syntax

admin.bat/.sh [-h|-z|-q>] [-l{c|r|ru}] "List options" [-a{c|r|ru}] "Add options" [-m{c|ru}] "Modify options" [-d{c|r|ru}] "Delete options"

NOTE
The UNIX version of the admin script is admin.sh.

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admin utility options

admin utility options
Table 22 lists the options for the admin utility. Table 22
Options -ac name=string:key=alphabetic: host=string:port=number:environment=Productio n or Test[:account=account id]:usergroups=*|user group names separated by comma

admin options
Description adds an Impact Manager When user groups=*, all user groups in all accounts have access to the Impact Manager. If there is only one account or user groups=*, the account ID can be omitted.

-ar [account=account id:]usergroups= user adds user groups for a specific account group names separated by comma If there is only one account, you can omit the account ID. -aru loginID=string:firstName=string: lastName:string:emailAddress=string [:htmlEmailStyle=truefalse][:account= account id]:usergroups=user group names separated by comma adds a new user If there is only one account, you can omit the account ID. If htmlEmailStyle is not specified, HTML style will be used for formatting emails. When a new user is created, his or her password will be the same as the login ID initially. Users can change their passwords by using the BMC Impact Portal. -dc name=string -dr [account=account id:]usergroups=user group names separated by comma -dru loginID=string -h -lc -lr[account=account id] -lru -mc name=string[:key=alphabetic| :host=string|:port=number|:environment=Prod uction or Test|:account= account id:usergroups=*|user group names separated by comma:appendUserGroup= true or false -mru loginId=string:usergroups=user group names separated by comma -q -z deletes a cell deletes a user group from a specific account deletes an existing user account prints this help and exits lists all the registered cells lists all the roles and role IDs lists all the remote users modifies an Impact Manager New user groups are appended to the current user groups by default. If appendUserGroup is set to false, new user groups will replace the current user groups. modifies a user group to which an existing user belongs does not print output to stdout/stderr prints the version information for the BMC Impact Portal and exits

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admin utility options

If the value of an option contains a space, enclose the value in quotes. For example, use the following command to add two new user groups, Test One, and TestTwo, to account 123456:
admin -ar account=123456:usergroups=”Test One, TestTwo”

admin return codes
The admin script returns a nonzero value if it encounters any errors during execution. It returns a zero (0) value upon a successful execution, as shown in Table 23. Table 23
Code 0 -1

admin return codes
Description success failure

admin script
You must run the admin script on a computer running BMC Impact Portal to set the environment up for the admin utility. Figure 12 lists the code for the admin script. Figure 12 admin script

set CURRENT_DIRECTORY=. set IXS_PROPERTIES=%CURRENT_DIRECTORY%\..\..\tools\jboss\server\ all\conf\properties\smsConsoleServer\ixs.properties set CP=%CP%;%CURRENT_DIRECTORY%\..\..\tools\jboss\server\all\ modules\smsConsoleServer.sar\IXSAdmin.jar set JAVA_HOME=%CURRENT_DIRECTORY%\..\..\tools\jdk %JAVA_HOME%\bin\java.exe -cp %CP% -Dixs_properties=%IXS_PROPERTIES% com.bmc.sms.ixscomm.cli.MccsCom %*%

The JAVA_HOME variable in the admin script is given its value during the installation process. Typically, you do not need to modify these values.

Using the admin utility to register and unregister a BMC Impact Manager instance
The admin utility can be used in automation scripts.

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admin utility options

To manually register a BMC Impact Manager instance 1 Add a gateway.portal entry for the BMC Impact Portal server to the mcell.dir file of
the BMC Impact Manager instance. To do this, open the
%MCELL_HOME%\etc\mcell.dir (or $MCELL_HOME/etc/mcell.dir) file of the target

cell and add an entry for the BMC Impact Portal. For more information on editing the mcell.dir file, see “Configuring mcell.conf parameters” on page 52.

2 Restart the BMC Impact Manager instance.
s

Windows: you restart the cell service through the Services window in the Control Panel, or you can use the net stop mcell_CellName and net start mcell_CellName command. Solaris: you issue the mkill -n CellName and the mcell -n CellName commands to stop and start the BMC Impact Manager instance.

s

3 Register the BMC Impact Manager instance by executing the admin.bat or admin.sh
command. On the system where the BMC Portal application server is installed, follow these steps. You can register only one cell at a time.
s

Windows—Open a Command Prompt window, change the directory to
%BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME%\appserver\websdk\bin\smsConsoleServer, and

enter the following command string:
admin.bat -ac name=cellName:key=mc:host=HostNameOfCell:port=1828:environment=production (or test):account=usergroups=*
s

Solaris—Open a terminal window, change the directory to
$BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/bin/smsConsoleServer, and enter

the following command string:
./admin.sh -ac name=CellName:key=mc:host=HostNameOfCell:port=1828:usergroups=*

The usergroups parameter specifies the user group or user groups that will have access to the BMC Impact Manager instance. For example, Service Managers and Service Administrators. In the commands shown above, the wildcard character (*) indicates that all user groups in all BMC Impact Portal accounts can access the specified BMC Impact Manager instance.

4 Repeat these steps for each additional BMC Impact Manager instance that you
want to register with the BMC Impact Portal.

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admin utility examples

To manually unregister a BMC Impact Manager instance 1 Change to the appropriate directory for your environment:
s

Windows: %BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME%\appserver\websdk\bin\
smsConsoleServer

s

Solaris: $BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/bin/
smsConsoleServer

2 Enter the appropriate command:
s s

Windows: admin.bat -dc name=cellName Solaris: ./admin.sh -dc name=cellName

admin utility examples
This section provides admin utility examples.

Listing the BMC Impact Portal version
To list the version of the BMC Impact Portal on the local host, type the command shown in Figure 13. Figure 13 Command to list the version of BMC Impact Portal

admin.bat/sh -z

This command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 14. Figure 14 BMC Impact Portal version example

Copyright (c) BMC Software, Inc. 1999-2006 BNF version number (Build Version:version number;Build Date: date)

Adding a Cell and limiting access
To add a cell named test which can be accessed only by users who belong to the Full Access and Service Administrators user groups of account 123456, type the command shown in Figure 15. Figure 15 Adding a cell and limiting access

admin -ac name=test:key=mc:host=testMachineName:port=1828:environment=Test:account=123456: usergroups=”Full Access,Service Administrators”

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4
114 109 109 110 111 114 115 116 117

Managing the BMC Impact Explorer (BMC IX) console
4

This chapter describes how to configure BMC Impact Explorer (BMC IX) console and contains the following topics: Configuring display and connection settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Specific configuration tasks in BMC IX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining a user’s home directory on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining property files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining console-wide policy files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring display and connection settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining global event severity and priority color values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event group configuration files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XML files that define user interface elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Connecting BMC IX to a BMC Impact Portal

Connecting BMC IX to a BMC Impact Portal
If you have multiple BMC Impact Portals in your environment, you can set up BMC IX to connect to each of them.

NOTE
Each portal uses a different BMC Atrium Configuration Management Database (CMDB), so if you connect to a different portal, you will be accessing a different service model and all its related data. Using a different BMC Impact Portal as a backup requires that the administrator replicate the entire environment and maintain it as a backup.

The following procedure describes how to add one or more BMC Impact Portals to the BMC IX console configuration. You can then select the BMC Impact Portal that you want to connect to from the Logon dialog box when you start the console. This task applies to BMC IX as a stand-alone console or as a Java Web Start application.

To connect to a BMC Impact Portal and make cells available to BMC IX 1 Start the BMC Impact Explorer. 2 Define the name and port of each BMC Impact Portal to which you want BMC IX
to connect by following these steps:

A Choose Edit => Configuration.
The Edit Configuration dialog box appears.

B Click the Impact Portals tab. C In the Host box, enter the name of the computer hosting the BMC Impact Portal. D In the Port box, enter the port number for the BMC Impact Portal. E Click Add to include the BMC Impact Portal in the list of servers to which you
want connect.

F Repeat steps 2C through 2E for each BMC Impact Portal to which you want to
connect.

3 Connect to the BMC Impact Explorer as a user.

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4 Identify the cells to make available to BMC Impact Explorer by following these steps: A From BMC Impact Explorer, choose Edit => Configuration. B In the Edit Configuration dialog box, click the Impact Managers tab.
The Available Cells list box lists all cells associated with the BMC Impact Portal to which you are connected.

C Select a cell from the Available Impact Managers list, and select a group (the
defaults are MyTest or MyProduction).

NOTE
You can select multiple cells at one time. To select adjacent cells, select the first cell, hold down the Shift key, and select the last cell. To select nonadjacent cells, select a cell, hold down the Ctrl key, and select each of the other cells.

D Click the arrow to move the cell. TIP
You can also click and drag a cell from the Available Cells list box to the Selected Cells list box.

E Click OK. The cell you added appears in the navigation pane of the console.
For complete information about configuring BMC IX, see the BMC Impact Solutions: Event Monitoring user guide.

Specific configuration tasks in BMC IX
This section describes specific configuration tasks for BMC IX.

Defining a user’s home directory on Windows
The first time a user opens the BMC Impact Explorer console interface, a preferences file called mccs.prop is created and stored in the user’s home directory (represented here as %HOME%):
%HOME%\.econsole\etc\mccscommunication\mccs.prop

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On computers running Windows, ensure the path to the user’s home directory is in the user’s profile. You can create a user’s home directory anywhere and it can have any name, as shown in the following example.

EXAMPLE
C:\username C:\Documents and Settings\username

Steps for defining a user’s home directory differ for each Windows version. For instructions, consult the documentation for your version.

WARNING
If multiple users are working on a single Windows computer and a separate home directory for each user is not defined, each subsequent user overwrites the previous user’s profile.

Defining property files
The BMC Impact Portal creates a unique properties file username.econ.config in the jboss\server\all\data\smsConsoleServer\econsole directory of the BMC Impact Portal. This file is based on the default.econ.config properties file that is created at installation. Figure 16 illustrates the username.econ.config file. Figure 16 default.econ.config file contents

#Mon Jan 20 17:51:13 CDT 2003 toolbar_orientation=0 toolbar_layout=North framework_bounds=444,256,512,384 user.region=US

Figure 17 illustrates a file Operator.econ.config created for a user named Operator. Figure 17 Operator.econ.config file contents

#Wed Feb 05 11:52:22 CST 2003 user.region=US toolbar_orientation=0 config_dialog_position_y=191 config_dialog_height=520 toolbar_layout=North config_dialog_position_x=288 config_dialog_width=394 framework_bounds=229,259,512,384

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Defining console-wide policy files
Another aspect of control vested in the BMC Impact Portal is the policy file that BMC Impact Explorer retrieves each time a user connects to the BMC Impact Portal. This file contains parameters that define BMC Impact Explorer console-wide policies for all users. At installation, the default policy file, default.console_policy.prop, is created; it is located in the jboss\server\all\data\smsConsoleServer\policy directory. The policy file is never saved from the BMC Impact Explorer console, only retrieved. If a specific user has a particular need, it is possible to create an individual user policy file, username.console_policy.prop, based on the default and located in the same jboss\server\all\data\smsConsoleServer\policy directory. This individual user policy file will be returned to the BMC Impact Explorer console, rather than the default file, default.console_policy.prop, when the user logs on. For ease of maintenance, BMC Software recommends that the default be used for most users. Table 24 summarizes the parameters in the default policy file. Table 24
Parameter
local_action_event_operations default_filter_name default_slotorder_name eventlist_icon_slots filter_hidden_slots

default.console_policy.prop parameters (part 1 of 2)
Description controls the tracking of local actions performed against events specifies the default filter used to display the event list when no view is selected specifies the default slot order used for the event list when no view is selected controls the slots shown as icons in the event list (values of hidden slots can be viewed only as icons) controls the hidden slots that are available for creating filters Note: Filters that rely on hidden slots may be broken in future releases because they rely on undocumented contents.

administration_editor_classes administration_editor_acls no_import_slots config.save.freq ix.servicetree.save.timer local_action_event_notes

controls the classes (with their subclasses) that are available to the Dynamic Data Editor specifies the ACLs that control access to the Dynamic Data Editor controls exclusion of slots when exporting controls the time interval between saves of configuration information (such as window sizes and locations) controls the time interval between saves of Services View navigation tree information (deprecated)a controls creation of notes for events that have local actions performed against them; replaced with local_action_event_operations

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Table 24
Parameter

default.console_policy.prop parameters (part 2 of 2)
Description (deprecated)a controls creation of notes for events that have remote actions performed against them (deprecated)a controls creation of notes for events that change status by means of user-initiated action

remote_action_event_notes status_mod_event_note
a

Deprecated parameters remain in version 4.1 and earlier cells. However, the parameters do not exist in newer releases.

Figure 18 lists its contents, including the default values for each parameter. Figure 18 Default policy file (part 1 of 2)

# This document keeps default Policies for different BMC Impact Explorer wide functions. # Format: # <policy_name>=<polcy specific value> # Policy which controls the creation of an event operation track for events which # have local actions performed against them. # value: on=operation track created when local action performed, off=operation track not created. local_action_event_operations=on # Policy which controls the creation of an event note for events which # have local actions performed against them. # deprecated: On im's 4.1 and further mc_notes is no longer used to track history, mc_operations is dedicated to this purpose. # replaced with local_action_event_operations # value: on=note created when local action performed, off=note not created. local_action_event_notes=on # Policy which controls the creation of an event note for events which # have remote actions performed against them. # deprecated: On im's 4.1 and further mc_notes is no longer used to track history, mc_operations is dedicated to this purpose. # The registering of history in mc_operations is configured at the im. # value: on=note created when remote action performed, off=note not created. remote_action_event_notes=on # Policy which controls the creation of an event note for events which # change status via user initiated action (e.g.: OPEN -> CLOSED). # deprecated: On im's 4.1 and further mc_notes is no longer used to track history, mc_operations is dedicated to this purpose. # The registering of history in mc_operations is configured at the im. # value: on=note created when event status changes, off=note not created. status_mod_event_note=on # default filter and slot order when no view is ever selected. # value: the name of a defined filter and slotorder. default_filter_name=All Events default_slotorder_name=Basic Information # controls if ClassDetailProvider detail tabs show hidden slots #ClassDetailProvider_shows_hidden_slots=false

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Figure 18

Default policy file (part 2 of 2)

# Policy which controls the slots shown as icons in the event lists. # Values of hidden slots can only be viewed as icons. # value: <className> "." <slotName> { "," <className> "." <slotName> } # default value: CORE_EVENT.mc_abstracted, CORE_EVENT.mc_abstraction, CORE_EVENT.mc_action_count, CORE_EVENT.mc_cause, CORE_EVENT.mc_effects, CORE_EVENT.mc_history, CORE_EVENT.mc_notes, CORE_EVENT.mc_smc_cause, CORE_EVENT.mc_smc_effects, CORE_EVENT.mc_smc_impact #eventlist_icon_slots=CORE_EVENT.mc_abstracted, CORE_EVENT.mc_abstraction, CORE_EVENT.mc_action_count, CORE_EVENT.mc_cause, CORE_EVENT.mc_effects, CORE_EVENT.mc_history, CORE_EVENT.mc_notes, CORE_EVENT.mc_smc_cause, CORE_EVENT.mc_smc_effects, CORE_EVENT.mc_smc_impact # Policy which controls the hidden slots that will be available for filter building. # Impartant remark: Filters that rely on hidden slots may be broken in future release without notice, because they rely on undocumented contents. # value: <className> "." <slotName> { "," <className> "." <slotName> } # default value: <empty list> #filter_hidden_slots= # Policy which controls what classes (with their subclasses) are visible in Administration's editor # value: <className> { "," <className> } # default value: DATA #administration_editor_classes=DATA #Policy which controls what acls control the classes (with their subclasses) in Administration's editor # value: <aclName> { "," <aclName> } # default value: MC_DATA_EDITOR #administration_editor_acls=MC_DATA_EDITOR # Slots that, though parsable, should be excluded from import (thus paste and export for import), because of specific semantics # value: <className> "." <slotName> { "," <className> "." <slotName> } no_import_slots=CORE_DATA.mc_udid, MC_SM_OBJECT.creation_mode, MC_SM_COMPONENT.ext_id, MC_SM_COMPONENT.home_cell, MC_SM_RELATIONSHIP.provider_id, MC_SM_RELATIONSHIP.consumer_id # Configuration information (such as window sizes and locations) will be saved on a periodic basis. # Policy which controls the time window (in seconds) for this operation. # default value: 5 minutes (300 seconds). config.save.freq=300 # Service Views navigation tree information stored as XML will be saved to the IXS on a periodic basis. # Policy which controls the time window (in seconds) for this operation. # default value: 5 seconds (5000 milliseconds). # Based on section 4.1.1.2.1 in Impact Explorer 4.1 Functional Specification ix.servicetree.save.timer=5

When you execute a local action, a remote action, or modify the status of an event, a note is written to the event as a value to the mc_notes slot and appears in the Notes tab of the details pane of BMC Impact Explorer Events View. The initial filter is set to display all events and the initial slot order is to display as basic information, as indicated on the event source tab in the event list display. The last entry in the policy file identifies those slots that should not be imported because of their specific semantics.

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The policy file’s console-wide application can be used to protect the individual user’s cell groupings from being accessed and modified by other users on a multi-user BMC Impact Explorer console. This enables a business to assign multiple users with limited use requirements to one BMC Impact Explorer console, fully utilizing one resource, rather than investing in several BMC Impact Explorer consoles that will be under utilized. Another beneficial aspect of the global nature of the policy file is that you can use it to create a customized default event filter and slot order for a BMC Impact Explorer console for new users and as the default filter and slot order when a user selects an improper filter.

Configuring display and connection settings
You can use the ix.properties file to configure the display and connection settings for BMC IX. Table 25 lists the property settings included in the ix.properties file. Table 25 Property descriptions from ix.properties file (part 1 of 2)
Description when set to true, enables debugging for the console sets the directory location and URL address for the BMC Impact Explorer Help file specifies the look and feel for BMC Impact Explorer according to the Java GUI settings sets the amount of time, in seconds, a macro waits to connect to a cell sets the port number used by the Remote Method Invocation (RMI) service in BMC Impact Explorer enables the RMI service for BMC Impact Explorer for remote access to event data enables any connection to the RMI service for a BMC Impact Explorer If set to false, the RMI service can only accept connections from the local computer where the console is running.
mc_console_remote_object_name

Console property
framework_debug help_url java_plaf macro_connect_timeout remote_server_port remote_server_enabled all_connection_allowed

specifies the name of the remote object used by the RMI client This value must be matched in the -Dremote_object_name option in the run_client.bat or run_client.sh scripts.

user.region

specifies the region used for the console to provide II8N support By default, this information is retrieved from the environment setup of the computer.

collector_tree_color

specifies the background color for the navigation tab on the Events tab of the console

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Table 25

Property descriptions from ix.properties file (part 2 of 2)
Description sets the maximum number of status bar history messages that are stored in the console specifies the default name assigned to newly created subgroups on the Services tab on the console length of time, in milliseconds, the console waits to display tooltips in the Services View sets the width for line indicators that connect service model components in the relationships pane of the console relationships between service model components in the relationships pane of the console

Console property
max_msg_history new_groups_name svc_view_tooltip svc_view_link_thickness_normal

svc_view_link_thickness_true_impact sets the width of the line indicators that indicate impact

Defining global event severity and priority color values
Event records are displayed in the BMC Impact Explorer Events View using colors that represent their level of severity and priority. The color.properties file, located in the JBOSS/server/all/conf/properties/smsConsoleServer directory, defines severity and priority value colors for the events and contains the default color values. The color.properties file also can contain custom definitions for the status conditions of BMC Service Impact Manager components. Modify this file if you want to define custom colors for event severities and priorities. To avoid confusion, each user receives the same colors for events that the BMC Impact Explorer console interface displays. Table 26 lists the default severity level colors and their values, as defined in color.properties. Table 26
Down Critical Major Minor Warning Information OK Unknown

Event severity levels and colors
Color Black Red orange light orange yellow blue green gray Hexadecimal RGB values in color.properties 000000,FFFFFF FF0000,FFFFFF FF9900,000000 FFCC33,000000 FFFF00,000000 3366CC,FFFFFF 33CC00,000000 CCCCCC,000000

Severity level

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Event group configuration files

WARNING
s s

The entries are the default color properties. Do not delete these properties. If you customize the severities by increasing the number of levels to be greater than the number of default severity levels, the severity list on the Event and Services Views becomes truncated and partially illegible. Restrict your customizations to the same number or fewer severity levels.

Table 27 lists the default priority level colors and their values, as defined in color.properties. Table 27
Priority_1 Priority_2 Priority_3 Priority_4 Priority_5

Event priority levels and colors
Color red orange light orange yellow green Hexadecimal RGB values in color.properties FF0000,FFFFFF FF9900,FFFFFF FFCC33,000000 FFFF00,000000 33CC00,000000

Priority level

To globally change the default severity or priority colors, modify the color.properties file and stop and start the BMC Impact Portal.

NOTE
Modifications made to the color.properties file do not immediately appear in the BMC Impact Portal. By default, the BMC Impact Portal configuration.update.interval parameter checks for changes every 300 seconds.

Event group configuration files
The event group configuration file structure is listed in Table 28: Table 28
Folder \Images \Images\Backgrounds \Images\Icons \Map \Map \Map

Event group configuration files (part 1 of 2)
Contains Backgrounds and Icons directories background image files that are shared by all Map definitions image files which are shared by all Map definitions event group tree node template MapObjectTemplate.xml event group default image view configuration DefaultMapPage.xsl Map tree definition Maps.xml

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Table 28
Folder

Event group configuration files (part 2 of 2)
Contains Map.xml for Map_xxx as well as its MapPages directory

\Map\Map_xxx

\Map\Map_xxx\MapPages all map page definitions for Map Map_xxx

XML files that define user interface elements
Table 29 lists XML files that control some user interface characteristics in BMC Impact Explorer that cannot be edited in the BMC IX user interface. Use care when you edit these files to avoid unexpected and undesirable results. These files are located in
s

Windows: %BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME%
\appserver\websdk\tools\jboss\server\all\data\smsConsoleServer\extdetails

s

UNIX: $BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME
/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/data/smsConsoleServer/extdetails

Table 29
File name

xml files that define user interface elements in BMC IX
Description defines the default tabs if the global.DataEditor.extdetails.xml file is not present or does not contain values defines the tabs that appear in the data editor defines the tabs that appear for events and components defines the policy type to policy editor mapping

default.DataEditor.extdetails.xml

global.DataEditor.extdetails.xml global.extdetails.xml global.PolicyEditor.extdetails.xml

global.SmcToolTips.extdetails.xml defines the tooltips that appear on a component instance

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XML files that define user interface elements

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120 121 121 122 127 127 128 129

Configuring StateBuilder and gateways
5

This chapter describes how to configure the StateBuilder and gateways for exporting events and contains the following topics: Understanding the StateBuilder and gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . StateBuilder configuration file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . statbld return codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gateway configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exporting events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modifying a statbld.conf file to export events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modifying a gateway.export file to export events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring tracing for StateBuilder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Understanding the StateBuilder and gateways

Understanding the StateBuilder and gateways
The StateBuilder is an executable, statbld.exe, located in the MCELL_HOME\bin directory. It records saved states of the cell at regular intervals. When it starts, the cell loads its last saved state (mcdb). All transactions it performs are stored in a transaction file (xact). As soon as the transaction file reaches a certain size, or after a certain period, the StateBuilder is started. It produces a new saved state from the previous file and from the transaction file. When the cell terminates and restarts, any trailing transaction file is first processed by the StateBuilder to produce a new saved state. A history of saved states and corresponding transaction files can be kept. The mcdb and xact files of that history have their timestamp in the file name. All mcdb and xact files are located in the MCELL_HOME\log\cellName directory. The StateBuilder runs as configured in the cell’s mcell.conf file, which is detailed in “StateBuilder configuration file” on page 121. The configuration of how the StateBuilder itself operates is in the statbld.conf file. Table 30 on page 120 lists the file naming conventions for the StateBuilder. Table 30
File mcdb mcdb.0 mcdb.t

StateBuilder file name conventions
Description state file the cell uses at startup new state file being generated saved state history files, where t = timestamp Timestamp t in the mcdb.t file corresponds to the time when the state is created.

mcdb.lock xact xact.n xact.t.n

lock file indicating StateBuilder activity transaction file generated by the cell terminated transaction file, where n=1 is the oldest transaction file terminated transaction history file corresponding to mcdb.t Timestamp t in the xact.t.n file refers to the mcdb.t file to which the transactions lead.

There is also a statbld.trace file for the configuration of StateBuilder tracing. For further information, see “Configuring tracing for StateBuilder” on page 129. The StateBuilder uses the gateway.export file in conjunction with its statbld.conf file to export event data. For more information, see the “StateBuilder configuration file”and “Exporting events” on page 127.

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StateBuilder configuration file
The state configuration file, statbld.conf, is located in the MCELL_HOME\etc directory. Table 31 lists the statbld.conf parameters, which use the same syntax as all BMC Impact Solutions configuration files. Table 31
Parameter
Export ExportConfigFileName ExportDiscarded

statbld.conf Parameters
Description sets path to the gateway.export file Default value
%H/etc/%N/gateway. export

uses Boolean values to specify whether to export data No

indicates whether discarded events are included in the No export file Discarded events are those that were dropped in the first four rule phases: Refine, Filter, Regulate, and New (Update).

ExportTriggerArguments

sets the arguments to be passed to the executable serving as the export trigger program Value is interpreted as a sequence of space-separated arguments, so spaces within each argument are not allowed.

blank; no arguments

ExportTriggerProgram

sets the program to execute after exporting data The value is interpreted as a path. See the mcell.conf file for special syntax for a path.

blank

StateHistoryCount

sets the number of state files to retain in the history Each time a new saved state is produced, the oldest state is removed.

3

statbld return codes
Table 32 lists the return codes for statbld. Table 32
1 2 10 37 47

statbld return codes (part 1 of 2)
Description failed to build new mcdb failed to update history files early initialization failure process handling module initialization failure StateBuilder specific file access initialization failure

Return code

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Gateway configuration

Table 32
57 67 77 87 97

statbld return codes (part 2 of 2)
Description transaction file handling initialization failure failed to load KB classes server directory load failure internal table initialization failure detected running StateBuilder (mcdb.lock)

Return code

Gateway configuration
This section discusses general message formatting that applies both to StateBuilder export and to gateways. Gateway specific message formats are described in a gateway configuration file. The location of this file for gateway of a particular type is determined from the GwTypeConfigFileName parameter of the cell. Its default value is %H/etc/gateway.Type where Type represents the type of gateway. Example default parameter values for TEC and jServer gateways:
s

GwTECConfigFileName=%H/etc/gateway.TEC which means: $MCELL_HOME/etc/gateway.TEC GwjServerConfigFileName=%H/etc/gateway.jServer which means: $MCELL_HOME/etc/gateway.jServer

s

A gateway configuration file contains parameter settings in the form of parameter=setting. Parameters can be specified differently for new events and for event modifications. The parameter name must be suffixed with
s s

.new for new events .mod for event modifications

Without a suffix, the setting is assumed to be on both categories. Both the contents of a message and its format are specified using parameters.

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Gateway predefined variables
Table 33 lists the parameters that can refer to predefined variables. Table 33
Variable $CLASS $CONTEXT

Gateway configuration parameter predefined variables
Description class name context name: s Permanent—event permanently in DB (until out of date) s Processed—discarded by rule processing s Regulated—discarded by regulation s Filtered—discarded by filter s Refined—discarded by refine s Received—discarded immediately date stamp time stamp names of modified slots (empty for “new”) event ID in gateway cell name of cell connecting to gateway event ID in cell value of slot slot selected slot name (only for body parameter) selected slot value (only for body parameter) all modified slots (empty for “new”) all slots (only for slots parameter) all slots, but limited to class cls (only for slots parameter) mapped value of val using map val can be a literal or a variable reference

$DATE $TIME $MODNMS $GHANDLE $CNAME $CHANDLE $VALUE slot $NAME $VALUE $MODS $ALL $ALL cls $MAP.map val

Gateway text parameters
Text parameter values consist of literal text, possibly mixed with references to variables and with escape sequences, as shown in Table 34. Table 34
Character \\ \s \n \r

Gateway Configuration Parameter Text Values
Name backslash space new line carriage return

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Table 34
Character \t \0ddd

Gateway Configuration Parameter Text Values (continued)
Name tab character code in octal (0, 1, 2, or 3 digits d)

References to variables that are not followed by punctuation or space characters must be enclosed in curly brackets ( { } ). For example, $NAMEabc is invalid; ${NAME}abc is correct. Non-printable characters and hard spaces must be expressed with an escape sequence. String values for parameters are considered from the first non-white space character up to the first (non-escaped) white space character. Table 35 on page 124 lists the gateway.export file parameters. Table 35 gateway.export file parameters (part 1 of 2)
Parameter Communication protocol parameters Contents parameters cond Description sets the communication protocol. Both categories, new event and modification, use the same protocol. The last one specified is used. The default value is MCELL. sets the condition for a slot to be included in the $ALL variable. Use always to always include the slot. Use propagate to include the slot if its value is different from the default value for the slot and it is able to be parsed. The default value is propagate for new, and always for mod. lists slots that must be dropped from the $ALL and $MODS variable. List of comma separated slot names. Only real slot names can be used. The default value is [], so no slot is dropped. lists additional new slot definitions. List of comma separated settings in the format slotname=slotvalue. slotname represents the name for the new defined slot and slotvalue defines the value of the new slot. The default value is [], so no slot is added. sets and orders the slot names to be included. Non-base class slots must be prefixed with ClassName: . The list can also contain variable references to include those values among regular slots. The default value is [], so no slots are exported.
modify

drop

add

slots

lists slots whose modifications result in a message. Modifications of slots that are not included in this list are ignored. The default value is [], which means that every slot modification is included. Defines the map table with the name name List of comma separated settings in the format original_value=converted_value original_value represents a value that has to be replaced and converted_value is the replacement value. Both values must be literal values.

map.name

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Gateway configuration

Table 35
Format parameters

gateway.export file parameters (part 2 of 2)
Parameter init Description text or value to be printed at the beginning of each export message. The default value is blank. At least one of the init, body, or term parameters must be specified to populate the export file. text or value to be printed for every slot to be included; can use the variable, $NAME (name of the slot) and $VALUE (value of the slot). The default value is blank. At least one of the init, body, or term parameters must be specified to populate the export file. text or value to be printed at the end of each event. The default value is blank. At least one of the init, body, or term parameters must be specified to populate the export file. sets the separator character or string to use between slot values. The default value is nothing. sets the characters leading to quotation when appearing in a slot value. If the parameter value is empty, slot values are never quoted. The default value is standard MRL quotation rules. sets the opening quotation character to use for values that must be quoted. The default value is a single quote (‘). sets the closing quotation character to use for values that must be quoted. The default value is a single quote (‘). default value is a single quote (‘).

body

term

separator quotable

openquote closequote

escapequote determines how to escape a quotation mark inside a quoted value. The

Gateway configuration value mapping
For some destinations, it is necessary to map values from a cell domain to a gateway domain. You can implement value mapping by defining a map table and using the value mapping function. You define a value map table using the parameter map suffixed with the name of the map table.
map.name=[original_value=converted value,original_value=converted value, etc.] name represents the name you give the map table; original_value is the value to be replaced and converted_value is the replacement value.

You convert a value applying a map table, by using the variable $MAP.
$MAP.name(value)

If the specified value cannot be found in the map table, it is not replaced.

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Gateway configuration

For example: You want to modify the value of the enumeration SEVERITY when it is sent to a certain gateway. Value WARNING will be replaced with LOW, and value CRITICAL with URGENT. To do this, create a map table to define the required mapping:

EXAMPLE
map.GW1severity=[WARNING=LOW,CRITICAL=URGENT]

All other values of SEVERITY are passed unchanged. To actually replace the values of slot severity, the slot has to be dropped and a new slot, with the same name, has to be added, mapping the value:

EXAMPLE
drop=[severity] add=[severity=$MAP.GW1severity($VALUE(severity))]

Example of printed events
To print events in BAROC format, set the parameters as shown in Figure 19. Figure 19 Parameters used to print event in BAROC format

init=$CLASS;\n body=\t$NAME=$VALUE;\n term=END\n

The BAROC format produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 20. Figure 20 Example of printed events

MC_CELL_TICK; server_handle=0; date_reception=1010183001; event_handle=2; source=; sub_source=; ... END

The slots are displayed, one per line, indented by a tab (\t). For every slot, the slot name and value are printed, separated by an equals sign (=) and terminated with semicolon and a new line (\n). To terminate, END is printed on a line at the end of the data.

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Exporting events

In the example shown in Figure 21, the first two lines configure the export file so that it exports new events and modified events differently. Specifically, slots.new=[$ALL] exports all slots of new events to the database and slots.mod=[event_handle,$NAME,$VALUE] exports event_handle, slot name, and value of events that are modified to the export file. Figure 21 Command to configure the export file

slots.new=[$ALL] slots.mod=[event_handle, $NAME, $VALUE]

Exporting events
Events received in the cell can be exported to a flat file that resides on the same computer as the cell. The exported events then can be used in third-party products for archiving and data mining. Also, they can be exported to a program on another computer by using the BMC Impact Solutions Gateway. To export events, you configure the statbld.conf and gateway.export files.

Modifying a statbld.conf file to export events
To modify the statbld.conf file to generate an export file, set Export=Yes and remove the # sign that precedes it. If you retain the default value ExportDiscarded=No, events that were discarded in the first four rule phases—Refine, Filter, Regulate, and New/Update—are not included in the export file. Set ExportDiscarded=Yes to include these events in the export file. Use the ExportConfigFileName parameter in the statbld.conf file to set the location of the export configuration file. By default, the location is the gateway.export file in the cell-specific subdirectory of MCELL_HOME\etc. When the data files are generated, the cell can trigger a program, which can be used to import the data automatically into another product, such as a database. This can be controlled using the ExportTriggerArguments and the ExportTriggerProgram parameters, which are set also in the statbld.conf file. The arguments specified in ExportTriggerArguments are passed as arguments to the program, if any. These are always followed by the paths to the new event and modification export files, in that order.

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Modifying a gateway.export file to export events

The export process produces two separate files that are located in the MCELL_HOME\log\cellName directory. These two files are exp.TimeStamp.new, which contains all new events since the previous export, and exp.TimeStamp.mod, which contains all modifications of events after they have first passed through all rule phases. The TimeStamp part of the file name corresponds to the timestamp part used in the mcdb and xact file names and enables archiving of multiple export files. Because the primary goal of exporting events is to import the data into another format for other use, BMC Software recommends that you remove the export files as soon as their contents have been archived. The easiest way to do this is to have them removed by the program that is triggered at the end of the export.

Modifying a gateway.export file to export events
In a gateway.export file, you can configure what data goes into the export file and how that data is formatted. A default gateway.export file exists in the MCELL_HOME\etc directory. Copy the gateway.export file to the MCELL_HOME\etc\cellName directory and edit the copy. By default, the gateway.export file has the format shown in Figure 22. Figure 22 gateway.export file format

# Export Gateway Configuration # cond=always slots.new=[$ALL] slots.mod=[$MODS] body=$VALUE term=\n separator=, quotable=," openquote=" closequote=" escapequote="

Using the default values in the gateway.export file for new events produces output in the format shown in Figure 23. Figure 23 gateway.explore file output for new events

0,1010183001,1,,,,,,,,OPEN,,[admin],1,OK,,,0,0,0,0, mc.exp.000000001,0,['exp:1'],[],[],[],[],[],0,[],exp, 10.0.9.10:1981,28698 0,1010183001,2,,,,,,,,OPEN,,[admin],1,OK,,,0,0,0,0, mc.exp.000000002,0,['exp:2'],[],[],[],[],[],0,[],exp, 10.0.9.10:1981,600

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Configuring tracing for StateBuilder

Using the default values in the gateway.export file for modified events produces output in the format shown in Figure 24. Figure 24 gateway.explore file output for modified events

mc.exp.000000001 exp 10.0.9.10:1981 28698 mc.exp.000000002 exp 10.0.9.10:1981 600 ACK 1010183062 mc.exp.000000003 exp 10.0.9.10:1981 28698

Configuring tracing for StateBuilder
You configure StateBuilder tracing in the MCELL_HOME\etc\statbld.trace file. The statbld.trace file uses the same parameters as the mcell.trace configuration file. For details on the cell tracing configuration, see “Configuring cell tracing” on page 72.

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Configuring tracing for StateBuilder

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132 132 133 134 135 136 136 138 139

6

Defining presentation names
This chapter describes how to add or modify user-friendly presentation names in the following BMC Impact Solutions interfaces: BMC Impact Explorer, BMC Impact Service Model Editor, and BMC Impact Portal. This chapter presents the following topics: Presentation names overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Presentation name resource file locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Default presentation name definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating a new presentation name resource file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Presentation name resource files search order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining presentation names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating or modifying presentation name keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Digitally signing a .jar file with a digital test certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling or disabling presentation names in BMC Impact Explorer tool tips . . . . .

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Presentation names overview

Presentation names overview
By default, BMC Impact Solution products use user-friendly data labels (presentation names) in the user interface instead of the internal object names. For example, the presentation name Occurred is used in the BMC Impact Explorer event list column title and the Summary tab instead of the internal slot name date_reception. Table 36 describes the objects for which presentation names are defined. Table 36
Interface BMC Impact Explorer Events View

Presentation names for BMC Impact Solution interfaces
Objects with presentation names
s s s s s

event class names slot names enumeration class names and values collector names action names service model class names (component types) and slot names service model management class and slot names service model enumeration class names and values policy type names event class names slot names - In the Event Selection Criteria column, the internal slot names are shown because this is the actual text of the ECF. event class names slot names enumeration class names and values service model class names (component types) and slot names service model management class and slot names service model enumeration class names and values service model class names (component types) and slot names service model management class and slot names service model enumeration class names and values

BMC Impact Explorer Services View BMC Impact Explorer Administration View

s s s s s s

BMC Impact Portal

s s s s s s

BMC Impact Service Model Editor

s s s

Presentation name resource file locations
Presentation names are defined within a presentation name resource file. The default presentation name resource file is the kb_core_resource.properties file. The location of the kb_core_resource.properties file depends on which BMC Impact Solutions application you are using.
s

For BMC Impact Explorer, the default presentation names are defined in the following two files:
s

InstallDir\BMC Software\MasterCell\console\lib\lang\kbinfo\ kb_core_resource.properties

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s

InstallDir\BMC Software\MasterCell\console\lib\lang\kbinfo\ kb_deprecated_resource.properties. (contains names for slots that appear on the

Deprecated tab of the BMC Impact Explorer Events View)
s

For BMC Impact Portal, the kb_core_resource.properties file is located in the
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/resources /en_US/smsConsoleServer directory.

s

For BMC Impact Service Model Editor, the kb_core_resource.properties file is located in the BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all /conf/resources/en_US/smsConsoleServer directory.

Extracting the presentation name resource files for BMC Impact Explorer (Java Web Start)
The presentation name resource file for BMC Impact Explorer (Java Web Start) is provided in a .jar file and is digitally signed by BMC Software, Inc. with its digital certificate. To edit the presentation name resource file for BMC Impact Explorer (Java Web Start), you must uncompress the BMC_Portal_Kit_Home/appserver/websdk/tools /jboss/server/all/modules/smsIX.sar /smsIX.war/kbresource.jar into a temporary directory using the following command:
jar xvf kbresource.jar

This command extracts the kb_core_resource.properties and kb_deprecated_resource.properties files.

Default presentation name definitions
The kb_core_resource.properties file maps the internal names of all classes, slots, enumerations, and enumeration values to presentation names for the KB BAROC files that are loaded by default. The default BAROC files loaded are located in one of the following directories:
s

On UNIX: $MCELL_HOME/etc/default/SIM/kb/classes/.load or $MCELL_HOME/etc/default/EM/kb/classes/.load On Windows: %MCELL_HOME%\etc\default\SIM\kb\classes\.load or
%MCELL_HOME%\etc\default\EM\kb\classes\.load

s

NOTE
The event slot names shown on the Deprecated tab in the BMC Impact Explorer Events View do not have presentation names by default. This tab shows in parenthesis the recommended internal slot to use in place of the deprecated internal slot.

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Creating a new presentation name resource file

If you load a supplied BAROC file that is not loaded by default, you should define presentation names for the internal names. For instructions, see “Defining presentation names” on page 136. Collector names and action presentation names are also defined in kb_core_resource.properties by default. However, these entries are used by BMC Impact Explorer only and are used primarily for localization.

Creating a new presentation name resource file
NOTE
When you change or replace the original presentation name resource file for BMC Impact Explorer (Java Web Start application), you must provide one that is signed with your organization’s digital certificate. For instructions on digitally signing a new presentation name resource .jar file, see “Digitally signing a .jar file with a digital test certificate” on page 138.

If you want to modify the exiting presentation names or create new ones, you can create a new presentation name resource file for any BMC Impact Solutions application by following these steps:

1 Create a file with a .properties extension. 2 Save the file. WARNING
To preserve the .properties suffix, save as type All Files. Do not save the .properties file as a .txt file. The configuration changes may not be recognized.

3 (BMC Impact Explorer only.) Place the resource file in the
InstallDir\BMC Software\MasterCell\console\lib\lang\kbinfo\ directory.

4 (BMC Impact Explorer only.) Add the base name of the resource file to the value of
kb_info_resources parameter in the InstallDir\BMC Software\MasterCell\console\etc\ix.properties file using the

following format:
kb_info_resources=ResourceFileName,kb_core_resource, kb_deprecated_resource

5 Follow the procedure, “Creating or modifying presentation name keys” on
page 136, to add presentation name entries for your classes and slots to the new .properties file that you have created.

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Presentation name resource files search order

Presentation name resource files search order
Each BMC Impact Solutions application searches the presentation name resource files differently.

Presentation name resource file search order for BMC Impact Explorer
BMC Impact Explorer searches a list of local resource files for presentation name keys. You specify the order in which resource files are searched by defining the search order in the kb_info_resource parameter located in the InstallDir\BMC Software\MasterCell\console\etc\ix.properties file. Because BMC Impact Explorer searches a set of files in the order you specify, you can override the presentation names in the default file by creating a new .properties file, defining presentation names in this file and listing the new .properties file before the default file in the kb_info_resource parameter. (For instructions on creating a new .properties file, see “Creating a new presentation name resource file” on page 134.) For example, if you created a new .properties file called my_ix_names.properties and you wanted BMC Impact Explorer to search this file first, you would modify the kb_info_resource parameter to look like this:
# Specifies the set of files to load for kb specific resources (base names only, comma separated list) kb_info_resources=my_ix_names, kb_core_resource, kb_deprecated_resource

Presentation name resource file search order for BMC Impact Portal
The BMC Impact Portal searches for presentation name keys in the files located in the
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/resources /en_US/smsConsoleServer and BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools /jboss/server/all/conf/resources/en_US/smsIwc directories.

If you want to add custom classes or extend existing classes to add new attributes, you can add them to the kb_core_resource.properties file located in the
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/resources /en_US/smsConsoleServer directory. For more information about modifying

presentation name keys, see “Defining presentation names” on page 136.

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Presentation name resource file search order for BMC Impact Service Model Editor
The BMC Impact Service Model Editor looks for presentation name keys in the
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/resources/ en_US/smsConsoleServer/kb_core_resource.properties file.

If you want to add custom classes or extend existing classes to add new attributes, you can add them to the kb_core_resource.properties file. For more information about modifying presentation name keys, see “Defining presentation names” on page 136.

Defining presentation names
Perform these procedures to define user-friendly presentation names for new event classes, component types, slots, enumerations, or policy types.

NOTE
If you customize presentation names in the default kb_core_resource.properties file, you will need to merge your customizations into a newer file when you upgrade.

Creating or modifying presentation name keys
The entries in kb_core_resource.properties have the form
key=value

where value is the presentation name. The value can contain space characters. Table 36 lists the formats for the presentation name key. Table 37
Object Class Slot

Presentation name key formats
Key format CLASS.InternalClassName SLOT.InternalClassName.InternalSlotName Note: Use the class name where the slot is originally defined (the superclass).

Enumeration Enumeration Value

ENUM.InternalEnumerationName ENUMVAL.InternalEnumerationName.InternalValueName

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Creating or modifying presentation name keys

To create or modify presentation name keys 1 In a text editor, open either the kb_core_resource.properties file or the new
.properties file that you have created. For instructions on creating a new .properties file, see “Creating a new presentation name resource file” on page 134.

2 To define the presentation name for an event class, add a line with the following
format to the resource file:
CLASS.eventClassName=eventPresentationName Event

3 To define the presentation name for an event slot, add a line with the following
format to the resource file:
SLOT.eventClassName.slotName=slotPresentationName

4 To define the presentation name for a new policy type, add a line with the
following format to the resource file:
CLASS.policyTypeName=policyTypePresentationName Policy

5 To define the presentation name for a policy slot, add a line with the following
format to the resource file:
SLOT.policyTypeName.slotName=slotPresentationName

6 To define the presentation name for a service model component type, add a line
with the following format to the resource file:
CLASS.BMC_ClassName=ComponentTypeName

7 To define the presentation name for a service model component slot (attribute),
add a line with the following format to the resource file:
SLOT.BMC_ClassName.slotName=slotPresentationName

8 When you have finished adding or modifying the presentation names in the
.properties file, save and close the file.

WARNING
To preserve the .properties suffix, save as type All Files. Do not save the .properties file as a .txt file. The configuration changes may not be recognized.

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Digitally signing a .jar file with a digital test certificate

9 (BMC Impact Explorer only.) Deploy the revised files to all machines on which BMC
Impact Explorer is installed.

10 (BMC Impact Explorer only.) If you are using BMC Impact Explorer (Java Web Start
application), digitally sign the .jar file using the instructions in “Digitally signing a .jar file with a digital test certificate” on page 138.

11 Stop and start the BMC Impact Solutions application.

Digitally signing a .jar file with a digital test certificate
If you change or replace the original presentation name resource file for BMC Impact Explorer (Java Web Start application), you must provide one that is signed with your organization’s digital certificate. To accomplish this task, you must have a JDK 1.2 or JDK 1.3 keytool and jarsigner (located in the J2SE SDK bin directory) in your environment path.

1 Create a new key in a new keystore: A Enter the following command.
keytool -genkey -keystore keystore_filename -alias my_alias

B Enter the requested information for each option.
For example: keytool -genkey -keystore myKeystore -alias myself. This command creates a new key in the keystore file named myKeystore on disk.

2 Create a self-signed test certificate by following these steps: A Enter the following command.
keytool -selfcert -alias <my_alias> -keystore <keystore_filename>

B Enter the password at the prompt.
Generating the certificate takes a few minutes.

3 Verify that the key and certificate creation were successful by following these
steps:

A List the contents of the keystore by entering the following command:
keytool -list -keystore <keystore_filename>

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Enabling or disabling presentation names in BMC Impact Explorer tool tips

The resulting listing should appear as follows: Figure 25 Listing of the contents of a keystore file

Keystore type: jks Keystore provider: SUN Your keystore contains 1 entry: myself, Tue Jan 23 19:29:32 PST 2001, keyEntry, Certificate fingerprint (MD5): C2:E9:BF:F9:D3:DF:4C:8F:3C:5F:22:9E:AF:0B:42:9D

4 Sign the .jar file with the test certificate by following these steps: A Enter the following command.
jarsigner -keystore keystore_filename jar_filename alias

B Repeat this step for all the .jar files that you have created or changed. NOTE
A self-signed test certificate should only be used for internal testing, because it does not provide any guarantees about the identity of the user and, therefore, cannot be trusted. You can obtain a trust-worthy certificate from a certificate authority, such as VeriSign, use it to sign the .jar file when the application is put into production.

After you have defined presentation names, they are available for automatic download by users who are using the BMC Impact Explorer consoles that are Java Web Start applications.

Enabling or disabling presentation names in BMC Impact Explorer tool tips
A BMC Impact Explorer user can view the internal object names as tool tips when the mouse pointer is over
s s s s s s

a presentation name in a column header a presentation name that labels a slot value (for example, in an Event Details tab) the label of a drop-down list or field that shows a presentation name, a slot presentation name in a list box (as in the Edit Slot Order window) a class presentation name in the Class Chooser window a class presentation name in either of the Administration tab navigation trees

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Enabling or disabling presentation names in BMC Impact Explorer tool tips

Tool tips are not shown for
s s

classes in the Services tab Of type list classes or enumeration values in lists such as event and data lists or event selection criteria lists

To enable the display of internal names in tool tips, select the Show Internal Names in
Tool Tips on the Global tab of the Edit Configuration dialog.

To always display internal names instead of the presentation names in BMC Impact Explorer, set the value of the kb_disable_resources parameter in InstallDir\BMC Software\MasterCell\console\etc\ix.properties to true. There is no way to display presentation names in some BMC Impact Explorer views and internal names in others.

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Part

2

Event management administration
Part 2

This part presents the following topics: Chapter 7 Event management overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Chapter 8 Working with the Dynamic Data Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Chapter 9 Implementing event management policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Chapter 10 Creating and implementing user-defined policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 Chapter 11 Building event groups and image views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267

Part 2 Event management administration

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143 144 144 146 148 148 149 149

7

Event management overview
BMC Event Manager allows you to detect IT-related problems and to plan the fastest resolution before there is an impact on critical IT services. This chapter presents the following topics: Event management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event collection sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event management in BMC Impact Explorer console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event flow for service impact management and event management . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Explorer Administration View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event management policy definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dynamic data definition using the Dynamic Data Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager cell management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Event management
Event management is the collection, correlation, enrichment, and manipulation of events across the enterprise to enable IT operations staff to focus the proper resources on the most critical events. Event management is required to implement service impact management because events are associated with service model components and contribute to the computation of status of those components. The BMC Event Manager solution formulate
s

collects events from IT components and other event management systems through its event adapters and other BMC Software application-specific integration products processes events to enable faster problem detection and resolution in BMC Impact Manager cells

s

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Event collection sources

s

automates management and corrective actions in the BMC Impact Explorer console displays events in logical groups and graphical image views in the BMC Impact Explorer console integrates with help desk and notification applications

s

s

Event collection sources
BMC Impact Manager collects source event data through event adapters or collects existing events from other event management products through various integration products. Event adapters and integrations prepare the source event data and convert the events into Basic Recorder of Objects in C (BAROC) language format for processing by the BMC Impact Manager event processor. Using BMC Impact Event Adapters or BMC Impact Event Log Adapter for Windows, source event data can be collected from
s s s

operating system and application log files SNMP type 1 and type 2 traps a Telnet, UDP, or TCP data source

For more information on event adapters, see the BMC Impact Solutions: Event Adapters Installation and Configuration. Using the out-of-the-box integrations with PATROL or PATROL Enterprise Manager, BMC Impact Manager can accept events (or alerts) that have already been processed by those systems. With the BMC Impact Integration Developer’s Kit, you can develop a custom solution to obtain source event data from an IT application or infrastructure monitoring solution.

Event management in BMC Impact Explorer console
BMC Impact Explorer is the console used by IT operations staff to manage and monitor events. BMC Impact Explorer consists of the following views:

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Event management in BMC Impact Explorer console

Table 38
View Events

BMC Impact Explorer Views
Description Operators use the Events view to monitor and manage events received from IT components. Service administrators and service managers use this view to define event management policies and to define dynamic data instances for use in event management rules. IT operations staff and service managers monitor service models in this view.

Administration

Services

Events view in BMC Impact Explorer
In the Events view, event instances are displayed in an event list. From the event list, IT operators can perform event operations (such as closing or escalating an event), view event relationships (such as correlation), perform actions on an event, or view the business services related to an event. The Events view contains the following hierarchical navigation trees for viewing events and their severity:
s

event collectors—an event list, a meaningful grouping of events or events grouped by their relationships MetaCollectors—a grouping of events from several different event lists (collectors), showing their combined status event groups—a hierarchy of event lists image views—a graphical representation of the collectors in an event group

s

s

s

For more information on event groupings, see Chapter 7, “Event management overview.”

Administration view in BMC Impact Explorer
The Administration view provides interfaces for editing
s

event management policies In the Event Management Policies tab, service administrators and service managers can define how an event should be processed by the cell after it has been received.

s

dynamic data (in the Dynamic Data Editor)

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Event flow for service impact management and event management

A service administrator or service manager uses the Dynamic Data Editor to define data classes for use in event management rules or service models. To define the data instances, the service administrator or service manager must first define a data class. A service administrator or service manager can also use the Dynamic Data Editor to define alias formulas and grant access to components and relationships. In addition, a service administrator or service manager can also perform commands to stop, pause, restart, or reconfigure a cell from the Administration view.

Services view in BMC Impact Explorer
Service managers can view service models that represent a company’s business services in the BMC Impact Explorer Services view. The service model components are organized into hierarchical relationships that can then be navigated by operators and service managers from the Services view. In the Services view, the service manager or IT operations staff can determine whether a service model component consumes the services of another service model component (consumer) or whether it provides service to another component (provider). The status of the provider component has an impact on the status of the consumer component by means of its impact relationship. Service managers and IT operations staff can determine the root cause of a problem or the impact that a service model component has on a business service in the Related Components tab of the Services view. For more information, see BMC Impact Solutions: Event Monitoring and BMC Impact Solutions: Service Monitoring.

Event flow for service impact management and event management
Service impact management begins with the organization analyzing how various IT assets form the infrastructure that delivers a critical business service. First, the organization decomposes its key business processes and identifies the IT services that support those processes. Next, the service manager catalogs the IT assets or obtains the information from a configuration or asset management system. With this information gathered, the service manager can design a service model and the service model components, or data classes, that represent a business process, its users, and the related IT services.

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Event flow for service impact management and event management

Service model development in BSM
In the BMC Impact Service Model Editor component of the BMC Impact Portal, a service manager defines the service model components that symbolize the real IT assets that underlie the delivery of services, such as applications, servers, and databases; and the logical assets, such as user groups, business processes, and geographic locations. The default BMC Atrium CMDB Common Data Model (CDM) provides the default component types used by the BMC Impact Service Model Editor. The service manager defines the interdependencies of these components and maps the event flow to the components into the model. A service model component can consume the services of another component (consumer relationship), provide services to another component (provider relationship), or both. If an appropriate subclass does not exist or is too generic, a service manager or service administrator can extend the CMDB class hierarchy by adding a new subclass definition. Or, you can extend an existing class definition by adding one or more attributes to store component-specific information. You must make these changes to the CMDB Common Data Model (CDM) by using the BMC CMDB Class Manager console. For more information, see the BMC Atrium CMDB Installation and Configuration Guide. All service model component instances and related data in the service model are stored and managed in the BMC Atrium CMDB. The service manager publishes the service model to the associated BMC Impact Manager cells, which use it in service impact management.

Service impact management in BSM
Each BMC Impact Manager cell running a SIM Knowledge Base processes the events from the various contributing IT assets, associates the events with the service model components that represent those assets, and analyzes the relationships among the components to determine the consolidated status of services to provide real-time, adaptive service management information. With the service model published to BMC Impact Manager cells, when a business service experiences problems, service managers and IT operations staff, monitoring the BMC Impact Portal or the BMC Impact Explorer consoles, can determine the cause of a problem or the impact that a service model component has on a business service. Figure 26 on page 148 shows the service impact and event management process flow.

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BMC Impact Explorer Administration View

Figure 26

Service impact and event management process flow

BMC Impact Explorer Administration View
Administrators use the Administration View interfaces to do these things
s s s

define event management policies with the Event Management Policies Editor define dynamic data with the Dynamic Data Editor stop, pause, restart, or reconfigure a cell

Event management policy definition
An event management policy is an interactively-defined rule that controls how an event that meets certain selection criteria, is processed when it is received by a cell. A policy is similar to a compiled rule written in MRL, but an administrator can easily create it from a pre-defined policy type in the Administration View, Event Management Policy Editor.

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Dynamic data definition using the Dynamic Data Editor

A policy consists of
s

s

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an event selector In the Event Selection Criteria Editor, the administrator defines the filtering criteria used in selecting the events to be processed. a schedule Using the Time Frame Editor, the administrator defines the processing schedule for the selected events. an event management policy type For a list of predefined event management policy types, see “Table 40 Standard event management policy types” on page 167. You can also create new user-defined policy types to add new event processing actions. See Chapter 10, “Creating and implementing user-defined policies,” for information about creating user-defined policy types.

Dynamic data definition using the Dynamic Data Editor
Dynamic data is contextual reference data that is stored in the event repository and updated whenever the context changes while the cell is running. Its function is similar to a global variable. An administrator uses the Dynamic Data Editor to define data class instances for use in event management rules or service models. To define the data instances, the administrator must first define a data class. See Chapter 8, “Working with the Dynamic Data Editor” and BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development for information about dynamic data.

BMC Impact Manager cell management
For information about starting and stopping cells, see BMC Impact Solutions: Event Adapters Installation and Configuration.

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Chapter

8
152 152 152 154 154 154 157 158 159 159 159 159 161 162

Working with the Dynamic Data Editor
8

This chapter describes the Dynamic Data Editor. It contains the following topics: About data classes and dynamic data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Navigating the Dynamic Data Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Navigation pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Toolbar functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Filtering and sorting the Data List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Filtering slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sorting data fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with data instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Extended Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internals tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Data instance context menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a new data instance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editing slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exporting data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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About data classes and dynamic data

About data classes and dynamic data
A data class is the type of class used to define dynamic data. Dynamic data function as contextual variables that can provide data values to rules and policies during event processing. By using dynamic data, you can create generic event management rules and policies that apply broadly. Using dynamic data greatly simplifies the creation and maintenance of the event management rules. For example, without using dynamic data, if you want to create a rule that changes the severity of an event based on the host name of a device, you must create a rule for each host name. Using dynamic data, you can define the host names and corresponding severity as data instances and reference them from one generic rule, rather than writing one rule for each possible host name. To define a data instance, the service administrator or service manager must first define a new data class. As new hosts are added to the environment, the service administrator or service manager adds new data instances dynamically through the BMC Impact Explorer Administration View, using the CLI or an API, or by means the rules themselves. Event management rules do not need to be recompiled to use new data instances.

Navigating the Dynamic Data Editor
You can use the Dynamic Data Editor to add a dynamic data instance to use as a contextual variable in MRL rules and policies (“Adding a new data instance” on page 159). This section discusses the basics of how to navigate the Dynamic Data Editor.

Navigation pane
In the Dynamic Data Editor tab on the Administration view you can view the data classes for a cell in a hierarchical tree, as illustrated in Figure 27.

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Navigation pane

Figure 27

Dynamic Data Editor Navigation Pane

1 2 3 4 5

6

Table 39 lists the parts on the Administration Tab Navigation pane. Table 39
# 1 2 3 4 5

Administration tab navigation pane
Description identifies the dynamic data editor identifies a cell group identifies a cell root class to which all data classes belong data class defined as a subclass of the root class DATA Data subclasses comprise the dynamic data tables in the current cell.

Name Dynamic Data Editor tab cell group icon cell icon DATA class DATA subclass

6

view selection tabs

access to the events, services, or administration portions of the console

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Toolbar functions

Toolbar functions
Figure 28 describes the toolbar buttons available in the Dynamic Data Editor. Figure 28
Hide Navigation

Dynamic Data Editor toolbar
Add data instances Update data instance Copy data instances Export data instances

Hide Details

Hide Data List

Refresh Current Data List

Copy and add data instances

Delete data instances

Paste data instances

Print data instances

Filtering and sorting the Data List
The Data List of the Administration view in BMC Impact Explorer provides GUI elements to assist you in working with a cell’s dynamic data. From the Data List, you can
s s

filter slots sort data

Filtering slots
The Slot Quick Filter allows you to filter the displayed data list according to specified slot criteria.

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Filtering slots

1 Click on the Slot Quick Filter button

or the down arrow to its right to display the Slot Quick Filter dialog box, shown in Figure 29, in which you set the filter criteria. Slot Quick Filter dialog box

Figure 29

2 From the Slot list, select the slot name. 3 From the Operator list, select the specific operator with which the filter acts. 4 In the Value box, enter the value with which you want to filter the Data List. 5 Click OK.
The filter you specified appears in place of the Slot Quick Filter button and the data instances that meet the criteria are displayed in the Data List, as shown in Figure 30. For illustration purposes, the Data List is filtered by Slot name equals Brussels.

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Filtering slots

Figure 30

Unfiltered data list

Unfiltered Data List:

To toggle the quick filter on and off, click on the Slot Quick Filter button or on the filter specifications currently displayed in place of the icon.

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Sorting data fields

Sorting data fields
You can sort fields in the Data List using two methods: a multiple column sort order or single-click on a column to sort immediately by that column.

To sort using multiple column sorting
Designating multiple columns for a sorting order is useful in resolving sort order conflicts in the data list. Multiple column sorting functions as the following illustrates. Set a multiple column sort order for a maximum of three columns with these steps.

1 Right-click on a column head to display the Slot Order Indicator. 2 Select the order position desired for that column.
The Slot Order Indicator permits you to select a column as having no influence on the sort order, or as first, second or third in the order.

NOTE
When you select the first column to include in your sort order the only options available in the Slot Order Indicator are None and First. After you designate a column as first in the sort order, the option Second is available in the Slot Order Indicator when you right-click on the second column. The Third option is available when you have designated a column as Second in the sort order.

3 Right-click next on the column you want to include in the sort order. 4 Select the order position desired for that column. 5 Repeat if you want to establish a third column in the sort order.
An alternative method of multiple-column sorting is to press the Ctrl key and singleclick on a header to add that column as the next column in the sort order. That is, pressing Ctrl and single-clicking on a column sets it as the first in the sort order, pressing Ctrl and single-clicking on the next column sets it as the second in the sort order, and the third column is set as the third in the sort order by again pressing the Ctrl key and single-clicking on the column header. Currently only three columns can be included in the sort order. Pressing the Ctrl key and single-clicking on a fourth column will designate it as third in the sort order in place of the column previously designated as third. Also, pressing the Ctrl key and single-clicking on a column that is part of a sort order will remove it from the sort order. The remaining columns in the designated sort order will reposition in the sort

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Working with data instances

order to replace the one that has been removed. For example, if you press the Ctrl key and single-click on the column previously designated as first in the sort order, it will be removed from the order and the two remaining will move from second to first and from third to second in the new sort order. Remember the following facts about sorting:
s

Only if there is a sorting conflict in the First sort column will the sorting be resolved by use of the Second sort column. The sorting will extend to the Third sort column only if there is a sorting conflict in the Second sort column. Establishing a multiple column sort simply ensures that any sorting conflicts that may arise can be resolved to the third column level.

s

s

If you have established a multiple sort order in the Data List, clicking on one of the sort order columns toggles that column’s display between ascending and descending order, as indicated by the small arrow next to the sort order number in the column head.

To sort using single-click sorting
Sorting also can be done by single-clicking on the column you want to use as the basis of your Data List sort. Even if a multiple sort order has been established, as in the preceding section, you can click on any column that is not part of the designated multiple sort order to reset sorting. This action establishes single column sorting and the column on which you clicked is designated as the First, and only, column in the new sort order.

Working with data instances
From the Administration view, you can edit and manipulate a cell’s dynamic data instances. All classes that are visible in the Administration View are subclasses of the base data class DATA and MC_SM_DATA. Subclasses of MC_SM_DATA are shown in the navigation pane, but data instances are not shown for these classes. Each cell’s data class definitions reside in its Knowledge Base. To define data instances in the Administration view for a custom data class, you must first define that data class in the KB of the cell. For further information, see the BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

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Extended Details tab

Extended Details tab
The Extended Details tab displays extended details of a selected data instance.

Internals tab
The Internals tab displays the internal data as defined on the base DATA class.

Data instance context menu
The Data List of the Administration view in BMC Impact Explorer provides GUI elements to assist you in working with a cell’s dynamic data. Right-click on a data instance in this pane to display the pop-up context menu. Discussion here focuses on the New, New Copy, Edit, and Delete pop-up context menu options.

Adding a new data instance
This section describes how to create a new data instance.

To create a new data instance 1 Right-click on a data instance. 2 Select the New pop-up menu option to display the New tab in the Details pane of
the Administration View. The fields on the New tab are the slots for which data information can be entered for this new data instance. The fields with a white background can be edited; fields with an asterisk are required. The unique data identifier slot (mc_udid) has a white background and is empty.

NOTE
The mc_udid slot information is assigned by the cell and BMC Software recommends that you allow the cell to assign this value rather than entering one of your own.

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Adding a new data instance

The cell assigns a valid value for this slot. The slot fields that are dimmed will be completed automatically by the cell. The only exception to this is the list associated with the Type field that permits you to select from specified options, as shown in Figure 31. Figure 31 Type field list

3 Click OK to complete the new data instance and close the New tab.
The success or failure of your attempt to create a new data instance will be reflected in the message bar at the bottom of BMC Impact Explorer window. Figure 32 illustrates a notification of a failed attempt to create a new data instance. Figure 32 Message bar

To create a new data instance with the New Copy option
Unlike the New menu option, the New Copy option requires you to right-click on a selected data instance in the Data List of the Administration View to display a New tab in the Details pane of the Administration View in BMC Impact Explorer window, as shown in Figure 33. Note that certain of the editable fields contain slot information that is copied from the selected data instance in the Data List.

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Editing slots

Figure 33

New data instance created with the New Copy option

The New Copy menu option provides the same selection in the type field list as the New menu option, as shown in Figure 34. Figure 34 Type field List

When you have entered or edited the appropriate slot information, click OK to create the new data instance and close the New tab. The success or failure of your attempt to create a new data instance is reflected in the message bar of BMC Impact Explorer window.

Editing slots
A class definition consists of one or more slots. Each slot has a data type and can have specific attributes called facets that can control the values that the slot can have or control aspects of a class instance’s processing. A class that is a subclass to another class inherits all the slots of the parent class. The Edit pop-up menu option allows you to update the selected data instance of the current data list in the Data List display pane.

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Exporting data

1 Select and right-click on the data instance to display the Edit tab in the Details pane
of BMC Impact Explorer window. The Edit tab contains the slot value information of the selected data instance. Fields that can be changed have a white background.

2 To save the edited information and close the Edit tab, click OK.

Exporting data
From the Data List in the Administration view, you can export a data instance as a file with a specified file name, in a format selected from a list, and containing all or only the visible slot information available for the data instance. Multiple data instances can be exported to the same file at the same time. Do this by selecting all the data instances your want included to begin the export process.

1 Select a data instance and select the File => Export menu option or click on the
Export toolbar button to display the Export Policies dialog box, as shown in Figure 35.

Figure 35

Export Data dialog box

2 In the Format list, select the format for the export file, as shown in Figure 36.
Figure 36 Export Data dialog box—Selecting the data format

3 With the Visible Slots and All Slots option buttons, select whether you want to
include only the visible slots or all slots in the file. If you select All Slots, the Filter for Importing check box is available.

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Exporting data

4 In the To File box, accept the default or specify the file name and location for the
export file.

5 Click OK to create the export file and close the Export Data dialog box.
For illustration purposes, in Figure 37, the export file mcdata.csv containing information on all the slots for the selected data instance is created in C:\Documents and Settings\zane\My Documents. Figure 37 Contents of mcdata.csv

Figure 38 illustrates an export file containing four data instances. Figure 38 Export file containing four data instances

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Chapter

9

Implementing event management policies
9

This chapter describes event management policy types, event management policies and their components, and explains how to implement them. This chapter presents the following topics: What is an event management policy? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 How an event management policy differs from a rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 When to use an event management policy rather than a rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Event management policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 How standard event management policies differ from dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Out-of-the-box event management policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 How event management policies work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Event management policy workflow overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Event selectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Event selector groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Timeframes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Evaluation order of event policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Compiling event policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 How dynamic data enrichment event management policies work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 External enrichment data sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 How to create a new local timeframe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 How to add a notification service (notification policies only). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment source file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Creating new standard event management policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Creating a new standard blackout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Creating a new closure policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Creating a new correlation policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Creating a new enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Creating a new escalation policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
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What is an event management policy?

Creating a new notification policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Creating a new propagation policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Creating a new recurrence policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Creating a new suppression policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Creating a new threshold policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 Creating a new timeout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Enabling and disabling out-of-the-box standard event management policies . . . . . 226 Creating a new dynamic data enrichment event management policy . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event management policies . . . 238 Enabling a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Enabling a dynamic data enrichment location policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Enabling a dynamic data enrichment service contact policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation policy . . . . 249 Importing dynamic data enrichment source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Verifying that the policy is running. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Trouble-shooting event management policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Problem: The policy is not running . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Problem: I receive an invalid data error when running a dynamic data enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Problem: I receive an error message when running a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Trouble-shooting tools for dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Editing event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Deleting an event selector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257

What is an event management policy?
An event management policy is one of several generic rule types that perform actions against events that meet selection criteria specified in an associated event selector. An event management policy selects the events that you want to process, defines the processes needed to manage those events, and schedules when the events are processed.

How an event management policy differs from a rule
Like a rule, an event management policy processes events and performs event management. However, unlike rules, an event management policy
s

is easily defined interactively through the BMC Impact Explorer Administrator interface of the BMC Impact Explorer console rather than being manually written in MRL.

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When to use an event management policy rather than a rule

s

uses an event selector by which you specify the criteria used to select events for processing by the policy. The event selector allows you to specify a number of events that meet selection criteria. This gives the event policy greater flexibility than a rule. does not require compilation because it is implemented using predefined data classes and precompiled rules.

s

When to use an event management policy rather than a rule
Use a policy if there is a fairly simple, routine action that you would like to apply to many events. If some complex event manipulation is required that is specific to a small subset of events, a rule written in MRL may be more appropriate In some cases, a rule can provide better performance than its event management policy equivalent. If an event management policy gives problematic performance, substituting an equivalent rule might rectify the performance issue.

Event management policy types
Event management policy types provide a base policy definition that allows you to quickly create certain types of policies. Policy types allow you to quickly set up routine event management processes. Table 40 describes the standard event management policy types. Table 40
Blackout

Standard event management policy types (part 1 of 2)
Definition specifies which events the receiving cell should classify as unimportant and process no further but log for reporting purposes A blackout event management policy might specify that the cell ignore events generated from a successful logon to an internal system.

Policy name

Closure Correlation

closes a specified event in response to receipt of a separate event relates one or more cause events to an effect event, and can close the effect event The cell maintains the association between these cause-and-effect events.

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Table 40

Standard event management policy types (part 2 of 2)
Definition adds values for specific event slots if those slots are empty as received from the event source An enrichment event management policy can also reformat slots or normalize slot values.

Policy name Enrichment

Escalation

raises or lowers the priority level of an event after a specified period of time A specified number of event recurrences can also trigger escalation of an event. For example, if the abnormally high temperature of a storage device goes unchecked for 10 minutes or if a cell receives more than five high-temperature warning events in 25 minutes, an escalation event management policy might increase the priority level of the event to critical.

Notification

sends a request to an external service to notify a user or group of users of the event A notification event management policy might notify a system administrator by means of a pager about the imminent unavailability of mission-critical piece of storage hardware.

Propagation Recurrence Suppression

forwards events to other cells or to integrations to other products combines duplicate events into one event that maintains a counter of the number of duplicates specifies which events that the receiving cell should delete Unlike a blackout event management policy, the suppression event management policy maintains no record of the deleted event.

Threshold

specifies a minimum number of duplicate events that must occur within a specific period of time before the cell accepts the event For events allowed to pass through to the cell, the event severity can be escalated or de-escalated a relative number of levels or set to a specific level. If the event occurrence rate falls below a specified level, the cell can take action against the event, such as changing the event to closed or acknowledged status.

Timeout

changes an event status to closed after a specified period of time elapses

It is also possible to define custom policy types that allow you to do specialized event processing not supported by the out-of-the-box policy types. For more information about creating user-defined policy types, see Chapter 10, “Creating and implementing user-defined policies” on page 259.

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How standard event management policies differ from dynamic data enrichment policies

How standard event management policies differ from dynamic data enrichment policies
A standard event management policy requires you to use the BMC Impact Explorer to input data into a policy. This type of policy works well if you only want to apply the policy to a small number of events or hosts. Examples of standard event management policies that are provided out-of-the-box with the product include:
s s s

PATROL_Portal_Closure Apache_Login_Failed_Repeats Blackout_Suppression

A dynamic data enrichment policy provides additional context to an event by extracting data from an external source and appending it to the event so it is accessible to IT operations. For example, it may be useful for IT operators to know the location of a particular piece of equipment. This type of information is not normally included in a standard technical event; however, you can use dynamic data enrichment to add this information to the event by accessing data stored external to the product (for example, an asset store). If you want to apply a policy to a large number of hosts or events, you should use a dynamic data enrichment policy. Examples dynamic data enrichment policies that are provided out-of-the-box with the product include:
s s s s

Location_Enrichment Service_Contact_Enrichment PATROL_Message_Translation Dynamic_Blackout

To use these out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies, you must enable the policy, import useful data into the sample .csv files and then import the data into the cell using the policy mechanism. For instructions on creating dynamic data enrichment policies, see “Creating a new dynamic data enrichment event management policy” on page 227.

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Out-of-the-box event management policies

Out-of-the-box event management policies
Several event management policies are included with the product that enable you to interactively set up routine event processing quickly. Table 41 lists the out-of-the-box policies and indicates whether or not each out-of-the-box policy is enabled by default. Table 41
Policy type Closure

Out-of-the-box policies
Policy name PATROL_Portal_Closure Adapter_Start_Stop_Closure Client_Stop_Closes_Start Description closes previous Portal events for the same managed object closes previous events for the same adapter instance Client Stop events close Client Start events and then close themselves Enabled? Yes Yes Yes

Dynamic Blackout

Dynamic_Blackout

suppresses events that meet a specified No criteria during a specified time period. appends the location of a server to an event appends contact information for a server administrator to an event. For example, contact information may include the name of the administrator for that server and his or her telephone number. No No

Dynamic Enrichment Location_Enrichment Service_Contact_Enrichment

No PATROL_Message_Translation replaces the text of existing PATROL event messages with messages that can be more easily understood by operators in your enterprise. Recurrence Suppression Timeout Apache_Login_Failed_Repeats Blackout_Suppression PATROL_Portal_Timeout handles repeating Apache Login Failed No events suppresses Blackout events times out OK Portal events No Yes

For instructions on using these out-of-the-box policies, see “Creating new standard event management policies” on page 191 and “Creating a new dynamic data enrichment event management policy” on page 227.

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How event management policies work

How event management policies work
All event management policies must include the following components:
s s s s

event selector process(es) timeframe(s) evaluation order

Each event management policy defines selection criteria that is applied to incoming events to determine which events are processed. A timeframe determines when the policy is active or inactive. The evaluation order determines which policies are implemented first if there is a conflict. In addition to these components, dynamic data enrichment policies also require a dynamic data enrichment source file, for more information on how dynamic data enrichment policies interact with dynamic data enrichment source files, see “How dynamic data enrichment event management policies work” on page 176.

Event management policy workflow overview
Figure 39 illustrates the workflow for creating and implementing an event management policy. Figure 39 Event management policy definition workflow

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Event selectors

Event selectors
An event selector is the component of an event management policy that selects one or more events to which an event management policy applies. Rather than specifying a particular event to process, as a rule does, a selector specifies a list of event selection criteria (also called an Event Condition Formula (ECF)). When an incoming event meets any of the specified event selection criteria, the cell applies the associated event management policy to the event. See “Event selection criteria” on page 173 for more information. Table 42 lists the out-of-the-box event selectors. Table 42 Out-of-the-box event selectors
Events selected Adapter starting and stopping events Apache web server login failed events client stop events

Event selector Group Event selector Default Default Default Default Default None None None Adapter_Start_Stop Apache_Login_Failed Client Stop

PATROL_Portal_OK_Events OK severity events coming from PATROL Portal PATROL_Portal_Events All_Events Blackout_Events PATROL_Events events coming from PATROL Portal all events all blacked-out events events coming from PATROL agents

You can create custom event selectors. For information about creating event selectors, see “How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria” on page 187.

Event selector groups
An event selector group, created when an event selector is defined, allows you to organize event selectors. For example, you could create event selector groups that classify event selectors by the severity of events. You could create one event selector group for major severity events and one for minor severity events. Event selector groups appear as folders in the By Selector subtree in the Event Management Policies navigation pane. The names of event selectors which belong to a group are displayed as group.event_selector_name in the selectors lists in the list pane and in the By Event Class subtree. The name also is displayed in a separate field in the Selector Details tab.

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Event selection criteria

Figure 40 shows an event selector group called Default that has the Adapter Start Stop event selector highlighted. Notice that details about the highlighted event selector appear in the Selector list in the right pane of the Administration view. Figure 40 Event selector group name

event selector group name

Event selectors do not have to belong to a group. Event selectors that do not belong to a group are displayed directly under the By Selector subtree.

Event selection criteria
Event selection criteria tells a cell to which incoming events to apply the associated event policies. By using selection criteria to choose events rather than creating a single event management policy for each event type, event selection criteria perform the event management policy equivalent of dynamic data for rules. One event management policy using event selection criteria that spans a range of event types can be easier to maintain than a separate rule for each of many event types. The BMC Impact Explorer interface allows you to interactively create syntactically accurate event selection criteria expressions without the need for specific syntax knowledge because the editor verifies that the expression has the correct syntax. For more information see, “How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria” on page 187.

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Timeframes

Timeframes
Timeframes allow you to specify when the event management policy is active. For example, during scheduled database maintenance periods, you might want to activate an event suppression policy for maintenance-related events to reduce unnecessary event accumulation. For events to be impacted by a timeframe setting, the timeframe must be active for the entire time that is specified in the policy.

EXAMPLE
An escalation policy is defined to escalate an event to priority level 1 (escalated one level) after 10 minutes. Events are generated. No event will be escalated for at least 10 minutes. Five minutes after the policy is enabled, the policy is disabled. Even though the policy was active at the beginning of the 10 minute period, no event is impacted by the policy because it is not active at the end of the 10 minutes. An escalation policy is defined to escalate an event priority after 30 minutes with an active timeframe from 4:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. At 4:45 P.M. events are generated. The active time period expires at 5:00 P.M. Events generated at 4:45 P.M. are not impacted by the policy because the timeframe is not active at 5:15 P.M.

Table 43 describes the types of timeframes you can use in an event management policy. Table 43
Type local timeframe

Timeframe types and descriptions
Icon Description Local timeframes are used for event policies only. They are maintained in the cell and are only visible to a single cell. You create local timeframes from the Administration view of the BMC Impact Explorer, as described in “How to create a new local timeframe” on page 180.

global timeframe

Global timeframes are used for event policies and service model components. They are maintained in the CMDB and are visible to all cells in an environment. You create global timeframes in the Service Model Editor. For instructions, see “Working with timeframes” on page 380.

The following timeframe definitions are provided out-of-the-box:
s s s s

US_Holidays_2004 US_Holidays_2005 Weekdays Weekend

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Evaluation order of event policy types

Evaluation order of event policy types
BMC Impact Managers evaluate event policies of different types based on the order of the rule phase in which the event management policy executes. The standard rule phases and their associated event policy types are shown in Table 44. Table 44
1

Evaluation order of event policy types
Rule phase refine Event policy type blackout enrichment dynamic blackout dynamic enrichment timeout (initialization) suppression threshold1 threshold1 escalation closure recurrence no related event management policy correlation timeout (arm) notification propagation no related event management policy timeout (execute) escalation

Evaluation order

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1

filter NOPASS regulate threshold new abstract correlate execute propagate delete timer

Unlike other event policies, cells evaluate threshold event policies in two distinct phases—the first phase for the hold threshold and the second phase for the pass through threshold.

WARNING
Although event policies of different types are evaluated according to their associated rule phase, event policies of the same type do not have an evaluation order. For example, if event selectors for two event policies of the same type select the same event, the cell evaluates the event according to one event management policy and ignores the other event management policy. To prevent omission of event management policy evaluation, you must create mutually exclusive event selection criteria for two event policies of the same type. With the exception of dynamic blackout, dynamic enrichment, notification and propagation event policies, two or more policies of the same type should not execute against the same event. In the case of exceptional event policies, the cell evaluates all event policies of those four types, even if their selectors reference the same event.

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Compiling event policies

Compiling event policies
Event policies are validated during compilation. Event policies are compiled when a BMC Impact Manager (cell) starts. As soon as compilation successfully completes, event processing begins. If, during cell startup, the compilation of any policy fails, the BMC Impact Manager issues an error message that lists the causes of the failure and stops. If, while the BMC Impact Manager is running, an event management policy is defined or is changed, it compiles dynamically.

How dynamic data enrichment event management policies work
Dynamic data enrichment policies require the same components as standard event management policies. However, dynamic enrichment policies allow you to import external enrichment data into the policy, rather than having to enter it manually. First, you must either export data from a data source (such as an asset database) or manually enter information into the enrichment file (.csv). Once the data enrichment source file contains the data required, you can use the policy to import the data into BMC Event Manager for use in the enrichment process. Figure 41 illustrates the dynamic data enrichment flow. Figure 41 Flow of data required to implement a dynamic data enrichment policy

External enrichment data sources
An external enrichment data source can provide additional information about an event that is not available from the technology from which the event originates. An example of an external enrichment data source is a database such as an asset data store. Information from the database must be manually exported into a flat delimited file, so that BMC Event Manager can access the information. The recommended format to export the data to is a .csv file. BMC provides some sample policies and associated enrichment data sources in the %HOME%\Mastercell\console\etc\samples directory.

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External enrichment data sources

Dynamic data enrichment policies can also use data included in BMC PATROL Enterprise Manager (PMEP) files if you are migrating from BMC PATROL Enterprise Manager to the BMC Event Manager solution.

Dynamic data enrichment source files
A dynamic data enrichment source file must contain at least one match field and at least one output field. A match field is the lookup or key field which the dynamic data enrichment policy uses to identify the incoming event. You may use multiple match fields to identify an incoming event. An output field identifies the type of enrichment information that is to be added to the event. Once the policy has matched the event data of the match field(s) with the data in the enrichment file, it will add the associated enrichment data from the enrichment file into the output field identified in the policy.

WARNING
It is critical that the policy definition and the data enrichment source file contain the exact same number of match fields and output fields in the same order. If the match fields and output fields in the enrichment file and the policy do not match, the policy will not run. For example, if you are using the contact.csv file that is included with the product, you must select the Host Class, Host, Object Class, and Object slots as the Match Fields and the Service and Owner slots as the Output Fields to correspond to the slots in the contact.csv file.

Wildcards are supported for pattern matching which allows for more generic policy rules to be written.

Sample dynamic data enrichment source files
Table 45 lists the product-supplied dynamic data enrichment source files that are located in the %HOME%\Mastercell\console\etc\samples directory. These sample files provide commonly needed enrichment information.

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External enrichment data sources

You can use these files as a guide to create your own dynamic data enrichment source files or you can modify and use these sample files. Table 45 Dynamic data enrichment source files
Policy name Location_Enrichment Service_Contact_Enrichment Description appends the location of a server to an event appends contact information for a server administrator to an event. For example, contact information may include the name of the administrator for that server and his or her telephone number. replaces the text of existing PATROL event messages with messages that can be more easily understood by operators in your enterprise. This file includes predefined message translations that will be immediately useful in your enterprise. For more information, see “Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment source file” on page 185. suppresses events that meet a specified criteria during a specified time period.

Data source file location.csv contact.csv

TextTranslation.csv PATROL_Message_Translation

blackout.csv

Dynamic_Blackout

For information on creating and using dynamic data enrichment source files, see “How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file” on page 183.

PMEP files
PMEP files are BMC PATROL Enterprise Manager (PATROL Message Enhancement Processor) enrichment configuration files. In BMC PATROL Enterprise Manager, PMEP provided a similar dynamic data enrichment capability. If you are migrating from BMC PATROL Enterprise Manager to BMC Event Manager (BEM), you can continue to use the PMEP files in the BEM environment. Depending on your requirements, you can use one or more of the following configuration files shown in Table 46.

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External enrichment data sources

Table 46
File

Enrichment configuration files
Description Provides event suppression for specified time periods when matching criteria are met Provides a name that identifies the location (or server) from which the PATROL Agent events are being sent to Agent Connection. The name is added to the ObjectLocation field when matching criteria is met Provides the Business Service Views or Application Groups to which the events belong. The support staff that are responsible for correcting the problem are identified by an event and any trouble ticket information will be included in an event when matching criteria is met. Service information is added to the Service field; contact information is added to the ObjectStaff field and concatenated into the ObjectLocation field and trouble ticket information is concatenated into the ObjectLocation field Provides modifications to text in the FreeText field when matching criteria is met

Blackout.cfg Location.cfg

ServiceContact.cfg

TextTranslation.cfg

In data event policies, your PMEP file selection will populate the event class and match fields with predefined values. Figure 42 lists the default PMEP event classes and slot values. Figure 42 Default PMEP event classes and slots

# PMEP Text Transaclation pmep.text.eventclass=PATROL_EV pmep.text.match_fields=mc_object_class,mc_parameter,p_class pmep.text.output_fields=msg # PMEP Service Contact pmep.service.eventclass=EVENT pmep.service.match_fields=mc_host_class,mc_host,mc_object_class,mc_object pmep.service.output_fields=mc_service,administrator,mc_notes # PMEP Location pmep.location.eventclass=EVENT pmep.location.match_fields=mc_host pmep.location.output_fields=mc_location # PMEP Blackout pmep.blackout.eventclass=EVENT pmep.blackout.match_fields=mc_host_class,mc_host,mc_object_class,mc_object,mc_paramemter

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How to create a new local timeframe

How to create a new local timeframe
NOTE
Global timeframes are created in the Service Model Editor. For instructions, see “Working with timeframes” on page 380.

Local timeframes allow you to specify periods of time that determine when an event management policy will or will not run. You can set up a single timeframe that can apply to multiple policies. For example, if you have several policies that you do not want to run on weekends, you can set up a timeframe from 12:00AM to 12:00 AM on both Saturday and Sunday and call that timeframe Weekend. You can then apply the timeframe Weekend to all policies that you do not want to run on weekends. If you do not specify a timeframe for a policy, the policy will run continuously. For a list of timeframes that are included out-of-the-box, see “Timeframes” on page 174.

NOTE
Timeframes are required for blackout policies.

To define an event management policy timeframe 1 From the toolbar of the Administration view, click the View/Update Timeframes
button . The Timeframes window is displayed, as shown in Figure 43. Figure 43 Timeframes

2 From the Timeframes toolbar, click the New Timeframe button.
The Timeframe Edit dialog is displayed, as shown in Figure 44 on page 181.

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How to create a new local timeframe

Figure 44

Timeframe Edit

3 Enter or modify the appropriate information in the fields available in the
Timeframe Edit dialog as described in Table 47.

Table 47
Field Name

Timeframe Edit dialog options (part 1 of 2)
Description Name of the timeframe Description of the timeframe Period when the timeframe begins and ends, and the duration of the timeframe. Changing the duration will change the value in the End field, and vice-versa. The individual time zone of cell will be used in timeframe calculations.

Description Start, End, and Duration

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How to add a notification service (notification policies only)

Table 47
Field

Timeframe Edit dialog options (part 2 of 2)
Description Schedules how often the timeframe will recur. Changing the selection in the left side list will change the options available on the right side. Besides the Daily, Weekly, Monthly, and Yearly timeframe options, you can select individual dates that are part of the timeframe by selecting Date List and choosing dates from the displayed calendar.

Recurrence pattern

Range of recurrence

When you have selected a Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or Yearly timeframe option, you can choose the starting and ending date range for the recurrence. Optionally, instead of choosing an end date, you can enter the number of recurrences for the timeframe.

4 To create additional timeframes, click Save and repeat this procedure starting with
step 2.

5 To close the editor, click Close.

How to add a notification service (notification policies only)
Before you can create or enable a standard notification event management policy (as described in “Creating a new notification policy” on page 208), you must add a notification service.

To add a notification service 1 On the Administration view, choose the Dynamic Data Editor tab. 2 In the Dynamic Data Editor tree, expand the server for which you want to add
notification.

3 Expand the Data section, and then expand the Cell Data section. 4 Select Notification Service.
The available notification services are listed in the Notification Service tab in the right pane of the Administration view.

5 In the Notification Service tab, right-click one of the available notification services
and choose New.

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6 On the New tab, in the Name field, enter a unique name for the service. 7 In the Type field, choose one of the notification service types. 8 In the Service field, enter the command to initiate notification. 9 In the available_targets field, enter the individual or group recipients of the
notification.

10 Click OK.

How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file
NOTE
Dynamic data enrichment source files are not required for standard event management policies. You only need a dynamic data enrichment source file if you are creating a dynamic data enrichment policy.

Before you enable a dynamic enrichment policy, you must import or enter the data that you want to use for enrichment into a data file. You can import the enrichment data into any delimited flat file; however, BMC Software recommends importing the data into a .csv file and using Microsoft Excel to view and manipulate the contents of the file. The spreadsheet format of Microsoft Excel makes it easier to view and manipulate the information in the file. You can use the sample data enrichment files provided with the product as a guide to set up your own data enrichment source files. The sample files are located in the %HOME%\Mastercell\console\etc\samples directory. For a list of sample files provided with the product, see “Sample dynamic data enrichment source files” on page 177.

Before you begin
If you will be referencing a timeframe in your dynamic data enrichment source file, you must ensure that the timeframe that you will be referencing already exists. If the timeframe you want to reference does not exist, you must define it as described in “How to create a new local timeframe” on page 180.

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How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file

To create a dynamic data enrichment source file 1 In Microsoft Excel, create a new file and save it as type .csv. 2 In each column of the spreadsheet, enter information that corresponds to each
match value and output value that will be included in your dynamic data enrichment policy.

WARNING
It is critical that the policy definition and the data enrichment source file contain the exact same number of match fields and output fields in the same order. If the match fields and output fields in the enrichment file and the policy do not match, the policy will not run. For example, if you are using the location.csv file that is included as a sample with the product, this file has two columns—mc_host and mc_location. If you are creating a dynamic data enrichment location policy that uses the location.csv file as the data enrichment source file, you must select the Host slot as the Match Field and the Location slot as the Output Field to correspond to the columns in the location.csv file.

3 Save and close the file. To edit a sample dynamic data enrichment source file 1 Open one of the sample data source files included with the product located in the
%HOME%\Mastercell\console\etc\samples directory.

2 Import or enter information specific to your enterprise.
Figure 45 shows an example of an edited location.csv file. Figure 45 Example edited location.csv file

# This enrichment file is used to add an extra field "mc_location" to an event. # This can be useful to group together or understand the physical location of IT components to help with event assignment and resolution. # mc_host, mc_location Texan1, Houston Texan2, Houston Cowboy*, Dallas

The location for hosts Texan1 and Texan2 is listed as Houston. The location for all hosts beginning with Cowboy (for example, Cowboy1, CowboySmith, CowboyAikman) is listed as Dallas.

3 Save and close the file. 4 The data enrichment source must be imported into the policy each time you
modify the .csv file. For instructions on importing dynamic data enrichment data source, see
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Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment source file

Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment source file
The sample PATROL messaging text translation data enrichment source file, TextTranslation.csv, provided in the %HOME%\Mastercell\console\etc\samples directory is prepopulated with over two hundred translations for messages from the following Knowledge Modules:
s s s s s s s s s

BMC SQL-BackTrack NetWorker OBSI Module PATROL KM for CONTROL-M PATROL KM for UNIX and Linux PATROL KM for Microsoft Windows Servers PATROL KM for Netware PATROL KM for Sybase PATROL KM for Internet Server Manager PATROL KM for Oracle BMC Performance Manager for Microsoft Windows Terminal Services

If you are integrated with PATROL, you can gain instant value by enabling this policy and importing the data from TextTranslation.csv into the cell as described in “Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation policy” on page 249. This policy allows you to reword ambiguous event messages into messages more easily understood by the IT operators handling the events in Impact Explorer. The sample policy, TextTranslation.csv, will translate PATROL event messages coming from either BMC Impact Integration for PATROL 3.0 or BMC Impact Integration for PATROL 7.0.

Overview of the PATROL messaging text translation

dynamic data enrichment source file
Figure 46 shows some sample rows included in the TextTranslation.csv file.

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Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment source file

Figure 46

Sample rows in the TextTranslation.csv file

The first three columns are match fields for incoming events. The first column contains the object class or application class of the KM. The second column contains the parameter. The third column contains the origin class. The last column is the output field or the message that should be displayed when an event matching the criteria in the first three columns is received. For example, in the first row, the cell will look for an event coming from the CPUCpuUtil parameter of the CPU application class. When the cell receives that event, it will display the message:
CPU Utilisation is at 97%

or whatever number the CPU utilization percentage is at that time. Many of the messages in the sample file contain slots that will be populated with values from the parameter. For information on the syntax for using slots in a text message see, “Editing the PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment source file.”

Editing the PATROL messaging text translation

dynamic data enrichment source file
You can also add to and edit the TextTranslation.csv file, if required. For example, you might want to translate the messages included in the file into your native language. Or, you might want to include messages related to a KM that is not already included in the file. One of the most powerful features of the text translation file is the ability to include CORE_EVENT base event class slots that will allow you to dynamically populate the message with information from parameters or other BMC Impact Manager components. This feature allows you to create messages that are very meaningful.

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Figure 46 shows some actual messages in the TranslationText.csv file that include variables. For example, Figure 47 Variable syntax example
FSCapacity Filesystem %mc_object% is %mc_parameter_value%\% full

FILESYSTEM

This message includes the %mc_object% and %mc_parameter_value% variables. This syntax in the enrichment source file allows you to substitute the value of the slot you have referenced into the event message. To insert a slot value into a message, use the following syntax:
Message text %<slot_name>% message text

If you need to include a % sign in the actual message text, you must precede the % character with a back slash (\). For example, in Figure 47 the desired text message includes a % character. The syntax for the message is %mc_parameter_value%\%
full.

If the value of mc_object is D: and the value of mc_parameter is 97 the reworded message would be:
Filesystem D: is 97% full.

For a list of CORE_EVENT base event class slots that you can use in text messages, see BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria
An event selector is the component of an event management policy that selects one or more events to which an event management policy applies using specified event selection criteria. When an incoming event matches any of the specified event selection criteria, the cell applies the associated event management policy to the event.

Before you begin
s

Unless you want the event management policy to run continuously, you must define a timeframe as described in “How to create a new local timeframe” on page 180.

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How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria

s

[For dynamic data enrichment policies only.] Create a data enrichment source file as described in “How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file” on page 183.

To create an event selector and specify event selection criteria 1 From the Administration view, select the Event Management Polices tab. 2 Select a valid node (non-cell group) from the navigation pane.
Valid nodes for event selector creation are all visible nodes except the top-level cell group node. When the Add Event Selector button in the toolbar becomes active, this is an
indication that valid node is selected.

3 On the Administration view toolbar, click the Add Event Selector button
The Selector Details tab, shown in Figure 48, is displayed. Figure 48 Selector Details tab

.

4 In the Selector Name field, type the event selector name. 5 In the Group field, type an event selector group name.
The event selector that you create in the next step will belong to the event selector group that you enter. If you enter a name of an event selector group that does not exist, that group will be created.

6 To the right of the Base Event Class field, click the

button to display an event class chooser dialog box (shown in Figure 49) from which to choose the event class.

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How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria

Figure 49

Class Chooser dialog box

7 Select an event class from the tree and click OK to accept the class.
For more information about event classes, see the BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

8 In the Description field, type an optional description for the event selector. 9 Click Add to add event selection criteria to this event selector.
The Add Event Criteria editor is displayed.

10 From the Add Event Criteria editor, type a description for the event selection criteria
in the Description slot.

11 In the Event Class field, use one of the following methods to select an event class on
which to base the event selection criteria:
s

Accept the default event class in the Event Class field. Change the class by clicking the browse button. The Class Chooser dialog box is displayed, select a class and click OK.

s

NOTE
You cannot change the event class specified in an ECF to any class that is not at the same level or below the event class already specified in the ECF. If the ECF contains slots in the current class that are not in the new class, you cannot change to the new class, even when it occurs in the hierarchy rooted in the base event class.

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How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria

12 In the Selection Definition section, shown in Figure 50, create an expression that is
used to determine whether an event of the selected class is processed by the policy by choosing a Slot, Operation, and Value. Figure 50 Selection Definition section of the Add Event Criteria editor

The example expression in Figure 51 tests events for Windows security messages containing logon and logoff messages. You might use this expression as part of an event selector for implementation in an event blackout policy that hides these security events from display but maintains their history. Figure 51 Example event selection criteria expression

For a list and definitions of EVENT slots available for selection, see the event and data classes appendix of the BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development. For a list and definitions of the operators available for each slot, see the section on operators in the Master Rule Language (MRL) appendix of the BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

13 Click OK to save the expression and close the Add Event Criteria editor.
The event selection criteria is displayed in the Event Selection Criteria section of the Selector Details tab, as shown in Figure 52. Figure 52 Completed event selection criteria in Selector Details tab

14 To add more event selection criteria, click Add and repeat step 10 through step 13. 15 Click OK to save the event selector and its event selector group.
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Creating new standard event management policies

Creating new standard event management policies
This section provides instructions for creating new standard event policies based on default event management policy types. If you want to create an event management policy based on a custom policy type, see Chapter 10, “Creating and implementing user-defined policies.”

Before you begin
s

Unless you want the event management policy to run continuously, you must define a timeframe as described in “How to create a new local timeframe” on page 180. Define an event selector and specify event selection criteria as described in “How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria” on page 187.

s

Table 48 lists each standard event management policy type and the page number of the procedure for each type. Table 48
Blackout Closure Correlation Enrichment Escalation Notification Propagation Recurrence Suppression Threshold Timeout

Standard event management policy types and procedures
See... “To create new a standard blackout policy” on page 192 “To create a new closure policy” on page 194 “To create a new correlation policy” on page 197 “To create an enrichment policy” on page 200 “To create an escalation policy” on page 204 “To create a new notification policy” on page 209 “To create a new propagation policy” on page 212 “To create a new recurrence policy” on page 214 “To create a new suppression policy” on page 217 “To create a new threshold policy” on page 219 “To create a new timeout policy” on page 223

To create this event policy...

Creating a new standard blackout policy
A blackout policy specifies a period of time during which incoming events that match the event specification criteria will be ignored. All ignored events are logged.

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Creating a new standard blackout policy

An example of a blackout event management policy might have the cell ignore events generated from a successful log on to an external system.

To create new a standard blackout policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the Policy Type folder, select Blackout Policy. 3 Click the Add Policy button
.

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Blackout Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view as shown in Figure 53.

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Figure 53

Blackout Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy. 7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

s

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:

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s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 Click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new closure policy
An closure policy closes a specified event when a separate specified event is received.

To create a new closure policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the Policy Type folder, select Closure Policy. 3 Click the Add Policy button
.

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A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Closure Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view as shown in Figure 54. Figure 54 Closure Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.
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6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy. 7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation Timeframes. The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

s

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 Click Edit Event Criteria.
The Add Event Criteria window is displayed.

10 In the Add Event Criteria window, specify event selection criteria for the event type
that you want to close and click OK.

11 To close only matching events that occur within a certain timeframe, check the
Close Events with Age Less Than check box and specify an amount of time. If the Close Events with Age Less Than check box is not checked, there is no limit on the

time between the closed event and the closing event.

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12 To suppress the closing event, check the Suppress the Closing Event check box. 13 To save the completed event closure policy, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the specified event selector.

Creating a new correlation policy
A correlation policy relates one or more cause events to an effect event. If desired, this policy can close the effect event. The cell maintains the association between these cause-and-effect events.

To create a new correlation policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the Policy Type folder, select Correlation Policy. 3 Click the Add Policy button
.

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Correlation Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view, as shown in Figure 55.

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Creating a new correlation policy

Figure 55

Correlation Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 To enable the event management policy immediately, select the Enabled check box.
If you do not want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.

7 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.

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8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation Timeframes. The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are enabled.

s

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 Complete a separate Cause Event tab as appropriate for each cause event that you
want to define. Table 49 describes each of the controls in the Cause Event tabs. Table 49 Cause Event tab controls
Description Select this check box to relate the cause events to the effect events; this information is stored in the cell. Click this button to specify the selection criteria for the cause event. Select this check box and enter a time limit within which the cause event must occur to produce the effect event.

Field name Enable check box Edit Event Criteria button Correlation Timespan check box

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Table 49

Cause Event tab controls
Description

Field name Close Effect Event radio buttons

Choose one of the following radio buttons to specify the circumstances under which the effect event will be closed:
s

Upon Correlation—as soon as events are associated (cause and effect), the effect event is closed On Cause Event Closure—when the cause event closes, the effect event is closed also On Its Own—closing the cause event has no consequence to the effect event

s

s

Escalate Cause Event check box De-escalate Effect Event check box

select this check box to escalate the cause event to the specified priority level select this check box to de-escalate the effect event

10 To save the completed event correlation policy, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new enrichment policy
An enrichment policy adds values for specific event slots if those slots are empty when the event is received from the event source. An enrichment policy can also reformat slots or normalize slot values.

To create an enrichment policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the Policy Type folder, select Enrichment Policy. 3 Click the Add Policy button
.

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.

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The Enrichment Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view, as shown in Figure 56. Figure 56 Enrichment Policy Details tab

5 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy. 6 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.

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7 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time that the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation Timeframes. The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are enabled.

s

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

8 Enable the following check boxes as necessary to assign appropriate settings:
s s

Event Priority—the relative priority to assign to the event (1 is a high priority) Event Category—the classification to assign to the event; categories include

s s s

— availability — capacity — configuration — operational — performance — recovery — security — SLM (service level management) — message text format Object Type—the object type against which the event applies, such as a server Location to Set—the physical location of the object, such as a city Services to Set—the service that the event is associated with

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9 In the Message Text Format box, define the message slot enrichment for the event: A From the list of available event slots in the Event Slot box, select an event slot to
which to add enrichment information and click Insert.

B To insert a a slot value into the message, either type the slot name surrounded
by % characters or select the slot name from the Event Slot list and click Insert. The box is a standard text box. You can position the cursor and type or insert text and slot refeences in any order. The Event Slot list and Insert button are provided as a convenience so you do not have to remember the valid slot names. The resulting string of characters in the Message Text Format box, %<slot name>%, whether typed or inserted, is used as a template to create the message (msg slot) for the event. Repeat steps A and B to add more enrichment information to the event slot, if necessary.

NOTE
The hidden and list of slots are not available for message enrichment. To avoid unpredictable results when adding a text message, use no more than one set of quotation marks.

10 To save the completed event enrichment policy, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new escalation policy
An escalation policy raises or lowers the priority level of an event after a specified period of time. A specified number of event recurrences can also trigger escalation of an event. For example, if the abnormally high temperature of a storage device goes unchecked for 10 minutes or if a cell receives more than five high-temperature warning events in 25 minutes, an escalation event management policy could increase the priority level of the event to critical.

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To create an escalation policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the Policy Type folder, select Escalation Policy and click OK. 3 Click the Add Policy button
.

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Escalation Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view, as shown in Figure 57.

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Creating a new escalation policy

Figure 57

Escalation Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy. 7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.

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8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation Timeframes. The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are enabled.

s

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 In the Time Escalation section, shown in Figure 58, use the Timespan Before Priority
is Escalated selectors to enter the number of a specified period of time that must elapse before an event is escalated. The default time period is seconds, but this time period can be changed to minutes, hours, or days by selecting one of these time

periods from the drop list.

NOTE
You can set Time Escalation or Rate of Event Arrival (step 13 through step 15 on page 208), or both. To set only one, leave the fields of the other set to zero.

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Figure 58

Time Escalation Controls

10 Choose one of the following radio buttons to determine how the priority of the
event will be escalated after the specified time has elapsed:
s

Levels to Escalate/De-escalate Priority By—Choose this radio button to escalate or

de-escalate the event by a specified number of levels after the time period specified by the Timespan Before Priority is Escalated selector has elapsed. Enter the number of levels that the event is to be escalated.
s

Set Priority to This Value—Choose this radio button to set the event to a specified priority level after the time period specified by the Timespan Before Priority is Escalated selector has elapsed. Choose the priority level from the drop list.

11 (optional) To prevent the event from being escalated after it has been
acknowledged, select the Do not Escalate if Acknowledged check box.

12 (optional) To prevent the event from being escalated after it has been assigned,
select the Do not Escalate if Assigned check box.

13 In the Rate of Event Arrival section, shown in Figure 58, in the Number of Events
Needed for Escalation selector, enter the number of events that must occur before

the event is escalated.

NOTE
You can set Time Escalation (step 9 through step 12) or Rate of Event Arrival, or both. To set only one, leave the fields of the other set to zero.

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Figure 59

Rate of Event Arrival Controls

14 In the Timespan in which Events Must Arrive selector, enter the time in which the
events must arrive before the event is escalated or the event priority is changed.

15 Choose one of the following radio buttons to determine how the priority of the
event will be escalated after the number of events have arrived within the specified timespan:
s

Levels to Escalate Causal Event Priority—Choose this radio button to escalate the

causal event by a specified number of levels after the number of events specified
Number of Events Needed for Escalation selector have occurred within the time period specified by the Timespan in which Events Must Arrive selector. Enter the

number of levels that the event is to be escalated.
s

Set Priority to This Value—Choose this radio button to set the event to a specified priority level after the number of events specified Number of Events Needed for Escalation selector have occurred within the time period specified by the Timespan in which Events Must Arrive selector. Choose the priority level from the

drop list.

16 To save the completed event escalation policy, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new notification policy
A notification policy sends a request to an external service to notify a user or group of users that the event has occurred. For example, a notification event management policy might notify a system administrator by means of a pager about the imminent unavailability of a missioncritical piece of storage hardware.

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Before you begin
You must add a notification service as described in “How to add a notification service (notification policies only)” on page 182.

To create a new notification policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the Policy Type folder, select Notification Policy and click OK. 3 Click the Add Policy button
.

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Notification Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view, as show in Figure 60.

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Creating a new notification policy

Figure 60

Notification Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy. 7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.
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8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation Timeframes. The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

s

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 From the Notification Service drop list, select the service to use as the notification
mechanism. The default service is email.

10 In the Add field, type the name of a person or group to notify. Click Add to add the
name to the Notify slot. Add more names or groups if necessary.

11 From the Event Status that will Notify Users list, choose the event status that you
want to trigger the notification.

12 In the Notification Text field, enter the notification message. If desired, you can use
the Event Slot drop list to choose event slots to add to the notification message. Click the Insert button to insert the slots into the message. Enter a space before and after each slot that you add.

13 (optional) Select the Auto Acknowledge check box to automatically acknowledge the
event.

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14 (optional) Select the Auto Assign check box to automatically assign the event to the
user you select from the list.

15 To save the completed event notification policy, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new propagation policy
A propagation policy forwards events to other cells or to integrations to other products.

To create a new propagation policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the Policy Type folder, select Propagation Policy and click OK. 3 Click the Add Policy button
.

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Propagation Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view, as shown in Figure 61.

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Creating a new propagation policy

Figure 61

Propagation Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description box, type a description of the event management policy. 7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

s

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:

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Creating a new recurrence policy

s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 In the Propagate to all of list, choose one or more cells (Impact Managers).
Figure 62 Propagation cell list

10 In the Propagate to one of list, select one or more cells (Impact Managers). 11 To save the completed event propagation policy, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new recurrence policy
A recurrence policy combines duplicate events into one event that maintains a counter of the number of duplicates.

To create a new recurrence policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the Policy Type folder, select Recurrence Policy and click OK. 3 Click the Add Policy button
214 BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

.

Creating a new recurrence policy

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Recurrence Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view, as shown in Figure 63. Figure 63
Recurrence Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name box, type a unique alphanumeric name (with no spaces) for the
event management policy.

6 In the Description box, type a description of the event management policy.
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Creating a new recurrence policy

7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

s

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 If you want to define a time window for events that are considered to be recurring,
check the Recurring Events Must Arrive Within this Timespan check box and set the maximum time after the initial event within which an event must arrive to count toward recurrence. If the box is not checked, there is no limit on the time between duplicate events that are counted as recurring.

10 In the Slot Updates section, select any original event values that you want updated
by the latest recurrent event values.

11 To save the completed event recurrence policy, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

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Creating a new suppression policy
A suppression policy specifies the events that the receiving cell should delete. Unlike a blackout event management policy, the suppression event management policy maintains no record of the deleted event.

To create a new suppression policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the Policy Type folder, select Suppression Policy. 3 Click the Add Policy button
.

The Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Suppression Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view, as shown in Figure 64.

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Creating a new suppression policy

Figure 64

Suppression Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description box, type a description of the event management policy. 7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation Timeframes. The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

s

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

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s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 Click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new threshold policy
A threshold policy specifies a minimum number of duplicate events that must occur within a specific period of time before the cell accepts the event. For events allowed to pass through to the cell, the event severity can be escalated or de-escalated a relative number of levels or set to a specified level. If the event occurrence rate falls below a specified level, the cell can take action against the event, such as changing the event to closed or acknowledged status.

To create a new threshold policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the Policy Type folder, select Threshold Policy. 3 Click the Add Policy button
.

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Creating a new threshold policy

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Threshold Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view as shown in Figure 65.

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Creating a new threshold policy

Figure 65

Threshold Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy. 7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

s

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.
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B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 For the Number of Duplicate Events Received slot, supply a numeric value and an
associated time measurement to specify the threshold above which an event is accepted.

10 Select one of the following radio buttons (The threshold-specific options displayed
on the tab change depending on which button you select.):
s

Hold Events Until Threshold is Met—Select this option to prevent creation of any

specified event until the number of events exceeds the threshold within the specified time period. If you select Hold Events Until Threshold is Met, the options shown in Figure 66 are displayed. Specify whether to include allowing the last, first, highest, or lowest severity event to pass and whether to acknowledge or close the passed event when incoming (new) events fall below a specified low threshold rate. Figure 66 Hold Events options

s

Pass Events through—select this option to create all events when they meet the required threshold rate.

If you select Pass Events through, the options shown in Figure 67 are displayed.
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Creating a new timeout policy

Figure 67

Pass Events Through options

Choose one of the following radio buttons to determine how the severity of the event will be escalated or de-escalated:
s

Levels to Escalate/De-Escalate Event Severity By—Choose this radio button to escalate or de-escalate the severity of the event by a specified number of levels after the number of events specified Number of Duplicated Events Received selector have occurred within the time period specified by the Timespan in which Events the Must Arrive selector. Enter the number of severity levels that the event is to be escalated. Set Severity to This Value—Choose this radio button to set the event to a specified severity level after the number of events specified Number of Duplicated Events Received selector have occurred within the time period specified by the Timespan in which Events the Must Arrive selector. Choose the

s

severity level from the drop list.

NOTE
From the Set Severity to This Value drop list, choose Critical, Non-critical, Minor, Warning, or OK. Do not choose Unknown, as it is considered a status rather than a severity.

11 To save the completed event threshold policy, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new timeout policy
A timeout policy changes an event status to closed after a specified period of time elapses.

To create a new timeout policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the Policy Type folder, select Timeout Policy.

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3 Click the Add Policy button

.

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Timeout Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view as shown in Figure 68. Figure 68 Timeout Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.

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7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

s

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 In the Timeout Event After field, enter a number of time periods that must elapse
before an event will time out. The default time period is seconds, but this time period can be changed to minutes, hours, or days by selecting one of these time periods from the drop list.

10 To save the completed event timeout policy, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

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Enabling and disabling out-of-the-box standard event management policies

Enabling and disabling out-of-the-box standard event management policies
This section provides instructions for enabling and disabling out-of-the-box standard event management policies. For a list of out-of-the-box event management policies, see “Out-of-the-box event management policies” on page 170. For instructions on enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies, see “Enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event management policies” on page 238.

To enable or disable a standard event management policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the
Policy Type folder.

1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select the policy type for the out-of-the-box
standard event policy that you want to enable. Out-of-the-box standard event policies are included under the following policy types:
s s s s

Closure Policy Recurrence Policy Suppression Policy Timeout Policy

A list of out-of-the-box standard event management policies of that policy type are displayed in the right pane of the Administration view as shown in Figure 76. Figure 69 List of event management policies

3 From the list of event management policies, select the policy that you want to
enable. The Details tab for that policy is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view.
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4 On the BMC Impact Manager toolbar, click the Update Policy button
the Details tab to be edited.

to enable

5 Enable or disable the policy by selecting or deselecting the Enabled check box. 6 Click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new dynamic data enrichment event management policy
This section provides instructions for creating a new dynamic data enrichment event management policy (page 227) and for creating a new dynamic enrichment blackout policy (page 233).

Before you begin
s

Ensure that the timeframe referenced in your dynamic data enrichment source file exists. If it does not exist, you must define the timeframe as described in “How to create a new local timeframe” on page 180. Determine which event selector you want to apply to your dynamic data enrichment policy. If none of the out-of-the-box event selectors are appropriate for your policy, define an event selector and specify event selection criteria as described in “How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria” on page 187. Create a data enrichment source file as described in “How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file” on page 183.

s

s

To create a new dynamic data enrichment policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Enrichment Policy. 3 Click the Add Policy button
.

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A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab, shown in Figure 70, is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view.

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Figure 70

Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy. 7 To enable the policy immediately, select the Enabled check box. If you do not want
to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.
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8 In the Execution Order field, if more than one policy exists, specify the order of
execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be one greater the largest current execution order. If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

9 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

s

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

10 If you do not want to accept the default event class, you can select an event class by
clicking in the Event Class field of the Match Fields section, selecting a new event class, and clicking OK. The Event Class determines what slots are available in the Available Event Fields column.

11 In the Class Chooser dialog box, select an event class and click OK.

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12 In Available Event Fields column, select the slots that correspond to the match fields
in your dynamic data enrichment source file. Use the left arrow button to move those slots into the Match Fields column. You may select and move multiple slots at the same time.

13 In Available Event Fields column, select the slots that correspond to the output
fields in your dynamic data enrichment source file. Use the right arrow button to move those slots into the Output Fields column. You may select and move multiple slots at the same time.

WARNING
It is critical that the policy definition and the data enrichment source file contain the exact same number of match fields and output fields in the same order. If the match fields and output fields in the enrichment file and the policy do not match, the policy will not run. For example, if you were creating a file similar to the location.csv file that is included with the product, you must select the Host slot as the Match Field and the Location slot as the Output Field to correspond to the slots in the location.csv file.

14 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event, if necessary.

15 In the Match Table section, in the Type field, accept the default. NOTE
Typically, you do not need to the change the value of the Type field. You can override the default; however, you must use a unique tag within the given match table.

16 In the Match Table section, in the Tag field, accept the default. NOTE
The Tag field uniquely identifies the match table that will be used by the policy instance. You do not need to the change the value of this field. You can override the default; however, you must use a unique tag within the given match table.

17 In the Match Table section, in the Data File field, do one of the following actions:
s s

Type the path to the enrichment data source. To browse for the enrichment data source, click,

.

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1. In the File Chooser dialog box, select the dynamic data enrichment source file appropriate for your policy. For more information, see “External enrichment data sources” on page 176. 2. Click OK.

18 In the Match Table section, in the File Format field, select one of the following radio
buttons to specify the type of data enrichment file to import:
s

Data file with this separator—Choose this radio button to import a flat, delimited file, such as a .csv file. Enter a separator to delimit the data column in the file.

For example, if you are using a .csv file, enter a comma (,) as the separator.
s

PMEP file—Choose this radio button to import a PMEP table and select the appropriate PMEP format for your policy from the drop list: — — — — — — — — Blackout Blackout CSV Location Location CSV Service Service CSV Text Text CSV

NOTE
If you select the PMEP file button, the Event Class, Match Fields, and Output Fields are autopopulated with predefined values and become read-only.

19 Click OK.
If this is the first time a policy is saved, the following confirmation dialog box is displayed: Figure 71 Import confirmation

20 Click Yes.

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A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

21 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in “Importing dynamic data enrichment source” on page 253.

To create a new dynamic data enrichment blackout policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Blackout Policy. 3 Click the Add Policy button
.

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK. The Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view, as shown in Figure 72.

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Figure 72

Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.

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7 To enable the policy immediately, select the Enabled check box. If you do not want
to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the policy later.

8 In the Execution Order field, if more than one policy exists, specify the order of
execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be one greater the largest current execution order. If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

9 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

s

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

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10 If you do not want to accept the default event class, you can select an event class by
clicking in the Event Class field of the Match Fields section, selecting a new event class, and clicking OK. The event class determines what slots are available in the Available Event Fields column.

11 In the Class Chooser dialog box, select an event class and click OK. 12 In Available Event Fields column, select the slots that correspond to the match fields
in your dynamic data enrichment source file. Use the left arrow button to move those slots into the Match Fields column. You may select and move multiple slots at the same time.

13 In Available Event Fields column, select the slots that correspond to the output
fields in your dynamic data enrichment source file. Use the right arrow button to move those slots into the Output Fields column. You may select and move multiple slots at the same time.

WARNING
It is critical that the policy definition and the data enrichment source file contain the exact same number of match fields and output fields in the same order. If the match fields and output fields in the enrichment file and the policy do not match, the policy will not run. For example, if you were creating a file similar to the location.csv file that is included with the product, you must select the Host slot as the Match Field and the Location slot as the Output Field to correspond to the slots in the location.csv file.

14 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event, if necessary.

15 In the Match Table section, in the Type field, accept the default. NOTE
Typically, you do not need to the change the value of the Type field. You can override the default; however, you must use a unique tag within the given match table.

16 In the Match Table section, in the Tag field, accept the default. NOTE
The Tag field uniquely identifies the match table that will be used by the policy instance. You do not need to the change the value of this field. You can override the default; however, you must use a unique tag within the given match table.

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17 In the Match Table section, in the Data File field, do one of the following actions:
s s

Type the path to the enrichment data source. To browse for the enrichment data source, click,

.

1. In the File Chooser dialog box, select the dynamic data enrichment source file appropriate for your policy. For more information, see “External enrichment data sources” on page 176. 2. Click OK.

18 In the Match Table section, in the File Format field, select one of the following radio
buttons to specify the type of data enrichment file to import:
s

Data file with this separator—Choose this radio button to import a flat, delimited file, such as a .csv file. Enter a separator to delimit the data column in the file.

For example, if you are using a .csv file, enter a comma (,) as the separator.
s

PMEP file—Choose this radio button to import a PMEP table and select the appropriate PMEP format for your policy from the drop list: — — — — — — — — Blackout Blackout CSV Location Location CSV Service Service CSV Text Text CSV

NOTE
If you select the PMEP file button, the Event Class, Match Fields, and Output Fields are autopopulated with predefined values and become read-only.

19 Click OK.
If this is the first time a policy is saved, the following confirmation dialog box is displayed: Figure 73 Import confirmation

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20 Click Yes.
A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

21 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in “Importing dynamic data enrichment source” on page 253.

Enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event management policies
This section provides instructions for enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event management policies.

Before you begin
You must export data from an external enrichment data source into the dynamic data enrichment source files provided with the product before you can enable any of the out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies. For more information see, “How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file” on page 183. The dynamic data enrichment source file for the PATROL Message Text Translation policy (TextTrans.csv) is the only out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment source file that includes valid data. You can enable PATROL Message Text Translation policy without exporting data into TextTrans.csv. For more information about TextTrans.csv, see “Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment source file” on page 185. Table 50 lists each out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event management policy type and the page number of the procedure for each type. Table 50 Out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event policy types and procedures
See... “Enabling a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy” on page 239 “Enabling a dynamic data enrichment location policy” on page 242

To enable this event policy... Dynamic blackout Dynamic location enrichment

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Table 50

Out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event policy types and procedures
See... “Enabling a dynamic data enrichment service contact policy” on page 246 “Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation policy” on page 249

To enable this event policy... Dynamic service contact enrichment Dynamic PATROL message translation

Enabling a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy
A dynamic data enrichment blackout policy specifies external schedules that initiate event blackout.

Before you begin
For the dynamic blackout policy to work, you must define the timeframes referenced in the enrichment source file (blackout.csv). If any of the timeframes referenced in the enrichment source file have not been created in BEM, then the policy will not run. For instructions on defining timeframes, see “How to create a new local timeframe” on page 180.

To enable a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Blackout Policy.
The Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view, as shown in Figure 74.

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Enabling a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy

Figure 74

Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab

3 On the BMC Impact Explorer toolbar, click the Update Policy button
the Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab editable.

to make

4 On the Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab, select the Enabled check box.

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5 In the Execution Order field, if more than one policy of this type exists, specify the
order of execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be one greater the largest current execution order. If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

6 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active and/or inactive (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

s

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes timeframe lists are displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

7 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event to assist with trouble-shooting an event.

8 Click OK.
A confirmation dialog box is displayed, asking if you want to import data now, as shown in Figure 75.

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Figure 75

Import Data Confirmation dialog box

9 Click Yes.
A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

10 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in “Importing dynamic data enrichment source” on page 253.

Enabling a dynamic data enrichment location policy
The dynamic enrichment location policy adds location information to an event. Some examples of uses for a dynamic enrichment location policy include:
s

Provides information to IT Operations so that they know which area/datacenter the problematic technology is located in and can direct engineers more quickly to the problem. Allows IT Operations to build views in Impact Explorer of specific areas/data centers and understand at a glance where the problems are. Allows IT Operations to view reports in BMC Impact Reporting based on location. For example, they can identify which locations which are generating the most events. If you are integrating with a service desk the location identifier can be passed along with the rest of event, providing more useful information to the engineer that will be assigned to handle the incident.

s

s

s

To enable a dynamic data enrichment location policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Enrichment Policy.
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Enabling a dynamic data enrichment location policy

A list of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies are displayed in the right pane of the Administration view as shown in Figure 76. Figure 76 List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies

3 From the list of out-of-the-box dynamic enrichment policies, select
Location_Enrichment.

The Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab, shown in Figure 77, is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view.

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Figure 77

Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab

4 On the BMC Impact Explorer toolbar, click the Update Policy button
the Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab editable.

to make

5 To enable the policy, select the Enabled check box.

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6 In the Execution Order field, if more than one of this type of policy exists, specify
the order of execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be one greater the largest current execution order. If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

7 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

s

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

8 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event, if necessary.

9 Click OK.
If this is the first time a policy is saved, the following confirmation dialog box is displayed:

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Figure 78

Import confirmation

10 Click Yes.
A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

11 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in “Importing dynamic data enrichment source” on page 253.

Enabling a dynamic data enrichment service contact policy
The dynamic enrichment location policy adds contact information related to the
originating technology to an event.

For example, you can add a server administrator’s name and telephone number to all events originating from a particular server

To enable a dynamic data enrichment service contact policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Enrichment Policy.
A list of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies are displayed in the right pane of the Administration view as shown in Figure 79. Figure 79 List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies

3 From the list of out-of-the-box dynamic enrichment policies, select
Service_Contact_Enrichment. 246 BMC Impact Solutions: Administration

Enabling a dynamic data enrichment service contact policy

The Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab, shown in Figure 80, is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view. Figure 80 Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab

4 On the BMC Impact Explorer toolbar, click the Update Policy button
the Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab editable.

to make

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5 To enable the policy, select the Enabled check box. 6 In the Execution Order field, if more than one type of this policy exists, specify the
order of execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be one greater the largest current execution order. If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

7 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

s

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

8 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event, if necessary.

9 Click OK.

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If this is the first time a policy is saved, the following confirmation dialog box is displayed: Figure 81 Import confirmation

10 Click Yes.
A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

11 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in “Importing dynamic data enrichment source” on page 253.

Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation policy
If you are integrated with PATROL, the dynamic data enrichment PATROL message translation policy allows you to substitute existing PATROL messages with messages that
are meaningful to your enterprise. For example, you can use the PATROL message translation policy to change this message: NT_CPU.CPU_0.CPUprcrUserTimePercent parameter CPUCputil triggered on 90 <= 97 <= 100

to the following, more comprehensible message:
CPU Utilization is at 97%

NOTE
A sample dynamic data enrichment service contact policy data source file, TextTranslation.csv, is provided in the %HOME%\Mastercell\console\etc\samples directory. The TextTranslation.csv file includes translations for many common messages that will be useful in your enterprise. If you are integrated with PATROL, BMC Software recommends that you take advantage of the data that is already included in this sample file. For information about using the TextTranslation.csv file, see “Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment source file” on page 185.

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To enable a dynamic data enrichment PATROL message translation policy 1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration view, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Enrichment Policy.
A list of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies are displayed in the right pane of the Administration view as shown in Figure 82. Figure 82 List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies

3 From the list of out-of-the-box dynamic enrichment policies, select
PATROL_Message_Translation.

4 Click the Update Policy button

.

The Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab, shown in Figure 83, is displayed in the details pane of the Administration view.

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Figure 83

Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab

5 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the event management policy at this time, it can be enabled later.

6 In the Execution Order field, if more than one policy exists, specify the order of
execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be one greater the largest current execution order. If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

7 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:
s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always Active. To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation Timeframes.

s

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Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation policy

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to
define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list. To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable list.

s

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

8 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event, if necessary.

9 Click OK.
If this is the first time a policy is saved, the following confirmation dialog box is displayed: Figure 84 Import confirmation

10 Click Yes.
A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

11 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in “Importing dynamic data enrichment source” on page 253.

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Importing dynamic data enrichment source
Before a dynamic data enrichment policy can take effect, the data in the dynamic data enrichment source file must be imported.

1 Ensure that the policy is enabled. 2 Select Import tab.
The Import tab is displayed as shown in Figure 85. Figure 85 Import tab

Table 51 describes the uneditable fields of the Import tab. These fields are for your information only. Table 51
Field Data File File Format Last Action

Import tab uneditable fields
Description Path to the enrichment data source Type of file used by the policy Last time an import (replace or merge) was completed.

3 In the field opposite the Import button, select whether you want to Replace the
existing data in the cell or Merge new data with existing data in the cell.

4 Click Import.
The data is imported from the file into the cell.

5 Verify that the information has been uploaded by ensuring that the Last Action
information in the Import tab shows a completed upload message.

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Verifying that the policy is running

Verifying that the policy is running
To verify that the policy is running,

1 Send an event that should trigger the policy 2 Access the History tab, scroll down to the Operations Log and verify that your
policy has executed. Figure 86 shows the History tab for a successfully executed dynamic data enrichment policy. Figure 86 History tab showing executed dynamic data enrichment policy

Trouble-shooting event management policies
This section lists some common problems encountered with event management policies and some tools to assist you trouble-shoot problems not listed here.

Problem: The policy is not running
If the policy is not running, try the following:
s

Access the Policy Details tab for the policy and ensure that the Enabled check box is selected. (Dynamic data enrichment policies only) Access the Policy Details tab for the policy and ensure that the Match Fields and Output Fields contain the exact same number of
match fields in the same order as the associated data enrichment source file.

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Problem: I receive an invalid data error when running a dynamic data enrichment policy

s

(Dynamic data enrichment policies only) Ensure that you have imported the data from the data enrichment source file into the cell using the Import tab.

Problem: I receive an invalid data error when running a dynamic data enrichment policy
Access the Policy Details tab for the policy and ensure that the Match Fields and Output
Fields contain the exact same number of match fields in the same order as the associated data enrichment source file.

Figure 87 shows an example error message generated by dynamic data enrichment policy that has a mismatch between the match and output fields defined in the policy and the number of columns included in the enrichment data source file. Figure 87 Invalid data error: dynamic enrichment policy

Problem: I receive an error message when running a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy
Ensure that the timeframe defined in the data source enrichment file actually exists. For information on creating valid timeframes, see “How to create a new local timeframe” on page 180. Figure 88 shows an example error message generated by dynamic blackout policy that has an invalid timeframes.

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Trouble-shooting tools for dynamic data enrichment policies

Figure 88

Invalid timeframe error: dynamic blackout policy

Trouble-shooting tools for dynamic data enrichment policies
You can use the following methods to trouble-shoot the dynamic data enrichment policies that you have defined:
s

Enable the Match Tracing check box in the Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab to to add diagnostic notes to the event. Access the History tab and check the Operations Log to determine which dynamic data enrichment policy added the information into the event.

s

Editing event selection criteria
If you need to edit event selection criteria that you have already defined, follow these steps:

1 From the event management policy tab navigation tree, select an event selector. 2 Click the Update Event Selector button
selection criteria in the list and click Edit. The Edit button remains inactive until you select an event selection criteria. .

3 From the Event Selection Criteria section of the Selector Details tab, select an event

4 Use the Edit Event Criteria editor to make the necessary changes to the description,
event class, or expression.

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Deleting an event selector

5 To save the edited event selection criteria, click OK. 6 From the Selector Details tab, click OK to save the edited event selection criteria and
the event selector.

Deleting an event selector
If you need to delete an event selector that you have defined, follow these steps:

1 From the event management policy navigation tree, select the appropriate event
selector.

2 Click the Delete Event Selector button

.

The Delete Confirmation dialog box is displayed.

3 Click Yes.
The event selector is deleted.

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Creating and implementing userdefined policies
10

This chapter describes how to create and how to implement user-defined policy types. This chapter presents the following topics: Understanding user-defined event policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Understanding event processing rules (MRL) for policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Format of event processing rules for policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How a rule for a policy type is processed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sources of information about rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . User-defined event policy type creation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating user-defined policy types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining the policy data class for a new policy type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining presentation names for a new policy type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating the event processing rule(s) for a new policy type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Understanding user-defined event policy types

Understanding user-defined event policy types
Predefined policy types cannot cover all requirements of different BMC Impact Solution implementations. To support specialized event processing, you can also define and implement custom event policy types to do specialized event processing not supported by the predefined policy types. For instructions on creating event policy types, see “User-defined event policy type creation” on page 262.

Understanding event processing rules (MRL) for policy types
This section describes the form of policy type rules and discusses how they work.

Format of event processing rules for policy types
A typical event processing rule for a user-defined policy type has this form:
<rule-phase> rule-name: using_policy { <POLICY_TYPE> ($POL) where [ ($POL.enabled == 1) AND (($POL.active_timeframes == [] OR tf_active($POL.active_timeframes)) AND NOT tf_active($POL.except_timeframes)) ] } $POL.selector_ecf ($EV) where [ <other conditions> ] { <actions>; opadd($EV, $POL.name, "action name", ""); } END

How a rule for a policy type is processed
The processing of a rule for a policy type is a follows:

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1. The using_policy clause finds the applicable policy, that is, the instance of the user-defined policy class (derived from IM_POLICY).

These class definitions describe the slots available in a policy class:
MC_DATA_CLASS : POLICY ISA CORE_DATA DEFINES { name : STRING, key = yes, read_only = yes; description : STRING; enabled : INTEGER, default = 1; }; END MC_DATA_CLASS: IM_POLICY ISA POLICY DEFINES { active_timeframes : LIST_OF STRING; except_timeframes : LIST_OF STRING; selector_name : STRING; selector_class : STRING; selector_ecf : ECF EVENT; ordinal : INTEGER, default=0; }; END

2. The tf_active calls evaluates timeframes for the policy. 3. The selector ECF selects the event to process. 4. The actions implement the policy and the opadd call adds an entry to the operations log of the event.

Sources of information about rules
You can get more information about rules for policy types and how to create them from these sources
For... examples of rules for policy types definitions of the MRL constructs and primitives for policy rules See... the pre-defined policies in .../kb/rules/im_internal.mrl. BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development

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User-defined event policy type creation

User-defined event policy type creation
If you want to create a new user-defined event policy to perform specialized event processing, first, you must define a new event policy type. An event policy type is a data class, derived from that defines the distinct type of event processing to be performed.

Creating user-defined policy types
To define a new user-defined policy type, you must do the following things. Table 52
Step 1

Policy Type Creation process
Task Define a new policy data class that describes the policy type and copy it to the Knowledge Base of each BMC IM instance to use the userdefined policy. Topic “Defining the policy data class for a new policy type” on page 262

2

Define the presentation names that you want to “Defining presentation names for a appear in user interfaces for the policy type in a new policy type” on page 264 BMCIX.properties configuration file. “Creating the event processing Create a new rule that defines the event rule(s) for a new policy type” on processing done by the policy type and copy it to the Knowledge Base of each BMC page 265 IM instance to use the policy.

3

Defining the policy data class for a new policy type
To create a new policy type, first you must define a data class derived directly from the IM_BASE_CUSTOM_POLICY base class. This policy data class describes the policy type’s data. It also provides the template of data fields (slots) used by BMC IM to generate the BMC IX Custom Policy Details panel in which users specify the processing details for a policy of that type.

To define a new policy data class 1 Using a text editor, open the appropriate BAROC language file in the Knowledge
Base. Because the IM_BASE_CUSTOM_POLICY base class is defined in .../kb/class/im_policies.baroc file, you must define the new policy type in a separate file that is loaded for compilation after .../kb/class/im_policies.baroc file (it is listed after the im_policies.baroc in the .../kb/class/.load file list).
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2 Define the new policy data class derived directly from the
IM_BASE_CUSTOM_POLICY base class.

A Create the new class slots. You can create slots of these types:
s s s s

ENUMERATION INTEGER STRING LIST OF

No other slot types are supported in custom event policies.

B Define the class slots in the order that you want them to appear in the BMC IX
Custom Policy Type panel. The BMC IX Custom Policy Details panel created from the policy type will have a field for each slot added to the IM_BASE_CUSTOM_POLICY class. The interface fields appear in the same order as the slots are defined in the class definition. See the BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development for detailed information on creating new classes.

3 Save the edited file after defining the new policy type (data class). 4 Add and entry for the new file that you created to the compiler load list in the
.../kb/class/.load file after the entry for the ../kb/class/im_policies.baroc file.which contains the base policy data class that the new policy type references.

5 Recompile the BMC Impact Manager instance’s Knowledge Base (KB) after
defining the new policy data class. For more information on compiling a KB, see “Compiling a Knowledge Base” in the BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

6 Finally, you must copy the changed KB to every BMC Impact Manager instance
(cell) that will use the new policy.

Verifying that you created the class successfully
If you created the class successfully, you should be able to see it in the “By Policy” list and the “Custom Policy Details” panel.

Where to go from here
Next, define user-friendly presentation names to appear in the user interface for the policy type and its slots.
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Defining presentation names for a new policy type

Defining presentation names for a new policy type
If you want user-friendly presentation names to appear in the user interface for the policy type and its slots instead of the internal names, you must:
s s

define presentation names for the policy type in a resource file list the resource file for the policy type in the BMC IX.properties file

To define presentation names for a policy type 1 Create a resource file for the policy type to list the policy type and each slot with its
assigned presentation name. The resource file name must have the .properties file extension.

2 Edit the resource file to add an entry for each presentation name assignment. A To define the presentation name (label) for the policy type, add a line with the
following format to the resource file:
CLASS.<policy type name>=<policy type presentation name> Policy

B To define the presentation name (label) used for a slot, add a line with the
following format to the resource file.:
SLOT.<policy type name>.<slot name>=<slot presentation name>

3 Place the resource file in the .../console/lib/lang/kbinfo directory. A Add the base name of the resource file to the value of kb_info_resources
parameter in the BMC Impact Explorer .../console/etc/ix.properties file using this format: kb_info_resources=<resource file name>,kb_core_resource, kb_deprecated_resource The defined presentation names will display in the BMC Impact Manager Event Management Policies tree, the Policy Type picker window, and in the Policy List panel. Any slot or policy type for which a presentation name is not defined displays its internal name. The event policy details tab for all user-defined policy types is Custom Policy Details.

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Creating the event processing rule(s) for a new policy type
Before you can define an event policy based on the user-defined policy type that you created, you must:
s

create a new Knowledge Base rule or rules to define the event processing done by the policy type copy the rule or rules to the Knowledge Base of each BMC IM instance on which the user-defined policy will run

s

Event Processing Rule Requirements
The event processing rule or rules that you define for the new user-defined policy type must:
s s

do dynamic selection (use the using_policy clause) reference the policy data class that describes the new policy type

To create the event processing rule for a new policy type 1 , Add a new file in the .../kb/rules directory, for example, my_policies.mrl, for the
new event processing rule or rules for the new policy type.

2 Edit the policy MRL file and write the event processing rule for the appropriate
rule phase. For more information, see
s s s

“Evaluation order of event policy types” on page 175 “Understanding event processing rules (MRL) for policy types” on page 260 See the MRL for the pre-defined policy types in ...\kb\rules\im_internal.mrl file.

3 Add the file name for the new rule or rules to the compiler load list in the
.../kb/rules/.load file.

4 Compile the BMC Impact Manager instance’s Knowledge Base (KB) after defining
the rule for the policy type. For more information on compiling a KB, see BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

5 Copy this KB change to every BMC Impact Manager instance (cell) that will use a
policy based on the new policy type.

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Creating the event processing rule(s) for a new policy type

The definition of the policy type is complete and users can now create policies based on it in the Custom Policy Type panel.

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Building event groups and image views
11

This chapter describes event groups and image views and explains how administrators create them for use by operators. This chapter presents the following topics: Understanding event groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Types of event groupings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event group configuration files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event tree hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event tree objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Understanding image views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Planning event groups and image views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with event groups and image views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating an event group (event tree top-level) node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating an event group subnode (event tree node) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting an event group subnode (event tree top-level node) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hiding a collector in an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Showing a hidden collector in an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Putting an event group into production or development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a custom image view to an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Granting user access to event groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Understanding event groups

Understanding event groups
The Event Groups tab on the Events view of BMC Impact Explorer allows you to create and control access to the event groups and their image views that IT operators use to monitor and manage events.

NOTE
Unlike metacollectors, which operators can define themselves in BMC Impact Explorer, only administrators create event groups and image views.

Event groups allow the organization of cells and collectors to make event displays meaningful for operators. For example, you might create an event group for collectors that gather database warning events and allow only operators that are database administrators access to that event group. Event groups are displayed in a hierarchical navigation tree. Although some of the objects displayed in the tree are unique to event groups, other objects are common across all three event management tabs on the Events tab of the BMC Impact Explorer. The remainder of this section provides more detail about the navigation tree and its objects.

Types of event groupings
In BMC Impact Explorer, events can be grouped or organized in these ways:
s

event collectors--an event list, a meaningful grouping of events or events grouped by their relationships MetaCollectors--a grouping of events from several different event lists (collectors), showing their combined status event groups--a hierarchy of event lists image views--a graphical representation of the collectors in an event group

s

s

s

Event collectors
Event collectors group events for display in an event list to provide operators with meaningful groups of events and to show relationship through the hierarchy of the nodes in the tree. To access the event list for a collector, operators click the collector node in the navigation tree.

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Event collectors are dynamic or static. Nodes for dynamic collectors appear or disappear from the navigation tree based on whether or not events are present that meet the collectors’ criteria. Nodes for static collectors remain in the navigation tree whether events are present or not.

MetaCollectors
A MetaCollector is a grouping of collectors. Operators create MetaCollectors to view events from several event lists. Each event list is shown as a tab in the event list pane. The MetaCollector node represents the state of the combined events. MetaCollectors are often used to view collectors from multiple cells in the network.

Event groups
An event group is another way for showing the relationship of events through the hierarchy of the navigation tree. Service administrators and managers define event groups and associate them with one or more collectors. Each level of the collector is shown as a node under the event group. An event list is associated with the lowest level nodes of an event group. The parent level of an event group represents all of the events associated with the collectors and it is associated with an image view.

Image views
An image view is a graphical representation of the collectors in an event group. The collectors are represented by objects that can be placed on a background image. The objects can be graphics, such as icons; statistical information, such as the number of events by priority or by severity; or text, such as a label.

Event group configuration files
The event group configuration file structure is listed in Table 53: Table 53
Folder \Images \Images\Backgrounds \Images\Icons \Map \Map \Map

Event group configuration files (part 1 of 2)
Contains Backgrounds and Icons directories background image files that are shared by all Map definitions image files which are shared by all Map definitions event group tree node template MapObjectTemplate.xml event group default image view configuration DefaultMapPage.xsl Map tree definition Maps.xml

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Event tree hierarchy

Table 53
Folder

Event group configuration files (part 2 of 2)
Contains Map.xml for Map_xxx as well as its MapPages directory all map page definitions for Map Map_xxx

\Map\Map_xxx \Map\Map_xxx\MapPages

Event tree hierarchy
Event groups are displayed in a hierarchical tree, the event tree, in the navigation pane of the Event Groups tab, as shown in Figure 89. Although administrators see all the event groups they create in the event tree, operators viewing the event tree see only those event groups to which they are granted access. Figure 89 Event tree hierarchy

Event groups appear as event tree top-level nodes. Beneath event tree top-level nodes you can add event tree nodes (child nodes of event groups) to further organize event tree display. To event tree top-level nodes and event tree nodes you can add collectors and subcollectors which represent, cells, collectors, and subcollectors. Use the Event Group Editor to create and modify the event group hierarchy to organize the display of these objects.

Event tree objects
Table 54 shows the icons and descriptions of the objects represented in the event tree.

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Table 54
Object icon

Event tree objects and definitions
Name and definition event tree top-level node in production status; the top-level node of an event group that is in production status, making the Event Group Editor and Image View Editor unavailable for the event group event tree top-level node in development status; the top-level node of an event group that is in development status, making the Event Group Editor available for the event group event group node; an event group subnode of an event tree top-level node or another event group node child collector node; displays information from a collector or subcollector of a cell or collector added as a collector node subcollector node; child node of a collector node

Additionally, each object icon in the event tree has an associated status, shown as an icon to the right of the object icon. For information about the statuses represented by each icon, see the BMC Impact Solutions: Event Monitoring.

Understanding image views
Image views provide operators with a graphical representation of the aggregated state of the event groups they represent. Administrators create image views by dragging and dropping an image view object, called a widget (shown in Figure 90 on page 271), onto a background image. Each widget represents a group node, collector, or child collector from the event tree. Figure 90 Image view widgets

image view widgets

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Planning event groups and image views

All event tree nodes with children (event tree top-level nodes, event group nodes, and collector nodes with child collectors) have either a default image view or a custom image view. All such nodes initially display a default image view that contains a blank background and a widget for each child node, as shown in Figure 90. Administrators create custom image views by adding an imported image (for example, a map of a geographical region or a diagram of the IT system of an enterprise) to replace the blank background of a default image view and by arranging widgets representing some or all of the child odes on the background, as shown in Figure 91. Figure 91 Custom image view

Planning event groups and image views
Planning is essential to creating event groups and image views that logically and efficiently depict IT assets of your enterprise. Before creating event groups and image views, consider these guidelines:
s

Event groups and image views organize and represent the contents of collectors Consequently, you should carefully plan and create the collectors for your enterprise. Event groups and image views can provide no more information than that gathered by collectors. (Collectors must be created before the event groups that use them. For more information about collectors, see the BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.) Creating event groups by using static collectors allows you to create the event groups before you run the event management system in a test or production environment. However, this practice can require a significant amount of manual work depending on the number of event groups you create.

s

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s

Creating event groups by using dynamic collectors requires less manual work than using static collectors, but the event groups do not exist until cells receive events to populate the dynamic collectors.

Working with event groups and image views
This section provides instructions for creating event groups and adding associated nodes that make up an event tree. This section also provides instructions for defining custom image views for event groups.

NOTE
Event groups are a prerequisite for image views. You must first create an event group to which you then add an image view.

Creating an event group (event tree top-level) node
Use the Event Groups tab to create an event group.

To create an event group (event tree top-level node) 1 On the menu bar of the Event Groups tab of the Events tab view, choose Edit => Add
Event Group.

The Event Group Editor, shown in Figure 92, is displayed.

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Creating an event group subnode (event tree node)

Figure 92

Event Group editor

2 On the Available Collectors pane, select a cell, collector, or subcollector to add to the
new event group.

3 On the Event Group pane, select NewEventsGroup. 4 To add the selected collector in the Available Collectors pane to the new event
group in the Event Group pane, click the right arrow. The selected collector appears beneath the new event group in the Event Group pane.

5 To add another collector (or cell or subcollector) to the new event group, select the
additional collector from the Available Collectors pane and click the right arrow. Repeat this step as necessary to add more cells, collectors, or subcollectors to the new event group.

6 To save the event group, click OK.

Creating an event group subnode (event tree node)
Use the Event Groups tab to create an event group subnode.

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Deleting an event group subnode (event tree top-level node)

To create an event group subnode (event tree node) 1 On the menu bar of the Event Groups tab of the Events tab view, choose
Edit => Add Event Group.

The Event Group Editor is displayed.

2 On the Event Group pane, select NewEventsGroup and click Insert Group.
An event group subnode, NewGroup, is inserted beneath the NewEventsGroup node, as shown in Figure 93. Figure 93 Event tree node addition

3 On the Available Collectors pane, select a cell, collector, or subcollector to add to the
new event group subnode.

4 To add the selected collector in the Available Collectors pane to the new event
group subnode in the Event Group pane, click the right arrow.

5 To add another collector (or cell or subcollector) to the new event group subnode,
select the additional collector from the Available Collectors pane and click the right arrow. Repeat this step as necessary to add more cells, collectors, or subcollectors to the new event group subnode.

6 To save the event group subnode, click OK.

Deleting an event group subnode (event tree top-level node)
Use the Event Groups tab to delete an event group subnode.

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Hiding a collector in an event group

To delete an event group (Event tree top-level node) 1 On the event tree of the Event Groups tab, select an event group or any of its
descendant nodes.

NOTE
To delete an event group, it must be in development status. If the event group is in production status you must change the status before deleting it.

2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Delete Event Group. WARNING
Deleting an event group deletes the entire event group and all its descendants, regardless of what node you select in the event group.

An action confirmation dialog box appears.

3 To delete the event group and its descendants, click OK.

Hiding a collector in an event group
Use the Event Group pane to hide a collector in an event group.

To hide a collector in an event group 1 In the Event Group pane, select a collector node. 2 Click Hide.
A lock icon is displayed with the node to show that the collector will not appear in the production event group. Event information from the collector and any subcollectors are still aggregated by the event group it appears in.

Showing a hidden collector in an event group
Use the Event Group pane to show a hidden event group.

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To show a hidden collector in an event group 1 In the Event Group pane, select a hidden collector node. 2 Click Show.
The collector now appears in the production event group.

Putting an event group into production or development
Use the Image Group Editor to put an event group into production or development.

To put an event group into production or development 1 On the menu bar of the Event Groups tab of the Events tab view, choose
Edit => Add Event Group.

The Event Group Editor is displayed.

2 In the Event Group navigation pane, select an event group. 3 Click the appropriate Status radio button. 4 Click OK to save your change. NOTE
If two administrators have the same event group open and one administrator changes the status of the event group from development to production, the properties of the event group will not be protected and the other administrator will be able to edit the properties of the event group. Image view objects become disabled after editing the event group.

Adding a custom image view to an event group
Use the Image View Editor to add a custom image view to an event group.

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Adding a custom image view to an event group

Before you begin
Custom image views require files in .jpg or .gif format for use as background images and icon images. To make these images available to the Image View Editor, copy the files to the Backgrounds directory and the Icons directory in the $BMCPORTAL_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/data/smsConsoleServer/ Image/Background directory on the system running BMC Impact Portal.

To add a custom image view to an event group 1 From the event tree of the Event Groups tab, select the event group (an event tree
top-level node).

NOTE
An event group must be in development status to add a custom image view. If the event group is in production status you must change the status before adding the image view. Custom image view still displays an event group or collector object that was deleted using the Event Group Editor.

2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Edit Image View.
The Image View Editor is displayed. The Image View Editor shows the current, default image view.

3 To create a custom image view, click Use Custom. 4 To add a custom image view background, from the View tab click the Filename list
and select an image file. The selected image file appears in the image pane of the Image View Editor, as shown in Figure 94. If no image file is available from the list, see “Before you begin” on page 278 before the start of this procedure.

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Figure 94

Image View editor

image view widgets

5 To place the widgets representing collectors for the event group, drag and drop the
widgets onto the image view background. When you drag and drop a widget, the Selected Object tab is enabled for the widget. Use the controls on this tab to modify the appearance of the widget on the image view background.

NOTE
You should choose contrasting widget fill colors and custom image canvas colors. Some color combinations can result in text that cannot be seen. For example, if the widget fill color is set to transparent and the custom image canvas color is set to white, white letters that appear on the widget cannot be seen against the white canvas.

6 To save the custom image view and close the Image View Editor, click Save Custom
Image & Close.

The saved image view is displayed in the Event Groups tab.

TIP
To modify the appearance of widgets that appear on a default image view, edit the object appearance attributes in the file defaultmappage.xsl located in the BMCPORTAL_HOME\appserver\websdk\tools\jboss\server\all\data\smsConsole Server directory on the system running BMC Impact Portal. The file contains comments that identify the appearance attributes.

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Granting user access to event groups

Granting user access to event groups
Administrators grant operators access privileges for event groups using the Event Group Properties editor. The Event Group Properties editor controls access to and the status of each event tree top-level node.

To grant user access to event groups 1 From the event tree of the Event Groups tab, select an event group (an event tree
top-level node).

2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Edit Event Group Properties.
The Event Group Properties editor, shown is displayed.

3 (optional) Add a text description of the event group. 4 Modify the Read and Write permissions to grant or deny access for each group as
necessary. When complete, click OK. BMC Impact Explorer saves the access settings for the selected event group.

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3

Part 3

Service model administration
This part presents the following topics: Chapter 12 Service model administration overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 Chapter 13 Building a service model—quick start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 Chapter 14 Understanding the service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 Chapter 15 Designing a service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 Chapter 16 Building a service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343 Chapter 17 Component and relationship status propagation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411 Chapter 18 Managing BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 Chapter 19 Managing the BMC Impact Publishing Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445

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12

Service model administration overview
12

This part provides detailed information about designing, developing, and maintaining service models that enable you to manage your IT resources from the perspective of the business services that they provide. Service model overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 BMC Impact Publishing Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285

Service model overview
A service model is an extensible system that defines the various resources that deliver business services, models their behaviors and functional relationships, and manages the delivery of the resulting services. The service model uses specific names for the objects that it manipulates. A physical or logical resource represented in the model is known as a service component instance or component instance. The functional relationship between two resources (component instances) is called a service component relationship or a relationship. These concepts are illustrated in Figure 95 on page 284.

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Service model overview

Figure 95

Service model objects

As a generic, open modeling system, the service model is applicable globally, regardless of the type of business, its geographical location, its customer base, or the types of services supporting the enterprise. Building, promoting, and publishing a service model involves process that span from the discovery or manual creation of component instances in your IT environment to verifying the service model before promoting and publishing it to specific BMC Impact Manager cells. This section provides information on how to
s s s s s s

discover or create component instances set up relationships among component instances associate events to component instances promote the service model to the BMC Atrium CMDB production data set refine and maintain the service model publish the service model to specific cell

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BMC Impact Service Model Editor
The BMC Impact Service Model Editor lets you build and maintain a service model. Service Management administration is performed in large part within BMC Impact Service Model Editor, with some administration also being done in the BMC Impact Portal. Administration includes managing all user access to information contained in the service model. Access control is managed in the service model through individual component instances. Each attribute can be associated with a user group that can be assigned either read or write access to a component. Additional user control functions in BMC Impact Service Model Editor include console navigation trees, which impose a structure on the organization of service management information, control folder-level rights, and pass this information to the Impact Portal.

BMC Impact Publishing Server
The BMC Impact Publishing Server publishes your service model from the BMC Atrium CMDB to BMC Impact Manager cells. In Automated mode (default), publishing operates in the back end. When data is reconciled in the production data set, a publish process is executed.

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BMC Impact Publishing Server

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13

Building a service model—quick start
13

A service model enables your organization to manage critical business services and their supporting IT assets so as to ensure the continued delivery of these services. Service models are designed in a sandbox View using the BMC Impact Service Model Editor. This chapter provides a quick, simplified look at how to build a basic, working service model. This chapter covers the following topics: Before you begin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Launching BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating new component instances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associating events with component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Promoting the service model—quick start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 289 289 290 291 293

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Before you begin

Before you begin
This quick-start chapter helps you understand the basic steps in creating a service model. The column headings in Table 55 are the data fields for which you must enter values when you create a service model in the BMC Impact Service Model Editor. For a complete description of the fields named in the column headings, see Chapter 14, “Understanding the service model.” After you have gathered all the service model data, you can create the service model using the BMC Impact Service Model Editor. Table 55 shows sample data to illustrate quickly building a subset of a service model. For more detailed information about building a service model, see Chapter 16, “Building a service model.” Table 55
Component type business process

Sample data for a subset of a service model
Component name Support service requests Tech Support Analysts Component description Business function is Customer support Techs supporting service requests Sales Logix application, v 6.01 Sales Logix server Cell name bogart Status computation model standard Relationship policy direct Provider instances that impact Tech Support Analysts Consumer instances dependent on

In/out model in

user community

bogart

in

standard

direct

Sales Logix v6.01 Support service requests

application

Sales Logix v6.01 Sales Logix server

bogart

in

standard

increasing

Sales Logix server Sales Logix DB software

Tech Support Analysts Sales Logix v6.01 Tech Support Analysts Sales Logix application Tech Support Analysts

software server

bogart

in

standard

increasing

database

Sales Logix DB software

Sales Logic database software v6.0

bogart

in

standard

direct

SALLOG

NOTE
Before you begin building actual service models relevant to your business, you must analyze the business processes that are critical to your business, their supporting IT resources, and the interdependencies between these products and services. For more information on designing your service model, see Chapter 15, “Designing a service model.”

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Launching BMC Impact Service Model Editor

Launching BMC Impact Service Model Editor
You can open BMC Impact Service Model Editor from the BMC Portal.

To log on to BMC Impact Service Model Editor from BMC Portal 1 Open a browser. 2 In the Address box, enter the URL in the format https://serverName.
serverName represents the name of the server on which BMC Portal is installed.

3 Log on to BMC Portal.
For instructions for logging on to BMC Portal, see BMC Portal Getting Started.

4 On the Configure tab, in the navigation pane on left side, under Tasks, click BMC
Impact Service Model Editor.

Creating new component instances
The first BMC Impact Service Model Editor step to creating a service model is creating component instances.

To create a new component instance 1 Open a new View by choosing File => New View.
A new View is opened which contains no components. To the left, in the Templates pane, each icon represents a class and each class represents a physical or logical resource such as an application server, a database, a user group, or a disk.

2 Perform one of the following actions:
s

Choose Edit => Create Component. Drag the appropriate component from the Templates pane and choose Edit => Edit Component Properties to configure the component. Skip to step 4 on page 290.

s

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Creating relationships

3 In the Create Component dialog box, on the General tab, in the Component Type
option, select the appropriate component type for the component instance you are creating.

4 In the Component Name box, type a name for the component instance that is
meaningful to the enterprise.

5 In the Cell box, choose the cell that will receive events for the component instance. 6 In the Component Is area, select In Model.
A component instance that is In Model is part of the service model, can be promoted and published to the cell, and can be monitored in BMC Portal and BMC Impact Explorer.

7 On the Status and Alias tab
s

in the Status Computation box, accept the default Standard in the Aliases box, enter the alias that will be used to associate the component instance with incoming events in the cell

s

8 Click OK. 9 Repeat steps 1-9 for each of the component instances in Table 55 on page 288.

Creating relationships
Now that you have the component instances created, define the consumer/provider relationships between them.

To define component impact relationships 1 Choose Edit => Create Relationship. 2 In the Create Relationship dialog box, in the Consumers’ List box, click Add.
The Add Components dialog box is displayed.

3 Using the Find functions of the Add Components dialog box, locate the component
instances that function as the consumer in the impact relationship and click Add. For information about the Find command, see “To find existing component instances” on page 358.

4 In the Provider List area, click Add.
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5 In the Find window, locate the component instance that functions as the provider
in the impact relationship and click Add.

6 Click OK. 7 Right-click on the new relationship line. 8 Select Edit Relationship Properties. 9 In the Edit Relationships dialog box, in the Activity area, select Active.
Active means the status of the provider component instance is propagated to the

consumer component instance.

10 In the Relationship Policy list, select a status propagation model. 11 Continue creating relationships until all components instances are appropriately
related.

12 (optional) Save the View.

Associating events with component instances
After you have defined relationships between component instances, you associate events with the component instances. You have already entered an Alias for each component instance created. Now you specify the event class that will affect each component instance and create a formula that is used by the cell to identify which specific events (within the class) should be associated with each component instance.

To associate events with a component instance 1 Select Tools => Alias Formulas. 2 In the Event Alias Associations dialog box, click Add. 3 In the Edit Event Alias Associations dialog box, in the Name box, enter a name for
the event association.

4 In the Event Match Criteria area, in the Event Class list, select an event class from the
list.

5 (optional) In the Match Attributes table, choose attributes and enter values to refine
which events (within the event class) will generate aliases.

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For each attribute you choose, select one of the relational operators from the Match list as described in Table 56, and enter a value in the text box to further define the events that are used to generate aliases using this formula. Table 56
Relational operators anything

Description of relational operators
Description the attribute can contain any value and is not used as a selection criteria If every attribute listed has is anything that means that every incoming event that belongs to the event class will pass through alias formula processing

contains has prefix has suffix equals

the characters you enter in the text box occur someplace in the value the value starts with the characters you enter in the text box the value ends with the characters you enter in the text box the value exactly matches the characters you enter in the text box

If you use more than one attribute, each condition must test true (the Boolean operator between the selection criteria phrases is AND) before the alias formula process is performed. For example a search phrase would read: Hostname contains SALLOG and IP address equals 20.22.19.321. Both conditions must be true for the event to be selected for alias processing.

6 In the Alias Formula area, use the Attribute, Text, and Function buttons in any order
and as many times as needed to build the formula:

A To insert an attribute in the formula, click on the Attribute button. The attributes
shown are those that belong to the event class you selected in the Event Definition area. When an attribute is selected, the control shows the attribute name, and the preview area is updated to show the syntax of the formula as it currently exists.

B To insert literal text (for example, a period, semi-colon, or the word Oracle), click
on the Text button. In the text box, type the literal text that you want in the alias formula. Literal text appears in the first part of the alias formula with data type definitions.

C To insert a function that defines the data type and expression in the formula,
click on the Function button. Type the function and choose the data type. For a list of functions you can use, see Online Help or the Master Rule Language Reference section of BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

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Promoting the service model—quick start

D (optional) To change the order of the elements in the alias formula, select the part
of the formula you want to move and click the Move Left or Move Right buttons as appropriate.

E (optional) To delete one of the elements in the alias formula, select the part of the
formula you want to delete and click the Delete button.

7 When the alias formula is complete, click OK. 8 Create an event alias association for each alias you entered in the component
instances you have created. When the View has all component instances and relationships defined, you can save the View. You can reopen saved Views at any time and make changes as needed.

To save the View
To save the View, choose File > Save View. Saved Views are available for future editing from the View dockable window. Changes to objects in a View are saved in the BMC Atrium Configuration Management Database (BMC Atrium CMDB) and are not available to cells, BMC Impact Portal, or BMC Impact Explorer until they are promoted and published.

Promoting the service model—quick start
After you have defined the service model objects, you must distribute them to the cells by promoting them so they can be published.

To promote the service model 1 Select File=>Promote All Sandbox Changes.
The Promotion Preview dialog box is displayed.

2 Enter descriptive text in the Description of Promotion box. 3 In the Objects to be Promoted lists, choose how you want to filter the list of objects
available for promotion. Note that regardless of how the objects are filtered, all objects in the list will be promoted whether or not they are visible.
s s

In the first Show list, choose All. In the second Show list, choose All Actions.

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Promoting the service model—quick start

4 In the Comparison of Sandbox and Promoted Property Values panel, you can verify
individual properties for each of the objects listed in the left pane. To filter the list of properties, select Changed Properties or All Properties.

5 When you have verified the objects to be promoted, click Begin Promotion.
The following events occur: 1. BMC Impact Service Model Editor submits the new or modified objects for promotion. 2. The Reconciliation Engine promotes the model from the sandbox data set to the production data set and returns either a success or failure status for the promotion. 3. If the promotion was successful, automated publishing is initiated by the BMC Impact Publishing Server and the model will be published to the appropriate cells. A status message displays that indicates the success or failure of the promotion. If promotion and publishing are successful, the service model becomes available to the specified cells, and you can monitor the component instances in the BMC Impact Portal and BMC Impact Explorer.

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296 296 297 302 303 304 304 304 306 306 307 307 307 308 308 309 311 317 317 319 320 320 321 322 323 323 324 326 326 327 327

14

Understanding the service model
This chapter presents the following topics: The service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The BMC Atrium Configuration Management Database—the datastore. . . . . . Service model and the Common Data Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Required service model data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Service Model Editor datasets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service model publishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service model execution on cells. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component classes and types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In-model and not-in-model component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component status and substatus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component status computation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service model component types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service consumers and providers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Relationship states. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Status propagation in relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How relationship control occurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How dynamic status mapping occurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bringing events from the resource into the cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component aliases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event alias associations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Timeframes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service schedules example with exceptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Importing Business Time Segments from BMC Remedy AR System . . . . . . . . .

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The service model

The service model
As described in “Service model overview” on page 283, a service model is an extensible system that defines the various resources that deliver business services, models their behaviors and functional relationships, and manages the delivery of the resulting services. A BMC impact service model is made up of
s

s s

s s s

data classes that describe the various types of physical and logical IT resources that make up an enterprise’s business corresponding data classes in the SIM kb of cells component instances that represent the unique physical and the logical configuration items that together deliver business services event classes associated with specific resources impact relationships management data instances

The BMC Atrium Configuration Management Database—the datastore
The BMC Atrium Configuration Management Database (BMC Atrium CMDB) is a data infrastructure made up of several components that allow different applications to store and share data. Service model developers and administrators use the BMC Atrium CMDB Configuration Console and BMC Atrium CMDB Class manager API’S to build and modify the Common Data Model (CDM). The BMC Atrium CMDB provides the ability to divide your configuration data into pieces called datasets, each representing a discrete set of data. This makes it possible for the same component or relationship instances to exist in more than one dataset. Datasets provide a mechanism for storing raw data from multiple resources in discrete locations. Then the reconciliation process takes that data and merges it appropriately to create a composite set of data that includes information from each source, based on what each source is proficient at obtaining. The ability to capture the raw data from various sources and reconcile it to a controlled dataset enables the interaction between various automation tools.

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Service model and the Common Data Model

Service model and the Common Data Model
The Common Data Model (CDM) is an extensible class schema that represents configuration items and their relationships to each other in an IT enterprise. It is designed to store asset data (as hardware, service management, and user information) and to provide a mechanism for linking that information to provide a complete view of how all elements of a company are connected and can affect each other. All service component types (classes) are defined in the BMC Atrium CMDB as part of the CDM. A class is the definition or metadata that describes an object type. The class includes information about the object type, such as attributes, primary key, and so on.

SIM classes
BMC Impact Solutions extends the BMC Atrium CMDB CDM with a predefined set of SIM-enabled classes. The asset information you use to define the service model is a subset of all of the configuration data in the CDM. The BMC SIM CMDB Extensions also define SIM-specific attributes, like StatusModel and ImpactCostPerSec. All components in the data model derive from a single subclass, BMC_BaseElement, while relationships derive from BMC_BaseRelationship. All impact relationships are instances of BMC_Impact. The BMC_Impact subclass of BMC_BaseRelationship comes with the BMC SIM CMDB Extension of the BMC Atrium CMDB CDM. The following tables list the main data subclasses to BMC_BaseElement that are associated with service impact management. For a graphical representation of the hierarchy of the Common Data Model, see the Common Data Model Diagram included with BMC Atrium CMDB documentation.

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Service model and the Common Data Model

Table 57 lists the SIM-qualified subclasses for BMC_Collection, which provides mechanisms for grouping components together into logical elements, including business processes and services. Table 57 SIM-qualified subclasses of BMC_Collection
Third Level BMC_ConnectivitySegment BMC_IPConnectivitySubnet BMC_IPXConnectivityNetwork BMC_LNsCollection BMC_Organization BMC_UserCommunity BMC_LAN BMC_WAN Fourth Level

Second Level BMC_ConnectivityCollection

Table 58 lists the SIM-qualified classes for BMC_LogicalEntity, which tracks other logical elements of a system, including people, physical plants, and location information. Table 58 SIM-qualified subclasses of BMC_LogicalEntity
Third Level BMC_BusinessProcess

Second Level BMC_Activity BMC_BusinessService BMC_Database

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Table 59 lists the SIM_qualified classes for BMC_System, which contains the definition of computer systems, mainframes, application systems, and virtual systems. Table 59 SIM-qualified subclasses of BMC_System
Third Level BMC_Application BMC_ApplicationInfrastructure BMC_SoftwareServer MainframeBMC_Activity Printer VirtualSystem

Second Level BMC_ApplicationSystem

BMC_ComputerSystem

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Table 60 lists the SIM-qualified classes for BMC_SystemComponent, which stores information on the components that comprise the system. This includes physical components like disk drives and monitors; applications like Microsoft Word; and other soft elements like network drives and file shares. The attributes for BMC_SystemComponent are SystemClassId and SystemName. Table 60 SIM-qualified subclasses of BMC_SystemComponent
Third Level BMC_DiskPartition BMC_SystemResource BMC_FileSystem BMC_DataBaseStorage BMC_LocalFileSystem BMC_RemoteFileSystem BMC_CDROMDrive BMC_DiskDrive BMC_FloppyDrive BMC_TapeDrive Fourth Level

Second Level LogicalSystemComponent

HardwareSystemComponent

BMC_UPS BMC_Media

Table 61 lists the SIM-qualified class for BMC_SystemService, which tracks the services used by systems. The most common services are those used by J2EE application systems, such as J2EE modules. The data model also provides a set of classes for defining relationships among configuration items. The attributes for BMC_SystemService are SystemClassId and SystemName. Table 61 SIM-qualified subclass of BMC_SystemService
Second Level BMC_ApplicationService

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SIM attributes
SIM qualifiers have been added to the attributes listed in Table 62. Table 62
Class BMC_BaseElement

SIM-qualified attributes
Namespace BMC.CORE Attributes AccountID [SIM] Category [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] ClassId [SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] CMDBRowLevelSecurity [SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] CMDBWriteSecurity [SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] DatasetId [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] Description [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] InstanceId [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] Item [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] ManufacturerName [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] MarkAsDeleted [SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] Model [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] Name [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] Notes [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] OwnerContact [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] OwnerName [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] Priority [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] ReconciliationIdentity [SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] ShortDescription [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] Type [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] VersionNumber [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] Site [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] Company [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] Department [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] Floor [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] Region [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] Room [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] SiteGroup [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] ReadSecurity [SIM] WriteSecurity [SIM] ComponentAliases [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] ImpactCostPerSec [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] ImpactCostUnit [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] ImpactCostPerSecOut [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] HomeCellAlias [SME_ReadWrite] PriorityWatchdog [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] PriorityOut [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] ScheduleId [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] StatusModel [SIM, SME_ReadWrite] ClusterType [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] Interconnect [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] InterconnectAddress [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] MaxNumberOfNodes [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] Types [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite]

BMC.AM

BMC.SIM

BMC_Cluster

BMC.CORE

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Table 62
Class

SIM-qualified attributes
Namespace Attributes ConnectivityType [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] OSType [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] VirtualSystemType [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] WANType [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] CapabilityList [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] DomainName [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] Hostname [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] PrimaryCapability [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] SystemType [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] SystemClassId [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] SystemName [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] MaxMediaSize [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] MediaType [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] SystemClassId [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite] SystemName [SIM, SME_Read, SME_ReadWrite]

BMC_ConnectivitySegm BMC.CORE ent BMC_OperatingSystem BMC_VirtualSystem BMC_WAN BMC_ComputerSystem BMC.CORE BMC.CORE BMC.CORE BMC.CORE

BMC_SystemComponen BMC.CORE t BMC_Media BMC_SystemService BMC.CORE BMC.CORE

The definitions of the SIM qualifiers are
s s s s

SIM: 300050 SIM_Internal: 300060 SIM_ReadWrite: 300070 SME_Read: 30080

Required service model data
Table 63 lists the data that is required for each component instance created in BMC Impact Service Model Editor that you want to monitor in BMC Impact Portal and BMC Impact Explorer. Table 63 Data required when creating a service model
Description a service component class that defines a specific logical or physical asset a name for a specific component instance that is meaningful in your enterprise the name of the cell that will receive events for the component instance

Required data component type component name cell name

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Sandboxes

Table 63

Data required when creating a service model
Description in model component instances are published to the cell and can be monitored for status changes; not in model component instances are not published to the cell and cannot be monitored for status changes a precisely defined method for calculating the status of a service component instance another name for a component instance that makes it possible to associate events to the component instance so that impacts can be effectively monitored a formula that makes it possible to dynamically construct an alias from values in event slots and match the event to the appropriate component instance so that impacts can be effectively monitored a precisely defined method for passing the status or modified status from one component instance to another through a relationship the component instances that can potentially impact the component instance the component instance that is impacted by the component instance relevant only for Weighted Cluster status computation model

Required data in/not in model

status computation model alias

alias formula

relationship policy (status propagation model) provider instances consumer instances status weight

Sandboxes
A sandbox is a personal work area for designing and developing a service model. Users can make changes to objects and their relationships, and save these changes between work sessions, without affecting the production environment until the user is ready to move the changes into the production dataset. BMC Impact Service Model Editor users each have their own unique, dedicated sandbox, and sandboxes persist between user sessions, allowing users to make multiple edits to the sandbox model over the course of time until the changes are promoted to the production dataset. Each user has one sandbox associated with the user account. Changes to a user’s sandbox do not affect sandboxes of other users if those changes are not promoted.

NOTE
No two users should have the same data (components, impact relationships, or management data instances) in their sandbox because only the values from the sandbox that was promoted last will be in the production dataset.

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BMC Impact Service Model Editor datasets

BMC Impact Service Model Editor datasets
The production dataset is the reference dataset, or logical partition of data in the BMC Atrium CMDB, shared by SIM and ITSM applications. Objects contained in the production dataset are components, relationships, and management data. The production dataset is not limited to objects that are in-model. A majority of these objects may be out-of-model (their information is not yet in BMC Impact Manager instances). When working with objects in a sandbox, users are making changes to an overlay dataset, a dataset which is related to and masks the production dataset. The overlay dataset provides a view of the underlying production dataset masked by changes made by the user in the overlay dataset. Another type of dataset is the test dataset. The test dataset relays objects from a sandbox view to a test BMC Impact Manager instance.

Testing
Before moving sandbox changes into production, BMC Impact Service Model Editor enables you to send those changes to a defined test cell and explore service model behavior in the context of various events. For example, you could send test data to a test cell, then view events sent to that cell in BMC Impact Explorer. After a test cell has been created and configured, you can send data to the test cell if user permissions in the BMC Impact Portal have been set up to allow you the ability to send to test. If you have promote permissions in the BMC Impact Portal, you will also have a test environment. A confirmation notice is displayed after the test dataset has been populated and the data has been sent to the test cell.

Promotion
Changes performed in a sandbox (on the overlay dataset) can be moved to the production dataset in a controlled manner in a process called promotion. When a promotion is successfully completed, changes in the sandbox are merged with changes from other users and processes in the BMC Atrium CMDB and, if automated publishing is enabled, in-model data is sent to BMC Impact Manager instances in the environment. As soon as a user successfully promotes changes to a production data set, the sandboxes of all other users will be updated to reflect the new data.

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Promotion

BMC Impact Service Model Editor limits promotion to 3000 component instances at a time.

Promotion and automated publishing process
“Promoting” and “publishing” may be viewed as a sequence, in which the user initiates promotion processes to push changes to objects in the BMC Atrium CMDB, followed by the automatic publication process in which that data is sent to appropriate BMC Impact Manager instances. The promotion process is as follows:
s

After making changes in a sandbox View, the user starts the promotion from the BMC Impact Service Model Editor interface. BMC Impact Service Model Editor initiates a reconciliation job. A promotion preview dialog box is displayed containing information about the objects being promoted. When the actual promotion process begins, a dialog box informs the user that the promotion is in progress. The user will not be able to work in BMC Impact Service Model Editor until the process completes; however, the user is given the option to stop the promotion or exit the BMC Impact Service Model Editor interface.

s

s

Promotion log objects are created in the BMC Atrium CMDB. The objects will contain the name of the user, a short description of the promotion (set by the user), the ID of the reconciliation job, start and end dates, and a list of objects which the user has selected for promotion. BMC Impact Service Model Editor regularly checks the progress of the reconciliation job. When the process is completed, BMC Impact Service Model Editor updates the objects and indicates that the promotion is complete. When the promotion has ended, if automated publishing is enabled, the BMC Impact Publishing Server will initiate a publish from the production dataset to the BMC Impact Manager instances in the environment. If other publish operations are underway at that time, the request will be queued. After the changes have been published to BMC Impact Manager instances, an execution log is generated and can be viewed from the BMC Impact Service Model Editor Promote and Publish History dialog box.

s

s

s

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Service model publishing

Data excluded in automated publication processes
Most data published during an automated publish routine will come from the sandbox functions of BMC Impact Service Model Editor. By default, new objects in the environment from a discovery source such as BMC Foundation Discovery or BMC Topology Discovery, or from BMC Remedy Asset Management, will not be flagged as in-model and will not be published. However, these sources can update objects that are already in-model and those changes will be published to BMC Impact Manager instances.

Service model publishing
Service model publishing is the process of distributing the service model data to BMC Impact Manager instances or cells. After a promotion is completed, The BMC Impact Publishing Server is notified of the termination of a reconciliation and starts a publication. From the BMC Atrium CMDB, the BMC Impact Publishing Server distributes the BMC.ASSET dataset to cells and stores a master copy in the BMC.IMPACT.PROD dataset. The BMC.IMPACT.PROD dataset is updated and maintained only by the BMC Impact Publishing Server. It mirrors the last successful publish to the cells. Publishing can only be initiated by using BMC Impact Service Model Editor or the BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI. When the component instances and relationships are published, the component instances can be monitored using BMC Impact Portal and BMC Impact Explorer.

Service model execution on cells
Service component instances are associated with events through the use of aliases, which you specify for each component instance, each alias unique to the component instance. When events that require alias processing enter the cell, the cell uses the values in the event’s slots to construct an alias and then searches for that alias in the cell’s impact component instances. When a match is found, the event is associated with the component instance and the instance’s status may be changed.

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Service components

Service components
This section contains overview information about components classes and types, types of service component instances, and component statuses.

Component classes and types
A class is the definition or metadata that describes an object type. The class includes information about the object type, such as attributes, primary key, and so on. You can view a list of subclasses or child classes that are associated with a class. A service component class is a CDM class that is available for inclusion in a service model. These are the only classes visible in BMC Impact Service Model Editor and BMC IM. There are whole classes of objects that are not visible to SIM because they do not make sense in a service model. For example, BMC_Keyboard. A service component type is a data class that defines a logical or physical asset that participates in the delivery of a business service. Service components can represent: a hardware component, an application, a service, customer groups, or any aspect of business for which you want to employ service impact management. Service components are organized in a hierarchy of classes in which each class represents a component type. The farther down the hierarchy a particular class occurs, the more specific its type. When you define a new service model component, you must create it using a subclass of the BMC_BaseElement class. Select the most appropriate subclass for each component that you wish to create. If an appropriate subclass does not exist or is too generic, you can extend the class hierarchy by adding a new subclass definition to the BMC Atrium CMDB Class Manager. You can also extend an existing class definition by adding one or more slots to store component-specific information. Classes and their creation are covered in detail in the BMC Atrium CMDB 2.0.1 Installation and Configuration Guide.

Service component instances
In BMC Impact Service Model Editor, a component instance is a specific occurrence of a component type. A component type is the generic object: for example, server. The component instance is the specific, unique version of the type: for example, JBoxxServer 123. In BMC Impact Service Model Editor, you select one of the component types from the Templates dockable window and modify that template to create a component instance, which defines a specific logical or physical asset.
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In-model and not-in-model component instances

All service model classes and related slots are stored in the BMC Impact Manager’s server/etc/default/SIM/kb directory. For a description of data class definitions that support the service model, see Appendix E, “Default service model hierarchy.”

In-model and not-in-model component instances
Service component instances that are visible in BMC Impact Service Model Editor are classified as in-model or not-in-model component instances. In-model service component instances exist in the BMC Atrium CMDB and in the specified cell and can be monitored in BMC Impact Portal and BMC Impact Explorer. (At any given time, they may not be visible to the end user in BMC Impact Portal and BMC Impact Explorer, depending on their status.) Not-in-model component instances are visible and available in BMC Impact Service Model Editor; however, they have not been published and therefore are not present in the cell and cannot be monitored in BMC Impact Portal and BMC Impact Explorer. You may choose to designate component instances as not-in-model at design time. For example, you may want to create the component instance but not monitor it right away. You would designate that component as Not In Model. Changes to in-model, published component instances are not seen in BMC Impact Portal and BMC Impact Explorer until the changes are published. A component instance that is In Model can be monitored in BMC Impact Portal and BMC Impact Explorer. A component instance that is not in the model cannot be monitored in BMC Impact Portal or BMC Impact Explorer.

Component status and substatus
A service component instance is characterized by its status. The color of a service component’s icon in the BMC Impact Explorer and BMC Impact Portal reflects its status. Information about the status of a component instance is stored in the cell in the instance’s status slot. The initial status of a service component instance, just after its creation, is determined by the default value of its class-level status slot (usually this value is green or OK).

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Component status computation

Table 64 defines the default service component status values that are available in BMC Impact Explorer. Table 64 Service component status definitions
Default color value
dark gray light gray green

Service component status
BLACKOUT UNKNOWN OK

Meaning
monitoring of the component is suspended for a scheduled period status of the component has not yet or cannot be determined nothing has occurred that affects the component’s normal delivery of service awaiting information on the component component is delivering services normally, but some problem may effect it component’s delivery of service is slightly affected component’s delivery of service is affected component has a failure and is unable to deliver service

Equivalent BAROC Enumeration status
01 10 20 30 NONE (no substatus) BLACKOUT UNKNOWN OK

INFORMATION WARNING

medium blue yellow

40 50

INFO WARNING

MINOR IMPACT IMPACTED UNAVAILABLE

light orange orange red

60 70 80

MINOR MAJOR CRITICAL

NOTE
Do not confuse the MC_SM_COMPONENT_STATUS enumeration with the STATUS enumeration that defines event status values, such as OPEN or ACK.

Component status computation
The status of a component instance is computed automatically by the cell when new conditions occur, such as
s s s

a new event is received that has a direct impact on the component the severity of an event impacting a component changes another component’s status change is propagated to the component

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Component status computation

Whether the status of a component is influenced directly by events, by other components’ status changes, or both, depends on the component’s type and its relative position in a particular service infrastructure. For example, the status of an IT component usually reflects the associated resource events that directly impact its status. In contrast, logical components such as applications or business groups rely on their relationships to IT components to provide their current status. The cell computes a component’s status using a status computation model that you assign to the component instance in the StatusModel attribute. Based on the specific status computation model, the cell uses an algorithm to calculate the
s s s

status values propagated by inbound relationships severities of direct events associated with the service component instance impact status and service component self-status

Three predefined status computation models are available: Standard, Cluster, and Weighted Cluster. The Weighted Cluster status computation model uses the Status Weight attribute of the BMC_Impact object. Status weight is used in impact relationships to determine how much importance (numerically weighted) to give to each provider relationship that impacts a consumer instance. The higher the number, the greater the importance. You select the status computation model for each component instance in the Create (or Edit) Component dialog box, on the Status and Alias tab, in the Status Computation box. BMC Impact Service Model Editor ensures that each component instance is associated with a valid status computation model. See “Creating service component instances in BMC Impact Service Model Editor” on page 345. For more information about component status computation and status computation models, see Chapter 17, “Component and relationship status propagation.”

NOTE
Whether and how the status of a provider component is propagated through a relationship is controlled by the relationship policy assigned to the component instance. For more information on selecting a relationship policy for a component, see Chapter 16, “Building a service model.”

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Service model component types

Service model component types
Table 65 lists the component types, the superclass of the component, the icon that represents the component in BMC Impact Service Model Editor and in the consoles, and the class of the component as defined in the data model. These classes are derived from the class BMC_BaseElement. Table 65
Component superclass Logical Entity Activity

Service model component types (part 1 of 6)
Icon Component type Component class BMC_LogicalEntity BMC_Activity

Activity Decision

BMC_Activity ActivityType=ActivityDecision BMC_Activity ActivityType=ActivityEnd BMC_Activity ActivityType=ActivityInteraction BMC_Activity ActivityType=ActivityManual BMC_Activity ActivityType=ActivityStart BMC_BusinessProcess

Activity End

Activity Interaction

Activity Manual

Activity Start

Business Process

Business Service

BMC_BusinessService

Database

BMC_DataBase

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Component superclass Collection

Service model component types (part 2 of 6)
Icon Component type User Community Component class BMC_Collection BMC_UserCommunity

Connectivity Collection

BMC_ConnectivityCollection

IP Connectivity Subnet

BMC_IPConnectivitySubnet

IPX Connectivity Network

BMC_IPXConnectivityNetwork

BMC_LNsCollection

BMC_LNsCollection

LAN Network

BMC_LAN

WAN Network

BMC_WAN

Organization

BMC_Organization

System Access Server

BMC_System BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Access Server BMC_Application

Application

Application Infrastructure

BMC_ApplicationInfrastructure

Application System

BMC_ApplicationSystem

Cluster

BMC_Cluster

Communication Server Computer System

BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=Communication Server BMC_ComputerSystem

Configuration Management Agent

BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=ConfigMgmtAgent

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Table 65
Component superclass System

Service model component types (part 3 of 6)
Icon Component type Database Server Component class BMC_System BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=DataBaseServer BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=DNSServer BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=File Server BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Firewall BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=FTPServer BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Gateway BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Hub BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=JBOD BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Layer 3 Switch BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=LDAPServer BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=LoadBalancer BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=MailServer BMC_Mainframe BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=MessageServer BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Mobile User Device

DNS Server

File Server

Firewall

FTP Server

Gateway Hub

Input/Output Device

JBOD (Just a Bunch Of Disks)

Layer 3 Switch

LDAP Server

Load Balancer

Mail Server

Mainframe Message Server

Mobile User Device (a handheld personal data assistant (PDA))

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Service model component types

Table 65
Component superclass System

Service model component types (part 4 of 6)
Icon Component type Monitor Component class BMC_System BMC_Monitor

Print Server

BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Print BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=PrintServer BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=RAIDStorageDevice BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=ResourceServer BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Router BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=SANBridge BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=SANDirector BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=SANHub BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=SANRouter BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=SANSwitch BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=SecurityServer BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Server BMC_SoftwareServer

Print Server

RAID Storage Device

Resource Server

Router

SAN Bridge

SAN Director

SAN Hub

SAN Router

SAN Switch Security Server

Server

Software Server

Storage

BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Storage BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Switch

Switch

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Service model component types

Table 65
Component superclass System

Service model component types (part 5 of 6)
Icon Component type Tape Library Component class BMC_System BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=TapeLibrary BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=TelnetServer BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=TransactionServer

Telnet Server

Transaction Server

UDDI Server

BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=UDDIServer BMC_VirtualSystem

Virtual System

Web Cache

BMC_ComputerSystem PrimaryCapability=Web Caching BMC_SoftwareServer SoftwareServerType=WebServer BMC_SystemService

Web Server

System Service Application Service

BMC_ApplicationService

System Component

BMC_SystemComponent Hardware System Component BMC_HardwareSystemComponent

Media

BMC_Media

CD ROM Drive

BMC_CDROMDrive

Disk Drive

BMC_DiskDrive

Floppy Drive

BMC_FloppyDrive

Tape Drive

BMC_TapeDrive

Uninterruptible Power Supply BMC_UPS (UPS)

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Service model component types

Table 65
Component superclass

Service model component types (part 6 of 6)
Icon Component type Logical System Component Component class BMC_SystemComponent BMC_LogicalSystemComponent

System Component

File System

BMC_FileSystem

Database Storage

BMC_DataBaseStorage

Local File System

BMC_LocalFileSystem

Remote File System

BMC_RemoteFileSystem

Disk Partition

BMC_DiskPartition

Software

BMC_Software

System Software

BMC_SystemSoftware

Operating System Virtual System Enabler

BMC_OperatingSystem BMC_VirtualSystemEnabler

VMware

BMC_VMWare

System Resource

BMC_SystemResource

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Component relationships

Component relationships
Service management relationships are impact relationships. Table 66 lists the main relationship classes derived from BMC_BaseRelationship, of which only BMC_Impact defines impact relationships for a service model. Table 66
Class name BMC_Impact

Main relationship classes
Class description The BMC_Impact relationship, and the subclasses that derive from this class are used to define service impact relationships between component instances. BMC_Dependency describes component relationships that are dependent on each other. This is different from impact relationships in that a dependency can be at a lower direct level, while an impact is often at a higher, more indirect level. BMC_Component is used to define composite objects. One key component relationship in the CMD is between the system and system component classes. This relationship defines a composite computer system, which is made up of a computer system instance, and subinstances of disk drives, monitors, software, network cards, and so on. BMC_MemberOfCollection is used to define groupings of instances in a logical manner. It is used to define the network topology, or to define the set of component instances that make up a business process or service. BMC_ElementLocation ElementLocation associates a ManagedElement with a Location for positioning, inventory, maintenance and similar purposes.

BMC_Dependency

BMC_Component

BMC_MemberOfCollection

BMC_ElementLocation

Service consumers and providers
A service model relationship is a link between a component that provides a service and the components that consume that service. In a provider/consumer relationship, the provider status naturally impacts the consumer status. When you define relationships in a service model, you make it possible to know, for example, which business services are affected if Router C fails. The concepts of provider and consumer are relative to the relationship being considered. In Figure 96 on page 318, Component B is a provider in one relationship and a consumer in another.

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Service consumers and providers

The data model enables a component instance to be related to another component instance by defining the relationship in the BMC_Impact class. Such a relationship states that a component instance is impacted if something happens to the component instances to which it is related. For example, a group of people responsible for accounting will be impacted when the accounting database server is down. Service model relationships are organized in a hierarchy of data classes in which each class represents a relationship type. The parent class for component relationships is BMC_Relationship. All service model relationship classes are defined in the BMC Atrium CMDB as a subclass of BMC_Relationship.

Important components
Some components can be considered “important” components and can be set to propagate their priority back to their provider. For more information on priority propagators, see “Impacts priority” on page 413. Figure 96 Impact (status) propagation in relationships

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Relationship states

Relationship states
Just as a component is characterized by its status, a relationship is characterized by its state. Relationship state values are defined internally in the cell as the enumeration MC_SM_RELATIONSHIP_STATE. A relationship can have be either active or inactive, as shown in the following table:
Relationship State Value ACTIVE INACTIVE

Meaning The consumer component depends on its provider. An impact relationship exists. The consumer does not have a dependency, or the dependency is unimportant. No impact relationship exists.

In status propagation models, the state of a relationship determines whether the provider’s status or a modification of it is passed to the consumer service component.

Status propagation models
A propagation model defines how the status of a provider component must be propagated in an impact relationship based on
s s

the current state of the relationship (active or inactive) the current value of the provider’s status

Status propagation models are used only by impact relationships. The role of the BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION class instance is to restrict the use of a propagation model to consumer and provider relationships. Status propagation models serve these purposes:
s

relationship control—propagation models enforce logical rules in new component relationships so that only valid relationships are created

dynamic status mapping—propagation models translate the computed status of the provider component into a propagated status for input into the impact_function of the related consumer component

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Status propagation in relationships

Status propagation in relationships
Status propagation is the passing of a status or a modified status from one component instance to another through a relationship. Depending on the status propagation model assigned to the relationship, the cell can automatically propagate the status of a provider component through its outbound impact relationships as new conditions occur, such as
s s

the component’s status changes the state of an outbound impact relationship changes, altering the status propagation from the provider component

This status may then be further propagated to subsequent components within the service model. The service model ensures that each impact relationship instance is associated to a valid status propagation model. For more information about status propagation and status propagation models, see Chapter 17, “Component and relationship status propagation.”

How relationship control occurs
Relationship control represents the enforcement of logical rules in creating new service model relationships. The BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION table defines the valid pairs of component types whose instances can participate in a specific type of relationship. Each time an impact relationship instance is submitted for creation, the cell seeks an BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION instance that matches
s s s

the name of the propagation model used by the component relationship the component type of the provider in the relationship the component type of the consumer in the relationship

During this process, the cell uses the component’s class hierarchy to interpret the component types in the BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION instances. If there is a matching BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION instance, the relationship is valid. Otherwise, the creation process is blocked.

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How dynamic status mapping occurs

How dynamic status mapping occurs
Dynamic status mapping translates the main status of the provider component into a propagated status for input into the impact function of the consumer component in a relationship.This is done in a two-step process: 1. bringing the events from the monitoring application of interest into the cell For physical resources, most of which are or can be instrumented, you can obtain status information by actively monitoring the resource’s variables, parsing its log files, or capturing the SNMP traps it sends. This information can be formatted into events that a cell can process. The cell can accept event instances from a variety of sources: Events can be manually obtained directly through adapters and the msend and
mposter commands.
s s

Cells also provide events through propagation rules. Other sources include third-party products that can be integrated with BMC IM.

2. associating those events with the service model component instance that represents the resource You can associate events from a resource with the component instance that represents it by using the alias key. The actual association is done using a slot-mapping data table, which stores all the slot-mapping formulas for event classes. The arrival of an event causes a unique pre-defined rule to be invoked that generates a value for the event’s mc_smc_alias slot and searches for the matching service component in the alias table. With these two processes in place, incoming events can alter the status of the component directly in real-time. For example, an event with a severity of CRITICAL could turn the status of the associated component to UNAVAILABLE by using a severity-to-status mapping table. Dynamic status mapping translates the main status of the provider component into a propagated status for input into the impact function of the consumer component in a relationship. The BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP table defines the status-mapping instances for the relationships. A group of BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP instances sharing the same name form a propagation map that is uniquely bound to the status propagation model with the same name. When two components participate in an impact relationship and the status of the provider changes, the new status must be propagated to a consumer component and the following logic applies.

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Event associations

First, the cell seeks the BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP instance in which the following value matches occur:
BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP instance slot value name relationship_state provider_status

Matching class instance relationship relationship provider component

Matching value propagation_ model slot value state slot value status slot value

Then, the cell obtains the appropriate propagated_status value to propagate, depending on the current state of the relationship (ACTIVE or INACTIVE). The cell propagates this value to the consumer component for input to the consumer’s status computation. For example, consider an impact relationship with service component named
XService that is a consumer of an IT component, DBsoftware. The relationship is active

and the propagation model assigned to it is INCREASING. When the cell needs to propagate DBsoftware’s current status (IMPACTED) to its consumer component, XService, it searches the INCREASING propagation map to find the instance corresponding to a provider status of IMPACTED. To obtain the appropriate propagated_status value, it matches the corresponding relationship state (ACTIVE), which is a value of UNAVAILABLE in this instance. Finally, the cell propagates the appropriate changed status to the consumer component. Propagation maps affect only the way in which the main status of the provider is propagated in the relationship. They do not affect how the substatus is propagated from the provider to the consumer.

Event associations
A live service model requires that the incoming events that contain information about the state of a IT asset be associated with the appropriate service model component instance. This event association is performed through aliases that you assign to service components, and event alias associations that you create in BMC Impact Service Model Editor. When you associate events to a component instance, you provide a mechanism for keeping a component instance’s status up-to-date, so that it reflects the real-time health of the actual resource that it represents.

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Bringing events from the resource into the cell

You designate a component instance as participating in alias activity by entering a value in the Alias attribute when you create (or edit) a component instance in BMC Impact Service Model Editor. You set up the dynamic association of events with a component instance by using the Tools => Alias Formulas menu command in BMC Impact Service Model Editor. An alias acts as an identifier for a component instance. When an event comes in, the cell constructs the alias using actual data in the event’s slots plus any other elements specified in the alias formula. An alias formula defines the content and format of the alias. After the cell has constructed the event’s alias, it searches each component instance to see if the value in its ComponentAlias attribute matches the alias constructed from values in the event. If it does match, the event is associated with the component instance in the BMC_SIM_ALIAS class and may change the component instance’s status, depending on the component instance’s status propagation model. To set up an event association, you must do the following:
s s

s

bring events from the resource into the cell associate the events with the service model component instance that represents the resource s enter an alias in the Alias attribute of the component instance s create an appropriate event alias association for the component instance verify that the event association works correctly

Bringing events from the resource into the cell
To bring events to a cell, you configure the event sources for the resource, such as a log file or an SNMP trap file, to provide the necessary information about its status. You can use a BMC Impact Event adapter, a BMC Impact Integration product, a thirdparty product, or another utility to produce BMC Impact Manager events.

Component aliases
A service component instance can have several different aliases so that different event types can be easily associated with it. Service component aliases are stored in the BMC Atrium CMDB and are associated with the relevant service component by the component’s universal data identifier (udid). For information on entering component aliases in a component instance, see “Creating service component instances in BMC Impact Service Model Editor” on page 345.

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Event alias associations

Event alias associations
When you set up the dynamic association of events with a component instance, you must specify two elements:
s s

an event class an alias formula

The event class identifies which incoming events may affect the status of the component instance. For example, for an application component instance, you want events of a particular category, such as SYSTEM_EVENT, APPLICATION_EVENT, DATABASE_EVENT, to be considered by the cell. The alias formula defines the content and format of the alias constructed by the cell from the values in the event’s slots. The alias formula must have a syntax that can be read by the cell. It consists of two parts: sprintf format specifications [specifies the format for the output] followed by expressions that specify event slots and functions involved in the construction of the alias. An example of a simple alias formula is

EXAMPLE
[‘sprintf("%s/%s", [$1.mc_object,$1.mc_host])']

The order of the sprintf format specifications matches and corresponds to the order of the expressions, as shown in Figure 97. Figure 97 Parts of a simple alias formula
sprintf format specifications expressions

['sprintf("%s/%s",[$1.mc_object/$1.mc_host])']

In the example in Figure 97, '%s/%s' is the data type of the output and '$1.mc_object', $1.mc_host' are variable expressions. The first format specification, ‘%s’ (a string), corresponds to the first variable expression ‘$1.mc_object’ (which is the value in the mc_object slot of the event with $1 representing the event ID). The second format specification (‘%s’, a string) corresponds to the second variable expression ‘$1.mc_host’.

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Event alias associations

Table 67 shows the event data, the alias formula, the alias that was computed from the data in the event and the alias formula, and the alias stored in the component instance, which in this example matches the computed alias from the event data. Table 67
Event DATABASE DOWN; mc_host='dcsrv02.store.com '; mc_object_class='Central Database'; mc_object='SALES'; msg='Database is down'; END

Parts of an event alias association
Alias Formula [‘sprintf("%s/%s", [$1.mc_object/ $1.mc_host])’] The values in mc_object and mc_host are output as string values, with a slash between them. (An alias formula is an object published to the cell; it is not associated with any object in the service model; it is management data supporting the service model.) Alias SALES/dcsrv02.store.com Component instance alias

When the cell finds a match, an entry is created in the BMC_SIM_ALIAS class, as shown in this example:

EXAMPLE
BMC_SIM_ALIAS; ComponentAlias='SALES/dcsrv02.megastore.com'; ComponentID='1234'; END

The alias links the event DATABASE DOWN to the component instance with the component ID 1234.

NOTE
The BMC_SIM_ALIAS object is part of the SIM management data. It is not visible in BMC Impact Service Model Editor.

Other examples of alias formulas:

EXAMPLE
[‘sprintf(%s,strextract($1.mc_object,1,6))’] [‘sprintf(Mail@robot%s,strextract($1.mc_object,(len($1.mc_object)),1 )’] ['sprintf("%s%s%s",[$1.date,$1.mc_ueid,$1.adapter_host])']

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Service schedules

Service schedules
Service schedules are a combination of a defined schedule with a specific component in the service model which indicates when it is important for the component to meet availability or performance goals. Each component is assigned a service schedule (but it may be a schedule shared with other components).
s

s

Periods when a component instance is in high demand, or when it is considered important that the component meet its availability and performance goals, are During Schedule. Periods when a component instance is in low demand, or when it is less important that the component meet its availability and performance goals, are Off Schedule. Note that any undefined time is considered Off Schedule.

Timeframes
Service schedules are built of timeframes. Timeframes are user-defined blocks of time that can be added to a schedule which can specify the times that are During Schedule or Exceptions Within During Schedule. Two types of timeframes exist: Global and Local.
s

Global timeframes are created within the BMC Impact Service Model Editor, stored in the BMC Atrium CMDB and are available to all cells within an environment. Global timeframes are created and are usable within both BMC Impact Service Model Editor and the BMC Impact Explorer. Local timeframes are stored in a single cell and are only available to the event management policies within that cell. Local timeframes are only created and usable within the BMC Impact Explorer schedules editor.

s

Table 68 illustrates the differences between Global timeframes and Local timeframes. Table 68
Global Local

Global and Local timeframe differences
Created in BMC Impact Service Model Editor BMC Impact Explorer Stored in Available to BMC Atrium CMDB all cells a single cell event management policies within a single cell

Timeframe type

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Service schedules example with exceptions

Service schedules example with exceptions
For example, a component might be expected to meet its performance goals from 8 A.M. to 5 P.M. each day. A timeframe for this period is would be considered During Schedule. The same component, if not needed from 5 P.M. to 8 A.M. each day, would be Off Schedule during that time. Periods within During Schedule in which a component is considered to be Off Schedule are Exceptions Within During Schedule. For example, within the 8 A.M. to 5 P.M. During Schedule period, if the component was scheduled to be regularly taken offline every day from noon to 1 P.M., instead of creating two different During Schedule timeframes (one for 8 A.M. to noon, and another from 1 P.M. to 5 P.M.), an Exceptions Within During Schedule timeframe could be created for the noon-to-1 P.M. span of time. Component attributes such as cost or base priority may have different values depending on whether the component is in high demand (a During Schedule period) or in low demand (an Off Schedule period). These priority changes are discussed in more detail in “Dynamic prioritization” on page 412.

Importing Business Time Segments from BMC Remedy AR System
You can import Business Time Segments from BMC Remedy AR System into BMC Impact Service Model Editor to use as timeframes when you define service schedules for service components. Imported timeframes, considered Global timeframes, are published when the next publish occurs. For information on importing Business Time Segments, see BMC Portal Getting Started.

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Importing Business Time Segments from BMC Remedy AR System

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15

Designing a service model
This chapter covers the following topics: Service model design process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining business goals for the service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Decomposing a business service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining the service catalog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining the service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining a component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining a new component class for a component type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analyzing a component’s critical failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining a component’s relationship and dependencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining the organization of the modeled relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Identifying a component’s critical events and their sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service model design considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determining cell topology for the service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component property updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component deletions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Service model design process

Service model design process
The best service models are enterprise-specific, achieving the organization’s business availability goals. The IT environment, its organization, and its operational constraints vary significantly among enterprises. A cost-effective strategy when you begin the process of building a service model is to select one critical business process/service and build as complete a service model as desired for that part of your enterprise. Figure 98 shows an example of a generic service model with business users, services, and IT structure layers. The lines between the component instances represent the provider/consumer relationships. Figure 98 Example of a service model

Business consumers

Service layer

IT infrastructure

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Defining business goals for the service model

The following factors determine how a service impact management solution should be designed and implemented:
s s

s s s

the diversity of IT resources and how they are monitored the location of resources and how the management responsibilities for them are distributed within and among IT or information services (IS) groups the relative importance of various resources in the delivery of business services the need for change management the maintainability of the service model over time

The service modeling process involves:
s s s s s s

s

identifying sources of information identifying core competencies within the organization identifying critical business processes identifying IT services and their components finding relationships and dependencies between IT services building the necessary database of information (asset inventory, service catalog, and so on) building the service model

Defining business goals for the service model
The most basic step involved in defining a service model is defining the specific business goals you hope to achieve with the model. To do this, the IT or IS group must engage the business managers in defining shortterm, mid-term, and long-term goals for service impact management for the enterprise. These goals guide the design and development of deliverables for all service model development phases and define the amount of time and effort required for development and implementation. Possible goals for service impact management include:
s

operational efficiency—This type of implementation is run by and for the IT or IS group. It creates a thin layer of logical groups on top of a large number of IT resources, ranging from applications and systems to hard disk and other hardware components. The concept of services are just logical groupings that provide a convenient way of classifying the technical resources.

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Decomposing a business service

s

business-focused operational efficiency—This type of implementation is likely to

involve various populations and loci of management in the enterprise. It creates a balanced representation of the operational environment, encompassing the IT components, such as systems and applications, and the logical components, such as services, user groups, and other business objects.
s

business continuity and service availability—This type of implementation is driven from the top and ensures that IT or IS is delivering their services as agreed. It creates a business-centric model in which business processes, services, and SLAs rely on a small number of vital IT components that measure the pulse of the underlying environment.

Decomposing a business service
The purpose of decomposing a business service is to identify and document business processes, identify the IT services that support them, and identify IT components and assets that provide the IT services. For example, a hardware manufacturing organization may identify a business function as microprocessor procurement, a supporting IT service as procurement information storage, and the supporting IT assets as servers, databases, and related hardware and software systems. On a high level, a service model is a collection of components that represent a business service. A business service can have one or more business processes. Each business process can contain several functional applications, each of which can have multiple IT components. A service model will contain the processes, show how the components are interconnected, and show how component failures propagate and impact the upstream services. The following steps facilitate the process of creating a service model.

1 Identify business services.
Sources of information include business unit managers, business process managers, and staff personnel knowledgeable about the business services. Company organization charts might be helpful in identifying the relevant people. The process involves interviewing the managers and identifying the following information:
s

business processes—Identify key business processes such as Market Research,

s

Product Planning, Response Management, or Case Management. There can be multiple levels of business processes, starting with higher level core competencies and business functions, to specific sub-business processes. functional applications—Identify the business applications that support the business processes. Map the business processes to the functional apps.

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Decomposing a business service

Map the functional applications to IT service components to create the business service models.

2 Identify IT services.
Sources of information include IT managers and staff. Disaster recovery plans, help desk documents, and purchase orders might be useful in identifying IT components and the business processes that they support. The process involves identifying the list of IT assets (components). Interview the IT management and staff, or utilize an asset/configuration management database as resources:
s

s s

Create a list of IT services (service catalog); discover what IT services are offered to business units through use of IT assets. Examples of IT services include customer support and customer call monitoring. For each IT service, identify the IT assets that support the service. Identify the interdependencies among the IT components and formulate a topology map. Consider the relationships and dependencies between IT components.

3 Build a business service model, and link the business processes to the IT services
you have identified. Table 69 Example business service model spreadsheet
Business functions Marketing Business processes Market research

Core competencies Plan and develop products

IT services

IT component

Research product and planning development Manager customer relations Front office sales Customer support Response management Support service requests FTP Server: FTP

Sprint Sales Logix

Server: Walrus Database: SALLOG Applications: Sales Logix User group: Tech Support dept Servers: Antelope

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Defining the service catalog

Defining the service catalog
A service catalog is a list of IT services, logical assets, and physical assets that support business processes for a company. The service catalog should list all of the IT services with a summary of their characteristics, including values for the fields shown in Table 70. For the Sales Logix IT service example shown in Table 69 on page 333, the detailed IT component information (except for Alias and Alias formula) that are required by BMC Impact Service Model Editor is shown in Table 70. Table 70
Component type business process user community application

BMC Impact Service Model Editor values for IT service Sales Logix
In/out model in Status computation model Relationship Policy direct Provider instances that impact Tech Support Analysts Sales Logix v6.01 Sales Logix server Sales Logix DB software SALLOG Support service requests Tech Support Analysts Sales Logix v6.01 Tech Support Analysts Sales Logix application Tech Support Analysts Sales Logix db software Tech Support Analysts Consumer instances depending on

Component Component name description Support service requests Tech Support Analysts

Cell name

Business function bogart is Customer support Techs supporting service requests bogart

in

standard

direct

Sales Logix Sales Logix v6.01 application, v 6.01

bogart

in

standard

increasing

application server database

Sales Logix Sales Logix server bogart server Sales Logix Sales Logic DB database software software v6.0 SALLOG Sales Logix database server bogart

in

standard

increasing

in

standard

direct

database server

bogart

in

standard

direct

Defining the service model
After you have decided on a business goal for service impact management, decomposed your business processes, and created a service catalog, you are ready to define the actual service model.

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Defining a component instance

Defining the service model involves establishing a list of all the IT resources that should be represented in the service model. This information should include:
s s

each resource’s name or component identification pattern its location or site

You use this information later in the design phase and when creating service model components. The first step in developing a service model is to design its logical architecture. To do this, you must analyze the IT environment to
s s s

identify the resources that make up the service model identify the event sources for the resources and their characteristics determine the functional relationships and dependencies between various resources that can affect services

Defining a component instance
In decomposing your business services, you have identified the basic building blocks of a service model—its assets or components. In the BMC service model, each individual resource is represented by a component instance. Component instances are created as a single instance of a class type that is defined in the BMC Atrium CMDB. Classes may identify such physical components as servers or databases, and such logical components as user groups. Component instances are created through BMC Impact Service Model Editor. The order in which you create related physical components is unimportant. You can create an IT system component before or after an application component that runs on it.

Defining a new component class for a component type
Component instances represent an individual occurrence of a component type, or class. Component classes are displayed in BMC Impact Service Model Editor as templates from which you can create new component types. They are created and maintained in the BMC Atrium CMDB. In order to maintain service model consistency, when you make a change to the SIM classes in the BMC Atrium CMDB, you must distribute the changes to all of the SIM BMC Impact Manager instances (cells) and recompile them.

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Analyzing a component’s critical failures

Analyzing a component’s critical failures
After service components and associated functions are identified, you need to monitor their status to analyze their effects and watch for failures. To do so:
s

s s s

identify the cause of failures and degraded performances for the service component categorize the failures into availability, performance, capacity identify the effects of the failures assign a severity level to each failure Severity level values are listed in Table 71.

Table 71
severe significant moderate minor slight minimal

Severity level index
Definition Permanently disabling critical end user dissatisfaction causes degradation of service causes inconvenience to end user caused annoyance for customer not noticeable by end user

Severity level

s

assign a frequency or occurrence level to each failure Occurrence level index values are listed in Table 72.

Table 72
high frequent moderate occasional slight remote

Occurrence level index
Definition high change of occurrence and needs immediate attention frequent change to happen and needs attention moderate change to consider prevention occasionally might happen slight chance to happen unlikely to happen

Occurrence level

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Determining a component’s relationship and dependencies

Sample of FMEA
s s s s s

s s s s s

Component—Message Transfer Agent (MTA) Function—routes and convert messages Point of failure—queue length size growing Issue type—performance Cause of failure—network connection failure, receiving MTA failure, problem on sending or receiving machine Effect of failure—remote recipients will not receive e-mail while MTA down Severity—significant Occurrence—slight Prevention—monitoring of the system, network, and exchange services Detection—PATROL NT and Exchange parameters related to the issue

Determining a component’s relationship and dependencies
To understand the impact of different components and their status on a service, you identify the underlying dependencies and relationships within the IT Systems.
s

s

s

s

s

consider relationships and dependencies within the IT service; for example, within email service, or call support’s dependency on email consider dependencies on other services; for example, web services and email services consider how the same IT components might support more than one service; for example, one server hosting multiple applications consider the dependencies of several business processes on the same service; for example, email used by all consider the relationship between IT services and business processes (the link called business service)

Map business processes to each system. The grouping of IT systems becomes the IT services, so that only one IT service would exist for each business process. Identify the relationships and dependencies among the IT components and the logical components to one another. The direction of the relationship is important. If a system component is to be linked to a hardware component, the hardware component must be the provider and the system component the consumer. Examine how the various resources combine to deliver a service on a particular host. Define the resources that are providers and the resources that consume their services in the service delivery stream.

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Determining the organization of the modeled relationships

Determining the organization of the modeled relationships
How you organize service model components depends on the goals that your organization wants to attain through service impact management. You can organize your service model components using one of these basic organizational strategies:
s

The IT resource management strategy is to create a thin layer of logical groupings on top of a large number of IT resources, ranging from applications and systems to hard disks and other hardware components. This type of implementation is run by and for the IT or IS group. Services are just logical groupings that provide convenient way of classifying the technical resources. The driving force behind this model is operational efficiency. The business-focused operational efficiency strategy is to create a balanced representation of the operational environment, encompassing the IT components, such as systems and applications, and the logical components, such as services, user groups, and other business objects. This type of implementation is likely to involve various populations and loci of management in the enterprise. The driving force is operational efficiency, but with a balanced business perspective. The business continuity and service availability strategy is to implement a business-centric model in which business processes and services rely on a small number of vital IT components to give a status overview of the underlying environment. This type of implementation is driven from the top, ensuring that IT or IS is delivering their services as agreed. The driving force is business continuity and availability. This strategy is similar to BMC Software’s BSM Strategy that is called a Business Service Impact Model.

s

s

Although these strategies are only briefly outlined here, they are helpful in understanding that each implementation probably has a different focus, favoring some types of components and having more or less granularity in some branches of the component hierarchy. The strategy that you choose also affects the amount of time and effort required for its development and implementation.

Identifying a component’s critical events and their sources
Even the most complete service model provides little value if there is not a consistent flow of events into the model to maintain the real-time status of its components. Event associations provide the mechanism for a component’s real-time status to reflect the health of the actual resource that it represents.

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Identifying a component’s critical events and their sources

To create the event associations for a component, you must
s s

identify the event classes that will be associated with the component establish a naming convention for the logical ID (a key value) so that the same identification string can be derived from each event class to be associated with the component

You perform event analysis to achieve these goals. Assuming that there is enough event data consistently available to understand the state of IT resources, perform the following actions:

1 Analyze the event flow of each real IT resource or group of resources that are
instrumented in the same way to identify:
s

events that provide no value to the service model Not all events received by a cell provide valuable information to the service model. Identify the events that are of no value and should be ignored, either by not sending them to a cell or by filtering them out when they reach the first cell.

s

events that provide valuable information about the service environment and must be retained by the cell, such as: — events that must be changed or adapted either at the source or in the event adapter that collects them to be usable by the model — events that must be enriched by the cell so that they contain the required information; events can be enriched using Refine and New rules — events that must be processed (using a Regulate rule) so that only the appropriate occurrences reach the service model — events that should be combined through abstraction, correlation, or through New rule updates before entering the service model This includes events that are best represented by a single higher-order event that represents their net effect or represented by event pairs, such as UP/DOWN.

s

missing events or events that cannot be processed Some situations that you may want to include in your model are not traced by events in the real environment, or the events produced cannot be associated with the IT resource.

2 For each significant event, determine whether the event should be associated only
with a component or whether it should also participate in the status computation.
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Service model design considerations

For example, a cause event E1 is associated with the component C1, and a consequence event E2 is associated with the component C2. While it may appear reasonable to elect E1 so that its severity value contributes to the status of C1, electing E2 may be of no use if a relationship propagates the impact of event E1 from component C1 to component C2.

3 Consider how the monitoring tool, such as an agent, adapter, or script, reports the
state of the service’s IT resources.
s

Does the monitoring tool send alerts only when something goes wrong? If so, does it close the alerts automatically? If the monitoring tool does not close alerts automatically, you may need to automate their closure through rules containing the appropriate cycle and conditions.

s

Does the monitoring tool send status-type events, such as ok or not ok, at regular intervals? Does the monitoring tool handle component availability with some form of heartbeat? When does the IT component representing the resource transition from AVAILABLE to UNKNOWN or from AVAILABLE to UNAVAILABLE, and back again? What is the reliability of the event flow? Even the most complete service model is of little value if a consistent flow of events into the model cannot be maintained. When creating new event propagation paths, you should take care to consider whether you can improve or, at least, not affect event flow.

s

s

s

Service model design considerations
This section contains information to keep in mind when designing your service model, including information on cell topology, component property updates, and component deletions.

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Determining cell topology for the service model

Determining cell topology for the service model
There are three basic approaches to cell topology:
s s s

centralized domain-based layered

The centralized (default implementation) approach is to implement the service model on one cell, with all the service management objects created and maintained in that cell. Then, use distributed cells to collect and process the raw events of interest before they enter the model. The domain-based approach separates the service model into two or more parts that correspond to clearly established entities or domains in the organization. Each part is run on a different cell, and users connect to the cells on which the components that they manage reside. Lines of business and independently operated sites are good candidates for this approach. With this approach, you can represent some resources in more than one cell, provided that the event flow is directed or propagated correctly. The layered approach separates the service model into two or more stratified management layers, such as IT components and logical components. Each layer is contained in a different cell, or possibly distributed among several cells if geography is a factor. If you are assigning different components of the same service model across multiple cells, first determine which components are related. Then assign related components to appropriate cells until you assign all components of the service model.

To determine related component instances
This topic addresses the publication of different components of a service model to multiple cells: for example, publishing component 1 to cell A, component 2 to cell B, and so forth, until all components of the service model have an assigned cell. You determine related component instances based on your interpretation of the service model. For example, you might group instances based on geographic proximity, network connectivity, similarity of function, provider-to-consumer relation, and so forth. You can assign different component instances to different cells to distribute the processing load, or you can make the assignment based on the proximity of the cell to the instance it is monitoring. See “Assigning related component instances to cells” on page 370.

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Component property updates

After you publish the service model, you can view the entire model from a single Impact Explorer console, as long as all the cells are registered with the BMC Impact Portal.

Component property updates
The cell updates the status of a component as new events are received or when an impact from other components occurs. However, other component properties that can change over time are not maintained by the cell. You can update these properties automatically only if the new values arrive in an event or are added in a data table. You must create a few simple rules to implement this mechanism.

Component deletions
To maintain the integrity of the service model, delete component instances only from BMC Impact Service Model Editor and then promote the delete actions.

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16

Building a service model
This chapter provides detailed information on how to build the service model. For a fast-track to building a working service model, see Chapter 13, “Building a service model—quick start.” This chapter covers the following topics: Service model creation process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with service component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating service component instances in BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . Switching View modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing properties for a component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editing component instances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Performing actions on multiple objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Copying component instances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hiding a component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting a component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Finding component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining relationships between component instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About relationship creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating a component relationship in BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . Assigning related component instances to cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Updating relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associating events with a component instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with timeframes and service schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Icons used in the service schedule and timeframes editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with timeframes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with service schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assigning components to service schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Granting access to service model objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Granting permissions to individual service model objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing the service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing component relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing event associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Promoting the service model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 About the publishing process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 Before you promote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392 Submitting a promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Verifying promotion status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395 Organizing service component instances for monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395 Working with BMC Impact Service Model Editor Views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 Saving, opening, renaming, and deleting Views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 Understanding visual cues in a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Repositioning objects in a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 Controlling what you see in a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 Exploring consumer and provider paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405 Refreshing the View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406 Repositioning the dockable windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Showing topology views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Exporting and importing service model data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408 Exporting class definitions from the BMC Atrium CMDB to a cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409

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Service model creation process
A cost-effective way of starting the service model creation is to select the components that have the largest financial impact on your company and enter them first. To build a service model, you must
s s s s s s

find or create component instances in the BMC Atrium CMDB assign component instances to a BMC Impact Manager cell define service model component relationships associate events with service model components assign schedules to components promote the service model and publish objects to cells

Working with service component instances
To populate the BMC Atrium CMDB with component instances for the service models, you can use discovery tools such as BMC Topology Discovery or you can manually enter the component instances using the BMC Impact Service Model Editor. The BMC Impact Service Model Editor is the part of SIM that provides a GUI into the BMC Atrium CMDB reconciled data set. It draws data from this data set and provides a centralized point for all service model objects. To search for existing component instances, see “Finding component instances” on page 357.

NOTE
BMC Software recommends creating a maximum of 20,000 service model component instances for each BMC Impact Manager cell.

Creating service component instances in BMC Impact Service Model Editor
You can create a service component instance in BMC Impact Service Model Editor by using either of these two methods:
s s

the Template dockable window the Create Component menu command

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Creating service component instances in BMC Impact Service Model Editor

Before you begin
You need the service catalog spreadsheet that lists IT components and their relationships. For information about launching the BMC Impact Service Model Editor, see “Launching BMC Impact Service Model Editor” on page 289. To launch BMC Impact Service Model Editor, BMC Portal must be installed; see BMC Portal Getting Started.

TIP
s

To free more desktop area for the View, you can hide the dockable windows by clicking the left-pointing quick expansion arrow located along the top right side of the dockable windows. You can also undock and move the Templates, Pan and Zoom, Find, Properties, Views, and Console Navigation Bar windows. See “Repositioning the dockable windows” on page 407.

s

To create a service component instance using the menu command 1 Open a new sandbox View at any time by clicking
on the toolbar.

If you have saved Views, you can open the appropriate View from the Views panel.

2 With a sandbox View open, from the menu bar, choose Edit => Create Component. 3 In the Create Component dialog box, on the General tab, scroll in the Component
Type pane until you find the appropriate component type for the instance you are creating.

The service component types are listed in hierarchical order.

Where to go from here
To enter values for other component instance attributes, see “To specify other component instance attributes” on page 348. To learn about creating component instances using the Template dockable window, continue with the next section.

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To create a service component instance using the Template dockable window 1 Open a new View at any time by clicking
on the toolbar.

If you have saved Views, you can open the appropriate View from the Views panel.

2 In the Templates dockable window, find the service component type (class)
appropriate for the instance you are creating. Note that you can change the order of the list of components in the Templates pane by clicking the appropriate icon. Available options include List, Large Icon, and Tree (ordered by SIM class) layouts. The List and Large Icon layouts may be sorted alphabetically.

3 Drag the component type icon from the dockable window to the View window.
When placing objects in the sandbox View window, place consumer instances above provider instances for a hierarchical layout. Create multiple copies of the component type at one time by holding down a number key while dragging the component icon to the View window. For example, to create eight copies of a component, hold the number 8 key on your numerical keypad while dragging over the component icon. Holding down the 0 key while dragging will create ten copies. Note that holding down the 1 key while dragging will create eleven copies of the component type.

4 Right-click the component icon and select Edit Component Properties. 5 On the General tab, in the Component Type pane, the component type you chose is
selected by default. If you chose the wrong component type, click Cancel and start again with step 3.

Where to go from here
To enter values for other component instance attributes, see “To specify other component instance attributes” on page 348.

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To specify other component instance attributes 1 In the General tab A In the Component Name box, replace the default component type name with a
specific component instance name that is meaningful to your enterprise. This value is the label for a component instance in a View.

B In the Cell box, accept the default unassigned, or choose the cell that will receive
events for the component instance. BMC Impact Service Model Editor retrieves the list of cell names from the BMC Atrium CMDB. If the cell you need is not listed, see the BMC Portal Getting Started guide for information about adding a cell.

WARNING
s

If unassigned is chosen, the component instance is automatically set to Not In Model and cannot be published. BMC Impact Service Model Editor verifies that the cell name you choose is present in the BMC Impact Portal, but if the component instance is created outside of BMC Impact Service Model Editor or if the cell is deleted from BMC Impact Portal after it has been created but before it is published, data integrity errors may result.

s

C (optional) In the Description box, enter a component description that is
meaningful to your enterprise.

D (optional) In the Owner section, in the Name box, enter the name of the individual
who is responsible for the component, and in the Contact box, enter a contact method, such as a phone number or e-mail address, for the individual entered in the Name box.

E In the Component Is area, choose Not In Model or In Model.
To include a component instance in the service model, select In Model; it can be published to the cell. To not include a component instance in the service model at the present time, select Not In Model; it cannot be published to the cell. For more information about in model/not in model, see “In-model and not-inmodel component instances” on page 308.

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2 In the Status and Alias tab A In the Status Computation list, select a status computation model.
The default selection is Standard, which is acceptable for most component instance definitions. For more information on status computation models, see Chapter 17, “Component and relationship status propagation.” The default status for new component instances is OK.

B In the Aliases box, click Add Alias.
Each component instance must have a unique Alias; if more than one component instance has the same alias, publishing will fail. For information about Aliases, see “Event associations” on page 322. — In the Alias box, enter the alias and press Return or click OK. Each alias you enter is listed in the Aliases box. — (optional) Enter additional aliases (one for each event that can potentially affect the status of the component instance) by clicking Add Alias.

3 In the Permissions tab, assign the proper permissions for this component instance
to each of the roles listed. Each role can have Full Access, Read Only, or Unassigned permissions.

4 In the Schedule tab A Assign the appropriate service schedules information to the components. For
more information, see “Assigning components to service schedules” on page 387.

B In the Time-Variable Properties pane
— Choose a base priority for the components for During Schedule and Off Schedule Timeframes — Enter the cost and units per second for During Schedule and Off Schedule Timeframes.

C In the Priority Propagation pane, choose Yes to have the selected components
propagate their self priority to their causal components, or choose No (default) if self priority should not be propagated.

5 In the Other tab, enter relevant information about the component in the fields
listed.
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Switching View modes

6 To save the component instance in the BMC Atrium CMDB (or save changes if you
used the Templates dockable window), click OK.

Where to go from here
Continue creating component instances until you have a number of component instances that are related, then see “Defining relationships between component instances” on page 365. To learn more about working with component instances (viewing, editing, copying, deleting, and finding), continue with the next section.

Switching View modes
You can switch between a model-based View of components (Topology mode), to a table-based View (Component Table mode) which displays a list of properties of components in the View. Components selected in either mode remain selected after switching to the other mode. You can switch View modes by clicking the appropriate toolbar icon, as shown in Table 73. Table 73
Icon

View mode switch icons
View mode Topology

Component Table

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Viewing properties for a component instance
To view properties for a component instance, do one of the following:
s s

s

s s

In a View window, right-click a component instance and select Properties. Switch to Component Table mode . Right-clicking on a column heading in Component Table mode brings up a configuration dialog so you may select custom headings. Note that custom headings do not persist between sessions. Select the Properties dockable window, and in a View window, select a component instance or vice versa, select a component instance and then click Properties on the Properties dockable window. On the toolbar, click the Display the properties window icon. Select a component instance and from the menu bar and choose Windows => Properties.

You can also change the values for a property from the Properties pane by clicking the appropriate Edit button. (Each section of data has its own Edit button.) By default, the properties shown for a component in Component Table mode include Table 74
Type Type Name Scope Cell Owner Name Company Status Model Priority - During Schedule Priority - Off Schedule Description Reconciliation Identity

Default component properties
Description the general component type, such as application, computer system, and database. the name of the component. whether the component is in a production, sandbox, or test environment. the name of the BMC Impact Manager to which the component is assigned. the name of the person responsible for the component. the name of the business associated with the component. status model description, such as Standard the base priority of a component (1-5) in a During Schedule timeframe the base priority of a component (1-5) in an Off Schedule timeframe any special notes on the component. id used to reconcile this component, as in matching this component instance across datasets

You can configure which component properties are displayed for a component in Component Table mode by right-clicking a table column heading and selecting Configure Table Columns.

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Editing component instances

The default sort order is by Name. For information about changing properties of a component instance, see “Editing component instances.”

Editing component instances
You can change properties (attributes) for a component instance, except the component’s class, by opening the Edit Component Properties dialog box. If the component is already being edited, a warning dialog is displayed. Though you are not locked-out of editing the component, you should wait until the edit is complete before proceeding.

To modify component instance properties 1 Either
s s

in the active View window, select the component instance to edit, or in a Table of Components view, select the component property to edit.

2 Do one of the following to display the Edit Component Properties dialog:
s

s

Right-click the component instance or property and choose Edit Component Properties from the context menu. From the menu bar, choose Edit => Edit Component Properties.

3 Make the appropriate changes. For more information on the properties of
components, see “To specify other component instance attributes” on page 348.

4 Click OK.

Performing actions on multiple objects
There are a number of actions you can perform on multiple objects at the same time. For example, you can add the same cell to several component instances, or delete multiple component instances.

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To select multiple objects 1 On the toolbar, select Selection
.

2 Draw a box around all the objects you want to select. 3 Right-click and select the action that you want to perform on the selected objects
from the context menu.

To quickly change In Model or Not in Model setting
In an active View window, select the component instances, or both component instances and relationships, and do one of the following:
s s

On the toolbar, click the add-to-model or remove-from-model Right-click and choose Add to Model or Remove from Model.

icon.

Note that only the object type specific to a particular action will be used and the other type will be ignored. For example, selected relationships are ignored when assigning multiple objects to a cell.

To add or change the assigned cell 1 In an active View window, select the component instances. 2 Right-click and choose Assign Component to Cell.
If all the component instances have the same cell, the cell name displays. If even one cell name is different, the Cell box will be blank.

3 Select a cell from the list, or select [unassigned].
When you select a cell, all component instances are updated with that cell. If you select unassigned, component instances no longer have cell assignments, all components that were In Model are changed to Not In Model and cannot be published.

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To edit multiple component instances 1 Select the appropriate component instances. See “To select multiple objects” on
page 353.

2 Either
s s

right-click and choose Edit Component Properties. from the menu bar, choose Edit => Edit Component Properties

3 In the Edit Multiple Component Properties dialog box, make the necessary
changes. Figure 99 Changing properties for more than one component instance

The objects you selected appear in the Component List box. Changes you make will apply to every component instance in the list. When even one component instance has a different value for a property, the field is blank. For example, in Figure 99, the Component Description box contains no value.

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4 When you have finished making changes
s s s

to save and exit, click OK. to save and keep the dialog box open, click Apply. to exit without saving your changes, click Cancel.

Copying component instances
You can copy one or more component instances and paste the copies into the sandbox View. When pasting copies, you can automatically rename the pasted components by attaching a prefix or suffix to the original component name. To configure copy/paste options, see “To set copy/paste and miscellaneous options” on page 428. Relationships are not copied unless they are also selected. See “To select multiple objects” on page 353.

To copy component instances 1 Select one or more component instances that you want to copy. 2 Right-click and choose Copy. 3 Right-click and choose Paste. 4 If you are copying more than one component, in the Paste Multiple Components
dialog box, add a prefix or suffix as needed to the original component name and click OK. The default prefix is Copy of, but you can change it for this paste operation by entering a new value.
Output Preview displays the name of the newly pasted component instance. When

more than one component instance is selected for copying, the name of only one of the selected component instances displays. To replace the default prefix or suffix, change it in the Options settings. To prevent the Paste Components dialog box from prompting you at each paste, check Do not show this dialog again. When this check box is selected, the current option is used until you change it in the Options settings. See “To set copy/paste and miscellaneous options” on page 428. To close the dialog box without creating copies or saving settings, click Cancel.

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Hiding a component instance

Hiding a component instance
You can hide a component instance so that it is not visible in the current active View or in all Views. A hidden component instance is not deleted from BMC Impact Service Model Editor and can be retrieved with the Find command if it has been published to a cell.

To hide a component instance 1 Select the component instances to hide. 2 To hide the component instances in the active View, do one of the following:
s s

Right-click and choose Hide in This View. Choose Edit => Hide in This View.

The selected component instances are removed from the active View, but are still visible in other Views in which they have been saved. If part of the service model, they remain in the service model.

3 To hide the component instances in all Views, do one of the following:
s s

Right-click and choose Hide in All Views. Choose Edit => Hide in All Views.

The selected component instances are removed from all Views and from the service model. Data in the component instance is not modified in any way; the component instance just does not appear any of the current Views.

Deleting a component instance
When you delete a component instance in a View
s

s

s

Components in BMC.ASSET that are marked as deleted (MarkAsDeleted) are not seen in BMC Impact Service Model Editor Components in the user’s sandbox that are marked as deleted show in BMC Impact Service Model Editor with an “X” icon. Components which are new in the sandbox (that have no copy in BMC.ASSET yet) are hard-deleted from the sandbox.

NOTE
If you simply want to remove a component instance from your Views without deleting it permanently, use the Hide in All Views command as described in “Hiding a component instance” on page 356.

I

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To delete a component instance 1 In a View window, select the component instances you want to delete. 2 Either
s

in a View window, right-click on the component instance, and choose Delete
from CMDB.

s

from the menu bar, choose Edit => Delete from CMDB.

3 Verify that you want to delete the component instances and click Yes. 4 Choose File=>Promote All Sandbox Changes. 5 Review the Objects to be Promoted area to ensure that the component instances
that you want to delete are listed.

6 Click Begin Promotion.
The deleted instances are removed from the service model; they are no longer available in BMC Atrium CMDB.

Finding component instances
You can search the BMC Atrium CMDB for existing component instances using the Find command. Only component instances associated with classes that are designated for service impact management in the BMC Atrium CMDB can be found in the BMC Impact Service Model Editor.

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Finding component instances

Figure 100 Find Component dialog box

You cannot search for relationships with the Find command, but when related component instances are found and both are placed in a View, the relationship between the two is also placed in the View.

To find existing component instances 1 Launch the Find command by doing one of the following:
s s s

On the toolbar, click Find. From the dockable windows, click Find. From the menu bar, choose Window => Find.

2 In the Component Name box, enter the name of the component instance you want to
find. To display a list of all component instances, leave the Component Name box blank and click Find. You can enter a partial name by using the % sign as a wildcard, either before or after the partial name. For example, %Sales%, Sales%, or %Sales.

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3 (optional) You can save the search statement by clicking Add to Saved Finds and
reuse it by clicking Open Saved Finds.

4 (optional) In the Look in area, accept the default, Sandbox and Production, or filter
the list of component instances in the results pane by choosing Production Only or Test Only.

5 (optional) To define the attributes that display in the results table and the order in
which they display, click the Configure the Result table columns Find dialog box). The attributes in the Available Attributes pane
s s

button (in the

are listed in alphabetical order are those that are common to all component types

In the Configure Find Results dialog box, select the appropriate attributes.
s

s

s

To change the order of the columns in the final results display, use the up and down arrow buttons. To move the attributes you want to display into the Attributes to Show pane, use the left and right arrow buttons. Click OK to save your changes or Cancel to exit without saving.

6 To start the search, click Find.
While the search is in progress, a find activity indicator spins next to the Find button. You may see results before the search is complete. The indicator disappears when the search is complete.

7 In the Results pane, review the results of the search.
The default sort order is by component name, if component name is one of the columns you choose to display. If component name is not chosen for display, the default sort order is creation date/time. To sort the values in any column, click in the column heading. To change the order of the columns from left to right, drag the column headings. For each user, the last user-defined columns and sort-order settings are saved and will be reapplied at the next session.

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8 (optional) In the results pane, select one of the instances and do any of the
following:
s s

To place objects in a new View window, click Open in New View. To place objects in the active View window, drag the instances into the View window or select them and click Place in Selected View. When you move one instance into a View, if the object already exists in that View window, the Duplicate Component dialog box opens. To shift the View focus so that the already existing object can be seen, click Go to Component. If you select more than one component instance to move into view, the Go to
Component button is not available.

s

To view the characteristics of a selected component instance, click Show Properties.

9 (optional) To start another search, click Reset to clear all the selection criteria
options on the Find tab to the default values (blank component name field, All Components, no results in table).

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Using Advanced Find
On the Advanced Find tab, you can refine a search based on additional search criteria. For example, in Figure 101, the search will locate objects assigned to the specified cell with a publish date within the past year. Figure 101 Advanced Find dialog box

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Finding component instances

Table 75 describes the additional search criteria available in Advanced Find. Table 75
Look in

Description of additional search criteria
Options Sandbox and Production Selects based on components that are in either sandbox or production (promoted and published) Views components that have been promoted and published and are now in production components that have been assigned to a test cell any component type the specific component type selected from the list any service impact cell the specific cell name selected from the list the date range during which the component instance was last changed the date range during which the component instance was created the user ID who last changed the component instance properties

Search criteria

Production Only

Test Only Component Type All list of component types (classes) Cell All Specific cell names Date Last Edited Date

Last Created Date

User

Last Editor

Creator

the login ID of the user who created the component instance

Using Conditional Find
With Conditional Find you can create a custom selection criteria phrase to select the component instances that cannot be located using Find or Advanced Find tabs.

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Figure 102 Using Conditional Find

In the Query Builder area, you define the attributes and specific values on which you want to base the search. When you search on the Alias attribute, you must use LIKE as the relational operator, because if the component instance has more than one alias, the values are stored as a string.

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To build selection criteria phrases 1 (optional) If needed, in the first list box, select the beginning parenthesis.
If the statement requires multiple selection criteria phrases, you may need the beginning and ending parentheses to define precedence. For example, you need the parentheses for a statement like
(phrase1 OR phrase2) AND phrase3

2 In the Select list box, select a component instance attribute.
As you build the statement, it is displayed in the Query Display area.

3 In the relational operator list box, select one from those defined in Table 76.
Table 76
= != < > <= >= LIKE

Definition of relational operators
Definition equal to not equal to less than greater than less than or equal to greater than or equal to similar to

Relational operators

Relational operators describe the relationship between the value in the attribute and the value you enter in the text box (step 4).

4 In the text box, enter the specific value that must be contained in the attribute. 5 (optional) To create multiple selection criteria phrases, add additional lines as
needed by clicking the Add Line button that is located directly under the line where you want to add a line. If you have more than one selection criteria line, in the first list box on the subsequent line, select the appropriate Boolean operator:
s s

And means both conditions must be met. Or means either condition can be met for the component instance to be selected.

6 (optional) If needed, in the last list box for any selection criteria phrase, select the
ending parenthesis.

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7 (optional) To delete lines, click the Delete Line button that is directly under the line
you want to delete.

8 To start the search, click Find. TIP
To save the search statement for reusing later, click Add to Saved Finds.

Using “smart” select
With “smart” select, you can choose to select only component instances in the current view which match the attributes you specify. The smart select attributes include
s s s s s s s

In Model (any view) Out of Model (any view) New (sandbox view) Edited (sandbox view) Production Components (sandbox view) Components With No Cell (any view) Components With Cell but Out of Model (any view)

To use smart select 1 With a View open, choose Edit=>Select. 2 Click on the appropriate attributes to select.
The component instances which match the specified attributes are selected.

Defining relationships between component instances
Each relationship in a service model is a directed link going from one component instance to another, where the first component instance (from which the relationship starts) provides a service, and the second component instance (from which the relationship ends) consumes the service.

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These impact relationships define how status propagation is passed from the provider component instance to the consumer component instance. An active relationship is an impact relationship and indicates that the status of the consumer instance depends in some measure on the status of the connected provider instance. An inactive relationship means that no dependency exists or that the dependency is irrelevant to the model; in either case, an impact relationship does not exist. Whenever the status of the provider instance changes, it is propagated up to the connected consumer component instance.

About relationship creation
After you have created the component instances that participate in a service model relationship, you can define their relationships. For each component instance for which you are creating relationships, you must know
s s s

whether it is a consumer or a provider for the related component its relationship state value (active or inactive) its status propagation model value (relationship policy)

After you have created relationships, test them to verify that they function in the way that you intended. See “Associating events with a component instance” on page 373.

Creating a component relationship in BMC Impact Service Model Editor
You can create consumer/provider relationships for components in BMC Impact Service Model Editor by
s s

drawing lines between components in the View window using the Create Relationship command

TIP
When you place components in a View, place them such that provider components are below consumer components.

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To create a relationship using draw mode 1 In the View window, on the toolbar, select
.

The default relationship is defined as from provider to consumer. If necessary, you can change it to consumer to provider by clicking on the arrow next to the tool. In draw mode, the cursor changes to .

2 Draw a relationship line from provider to consumer by clicking at the top of the
provider component and moving to the bottom of the consumer component, and then click again.

TIP
To delete a graphic line that you have started and do not want to complete, press Esc.

3 On the toolbar, select Selection
drew.

and right-click on the relationship line you just

Where to go from here
To specify other impact relationship attributes, see “To specify other impact relationship attributes” on page 369. To learn about creating relationships using the commands, continue with the next section.

To create relationships using menu commands 1 In a View with component instances that need relationships defined, do one of the
following:
s s s

On the toolbar, click Create a new Relationship . From the menu bar, choose Edit => Create Relationship. In a View window, right-click on a component, and choose Create Relationship.

2 In the Create Relationship Properties dialog box, in the Consumer List area, click
Add.

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Figure 103 Create Relationship dialog box

3 In the Find window, locate the component instances that function as the consumer
in an impact relationship. For information about the Find command, see “Finding component instances” on page 357. You can add more than one component instance (using basic Windows selection) to either the Consumer List box or the Provider List box.

4 In the Provider List area, click Add. 5 In the Find window, locate and choose the component instance that functions as
the provider in the impact relationship. If there are multiple component instances in the Consumer List, you can add only one provider component instance; the one that is the provider for each of the component instances in the consumer list.

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WARNING
Avoid creating circular relationships in which an component instance can propagate events to itself. For example: instance 1 —> instance 2 —> instance 1 again. Publishing will fail if loops (circular relationships) are created within the service model.

6 (optional) To switch the contents of the two lists (make the consumer the provider
and vice versa), click Swap List Contents.

Where to go from here
To specify other impact relationship attributes, see “To specify other impact relationship attributes” on page 369.

To specify other impact relationship attributes 1 On the toolbar, select Selection
and right-click on a relationship line.

2 Choose Edit Relationship Properties. 3 In the Edit Relationship Properties dialog box, for the Activity options, select Active
or Inactive.
s

Active—the status of the provider component instance is propagated to the

s

consumer component instance. Inactive—the status of the provider component instance is not propagated to the consumer component instance.

4 In the Relationship Policy list, select one of the pre-defined status propagation
models:
s

Direct—the status of the consumer component instance may be identical to that

s

s

of its provider component instance, depending on the events directly affecting the consumer’s status, which is also taken into account. Decreasing—the status of the consumer component instance is less critical than that of the provider component instance by one level. For example, if the provider status is WARNING, the consumer status is INFO. Increasing—the status of the consumer component instance becomes more critical than that of its provider component instance by one level. For example, if the provider status is WARNING, the consumer status is MINOR.

NOTE
BMC Impact Service Model Editor verifies that the impact relationship is associated with a valid status propagation model.

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5 In the Status Weight box, accept the default value or enter a number for the
consumer object. (Status weight is used in the WEIGHTED_CLUSTER status computation model.)

6 (optional) In the Description box, enter an explanation of the relationship that is
meaningful to your enterprise.

7 Click OK. WARNING
If you attempt to create a relationship between two components that already have a relationship between them, BMC Impact Service Model Editor displays an error message. Even if the original impact relationship was created outside of BMC Impact Service Model Editor, for example, through BMC Topology Discovery, BMC Impact Service Model Editor detects it.

Figure 104 shows an example sandbox View after some relationships were created. Figure 104 Drawing relationships

Assigning related component instances to cells
After you have grouped your related component instances of the service model and determined on which cells to publish them, you are ready to assign the related components to the specified cells.

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First, identify the target cells that share component relationships. Next, in the cells that share relationships, make entries in each mcell.dir file to identify the other related cells. For example, you intend to publish different component instances of your model across five different cells (1, 2, 3, 4, and 5), but only three cells (1, 3, 5) share a relationship. The mcell.dir file of cell 1 should have entries identifying cells 3 and 5; the mcell.dir file of cell 3 should have entries identifying cells 1 and 5; and the mcell.dir file of cell should have entries identifying cells 1 and 3.

To assign related component instances to cells 1 In an active View window, select one or more of the component instances and do
one of the following:
s s

Right-click and choose Edit Component Properties. From the menu bar, choose Edit => Edit Component Properties.

The General tab of the Edit Component Properties dialog box displays the corresponding component type in the component type hierarchy. The component instance name is displayed in the Component Name box. If you chose more than one component instance, the Edit Multiple Component Properties dialog box is displayed.

2 In the Edit Component Properties dialog box (or Edit Multiple Component
Properties dialog box), in the Cell box, select the cell to which you want to publish the components.

3 To assign other related components to a different cell, select them in the View
window, and repeat steps 1 and 2.

Where to go from here
To continue with the creation of a service model, see “Associating events with a component instance” on page 373. To learn about updating and deleting relationships, continue with the next section.

Updating relationships
You can change the properties for an existing relationship, but you cannot add or delete the consumer or provider instances, nor can you swap the consumer and provider nodes.

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To edit one or more impact relationships 1 In the View window, do one of the following:
s

s

s

Select one or more relationship graph lines, right-click and choose Edit Relationship Properties. Select one or more relationship graph lines and from the menu bar, choose Edit => Edit Relationship Properties from the menu bar. Select one or more the relationship graph lines, set the focus on the Properties window, and click Edit.

If more than one relationship is selected, all are listed in the Edit Multiple
Relationship Properties window.

2 Enter a new value in the Activity, Relationship Policy, Status Weight, and/or
Description boxes.

If more than one relationship was selected:
s

s

for each of the boxes, values are filled in if they are the same for all relationships listed; if even one relationship has a different value in a property box, the box is blank the changes you make are applied to all relationships listed in the Edit Multiple Relationship Properties dialog box

For more information about the properties, see “To specify other impact relationship attributes” on page 369.

TIP
You can select multiple components and multiple relationships and then open the Edit Relationship Properties dialog box.

Deleting relationships
When you delete a relationship, the component instances remain in the service model. The relationship is recorded as to be deleted in the user sandbox and it is immediately removed from the SME View. However, prior to promoting the change, if you activate the Show/Hide Deleted Components toggle button in the toolbar, the deleted relationship can be seen in the View if you re-expand the graph. Relationships that are to be deleted are, by default, rendered in red, though this option can be changed in the Personal Options dialog.

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When a component is deleted, all relationships referencing the component (provider and consumer) are automatically deleted to maintain the consistency of the service model.

To delete a relationship 1 In the View window, select the relationship line that you want to delete and do one
of the following:
s s

Right-click and choose Delete from CMDB. From the menu bar, choose Edit => Delete from CMDB.

2 In the confirmation window, verify that you are deleting the intended object, and
click OK.

3 Select File=>Promote All Sandbox Changes to remove the relationship from the
production model.

Associating events with a component instance
When an event is received by a cell, its event alias slot is checked for a value. If this value does not exist, the cell uses an alias association formula to construct an alias. The constructed alias must match the value you entered in the Alias box on the Status and Alias tab in the Create (or Edit) Component Properties dialog box. This section describes how to create the formula. For more information about event alias association, see “Event associations” on page 322.

WARNING
s

Only one promotion can be processed at a time. If you submit a promotion while a previous promotion is being processed, the second promotion will not start until the second one is complete. Event class definitions must be the same in all SIM cells. If you add custom event classes, you must manually modify the KB of each cell, recompile the KB, and then restart each cell.

s

To create an event alias association 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools =>Alias Formulas. 2 In the Event Alias Associations dialog box, click Add.
The list of existing alias event associations displays. To sort either column, click in the column heading.

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3 In the Edit Event Alias Associations dialog box, in the Name box, enter a name for
the event association. Figure 105 Creating an alias association

4 In the Event Match Criteria area, in the Event Class box, select an event class from the
list.

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BMC Impact Service Model Editor looks at the first available cell and uses its event classes in the list. When an event comes in, its event class has to match the event class or a subclass of the event class before the alias formula is even considered.

5 (optional) In the Match Attributes box, choose attributes and enter values to refine
which events (within the event class) will generate aliases. Figure 106 Defining the events to be processed by the alias formula

For each attribute you choose, select one of the conditional operators, as described in Table 77, and enter a value in the text box to further define the events that are used to generate aliases using this formula. Table 77
Conditional operators anything

Description of conditional operators
Description the attribute can contain any value and is not used as a selection criteria If every attribute listed has anything that means that every incoming event that belongs to the event class will pass through alias formula processing

contains has prefix has suffix equals

the characters you enter in the text box occur someplace in the value the value starts with the characters you enter in the text box the value ends with the characters you enter in the text box the value exactly matches the characters you enter in the text box

If you use more than one attribute, each condition must test true (the Boolean operator between the selection criteria phrases is AND) before the alias formula process is performed. For example, in Figure 107 on page 376, the search phrase would read: Hostname contains SALLOG and IP address equals 555.22.19.105. Both conditions must be true for the event to be selected for alias processing.

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Figure 107 Example of match attributes

6 In the Alias Formula area, use the Attribute, Text, and Function buttons in any order
and as many times as needed to build the formula:

A To insert an attribute in the formula, click the Attribute button. The attributes
shown are those that belong to the event class you selected in the Event Definition area. When an attribute is selected, the control shows the attribute name, and the preview area is updated to show the syntax of the formula as it currently exists.

B To insert literal text (for example, a period, semi-colon, the word Oracle), click
on the Text button. In the text box, type the literal text that you want in the alias formula. Literal text appears in the first part of the alias formula with data type definitions.

C To insert a function that defines the data type and an expression in the formula,
click on the Function button. Type the function and choose the data type. For a list of functions you can use, see BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

D (optional) To change the order of the elements in the alias formula, select the part
of the formula you want to move and click the Move arrow button as appropriate.

E (optional) To delete one of the elements in the alias formula, select the part of the
formula you want to delete and click the Delete button.

7 When the alias formula is complete, click Save.

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Where to go from here
To continue with the creation of a service model, see “Promoting the service model” on page 391. To learn about editing and deleting an event alias association, and adding an alias to a component instance, continue with the next section.

To edit an event alias formula 1 Choose Tools => Alias Formulas. 2 In the Event Alias Associations dialog box, select an existing alias computing
formula.

3 Click Edit. 4 In the Edit Event Alias Association dialog box, make changes as needed.
For details about each field, see “To create an event alias association” starting with step 4 on page 374.

5 When your changes are complete, click OK. To delete an event alias formula 1 Choose Tools =>Alias Formulas. 2 In the Event Alias Associations dialog box, select an existing alias computing
formula.

3 Click Delete. To add an alias to a component instance 1 In an active View window, select a component instance and either
s s

right-click the component instance and choose Edit Component Properties choose Edit => Edit Component Properties from the menu bar.

2 On the Status and Alias tab, click Add Alias. 3 In the Input box, enter the alias name and click OK.
Each alias you enter is listed in the Aliases box.

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4 (optional) Enter additional aliases (one for each event that can potentially affect the
status of the component instance).

5 (optional) To edit an alias name, in the Aliases box, select the alias and click Edit. 6 (optional) To delete an alias, in the Aliases box, select the alias and click Delete. 7 Click OK.
Edits on this tab are not saved to the BMC Atrium CMDB until you click OK.

TIP
To search for the component instances that use a specific alias, use the Conditional Find tab in the Find dockable window. One of the attributes available in the Select list box is Aliases. You must use LIKE as the relational operator.

Where to go from here
To learn about creating service schedules and assigning components to service schedules, continue with the next section.

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Working with timeframes and service schedules
You edit service schedules using the Schedules Editor function of BMC Impact Service Model Editor. Schedule information is stored in the BMC Atrium CMDB and can be viewed in BMC Impact Portal and BMC IX. If a schedule is not selected for a component, the component will have a default schedule of 24 x 7 x 365 (always in schedule). After service schedules are created, you can assign components to schedules in the Edit Component Properties dialog box as described in “Assigning components to service schedules” on page 387. Full Access, Service Administrators, and Service Managers user groups have access to the schedule editor.

Icons used in the service schedule and timeframes editors
Table 78 contains descriptions of the functions of icons used in the service schedule and timeframe editors. Table 78
Icon

Service schedule and timeframes editors icons
Function Edit the selected service schedule or timeframe

Create a new service schedule or timeframe

Copy of the selected service schedule or timeframe

Show Usages of components assigned to the selected service schedule or timeframe. Opens the Timeframe - Components and Schedule dialog box, which lists the components and schedules currently associated with the timeframe. If you are creating a new timeframe, these lists will not contain any components or schedules. Delete the selected service schedule or timeframe

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Working with timeframes
Service schedules are built from timeframes, which can be created and edited using the Timeframe Edit dialog box of BMC Impact Service Model Editor as shown in Figure 108. Figure 108 Timeframe Edit dialog box

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Table 79 provides descriptions of the fields in the Timeframe Edit dialog box. Table 79
:

Timeframe Edit field descriptions
Description Name of the timeframe Description of the timeframe Opens the Timeframe - Components and Schedule dialog box, which lists the components and schedules currently associated with the timeframe. If you are creating a new timeframe, these lists will not contain any components or schedules. Period when the timeframe begins and ends, and the duration of the timeframe. Changing the duration will change the value in the End field, and vice-versa. The individual time zone of each component’s BMC Impact Manager will be used in timeframe calculations.

Field Name Description Usages (button)

Start, End, and Duration

Recurrence pattern

Schedules how often the timeframe will recur. Changing the selection in the left side list will change the options available on the right side. Besides the Daily, Weekly, Monthly, and Yearly timeframe options, you can select individual dates that are part of the timeframe by selecting Date List and choosing dates from the displayed calendar.

Range of recurrence

When you have selected a Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or Yearly timeframe option as a timeframe recurrence pattern, you can choose the starting and ending date range for the recurrence. Optionally, instead of choosing an end date, you can enter the number of recurrences for the timeframe.

To create or edit a timeframe 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools => Edit Schedules.
The Schedules Editor dialog box is displayed.

2 On the Timeframes tab, click the New icon to create a new timeframe or click the
Edit icon to edit an existing timeframe.

The Timeframe Edit dialog box is displayed.

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3 Enter or modify the appropriate information in the fields available in the
Timeframe Edit dialog box. For more information on the Timeframe Edit dialog box, see Table 79, “Timeframe Edit field descriptions,” on page 381.

4 Click Save to save the timeframe and make it available for use in the Schedules
Editor.

To copy a timeframe 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools => Edit Schedules.
The Schedules Editor dialog box is displayed.

2 From the Timeframes tab, select a timeframe to copy. 3 Click the Copy icon.
The Timeframe Edit dialog box is displayed. The copied timeframe name is appended with the prefix “Copy of.”

4 Modify the fields for the copied timeframe as appropriate.
For more information on the Timeframe Edit dialog box, see Table 79, “Timeframe Edit field descriptions,” on page 381.

5 Click Save to save the timeframe and make it available for use in the Schedules
Editor.

To show what service schedules and components are associated with a timeframe 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools => Edit Schedules.
The Schedules Editor dialog box is displayed.

2 From the Timeframes tab, select a timeframe. 3 Click the Show Usages icon.

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The Timeframe - Components and Schedule dialog box is displayed, which lists the components and schedules currently associated with the timeframe. — Click the Components tab to view components associated with the selected timeframe. — Click the Schedules tab to view service schedules containing the selected component.

4 Click Close to close the Timeframe - Components and Schedule dialog box. To delete a timeframe 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools => Edit Schedules.
The Schedules Editor dialog box is displayed.

2 Select one or more timeframes from the list of timeframes. 3 On the Schedules tab, click the Delete icon.
A Deletion Confirmation dialog box is displayed, informing you that the selected timeframes will be removed from all schedules containing those timeframes. You can view what schedules make use of a given timeframe by clicking Show Usages in the Timeframes tab of the Schedules Editor dialog box. See “To show what service schedules and components are associated with a timeframe” on page 382.

4 Click Delete to delete the timeframes or click Cancel if you want to keep the
timeframe.

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Working with service schedules
Service schedules can be created and modified in the BMC Impact Service Model Editor Schedule Edit dialog box as shown Figure 109. Figure 109 Schedule Edit dialog box

To create or edit a service schedule 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools => Edit Schedules.
The Schedules Editor dialog box is displayed.

2 From the Schedules tab, click the New icon to create a new service schedule or click
the Edit icon to edit an existing service schedule. The Schedule Edit dialog box is displayed.

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3 Enter or modify the appropriate information in the fields available in the Schedule
Edit dialog box as shown in Table 80. Table 80
:

Schedule Edit field descriptions
Description Name of the service schedule being created or edited Description of the service schedule Opens the Schedules - Components Assigned to this Schedule dialog box, which lists the components and component descriptions currently associated with the selected schedule. Information on what timeframes are part of the service schedule, what timeframes are Exceptions Within During Schedule, and what timeframes are available. Any time period that is not part of a service schedule is considered Off Schedule. Available Timeframes, the center panel, contains the timeframes that are available to be added to the During Schedule and Exceptions Within During Schedule periods. During Schedule Timeframes, the left panel, contains the timeframes during which the associated components exists in the service schedule period (as opposed to being Off Schedule). Add or remove timeframes from the list by using the arrows between During Schedule Timeframes and Available Timeframes. Exceptions Within During Schedule, the right panel, contains the timeframes during which the associated components are treated as Off Schedule even though the time exists within the During Schedule period.

Field Schedule name Description Usages (button)

Timeframes in this schedule

Timeframe details

Opens the Timeframe Details dialog box listing the times, dates, and recurrence periods of the selected timeframe.

4 Click Save to save the service schedule. To copy a service schedule 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools => Edit Schedules.
The Schedules Editor dialog box is displayed.

2 From the Schedules tab, select a service schedule from the list. 3 Click the Copy icon.

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The Schedule Edit dialog box is displayed.

4 Modify the fields for the copied service schedule as appropriate.
For more information on the Timeframe Edit dialog box, see Table 80, “Schedule Edit field descriptions,” on page 385.

5 Click Save to save the service schedule. To show what component instances are associated with a service schedule 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools => Edit Schedules.
The Schedules Editor dialog box is displayed.

2 From the Schedules tab, select a service schedule from the list. 3 Click the Show Usages icon.
The Timeframe - Components and Schedule dialog box is displayed, which lists the components and schedules currently associated with the timeframe. View associated components in the Components tab and associated service schedules in the Schedules tab.

4 Click Close to close the Timeframe - Components and Schedule dialog box. To delete a service schedule 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools => Edit Schedules.
The Schedules Editor dialog box is displayed.

2 From the Schedules tab, select one or more service schedules from the list. 3 Click the Delete icon.
A Delete Confirmation dialog box is displayed, informing you that after deletion, all components using the deleted schedules will be assigned to the current default schedule. You can view what component instances are associated with a given service schedule by clicking Show Usages in the Schedules tab of the Schedules Editor dialog box. See “To show what component instances are associated with a service schedule” on page 386.

4 Click Delete to delete the timeframes or click Cancel if you want to keep the
timeframe.

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Assigning components to service schedules

Where to go from here
After service schedules are created, you can assign components to schedules in the Edit Component Properties dialog box as described in “Assigning components to service schedules” .

Assigning components to service schedules
You can assign one or more components to service schedules you have created by launching the Schedules Editor from the Edit Component Properties dialog box, Schedule tab, as shown in Figure 110. Figure 110 Schedules Editor section of Edit Component Properties dialog box

To assign components to service schedules 1 Select one or more components in the active View to which you want to assign to a
service schedule.

2 Choose Edit=>Edit Component Properties.

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3 In the Schedule tab, in the Schedule pane, click Select.
The Select a Schedule dialog box is displayed, containing the During Schedule and Exceptions Within During Schedule timeframes. By default, components are assigned the always-in-During Service schedule (24 x 7 x 365). — To choose a schedule for the components, select the schedule from the Schedules pane and click OK. — To edit an schedule, select a schedule and click Edit to display the Schedules Editor. For more information about editing schedules see “To create or edit a service schedule” on page 384. — To view what component instances are using the selected schedule, click Usages. — To view the details of what times and dates are specified in a selected timeframe, click Timeframe Details.

4 Click OK to exit the dialog box.

Granting access to service model objects
You define and maintain BMC Impact Service Model Editor user groups and permissions in the BMC Impact Portal. To modify user group permissions, go to the BMC Impact Portal, open the Configure tab, and under Tasks, select User Groups. To add users to these user groups, go to the BMC Impact Portal, open the Configure tab, and under Tasks, select Users. For more information, see BMC Portal Getting Started. Table 81 describes default BMC Impact Service Model Editor user groups and their corresponding rights. Table 81
User role Service Administrators, Service Executives, Service Managers - Senior

Default user groups and rights for BMC Impact Service Model Editor
Rights
s s s s s s

save View create/edit component and relationship instances publish service models view publication history reinitialize to a cell import and export service model data save View create/edit component and relationship instances view publication history read only

Service Managers

s s s

Service Operators - Senior Service Operators

s

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Granting permissions to individual service model objects
By default, BMC Impact Service Model Editor user groups that have permissions to create and edit component and relationship instances are: Service Administrator, Service Manager - Senior, and Service Manager. You can override these default permissions for individual component instances.

To grant permissions to individual component instances 1 With the component instance in an open View, select the component and do one of
the following:
s s

Right-click and choose Edit Component Properties From the menu bar, choose Edit => Edit Component Properties.

2 In the Edit Component Properties dialog box, on the Permissions tab, select the
appropriate options. Figure 111 Changing access for an individual component instance

User groups with Unassigned selected do not see the object.

3 Click OK.

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NOTE
When you modify user access permissions in the BMC Impact Service Model Editor, they are effective immediately in BMC Impact Service Model Editor. For the changes to appear in Impact Portal, they must be promoted from BMC Impact Service Model Editor and you must then log out and then log on to Impact Portal.

Testing the service model
Before promoting and publishing the components in your sandbox service model, you may test them by sending the component instances and relationships to a test cell that has been previously created specifically for the purposes of testing. BMC Impact Service Model Editor users having the correct permissions (set up in the BMC Portal) have their own individual test environments. From the BMC Impact Service Model Editor, you can send component, relationship, and management data to a cell that has been previously created exclusively for testing by using the Send to Test option on the File menu. (if the relationship View option is set to show non-impact relationships, the Send to Test option is not available.) You can send the sandbox service model to a test cell before promoting it into the production environment. After the test is initiated, the following events occur:
s s

s

existing data in the test environment is cleared components and relationships, including production components, as well as those in the sandbox, are sent to the test environment. Management data is also sent. if no impact relationships are visible in the selected view, or if components exist which are not part of an impact relationship, a dialog box is displayed warning the user that the test components being sent do not have impact relationships

Testing component relationships
After you have set up a relationship, you can test it by posting events against the provider component in the relationship and observe the resulting status of the consumer component in the relationship.

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Testing event associations
After you have set up event alias associations, in the component instance and by creating an alias formula, you need to verify that the association occurs correctly. In the BMC Impact Explorer console, open the Events tab. When an incoming event is associated with a component instance, the mc_smc_type and mc_smc_id slots will have values. If the slots are empty, the event is not associated. In the BMC Impact Service Model Editor, check the component alias and the event alias formula.

To send components to a test cell 1 Choose File=>Send to Test Objects in Current View.
If there are no impact relationships for the components in the current View, a warning dialog box is displayed. Choose Yes to continue the send to test, or No to stop the send to test process. If there are no test cells available in the current environment, an error dialog box is displayed and the process is stopped. If the send to test is successful, a dialog box is displayed indicating that the test dataset has been populated. Management data is also copied to the test environment.

2 Close the dialog box to return to the BMC Impact Service Model Editor.

Promoting the service model
After promoting component instances in BMC Impact Service Model Editor, these changes are stored in the production dataset (BMC.ASSET) in the BMC Atrium CMDB and are automatically published (by default) to the assigned cells. When you publish service model data to the cells, the BMC Impact Publishing Server updates and maintains the BMC.IMPACT.PROD dataset, which mirrors the last successful publish to the cells.

About the publishing process
Promotion and publishing are decoupled. Promotion is initiated and controlled from BMC Impact Service Model Editor, while publication is controlled by BMC Impact Publishing Server.

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Before you promote

There are two modes of running the BMC Impact Publishing Server.
s

s

In automated mode, by default, publication is initiated by the termination of a reconciliation job run, such as after a promotion. In manual mode, publication is initiated from CLI commands.

Note that a successful promotion does not guarantee that the automated publication will also be successful. For more details about automated publishing, see Chapter 19, “Managing the BMC Impact Publishing Server.” During the publishing of a service model, new or modified service model components and their relationships are selected from the BMC.ASSET dataset in the BMC Atrium CMDB and copied to respective BMC Impact Manager cells. The objects in BMC.ASSET are compared to any previously published instance in BMC.IMPACT.PROD and the changes between them are sent to the cell. BMC.IMPACT.PROD is then updated with the changes. After events that affect service component instances are received by the cell, you can monitor status changes using BMC Impact Explorer or BMC Portal for the published component instances.

Before you promote
To ensure a successful promotion and publication of the service model, verify that:
s s

s s

s

s

each component instance is assigned to a cell all target cells that are registered in the BMC Impact Portal are running and have a live connection with the BMC Impact Publishing Server event types are associated with component instances the BMC Impact Publishing Server is running in automated mode by using the CLI command psstat. This command should return Started - Automated mode. your user account belongs to one of these user groups: Service Administrator, Service Manager, or Service Manager - Senior (these are the default user group assignments; you may change them in the BMC Impact Portal) the SIM class definitions are in sync. The BMC Impact Publishing Server validates the class definitions and establishes a live connection with BMC Impact Portal, the BMC Atrium CMDB, and the cells before submitting the publication.

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Submitting a promotion
When you submit a promotion, the Promotion Preview dialog box offers the opportunity to compare your unpromoted sandbox service model component instances and relationships with those that have already been promoted so that you can verify the work done in the current editing session. When you click Begin Promotion, service model objects (component instances, impact relationships, and management data) shown in the preview are promoted (and subsequently automatically published).

Before you begin
Verify the items listed in the section “Before you promote” on page 392.

To promote all sandbox component instances and relationships 1 Start the promotion by doing one of the following:
s s s

On the toolbar, click Promote . From the menu bar, choose File => Promote All Sandbox Changes. In a View window, right-click and choose Promote All Sandbox Changes.

TIP
If promote service model options are unavailable, you may not have the permissions to promote component instances. For information on configuring user rights, see BMC Portal Getting Started.

2 In the Promotion Preview dialog box, in the Objects to be Promoted area, choose
how you want to filter the list of objects that you see. When you filter the list, it only affects what is visible, not what will be promoted. All items will be promoted. In the first Show list, choose All, Components, Relationships, Components and Relationships, or Management Data. In the second Show list, choose All Actions, New Objects, Changed Objects, or Deleted Objects. The component instances and relationships to be promoted are listed in the left pane.

3 In the results pane, review the list of objects.
The default sort order of objects is by Action, then Type (component or relationship), and then by Object Name. To change the sort order, click in the column heading.

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The icons in the Action and Type columns are defined in Table 82. The icons in the Class column match the icons associated with the component type in the Templates dockable window. Table 82
Action

Icons in Objects-to-be-Published pane
Icon Description object was deleted object was added object was modified

Column heading

Type

component relationship timeframe or service schedule

4 In the Comparison of Sandbox and Promoted Property Values area, for the Show
options, select Changed Properties or All Properties for the component instances you selected in the Objects to be Promoted pane.

5 Select one or more objects in the left pane and, in the right pane, compare the new
and previously published property values to verify that the new data is correct before you publish it.

TIP
s

To hide either the Objects to be Promoted pane or the Comparison of New and Promoted Property Values pane, click on the quick expansion arrows (tiny black arrows) between the panes. You can compare published and newly created, changed, or deleted component instances independently of the publication process by choosing Tools => Compare Sandbox to Production.

s

6 Click Begin Promotion.
The Promotion in Progress dialog box is displayed, along with the elapsed time since the promotion was started. Even if BMC Impact Service Model Editor is shut down and restarted, the elapsed time will reflect the total time since the promotion was originally started.

7 (optional) To stop the promotion, in the Promotion in Progress dialog box, click
Stop.

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Verifying promotion status

Closing the dialog box does not stop the promotion; the promotion continues in the background.

8 (optional) To exit BMC Impact Service Model Editor, click Exit SME, then click the
appropriate selection on the confirmation dialog box.

9 A status message indicates the success or failure of the promotion request.
If the promotion and subsequent automated publication processes are successful, the service model is available to the specified cells and you can monitor the component instances in BMC Impact Portal and in BMC Impact Explorer. For troubleshooting information, see “Source Parameters” on page 463.

Where to go from here
To learn about verifying promotion status, continue with the next section.

Verifying promotion status
After you submit a promotion request, you can view its status in the Promotion in Progress dialog box that displays after a promotion is requested. After the promotion process completes, a dialog box will display indicating whether the promotion succeeded or failed. If the promotion fails, the Promotion Status dialog box declares a promotion failure along with the error, a timestamp, and the user name of the submitter. Click OK to dismiss the dialog box. Note that a publication success or failure is not shown in the dialog box, but can be viewed in the Promote and Publish History dialog box (Tools => Promote and Publish History) or using the plog requestID | plogdisplay -@ commands. For more information about CLI commands, see Appendix F, “BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI Reference.”

Organizing service component instances for monitoring
Before you can monitor service model component instances that are in production (have been published) in the BMC Impact Portal and the BMC Impact Explorer, you must populate the console navigation tree in BMC Impact Service Model Editor.
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Organizing service component instances for monitoring

The Console Navigation Tree dockable window provides a flexible way of organizing your service component instances under folders that you create. The tree that you create in BMC Impact Service Model Editor is visible in BMC Impact Portal, on the Configure tab, under Properties and in BMC Impact Explorer, from the Services View, the Services Group tab. The top-level folder of the hierarchical directory is userAccount/Business, with userAccount representing the active BMC Impact Portal user account name. You create subfolders that meet the service monitoring requirements for your enterprise. Changes that are made to published service model component instances in the console navigation tree are immediately reflected in the BMC Impact Portal. To see changes that you made in BMC Impact Service Model Editor to a console navigation tree in BMC Impact Explorer, you must exit Impact Explorer and log in again. If you still cannot see changes, they have probably not been published.

To add a folder to the console navigation tree 1 In the Console Navigation Tree dockable window, navigate to and select the folder
under which you want to create a folders. All service component folders must be created under the userAccount/Business folder (which cannot be edited or renamed). The way you organize the folders and component instances is entirely dependent on your enterprise and the way you want to monitor the component instances in BMC Impact Portal and BMC Impact Explorer.

2 In the Console Navigation Tree toolbar, click Create Folder

.

3 In the Create New Folder dialog box, in the text box, enter the folder name. 4 Specify the permission levels for the appropriate user groups. These permissions
settings enable users to see the folder and its contents in BMC Impact Portal and BMC Impact Explorer.

5 Click OK. To rename folders 1 In the Console Navigation Tree dockable window, expand the Business folder
under the userAccount folder.

2 Select the folder you want to rename.

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NOTE
You can rename group folders, but you cannot rename component instances from the console navigation tree; you can rename them in a View.

3 On the Console Navigation Tree toolbar, click Rename Selected Folder 4 In the Rename Folder dialog box, enter the new name. 5 Click OK. To move a folder and its component instances

.

1 In the Console Navigation Tree dockable window, expand the Business folder
under the userAccount folder.

2 Select the folder or component instance that you want to move to another folder.
You can only move those component instances which exist directly under a folder. Components which appear as providers to other component instances in the console navigation tree cannot be moved (that would be editing the model).

3 Drag the object to the new location. To copy folders 1 In the Console Navigation Tree dockable window, expand the Business folder
under the userAccount folder.

2 Select the folder or component instance that you want to copy to another folder. 3 Control-drag the object to the new location. To define permissions for folders 1 In the Console Navigation Tree dockable window, navigate to and select the folder
for which you want to define permissions.

2 On the Console Navigation Tree toolbar, click Edit Permissions
user groups.

.

3 In the Edit Permissions dialog box, specify the permission level for the appropriate 4 Click OK.

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To remove a folder or a component 1 In the Console Navigation Tree dockable window, expand the Business folder
under the userAccount folder.

2 Select the folder you want to remove. 3 On the Console Navigation Tree toolbar, either click Remove Folders or components
or right-click and choose Remove from the context menu.

4 In the Confirmation box, click Yes. To add a component to the console navigation tree 1 In the Console Navigation Tree dockable window, navigate to and select the folder
under which you want to add component instances.

2 On the Console Navigation Tree toolbar, click Add a Component

.

3 In the Find window, locate and select the components to add and click Add.
For information on using the Find command, see “Finding component instances” on page 357. When you click Add, the component instances are automatically saved as part of the console navigation tree. You can also undock the Find window and drag component instances from the Find results pane to the console navigation tree.

4 (optional) Continue adding component instances using the Find command. NOTE
s

When you add a component instance that has providers to a folder, you can drill down and see the providers in the console navigation tree, even if they are not published. To see component instances in the BMC Impact Portal that you see in the console navigation tree, you must publish them. When you expand the tree, BMC Impact Service Model Editor checks the BMC Atrium CMDB to see if there are changes to provider component instances, and if there are changes, the tree is refreshed. These provider component instances are not saved as part of the console navigation tree.

s

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Organizing service component instances for monitoring

To add a component to the console navigation tree from a View 1 In the Console Navigation Tree dockable window, navigate to and select the folder
under which you want to add component instances.

2 In an open View, select the component instances to add and do one of the
following:
s s

Right-click and choose Add Components to Navigation Tree. On the menu bar, choose Edit => Add Components to Navigation Tree.

To open component instances in a View 1 In the Console Navigation Tree dockable window, expand the Business folder
under the userAccount folder.

2 Locate the component instances you want to open in a View. 3 Select the component instances and do one of the following:
s

To open in a new View, on the Console Navigation Tree toolbar, click
Open the selected components in a new view

.

s

To open in the current View, on the Console Navigation Tree toolbar, click
Place the selected components in current view

.

s

Right-click on the component instances and choose Open in New View or Place in Selected View.

You cannot move a folder into a View.

To refresh the tree
To query the BMC Atrium CMDB and redisplay the tree with the latest data, including provider component instances, on the toolbar, click Refresh navigation tree.

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Working with BMC Impact Service Model Editor Views

Working with BMC Impact Service Model Editor Views
Table 83 lists the topics covered in this section with page numbers. Table 83
Topic “To save a View” “To open a saved View” “To rename a View” “To delete a View” “Understanding visual cues in a View” “Repositioning objects in a View” “Controlling what you see in a View” “Exploring consumer and provider paths” “Refreshing the View” “Repositioning the dockable windows” “Showing topology views”

Topics covered in this section
Page Number 400 401 401 401 402 403 403 405 406 407 407

Saving, opening, renaming, and deleting Views
A View is a window into the service model, whether it exists in a sandbox environment, test environment, or the production environment. It may or may not encompass the entire service model, depending on the size of the service model and how the View is set up. Each View is unique to a user account. Each user can create and save multiple Views and multiple users can have many different Views into the same service model.

To save a View 1 In an open, active View, choose File => Save View. 2 In the View Name box, enter a unique name for the View.
The name of a saved View displays in the title bar of the View.

3 Click OK.

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Saving, opening, renaming, and deleting Views

To open a saved View 1 In the dockable panes area, click Views. 2 In the list of Views, locate the View you want to open and do one of the following:
s s s

Double-click on the View name. Select the View and click on the View toolbar. Right-click and choose Open View.

When you open a saved View, its component and relationship instances are verified against the definitions in the BMC Atrium CMDB. Depending on the number of objects contained in the View, this process can take some time. If any instance cannot be verified in the BMC Atrium CMDB, the View does not open.

To rename a View 1 In the dockable panes area, click Views. 2 In the list of Views, locate the View you want to rename and do one of the
following:
s s

Select the View and click on the View toolbar. Right-click and choose Rename View.

3 The selected row becomes editable; type a new name and press Enter. To delete a View 1 In the dockable panes area, click Views. 2 In the list of Views, locate the View you want to delete and do one of the following:
s s

Select the View and click on the View toolbar. Right-click and choose Delete View.

NOTE
When you delete a View, it does not affect the service model or the topology view. You are deleting only the View window, not any of the actual component or relationship instances in the BMC Atrium CMDB.

3 In the Confirm View Delete box, verify that you are deleting the correct View and
click Yes.

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Understanding visual cues in a View

Understanding visual cues in a View
BMC Impact Service Model Editor is a graphically rich interface. The component types are depicted as unique icons in the Templates dockable window. Additionally, you have the option of defining colors for background, border, line styles. The definitions for the icons in Table 84 can be viewed in the Legend, available by choosing Window => Legend. Table 84 contains visual cues for components in the View. Table 84
Visual cue

Visual cues in a View
Icon Description a component instance that is set to In Model displays the In model Component icon

a component instance that is set to Not in Model displays the Not in Model Component icon

a component instance that has been edited is flagged with this icon in the top right corner

a newly-created component instance is flagged with this icon in the top right corner

a component that is set to be deleted becomes semitransparent and is flagged with this icon in the top right corner

outline

a component instance showing the mouseover effect that results as you drag the mouse cursor over the icon

solid background

a selected component instance has a solid background and can be moved, viewed, and edited

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Repositioning objects in a View

Repositioning objects in a View
You can move objects in a View using a variety of methods:
s

To quickly move all the objects in a View, click objects as needed. To layout the objects automatically, click

on the toolbar and move

s

on the toolbar.

You can also manually move single or multiple objects in a View as described below.

To reposition objects manually 1 In an active View, ensure that the mouse cursor is in selection mode
box around the appropriate objects. .

2 Select an object or multiple objects. To select multiple objects as a group, draw a 3 Drag the object to the desired position.

Controlling what you see in a View
A service model may become quite large and not be entirely visible in the View window. To explore a service model you need to know how to
s s s

adjust the graphical view use pan and zoom to focus on specific areas of the model exploring consumer and provider paths

Table 85 describes each method of adjusting the graphical view. Table 85
Goal automatically align objects

Adjusting the graphical view
Action
s s

Toolbar button

on the toolbar, click Auto-Layout or from the menu bar, choose View => Layout Objects on the toolbar, click Fit to View or from the menu bar, choose View => Fit to View on the toolbar, choose a value in the percentage list or from the menu bar, choose View => Zoom => value

fit all objects in the View window adjust the zoom factor

s s

s s

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Controlling what you see in a View

Table 85
Goal

Adjusting the graphical view
Action
s s

Toolbar button

zoom in or out in predefined percentage intervals

Zoom Out on the toolbar, click Zoom Out or Zoom In or from the menu bar, choose View => Zoom In or View => Zoom Out Zoom In

grab and move objects magnify an area of the model

see “To use the pan and zoom tool” on page 404.
s s

click the magnifier icon to turn on magnifier mode left- or right-click an area of the model to magnify that area. click the topology view icon to turn on the topology view click the Component Table View icon to turn on the component table view click the Show Deleted Components icon click the Show Modifier Icons icon

view the component objects in a topology view view the component objects in component table show or hide deleted components show or hide modifier icons for each component

s

s

s

s

To use the pan and zoom tool 1 Open a View window. 2 Capture the service model view in a outlined rectangle (panner) by using one of
the following methods:
s s

From the menu bar, choose Window => Pan and Zoom. Click the Pan and Zoom dockable window.

The actions you take in the Pan and Zoom dockable window with the panner rectangle are mirrored on the service model in the View window.

3 (optional) To zoom in, position the cursor over a corner of the panner and reduce
the size of the panner. To zoom out, increase the size of the panner.

4 (optional) To resize or reposition the window, drag the panner. 5 (optional) Set the zoom percentage by adjusting the slider bar at the bottom of the
Pan and Zoom window.
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Exploring consumer and provider paths
The relationships between consumers and providers are depicted with lines between the objects. The graph line that connects providers to consumers begins at the expansion handle atop the provider object and connects to the expansion handle at the bottom of the consumer object. By default, consumer objects are arranged above and providers are arranged below a specific node.

To explore consumer and provider paths 1 In an active View window, ensure that the cursor is in selection mode. 2 To explore the consumer paths, click the collapsed expansion handle at the top of
the component instance you want to explore.

3 To explore the provider paths, click the collapsed expansion handle at the bottom
of the node. If the component renditions indicate other providers in the chain, you can continue clicking the expansion handles until you reach the last provider node (identifiable because it has no expansion handle). When you click on a + expansion handle, the server is always queried and an up-todate list of consumers or providers is displayed.

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Refreshing the View

Table 86

Understanding expansion handles

A component instance with expansion handles at the top and/or bottom functions as a consumer and/or provider in an impact relationship. To see the consumer (top +) or provider (bottom +) component instances, click on the expansion handle.

A component instance with two consumer or provider expansion handles indicates that there are other related component instances that are not displayed. For example, clicking on the expansion handle for Database 1 displays all its providers, in this case, Computer System 3. Computer System 3 has additional consumers as indicated by the extra + symbol at the top of the component instance icon.

Clicking the - symbol above Computer System 3 collapses all of its consumers, as shown.

Clicking on the + symbol above Computer System 3 results in the display of all consumer component instances, as shown.

Refreshing the View
To validate the current component instances against their current class definitions in the BMC Atrium CMDB, do one of the following:
s s

On the toolbar, click Refresh . From the menu bar, choose View => Refresh.

To refresh the list of component types, from the menu bar, choose Tools => Refresh Component Types.

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Repositioning the dockable windows

Repositioning the dockable windows
To undock and move the Templates, Pan and Zoom, Find, Properties, Views, or Console Navigation Bar windows, do one of the following:
s

s

Select one of the bars and drag it into the right pane of BMC Impact Service Model Editor. Right-click on the bar and choose Undock.

To redock an undocked window, do one of the following:
s s

Click the X in the top right corner of the undocked window. Right-click in the title bar and choose Close.

Showing topology views
There are many configuration items in the BMC Atrium CMDB that do not have consumer/provider relationships and are not appropriate for service impact management. If non-impact relationships exist between such component instances in your active View, you can see this topology for the entire View.

To show topology 1 In an active View window, from the menu bar, choose View, and then choose one
of the following:
s s s

Impact Relationships Non-impact Relationships All Relationships

TIP
You can redefine the line style for each type of relationship by selecting Tools => Options. See “To define line styles for relationships” on page 427.

2 (optional) In the same View, choose another relationship type to view its topology. 3 (optional) To see a legend of line styles, open the Relationship Legend box by
choosing Window => Legend.

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Exporting and importing service model data

Exporting and importing service model data
You can export component instance definitions between different BMC Atrium CMDB datasets only if they contain the following values:
s s

DatasetId = BMC.ASSET ServiceModelSet = IN

You cannot select a subset of this data for export. The data is exported as a series of files in XML format to a user-specified directory. You can import specified component instance definitions in XML format from another BMC Atrium CMDB dataset.

To export service model data 1 From the menu bar, choose File => Export. 2 In the Look in box, choose the directory where you want to save the file. 3 In the Directory Name box, verify that the path is correct. NOTE
In the Files of type box, do not change the file type; the files must be saved in XML format.

4 Click Export. To import service model data 1 From the menu bar, choose File => Import. 2 In the Look in box, locate the folder and select the file you want to import. 3 In the File Name box, verify the name of the file. 4 Click Import. 5 A dialog displays informing you that the import is in progress. 6 (optional) Close the dialog. The import process will continue in the background.
A notification will display when the import process is complete.

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Exporting class definitions from the BMC Atrium CMDB to a cells

7 To update the current View with the most recent data from the BMC Atrium
CMDB, on the toolbar, click Refresh .

8 To search for the new data, open the Find dockable window. See “Finding
component instances” on page 357.

Exporting class definitions from the BMC Atrium CMDB to a cells
The Export Cell Meta Data command enables you to synchronize the class definitions in the BMC Impact Manager knowledge bases in the target cells with those from the BMC Atrium CMDB. BMC Impact Service Model Editor sends the export request to the BMC Impact Publishing Server, which collects the entire hierarchy of component and relationship class definitions from the BMC Atrium CMDB. Next, the BMC Impact Publishing Server creates a BAROC-formatted class definition file (mc_sm_object.baroc file) of the component and relationship class definitions so that the BMC Impact Manager cell can interpret the contents of the file. The BMC Impact Publishing Server sends this file to BMC Impact Service Model Editor and you can save it to a location you specify. Then you must manually copy the file to the appropriate directory of the destination cell and recompile the Knowledge Base of the cell. Alternatively you can export the class definitions with the CLI command
pclassinfo -x -o mc_sm_object.baroc.

For more information on pclassinfo usage, see “pclassinfo—Comparing service model classes on cells with the BMC Atrium CMDB” on page 623.

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411 412 412 413 414 415 416 416 417 417 418 418 419 421 421 422 422 423

Component and relationship status propagation
17

This chapter contains the following topics: About component and relationship status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dynamic prioritization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Impacts priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Determination of final priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How component status propagation works. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About status computation models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Status computation functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anatomy of a status computation model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The internal status NONE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Status computation algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How status computation algorithms work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quorum algorithm examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Relationship status propagation concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How status propagation works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Status propagation models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Default status propagation models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What is a valid status propagation model? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

About component and relationship status
The status of a component can be influenced directly by the severities of its associated events, indirectly by the propagated status of its provider components, or by both. Status computation models calculate the new value of component status using these factors.

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Dynamic prioritization

A status computation model’s primary role is to associate an algorithm with each of the status computation functions. The model can be applied to one or more component instances, enabling the cell to handle status computation appropriately for those objects. The BMC_STATUS_COMPUTATION data class is the basis of all status computation model instances. The service model provides status computation models to support the definition of key component classes.

Dynamic prioritization
Dynamic prioritization is a system of setting the priority of a component to help users understand what problems to work on first, based on whether a component is in demand at the time (as defined in its service schedule), the severity of its status, and its impacts. The final priority of a component is determined by comparing the component’s
s s

self priority and impacts priority

The greater value becomes the final priority value of the component.

Self priority
The self priority of a component is determined from its base priority and its status. Each component has dual base priority values–one value for when it is During Schedule, and another for when it is in an Off Schedule time. The base priorities are static priority values that act as a baseline to determine self priority.
Self priority is a dynamic priority that changes depending on the status of the component. The self priority is determined by mapping the base priority against the status value of the component. This mapping is configured in the match table in BMC Impact Service Model Editor.

Figure 112 on page 413 illustrates the method of determining the self priority of a component.

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Impacts priority

Figure 112 Self priority determination

Impacts priority
The impacts priority of a component reflects the urgency of resolving a problem based on the components it impacts. The impacts priority is based on the components it is impacting that are marked as priority propagators. A component which is a priority propagator can be considered an “important” component in that a priority propagator sends its self priority value back to its causal component, which can have the result that the causal component’s problem is considered a more urgent problem than it would have been otherwise. Thus, the impacts priority is a dynamic value which changes as the self-priorities of the impacted components change. Figure 113 on page 414 illustrates the determination of impacts priority.

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Determination of final priority

Figure 113 Impacts priority determination

Determination of final priority
The final priority of a component is the highest value between the self priority and impacts priority, as illustrated in Figure 114 on page 415.

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How component status propagation works

Figure 114 Final priority determination

How component status propagation works
The cell computes component status automatically as new conditions occur, such as the reception of a direct impact event, a status change on a provider component that results in a state change on an inbound relationship. To compute component status, the cell uses the status computation model assigned to a component instance. The cell obtains the name of the status computation model to use from the instance’s StatusComputationModel slot.

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About status computation models

Based on the type of condition that triggered the status computation, the cell selects the appropriate function to use from the status computation model. It also obtains the algorithm to use with the function to calculate the appropriate status for the component. Then, the cell calculates the new component status.

About status computation models
The BMC_STATUS_COMPUTATION data class is the basis of all status computation model instances. BMC Impact Service Model Editor provides predefined status computation models to support the definition of key component classes: Standard, Cluster, and Weighted Cluster. Standard is the default status computation model in BMC Impact Service Model Editor. For a description of BMC_STATUS_COMPUTATION slots, see “BMC_STATUS_COMPUTATION data class” on page 594.

Status computation functions
The following functions perform status computation:
s s s

impact_function self_function consolidate_function

Table 87 lists the functions, their inputs, and the type of computed status that each function calculates. Table 87
Function impact_function self_function

Status computation functions and computed component statuses
Description computes the impact status from provider components computes the self_status from direct events computes the component computed_status from impact_status and self_status Inputs Computed status status values propagated by impact_status inbound relationships severities of direct events associated with the component the impact status and the self-status self_status

consolidate_function

computed_status

All the functions return a status value in the range of the MC_SM_COMPONENT_STATUS enumeration.

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Anatomy of a status computation model

Only the cell maintains the real-time status of components. Component status is not reflected in the BMC Atrium CMDB.

Anatomy of a status computation model
A status computation model defines the following:
s s

s

s

the algorithm used by each of the functions involved in status computation a no-alert status value that applies only when the consolidate_function returns NONE. The no-alert status is acceptable for all the default status computation functions. a quorum percentage that applies only when the impact_function uses the QUORUM algorithm an external algorithm that applies only when the impact_function uses the EXTERNAL placeholder

The internal status NONE
The status value NONE is an internal status only used in the component status computation function. The main status of a component should never have a value of NONE. For this reason, the following results apply to situations in which there is no input to a function or the input value is NONE.
Function impact_function Input value Component has no inbound relationship. Inbound relationships propagate NONE as a status. self_function consolidate_function No events are associated with the component. Output value NONE NONE NONE

Impact status value is “NONE” and default no-alert status self-status value is “NONE” or there value from the status are no inputs. computation model

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Status computation algorithms
The status computation algorithms define the functions involved in status computation use the cell’s internal algorithms, such as HIGHEST_VAL. Defining a status computation model includes associating the appropriate algorithm with each function. The algorithms are:
Highest Val—Using this algorithm, a function returns the highest value among those it receives as input. In general, the higher the value, the less desirable it becomes. For example, the highest value for the status of a component is 70 (UNAVAILABLE). Average—(impact_function only) Using this algorithm, impact_function returns the

average status of the propagated status values.
Quorum—(impact_function) This impact_function returns the smaller status value

among the highest values propagated by a quorum of incoming active relationships. The number of active relationships that constitute a quorum correspond to the quorum value of the status model multiplied by the total number of incoming active relationships divided by 100 (rounded up to the next integer if necessary).
Weight—Status weight is an attribute (StatusWeight) of the BMC_Impact object,

requiring an integer value. It is used in impact relationships to determine how much importance (numerically weighted) to give to each provider relationship that impacts a consumer instance. A higher numerical value indicates a greater importance.
Self-Preferred—(consolidate_function) The consolidate_function returns the highest

value among the severities of the direct events after they are automatically mapped to component status values. By default, all component types rely on a 3-High status computation model, in which all of the status computation functions use the HIGHEST_VAL algorithm.

How status computation algorithms work
Table 88 shows the type of value that a component status computation function returns when using an available algorithm.

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Table 88

What a function returns when using an available algorithm
Function impact_function self_function Returns the highest value among the status values of the provider components the highest value among the severities of the direct events, after they have been automatically mapped to component status values the higher value between the impact status and the self-status the average status of the provider components after weighting each status value, where the “weight” is the number of providers propagating this particular status divided by the total number of providers propagating a status the computed impact status is the lowest status that is propagated by the quorum percentage of providers (ignoring relationships propagating NONE) the highest value among the severities of the direct events, after they are automatically mapped to component status values. This highest severity ignores any value coming from the provider components. One exception is when the component has no direct events. In this case, the consolidate function returns the highest value among the status values of the provider components.

When using this algorithm HIGHEST_VAL

consolidate_function AVERAGE impact_function

QUORUM

impact_function

SELF_PREFERRED

consolidate_function

Quorum algorithm examples
The STANDARD option (default) for Status Computation uses the HIGHEST_VAL impact_function: the impact_status is simply the highest propagated_status of the incoming relationships. The CLUSTER option for Status Computation uses the QUORUM impact function, which is described below. When you create a quorum type of StatusModel, you specify a percentage, called the quorum percentage. The quorum value is given by the quorum slot of the BMC_STATUS_COMPUTATION instance. The impact_status is the highest propagated_status that a quorum percentage of provider agree upon.
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Quorum algorithm examples

An easy computation of the quorum status can be done as follows:
s

s s

There are n providers with propagated_status different from NONE: let i be the lowest integer that is greater or equal to quorum*n/100. Consider the array of propagated_status ordered from highest to lowest status. The impact_status is the status corresponding to the element i of this array.

EXAMPLE
CASE A website 1 (quorum-based component status computation) host1 host2 Example A1 QUORUM=50, host1=OK, host2=IMPACTED 50*2/100 = 1 => i = 1 array = [IMPACTED, OK] The percentage of hosts that are not AVAILABLE is 50%, which breaches the quorum threshold, so the status of website 1 is IMPACTED. Example A2 QUORUM=51, host1=OK, host2=IMPACTED 1 < 51*2/100 < 2 => q = 2 array = [IMPACTED, OK] The percentage of hosts that are not AVAILABLE is 50%, which does not breach the quorum threshold, so the status of website 1 is OK. Example A3 QUORUM=51, host1=MINOR, host2=IMPACTED 1 < 51*2/100 < 2 => q=2 array = [IMPACTED, MINOR] There is indeed at least 51% of the providers (actually 100%) that state a severity at least MINOR, so the status of website 1 = MINOR

CASE B website 2 (quorum-driven, impact-based component status computation) host1 host2 host3 host4 Example B1 quorum_percent=30, host1=OK, host2=OK, host3=OK, host4=Minor 1<30*4/100<2=>q=2 array = [MINOR, OK, OK, OK] The percent of hosts that are not UNAVAILABLE is 25%, which is less than 30%, so the status of website2 is OK. Example B2 quorum_percent=30, host1=OK, host2=OK, host3=UNAVAILABLE, host4=MINOR 1 < 30*4/100 < 2 => q = 2 array = [UNAVAILABLE, MINOR, OK, OK] There is at least 30% (actually 50%) of the providers that state a severity of at least MINOR, so the status of website 2 is MINOR. Example B3 quorum_percent=60, host1=MINOR, host2=OK, host3=UNAVAILABLE, host4=UNAVAILABLE 2 < 60*4/100 < 3 => q=3 array = [UNAVAILABLE, UNAVAILABLE, MINOR, OK] There is at least 60% (actually 75%) of the providers that state a severity at least MINOR, so the status of website 2 = MINOR

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Relationship status propagation concepts
The cell performs status propagation for relationships and it relies on the status propagation model associated with each impact relationship instance. The BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION data class supports relationship control and, together with the BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP data class, provides dynamic status mapping. One status propagation model is made up of several instances in both data classes. Each status propagation model must have a unique name to identify it. You can create as many status propagation models as needed to control component status propagation. The name of a single BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION refers to multiple BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP instances all of which have the same name (a one-tomany relationship). Each BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP instance defines how a provider component status is propagated over a relationship to the consumer component. For example, for the INCREASING status propagation there will be a number of propagation map instances each of which increases the status propagated by a provider component to a consumer component. So, if a provider has status MINOR the status propagated over the relationship to the consumer will be IMPACTED. This would be a single propagation map instances - one is needed for each status.

How status propagation works
The cell automatically propagates the status of component instances through its outbound relationships as new conditions occur, such as a status change on the component or a state change on an outbound relationship. Status propagation is based on impact relationships and status propagation models. The role of a status propagation model is to define the status value to be propagated in all possible situations. That model can then be applied to one or more impact relationship instances, enabling the cell to handle status propagation appropriately for those objects. When a status change on a component instance triggers a status propagation, the cell takes the main status (status slot value) of the component, retrieves each outbound impact relationship with its associated state and its status propagation model, and searches the propagation map for a matching entry. The result is the propagated_status value, which is passed as an input to the impact_function of each consumer component.

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Status propagation models

When a state change on an outbound impact relationship triggers a new status propagation for that component instance, the cell combines the main status of the component with the retrieved state and the status propagation model of the relationship, and searches the propagation map of the status propagation model for a matching entry. The result is the propagated_status value that is then passed as an input to the impact_function of the consumer component.

Status propagation models
A propagation model defines how the status of a provider component must be propagated in an impact relationship based on
s s

the current state of the relationship the current value of the provider’s status

Status propagation models are used only by impact relationships. Status propagation models serve the following purposes:
s

s

relationship control—enforcement of logical rules in creating new component relationships so that only valid relationships are created dynamic status mapping—translating the main status of the provider component into a propagated status for input into the impact_function of the consumer component in a relationship The impact_function is part of the status computation of a component. For more information, see “Status computation functions” on page 416.

Default status propagation models
The service model provides the following default status propagation models:
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INCREASING—consumer component is overly dependent on the provider. When a problem occurs, the consumer’s status degrades faster than the provider’s does DIRECT—consumer component depends on the provider’s services to the extent

s

that its status is the same as the provider’s
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DECREASING—consumer component can function without provider’s services. When a problem occurs, the consumer’s status is less degraded than the provider’s

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What is a valid status propagation model?

Table 89 describes the how status propagation occurs for a specific model. Table 89 How status propagation models work in relationships
If the relationship state is ACTIVE INACTIVE Result propagates the provider’s status without modification to the consumer propagation of the provider’s status is blocked by mapping the provider’s status to NONE This value is ignored by the consumer. INCREASING ACTIVE INACTIVE increases the impact of the provider’s status on the consumer’s status propagation of the provider’s status is blocked by mapping the provider’s status to NONE This value is ignored by the consumer. DECREASING ACTIVE INACTIVE decreases the impact of the provider’s status on the consumer’s status propagation of the provider’s status is blocked by mapping the provider’s status to NONE This value is ignored by the consumer.

Status propagation model DIRECT

What is a valid status propagation model?
A valid status propagation model is a BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION instance, complemented with the appropriate number of BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP instances, all sharing the same name. A BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION instance is not created if the supporting BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP instances have not yet been created. A valid status propagation model must have:
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8 instances of the data class BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP, one for each possible provider component status value for the ACTIVE state 8 instances of the data class BMC_PROPAGATION_MAP, one for each possible provider component status value for the INACTIVE state 1 instance of the BMC_STATUS_PROPAGATION data class that defines the propagation model’s attributes

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18

Managing BMC Impact Service Model Editor
18

Service Management administration is performed in large part within BMC Impact Service Model Editor and its supporting data classes, with some administration also being done in the BMC Impact Portal. Administration includes managing all user access to information contained in the service model. Access control is managed in the service model through individual component instances. Each component has a ReadSecurity and WriteSecurity set of attributes, and each attribute can be associated with a user group that can be assigned either read or write access to a component. Additional user control functions in BMC Impact Service Model Editor include console navigation trees, which impose a structure on the organization of service management information, control folder-level rights, and pass this information to the BMC Impact Portal. This chapter includes the following topics: Setting BMC Impact Service Model Editor options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Service Model Editor log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the topology view in BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . . . . . . . . Using a firewall with BMC Impact Service Model Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Atrium CMDB Class Manager authentication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding new classes to the BMC Atrium CMDB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Making your changes visible to applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating a new service model component class in the BMC Atrium CMDB . . . Associating a custom icon with a service model component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Documenting your extensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . smeserver properties file and parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 430 435 436 436 436 437 438 439 442 443

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Setting BMC Impact Service Model Editor options

Setting BMC Impact Service Model Editor options
The Options command offers numerous configuration settings for user-specific definition as well as global options and is available to any user with access to BMC Impact Service Model Editor.

Personal options
Personal options settings are unique to the user. The values specified here are specific to the user and are reapplied when the user logs into BMC Impact Service Model Editor on any computer. The options settings are saved on BMC Impact Service Model Editor server. Options that can be changed include icon colors and label styles, line styles, regional preferences, View appearance, copy/paste settings, and log file preferences. All personal options are available by choosing Tools=>Personal Options.

To define component instance icon colors and label styles 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools=>Personal Options. 2 On the Components tab, in the Component icon area, choose a drawing mode.
Drawing mode affects how the component instance looks when it is being moved.
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Ghost results in a simple rectangular border. Opaque results in the component being fully drawn.

3 In the Selection Background Color list, choose a background color for the
component instance icon when the component instance is selected.

4 In the Active Border Color list, choose a color for the border of the component
instance icon when the mouse cursor is over it.

5 In the Component Label area,
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choose a font, type size, color, and style for the label that names the component instance icon. in the Maximum Number of Characters to Display box, choose a number that limits the number of characters to display for component instance name labels. If a component name is longer that the maximum number of characters, the name is truncated. This value applies to every component instance in every View.

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To define line styles for relationships 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools=>Personal Options. 2 On the Relationships tab, in the Relationship Type pane, select the relationship type
that you want to change.

3 In the Line Color list, choose a predefined color or set a custom color for the line. 4 In Line Style list, select one of the predefined line styles or create a custom line
style. To create a custom line style, enter numbers separated by commas, which alternately define the length of the visible/invisible line segments. For example: 9,3,1,3 creates a repeating line pattern with 9 solid units, 3 invisible units, 1 solid unit, and 3 invisible units.

5 In the Line Weight list, choose a predefined line weight or define a custom line
weight by entering a decimal number (between 0.01 and 5.0) that defines the width of the line. For example, a weight of 2.0 creates a line that is twice as thick as one with a weight of 1.0.

TIP
When a View is open, you can see a legend of line styles by choosing Window => Legend.

To set regional preferences 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools=>Personal Options. 2 On the Regional Settings tab, in the Locale area, choose the option that works best in
your environment. The Use Country/Region Specified in BMC Portal User Account option uses the locale specified when BMC Portal was registered as a user.

3 In the Date Format and Time Format areas, choose a format for each.
For the Time Format, the Long and Full options appear the same in English, but may be different in other languages.

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Setting BMC Impact Service Model Editor options

To set View appearance options 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools=>Personal Options. 2 On the Appearance tab, in the Production/Sandbox View Background Color list,
choose a color for the production and sandbox View background.

3 In the Test View Background Color list, choose a color for the test View background. 4 In the Desktop Background Color list, choose a color for the right pane of BMC
Impact Service Model Editor before a View is opened.

5 For the Show Tooltips check box,
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clear this check box to not see tooltips, or enter values (in milliseconds) for the Initial Delay, Dismiss Delay, and Reshow Delay.

s

6 For the Show Embedded Help Text check box, clear this check box to not display
paragraph-style instances of Help text that appear in some dialog boxes.

To set copy/paste and miscellaneous options 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools=>Personal Options. 2 On the Other tab, in the Copy/Paste area, select the appropriate copy/paste options
for renaming copied component instances. This tab also controls the Paste Multiple Components dialog box; see “To copy component instances” on page 355.

3 In the Miscellaneous area, for the Load Saved Views at Login checkbox, options are
defined as follows:
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checkbox selected: data for all Views is loaded into memory when you log into BMC Impact Service Model Editor checkbox cleared: data for a View is loaded into memory only when you open that specific View.

4 For the Use Live Server Data During Selection checkbox, options are defined as
follows:
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checkbox selected: as each component is selected in the View, the data is retrieved again from the BMC Atrium CMDB. checkbox cleared: data for all the components in a View is retrieved from the BMC Atrium CMDB when the View is opened. Data for an individual component may become outdated.

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NOTE
Whichever setting is selected, when you open the Edit Component or Edit Relationship dialog boxes, the latest information is always retrieved from the BMC Atrium CMDB.

5 For the Show Duplicate Component Dialog checkbox, the dialog box displays when
you use the Find command and want to place found objects in a View (by dragging or clicking Place in Selected View) that already has contains the objects:
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checkbox selected: dialog box displays checkbox cleared: dialog box does not display; there is no alert that you are duplicating objects in the View

To set log file preferences 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools=>Personal Options. 2 In the Logging tab, set the level of log information you need on the client computer.
Logging becomes more detailed as you go from the top of column one to the bottom of column one, then to the top of column two to the bottom of column two. The most detailed log selection is All. The more detailed the log is, the more disk space is used.

3 In the Buffer Size box, enter the maximum number of log messages you want to
save in memory. This is a first in, first out buffer; when the maximum number of messages is reached, the oldest message is deleted when a new one is added.

4 In the Log Files area, select options for saving log files on the client computer.
You can specify a directory to save the files in, but the file name bmc_sme_integer_log# is generated by BMC Impact Service Model Editor. The first file saved is numbered 0; subsequent logs increment by one. When the number of log files saved reaches the value in the Number of Log Files box, the count starts again at zero and the existing files with the same name are written over.

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BMC Impact Service Model Editor log

Global options
Selecting Tools=>Options=>Global Options opens the Options - Global dialog box, which enables you to set component instance self-priorities when in a given status. For more information on Service Schedules, see “Service schedules” on page 326.

NOTE
If you change the self-priority of the component for an Other status, the self-priority values are automatically changed for the statuses of INFO, UNKNOWN, and BLACKOUT.

To edit service schedule self-priorities 1 In the Options - Global dialog box, in the Base Priority/Status table, select the
appropriate status level (1-5) for each base priority/status level.

2 In the Impacts Priority Calculation Method, choose the calculation method for the
component.

3 In the Default Component Types that Propagate Priority box, enter the classes of
components that will have a default value of Propagate Priority=Yes. Separate the class names by commas.

4 Click OK to save your changes.
For more information, see Chapter 17, “Component and relationship status propagation.”

BMC Impact Service Model Editor log
To open the BMC Impact Service Model Editor Log dialog box and view the log messages, choose Tools => View Log.

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BMC Impact Service Model Editor log

Figure 115 BMC Impact Service Model Editor log

By default, this log captures startup and shutdown information. To record different levels of information for debugging purposes, see “To set log file preferences” on page 429. The following illustration depicts representative log entries of the BMC Impact Service Model Editor GUI log.
Nov 27, 2006 4:57:08 PM [Seq: 0, ID: BMCSME001010, Level: INFO] FindPanel Creation done Nov 27, 2006 4:57:09 PM [Seq: 2, ID: BMCSME000006, Level: INFO] Service Model Editor console started. Version: 5.0.0 Build: 1124943 Nov 27, 2006 4:57:42 PM [Seq: 3, ID: BMCSME000018, Level: INFO] Loaded 1 workspaces from server. Nov 27, 2006 5:01:03 PM [Seq: 4, ID: BMCSME000004, Level: INFO] Logging level changed to ALL.

Outside BMC Impact Service Model Editor, you can enable the log for the BMC Impact Service Model Editor server and the Java Web Start console.

BMC Impact Service Model Editor Server
The BMC Impact Service Model Editor Server records commands, runtime exceptions, and debugger information. To view the output of the BMC Impact Service Model Editor Server log, you must modify the log4j.xml configuration file of the JBoss application server. The log4j.xml configuration file is located on the system where the BMC Portal is installed in the directory: BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/conf. You can modify the log4j.xml file to send its output to
s s s

the BMC Portal log file a console window a console window and the JBoss log file

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BMC Impact Service Model Editor log

To send BMC Impact Service Model Editor Server debug output to the BMC Portal log file 1 In an appropriate editor, open the
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/log4j.xml.

2 Add the following appender and category elements under the Setup the Root
Category heading.
<appender name="CLUSTER" class="org.jboss.logging.appender.RollingFileAppender"> <errorHandler class="org.jboss.logging.util.OnlyOnceErrorHandler"/> <param name="Threshold" value="DEBUG"/> <param name="File" value="${jboss.server.home.dir}/log/portal.log"/> <param name="Append" value="true"/> <param name="MaxFileSize" value="100MB"/> <param name="MaxBackupIndex" value="10"/> <layout class="org.apache.log4j.PatternLayout"> <param name="ConversionPattern" value="<%5.1p,%d{MM/dd/yy HH:mm:ss z},%c{1}> %m%n"/> </layout> </appender> <category name="com.bmc.sms.sme"> <priority value="DEBUG"/> <appender-ref ref="SME_FILE"/> </category>

To send BMC Impact Service Model Editor Server debug output to a console window 1 In an appropriate editor, open the
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/log4j.xml.

2 Add the following appender and category elements under the Setup the Root
Category heading.
<appender name="SME_CONSOLE" class="org.apache.log4j.ConsoleAppender"> <errorHandler class="org.jboss.logging.util.OnlyOnceErrorHandler"/> <param name="Target" value="System.out"/> <param name="Threshold" value="DEBUG"/> <layout class="org.apache.log4j.PatternLayout"> <!-- Since sdk logger prints its own context info, we shorten the context info from log4j and use the following format: <last letter of Priority,Date,Category> Message\n --> <param name="ConversionPattern" value="<%5.1p,%d{MM/dd/yy HH:mm:ss z},%c{1}> %m%n"/> </layout> </appender> <category name="com.bmc.sms.sme"> <priority value="DEBUG"/>

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BMC Impact Service Model Editor log

<appender-ref ref="SME_CONSOLE"/> </category>

3 To view debug output in a console window, start the BMC Impact Portal from a
shell window:
s

For Windows, open a Command Prompt window, and enter the following command:
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME\appserver\websdk\bin\run.bat

s

For Solaris, open a terminal window, and enter the following command:
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/tools/jboss/bin/jboss.sh

4 Restart the BMC Portal application server. To send BMC Impact Service Model Editor Server debug output to a console window and the BMC Portal log file 1 In an appropriate editor, open the
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/log4j.xml.

2 Add both sets of appender and category elements for sending output to the BMC
Portal log and to a console window as described in the preceding two procedures.

3 Add the following ref subelement pointing to the SME_FILE under the category
element with the value com.bmc.sms.sme.
<category name="com.bmc.sms.sme"> <priority value="DEBUG"/> <appender-ref ref=”SME_CONSOLE”/> <appender-ref ref="SME_FILE"/> </category>

NOTE
The appender element FILE is defined under the Preserve Messages in a local file heading of the default log4j.xml file.

Java Web Start logging
The Java Web Start log helps you to identify BMC Impact Service Model Editor deployment problems.

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BMC Impact Service Model Editor log

To enable Java Web Start logging 1 Open the Java Web Start Application Manager console in one of the following
ways:
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Double-click the Java Web Start icon on your desktop. Under Windows, choose Start => Programs => Java Web Start => Java Web Start or, from the Command Prompt, execute the following command:
%JAVA_HOME%\jre\javaws\javaws.exe

2 In the Java Web Start Application Manager console, choose File => Preferences. 3 On the Advanced tab, in the Output Options area, select Log Output. 4 To select an existing file, click Choose Log File Name, or enter a file path in the Log
File Name box.

5 Click OK.

Other BMC Impact Service Model Editor Troubleshooting Options
These workarounds apply to various troubleshooting scenarios that you might encounter.

Deleting all Views
Remove all the View files from the following locations:
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BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/data/ smsConsoleServer/sme/indexes BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/data/ smsConsoleServer/sme/Views

s

Connecting to the Remedy AR System server
To verify that the BMC Atrium CMDB is accessible, you connect to the Remedy AR System server using the Remedy User Tool. If necessary, restart the Remedy AR System server service. If the BMC Atrium CMDB is not accessible, you may receive a blank error dialog box when performing commands in BMC Impact Service Model Editor.

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Configuring the topology view in BMC Impact Service Model Editor

Testing the connection between BMC Impact Portal and the BMC Atrium CMDB
To verify the connection between BMC Impact Portal and the BMC Atrium CMDB, you can run the Impact Portal superadmin task Synchronize User Groups. If this fails, it is probably due to a bad BMC Atrium CMDB configuration in Impact Portal. BMC Impact Service Model Editor connects to the BMC Atrium CMDB through the Impact Portal, so it is a vital configuration. If the BMC Atrium CMDB is not accessible, you may receive a blank error dialog box when performing commands in BMC Impact Service Model Editor.

Configuring the topology view in BMC Impact Service Model Editor
You can set the type of topology views displayed by BMC Impact Service Model Editor in the ..\smsIwc\application.properties file using the com.bmc.sms.sme.topoviews parameter. This parameter has a comma-delimited list of the supported topology views. For example, the default is shown in Figure 116. Figure 116 Default value for com.bmc.sms.sme.topoviews parameter
com.bmc.sms.sme.topoviews=com.bmc.sms.sme.topo.application,com.bmc.sms.sme.topo. non.impact

Each item in the list has two functions:
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It is a resource key to a localized name (that can appear in the user interface). The localized name is defined in the sme_messages.properties file for the appropriate locale. It is the base key for the definition of the topology view.

s

Each base key is appended with an integer (for as many as needed) that defines a graph to traverse for the topology view. The general format of a graph definition is shown in Figure 117. Figure 117 Graph definition format
<ComponentType>.<RelationshipType>.<ComponentType>

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Using a firewall with BMC Impact Service Model Editor

For example, for a graph type whose key is com.bmc.sms.sme.topo.application, the following graph entries could be defined as shown in Figure 118. Figure 118 Example of a graph definition
com.bmc.sms.sme.topo.application.1=BMC_BaseElement.BMC_Component.BMC_BaseElement com.bmc.sms.sme.topo.application.2=BMC_BaseElement.BMC_MemberOf.BMC_BaseElement

A graph definition can include as many types as desired, but it must always begin and end with a component type. For example:
BMC_BaseElement.BMC_Impact.BMC_BaseElement

Using a firewall with BMC Impact Service Model Editor
If your environment contains a firewall between the BMC Impact Service Model Editor client and BMC Impact Service Model Editor server (with http port open), the BMC Impact Service Model Editor Client will fail unless ports 9378 and 9386 are opened in the firewall.

BMC Atrium CMDB Class Manager authentication
You can launch the BMC Atrium CMDB Class Manager from BMC Impact Service Model Editor by selecting Tools=>Class Manager Console. To successfully log in, you must have set up passwords for the Administrative user in the following locations:
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from the Mid Tier Configuration Tool, in AR Server Settings (see BMC Remedy Action Request System 7.0 Installing and Administering BMC Remedy Mid Tier). from BMC Remedy Administrator, in the Connection Settings tab (see BMC Remedy Action Request System 7.0 Configuring).

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Adding new classes to the BMC Atrium CMDB
This section contains information used if you are adding new classes and attributes to your data model.

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Making your changes visible to applications

Making your changes visible to applications
When you add classes and attributes to your data model, they are not automatically picked up by BMC Software products that use the BMC Atrium CMDB, such as BMC Impact Solutions products or BMC Remedy Asset Management. You must modify new classes and attributes so they can be used with these applications.

BMC Remedy AR System applications
Some BMC Remedy AR System applications, such as BMC Remedy Asset Management, maintain their own set of join forms for viewing and modifying BMC Atrium CMDB instance data. The BMC Atrium CMDB now has the ability to generate attribute fields for such an application and arrange the fields according to view templates specified by the application. For information about using this feature, see the BMC Atrium CMDB 2.0.1 Installation and Configuration Guide.

BMC Impact Solutions
While updating BMC Impact Solutions to use new classes and attributes, note the following information about classes:
s

s

s

s s

Classes with the custom property 100050 are SIM-enabled classes. Instances with this property are pushed by the BMC Impact Publishing Server to the cells. SIM-enabled class definitions in the BMC Atrium CMDB and the class definitions in the BMC Impact Manager cell must match. For more information, see “Exporting class definitions from the BMC Atrium CMDB to a cells” on page 409. For your new class to be a service model component class, not only does the new class need to be SIM-enabled (having the class custom properties value of 100050), its superclasses, whether concrete or abstract, up to the root class (such as BMC:BaseElement, BMC:BaseRelationship) must be SIM-enabled as well. BMC Impact Service Model Editor filters out abstract classes. The new class inherits the attributes of its superclass.

Note the following information about attributes:
s s

Attributes that have the custom property 300050 are SIM-enabled attributes. Attribute values are also pushed by the BMC Impact Publishing Server to the cells.

Perform the following steps to update BMC Impact Solutions to use new classes and attributes:

1 Using the Class Manager (see “BMC Atrium CMDB Class Manager
authentication”), add these custom properties to the new classes and attributes:
s

Classes: 1\100050\2\1\

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s

SMEReadWrite attributes: 2\300050\2\1\300070\2\1\ SMEReadOnly attributes: 2\300050\2\1\300080\2\1\

s

For instructions on this step, see “Creating a new service model component class in the BMC Atrium CMDB” on page 438.

2 Add custom icons for new classes.
For instructions on this step, see “Associating a custom icon with a service model component” on page 439.

3 From BMC Impact Service Model Editor, export cell metadata, import the resulting
file into the cell’s knowledge base, and recompile the cell. For instructions on this step, see “Exporting and importing service model data” on page 408 and BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

Creating a new service model component class in the BMC Atrium CMDB
This section contains steps for creating a new service model component class.

To create a new service model component class in the BMC Atrium CMDB 1 Use the BMC Atrium CMDB Class Manager (see “BMC Atrium CMDB Class
Manager authentication”) to create a new CI class. For instructions, see “Modifying the Data Model” in the BMC Atrium CMDB 2.0.1 Installation and Configuration Guide.

2 Assign the class to the namespace.
It is advised not to add new classes to BMC.CORE or BMC.SIM. User userName should use namespace userName.

3 Select the service model component superclass to which you want to assign the
new service model component class. SIM-enabled classes are listed in “Service model and the Common Data Model” on page 297.

4 Specify the Custom Property 1\100050\2\1\ in the General tab. 5 Click Save.
All superclasses of a SIM class, up to BMC_BaseElement, need to be SIM classes, regardless if they are abstract or concrete.

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Associating a custom icon with a service model component

Associating a custom icon with a service model component
The BMC Impact Service Model Editor, BMC Impact Portal, and BMC Impact Explorer Services views utilize icons to represent service model components. Each component type in BMC Impact Service Model Editor is associated with an icon, which you can view in the Templates dockable window. For a list of default service model component icons, see “Service model component types” on page 311. When you create a new component type by adding a new class to the BMC Atrium CMDB, associate an icon with the new component.

To associate an icon with a service model component class
When adding a custom icon to a newly created class, follow this sequence for initializing the new data and synchronizing the class definition with those in the SIM KB of the target cell or cells.

1 Create a new class in the BMC Atrium CMDB. For instructions, see “Adding new
classes to the BMC Atrium CMDB” on page 436.

2 Create a set of the three different-sized icons for the new class, and save them
using the file naming convention className_size.ext. See “Guidelines for associating a custom icon with a service model component class” on page 440.

3 Store an identical set of the three icon files—each file in the set designating a
different pixel size—under each of the three specified subfolders on the system where the BMC Portal application server is running. See “Guidelines for associating a custom icon with a service model component class” on page 440.

4 Associate the icon with the service model component class by performing the
following actions:

A Edit the component_icon.properties file. By default, the component_icon.properties
file is located in the following directory path:
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Solaris—$BMC_Portal_Kit_Home/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/
all/data/smsConsoleServer/Image/Icon

s

Windows—%BMC_Portal_Kit_Home%\appserver\websdk\tools\jboss\server\
all\data\smsConsoleServer\Image\Icon

B Add the following to the component_icon.properties file:
sms.component.icon.ClassName=IconFileClassName

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Replace ClassName with the name of the new class you defined in the BMC Atrium CMDB and IconFileClassName with the prefix you used to name the three icon files (className_size.ext).

C Save the component_icon.properties file. 5 Restart the BMC Portal application server and all BMC Impact Service Model
Editor client instances.

6 Refresh BMC Impact Service Model Editor templates by using Tools => Refresh
Component Types.

7 Synchronize the new service model class definitions with the SIM KB. For
instructions see “Exporting and importing service model data” on page 408.

8 Create the new class definition in BAROC format by using Tools => Export Cell
Meta Data. The file that is created is named mc_sm_object.baroc.

After you convert the class definition to BAROC format, you make it available to the SIM KB of the target cell or cells.

9 Manually copy the mc_sm_object.baroc file to the destination directory of the target
cell or cells. By default, the mc_sm_object.baroc file is located in the following directory path:
s

Solaris—$MCELL_HOME/etc/CellName/kb/classes Windows—%MCELL_HOME%\etc\CellName\kb\classes

s

10 Recompile each cell’s KB by using the mccomp -v manifest.kb command. 11 Restart the cell or cells. Guidelines for associating a custom icon with a service model component class
Follow these guidelines when adding and associating custom icons with service model component classes:
s

BMC Impact Service Model Editor and BMC Impact Portal accept three sets of pixel sizes for the component icons: 16 x 16, 32 x 32, and 128 x 128. For each custom class that you create, you must include three sets of identical icons, each set using the three different pixel sizes: 16 x 16, 32 x 32, and 128 x 128. Use the .gif format for the 16 x 16 icons, and the .png format for the 32 x 32 and the 128 x 128 icons.

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Associating a custom icon with a service model component

For example, set one contains three identical icons of 16 x 16, 32 x 32, and 128 x 128 pixels; set two contains the same three icons of 16 x 16, 32 x 32, and 128 x 128 pixels, and so forth.
s

Name each custom icon using the same name as the custom class it represents. Follow this naming convention:

className_size.ext

className is the name of the custom class you created. size refers to the pixel sizes 16, 32, and 128. ext is the file extension, which will be either .gif or .png and is required. For example, if you created a custom class named BMC_ABCServer, you would create three corresponding custom icons named as follows: — BMC_ABCServer_16.gif — BMC_ABCServer_32.png — BMC_ABCServer_128.png
s

Save a set of the three different-sized custom icons to each of the following three subdirectories under the BMC_Portal_Kit_Home installation directory. You can find these directories on the system where the BMC Portal application server is installed. On Windows, the directories are located as follows: — %BMC_Portal_Kit_Home%\appserver\websdk\tools\jboss\server\all\modules\
smsSme.sar\smsSme.war\images

— %BMC_Portal_Kit_Home%\appserver\websdk\tools\jboss\server\all\data\
smsConsoleServer\Image\Icon

— %BMC_Portal_Kit_Home%\appserver\websdk\tools\jboss\server\all\modules\
smsConsoleServer.sar\smsConsoleServer.war\images\objects

On Solaris, the directory are located as follows: — $BMC_Portal_Kit_Home/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/modules/
smsSme.sar/smsSme.war/images

— $BMC_Portal_Kit_Home/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/data/
smsConsoleServer/Image/Icon

— $BMC_Portal_Kit_Home/appserver/websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/modules/
smsConsoleServer.sar/smsConsoleServer.war/images/objects

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Documenting your extensions

By saving an identical set of the three different-sized icon files to each of the subdirectories, you are making them available to both BMC Impact Service Model Editor, BMC Impact Portal, and BMC Impact Explorer Services View.

Default icon when no match is found
When retrieving component icons, BMC Impact Service Model Editor first searches its local repository for the icons shipped with the product. If the matching icons are not found, it next searches the images subfolder. If no match is found, BMC Impact Service Model Editor uses the default icon Unknown_16.png, Unknown_32.png, or Unknown_128.png. Figure 119 BMC_BaseElement default icon image

Documenting your extensions
Just as you need to occasionally look up information about classes in the CDM, you will need to look up information about classes you create. One easy way to document a class is to copy one of the existing HTML files in CMDBInstallationFolder\sdk\doc\cdm and modify it to fit your class. If you copy the help file for a class with the same superclass as your class, you won’t need to change the information about inherited attributes and relationships. After creating your HTML help files, be sure to make a backup copy of them in a separate location so that they won’t be overwritten when you install a future version of the BMC Atrium CMDB.

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smeserver properties file and parameters

smeserver properties file and parameters
Table 90 describes the smeserver.properties file and its parameters. Table 90
Filename File path Description

smeserver.properties file
smeserver.properties BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/webskd/tools/jboss/server/all/conf/properties/smsS me contains all the user configurable BMC Impact Service Model Editor properties Description sets whether the precache applet is run to request component types from the BMC Atrium CMDB if defined, sets the number (integer) of component instances retrieved as a result of the Find command sets the temp directory of the BMC Impact Service Model Editor server Default value true

Parameter name
com.bmc.sms.sme.server. cmdbservice.precache. componenttypes com.bmc.sms.sme.server. cmdb.find.result.limit com.bmc.sms.sme.server. tmpdir

undefined; no limit undefined; default temp directory is JBOSS_HOME/ server/all/tmp/ sme ps_requests ps_response ps_notifications

com.bmc.sms.sme.server. publish.queue.requests com.bmc.sms.sme.server. publish.queue.response com.bmc.sms.sme.server. publish.topic.publish. status.change com.bmc.sms.sme.server. publish.controller.name

sets the name for the BMC Impact Publishing Server request queue sets the name for the BMC Impact Publishing Server response queue sets the name for the BMC Impact Publishing Server notification topic

sets the Java Management Extensions (JMX) name for com.bmc.sms. the publishing controller component of the BMC Impact sme.server: Publishing Server name= PublishService Controller defines the JMX name of the last successful Publishing Manager com.bmc.sms. consoleserver: name=LastPubli shManager 60 seconds

com.bmc.sms.sme.lsp.manager

com.bmc.sms.sme.server. publish.response.timeout com.bmc.sms.sme.server. publish.extended.response. timeout

sets the timeout value (the number of seconds to wait) for reception of BMC Impact Publishing Server responses sets the timeout value (the number of seconds to wait) for reception of BMC Impact Publishing Server extended responses

3600 seconds

com.bmc.sms.sme.server.promot sets the timeout, in seconds, for the Reconciliation ion.timeout Engine to reconcile objects into production

3600000 seconds

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Table 90

smeserver.properties file
1000 seconds true HH:mm:ss z MM/dd/yyyy BMC.ASSET 60 seconds smsConsoleServ er

com.bmc.sms.sme.server.promot sets the amount of time to wait before checking the ion.wait.time status on a reconciliation job
com.bmc.sms.sme.publish. preview.enable com.bmc.sms.sme.date.format com.bmc.sms.sme.server. export.datasetid com.bmc.sms.sme.cmdb.ping com.bmc.sms.sme.localized. classes.dir

enables (true) or disables (false) publishing previews sets the date format for the BMC Impact Service Model Editor defines the dataset (using dataset ID) to use for service model exports sets the polling interval, in seconds, for pinging the BMC Atrium CMDB to ensure that it is available defines the base directory used under SDK_HOME/tools/jboss/server/all/ conf/resources/locale/classesdir to retrieve localized server resources for class names and attributes lists the names of property files that contain localized classes and attributes. You can define custom files and add them to the list. The files are loaded in the order listed and the files loaded later override settings in files loaded earlier. The files listed must exist in the SDK_HOME/tools/jboss/server/all/ conf/resources/locale/classesdir

com.bmc.sms.sme.kb.info. resources

kb_deprecated_ resource. properties,kb_co re_resource. properties

com.bmc.sms.sme.topoviews

defines a comma-delimited list of supported topology views. Each element in the list has two functions:
s

See smeserver. properties file for current It is a resource key for a localized name (suitable for default values. the UI). It is the base key for the definition of the topology view. Each key is appended with an integer (for as many as needed) that defines a graph to traverse for the topology view.

s

If you edit any of these configuration files manually, you must restart the BMC Portal service or daemon for the changes to take effect. If you have edited any of the BMC Impact Publishing Server configuration files, you must restart the BMC Impact Publishing Server service or daemon also.

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Chapter

19
446 446 449 451 453 453 453 454 455 456 458 458 459 459 460 461 463 464 466 467 467 467 468 469 472 478 479 479 481 481
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19

This chapter contains information on troubleshooting issues with the BMC Impact Publishing Server and contains these topics: Managing the BMC Impact Publishing Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting and stopping the BMC Impact Publishing Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How publishing works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automated publishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Publish environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Production environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Test environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advanced staging and testing environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cell aliases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating additional publish environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling automated publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Initializing a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Initializing the BMC Atrium CMDB with SIM data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ServiceModelSet attribute values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . InitEffectively parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Source Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example scenario for working with baroc files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Atrium CMDB purges and hard deletions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshooting publication failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server service or daemon fails to start . . . . . . . . . . . . . No publication after successful promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Publishing Server doesn't reply to any requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with publication logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagnosing publication failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Another publish request is ongoing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring BMC Impact Publishing Server with BMC Impact Manager events. . . Generating BMC Impact Publishing Server log information and events . . . . . . Enabling generation of BMC Impact Manager events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event slot descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Managing the BMC Impact Publishing Server

BMC Impact Publishing Server error events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487 Trace files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 488 Configuring the BMC Impact Publishing Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 489 Configuring the Notify ARDBC plugin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 491

Managing the BMC Impact Publishing Server
The BMC Impact Publishing Server publishes your service model from the BMC Atrium CMDB to the BMC Impact Managers. In automated mode (default), publishing operates in the back end. When data is reconciled in the production dataset, a publish process is executed.

Starting and stopping the BMC Impact Publishing Server
Installation of BMC Impact Portal includes installation of the BMC Impact Publishing Server in the directory $BMC_PORTAL_KIT_Home/Impact/pubserv. For brevity, this directory will be called $PS_HOME in this section, although no such environment variable is created by default. Note that the BMC Impact Publishing Server does not run in the BMC Impact Portal, but as a separate process. However, clients such as the BMC Impact Service Model Editor and CLIs communicate with BMC Impact Publishing Server via the JMS (Java Messaging Service) of the BMC Impact Portal.
s

To start the BMC Impact Publishing Server, use the CLI command pserver. For more information, see “pserver—Starts up the BMC Impact Publishing Server service or daemon” on page 646. To stop the BMC Impact Publishing Server, use the CLI command pscontrol stop. For more information, see “pscontrol —Sends a command to BMC Impact Publishing Server” on page 644.

s

To ensure that only one BMC Impact Publishing Server is running, BMC Impact Publishing Server keeps the file $PS_HOME/log/ps.lock. If the BMC Impact Portal JMS is not functioning properly, ps.lock can be used to verify whether a BMC Impact Publishing Server is running.

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Starting and stopping the BMC Impact Publishing Server

Starting and stopping BMC Impact Publishing Server on Windows
The installation process creates a service BMC Impact Publishing Server with Startup type Automatic. When the system is rebooted, the BMC Impact Publishing Server service is automatically started. The service is also automatically started after initial installation.

To start the BMC Impact Publishing Server on Windows platforms by using services 1 Open the Services window by choosing Start => Settings => Control Panel =>
Administrative Tools => Services.

2 Select BMC Impact Publishing Server. 3 Click Start Service. To start the BMC Impact Publishing Server on Windows platforms by using the net start command 1 Select Start => Programs => Command Prompt. 2 Enter the following command:
net start "BMC Impact Publishing Server"

To start the BMC Impact Publishing Server from a command prompt 1 Select Start => Programs => Command Prompt. 2 Enter the following command:
pserver

On Windows, the -d option for pserver makes no difference as pserver always runs in the foreground.

To stop the BMC Impact Publishing Server on Windows platforms by using services 1 Open the Services window by choosing Start => Settings => Control Panel =>
Administrative Tools => Services.

2 Select BMC Impact Publishing Server. 3 Click Stop Service.

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Starting and stopping the BMC Impact Publishing Server

To stop the BMC Impact Publishing Server on Windows platforms by using the net start command 1 Select Start => Programs => Command Prompt. 2 Enter the following command:
net stop “BMC Impact Publishing Server”

To stop the BMC Impact Publishing Server from a command prompt 1 Select Start => Programs => Command Prompt. 2 Enter the following command: pscontrol stop

Starting and stopping BMC Impact Publishing Server on UNIX computers
The installation process creates the script impactPubServ in /etc/init.d. When rebooting the system, the BMC Impact Publishing Server is automatically started as a daemon. After install, the BMC Impact Publishing Server is also automatically started as a daemon.

To start the BMC Impact Publishing Server as a daemon on UNIX platforms
To start the BMC Impact Publishing Server as a daemon on UNIX platforms, use the following command: pserver.

To start the BMC Impact Publishing Server in the foreground on UNIX platforms
To start the BMC Impact Publishing Server in the foreground on UNIX platforms, use the following command: pserver -d.

To stop the BMC Impact Publishing Server on Unix platforms
To stop BMC Impact Publishing Server UNIX platforms, use the following command: pscontrol stop

To stop the BMC Impact Publishing Server when JMS is not running
If JMS of BMC Impact Portal is not up and running properly, you must first find the BMC Impact Publishing Server process that is running on UNIX platforms, then stop the BMC Impact Publishing Server process.

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How publishing works

1 Navigate to the $PS_HOME/log directory. 2 Execute the command fuser ps.lock.
The processId of the BMC Impact Publishing Server process is returned.

3 Kill the BMC Impact Publishing Server process by executing the following
command: fuser -k ps.lock Ensure that you do not kill the BMC Impact Publishing Server process when it is processing a request.

How publishing works
A publish is incremental: it looks up the changes of SIM data in the asset dataset since the last successful publication and pushes them to the desired cells. When the push is successful, a master copy of the published data is saved in the impact dataset. Not all CMDB classes have CI's that are useful for impact analysis. Only the CMDB classes that have the custom property 100050 are published to SIM. It is always possible to qualify classes that wouldn't be considered SIM classes OOB.

To make a class a SIM class
1. Give it custom property 100050 via Remedy User's Class Manager Console. 2. Use the CLI command pclassinfo -x to export the modified SIM class information. 3. Update the Knowledge Base of the cells and recompile. For more information, see “Adding new classes to the BMC Atrium CMDB” on page 436. See also “Service model and the Common Data Model” on page 297. Not all CMDB attributes of SIM classes are useful for SIM. Only the CMDB attributes that have custom property 300050 are published to SIM. It is always possible to qualify attributes that wouldn't be considered SIM attributes OOB.

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To make an attribute a SIM attribute
1. Give it custom property 300050 via Remedy User's Class Manager Console. 2. Use the CLI command pclassinfo -x to export the modified SIM class information. 3. Update the Knowledge Base of the cells and recompile. See also “Service model and the Common Data Model” on page 297.

The attribute ServiceModelSet allows CIs to be created in the CMDB but not included in any service model published to SIM. The supported values are OUT, IN and OUT_OF_IN. The default value is OUT. Only CI's of SIM classes should have a value different from OUT. The value IN indicates that the CI is included in the service model published to SIM. The value OUT_OF_IN indicates that the CI is not included in the service model published to SIM. To assure synchronization of the impact dataset and service model in SIM, a ServiceModelSet cannot be reset to OUT after it has been IN or OUT_OF_IN. Only CIs with ServiceModelSet IN or OUT_OF_IN are considered by the BMC Impact Publishing Server. See also “In-model and not-in-model component instances” on page 308. Every CI that has a ServiceModelSet IN or OUT_OF_IN should have a ReconciliationIdentity defined. To define the cell to which a CI needs to be pushed, the BMC Impact Publishing Server uses the following algorithm:
s

If a HomeCell is defined for the publish environment, that defined HomeCell is used (regardless of the values of the CI's HomeCellAlias or HomeCell attributes). The CI's HomeCellAlias for the publish environment is looked up in the class SIM_CellAliases in the dataset BMC.ASSET.

s

If in SIM_CellAlias you define an instance in the dataset BMC.ASSET for the publish environment without CellAlias set, then its CellName will be used as the default cell. Every CI that has no HomeCellAlias set will be pushed to this default cell. See also “Cell aliases” on page 455.

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Automated publishing

Automated publishing
BMC Impact Publishing Server can run in two modes: automated and manual. The configuration parameter AutomatedStartMode defines the mode in which the BMC Impact Publishing Server is started. When running in automated mode, every termination of a CMDB reconciliation job will trigger a publication, if applicable. When running in manual mode, you can control when modifications from the BMC Atrium CMDB are published to cells. To invoke a publication, execute the command publish. This command can be scheduled as necessary. The publish command can also be used when running in automated mode. By default, BMC Impact Publishing Server is started in automated mode so BMC Impact Publishing Server will publish instances that are promoted in the BMC Impact Service Model Editor. Automated requests are queued. The new request will start when the ongoing one is finished. If you have many reconciliation/promotion processes going at the same time, be aware that the throughput time of the publication will increase. Also, if the ongoing publication is still retrieving publishable data from an asset dataset, it will find new data in the asset dataset. This process
s

s

might cause inconsistent data (like an impact relationship pointing to a nonexistent CI) and thus publication failure. Such a failure cannot be prevented because the BMC Atrium CMDB does not “know” the concept of transactions. causes the previous publication to also publish the data of the following reconciliation. The following publication will display a message indicating "Nothing to be published."

To verify the mode in which BMC Impact Publishing Server is running
To verify the mode in which BMC Impact Publishing Server is running, execute the command psstat.
s

When BMC Impact Publishing Server runs in automated mode, the command returns Started - Automated mode When BMC Impact Publishing Server runs in manual mode the command returns
Started - Manual mode

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Automated publishing

To switch the mode in which BMC Impact Publishing Server is running
To switch the mode in which BMC Impact Publishing Server is running, execute the command pscontrol automated or pscontrol manual.

How automated publishing works
The automated publisher is notified by the Remedy Notify ARDBC plugin upon each termination of a reconciliation job run. If the reconciliation job has a unique merge activity with an asset target dataset, then a publish is queued for the publish environment of that asset target dataset. To ensure that no reconciliation job run notifications are lost if the automated publisher is temporarily off, notifications are kept in its persistent store. Whenever automated publisher comes up, it first deals with notifications that it finds in the persistent store (for example, notifications of reconciliations that happened while the automated publisher was off). Because a publish always publishes all modifications, one publish will be requested for all the notifications that are found.

Promotion and publishing
Reconciliation/promotion and publishing are independent processes. It is possible that a reconciliation and promotion process is successful, but the subsequent publication fails. BMC Impact Service Model Editor only notifies you of success or failure of the promotion, not whether the publication is successful or has failed. It is recommended that an administrator monitor the success or failure of publications that are automatically started. Also, because every publish process always publishes all modified instances since the last successful publish, the instances that are reconciled and promoted, and the instances that are published may not necessarily be the same.

Publishing failures and reattempts
When an automated publish request fails because of reasons independent of model consistency (for example, when a cell is not available), the automated publisher retries the publish (the configuration parameter AutomatedPublishRetryPeriod defines the interval between two publish requests). If a request is still not terminated when the interval runs out, a new interval is started.

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The configuration parameter AutomatedPublishRetryCount gives the maximum number of retries:
s s s

0 means no retrial, thus only a single publish request is performed. 1 means a publish request and one retry attempt, if necessary. a number less than zero (-1) means the automated publisher will republish forever, until a publish is successful.

Publish environments
Three types of environments are used for publication processes: production, test, and the more advanced staging and testing environments available using the CLI command penv.

Production environment
The production service model data is in the BMC Atrium CMDB in the production data set BMC.ASSET. After promoting component instances in BMC Impact Service Model Editor, these changes are reconciled in the production data set. After reconciling data from a discovery source, this data is stored in the production data set. When production service model data is published to the cells, the BMC Impact Publishing Server updates and maintains the production's impact data set (BMC.IMPACT.PROD), which mirrors the last successful publish to the cells. To guarantee that the BMC Atrium CMDB data and cell data are synchronized, only the BMC Impact Publishing Server should touch the data in the impact data set.

Test environments
When sending to test, BMC Impact Service Model Editor requests that the BMC Impact Publishing Server register a test environment consisting of the asset data set BMC.ASSET.user.Test.1 and the impact data set BMC.IMPACT.user.Test.1. BMC Impact Service Model Editor puts the service model data that is to be sent to test into the asset data set of the new test environment and requests a publication from the BMC Impact Publishing Server. The BMC Impact Publishing Server then looks up the test cell for the cell alias of every component. The last successful publish to the test cells is mirrored in the impact data set.

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Advanced staging and testing environments

To guarantee that the BMC Atrium CMDB data and cell data are synchronized, only the BMC Impact BMC Impact Publishing Server should touch the data in the impact data set.

Advanced staging and testing environments
Send to test from BMC Impact Service Model Editor is aimed at testing small service models. With the penv CLI command, more staging and testing options are available for larger service models. The penv command allows for testing scenarios like the following:
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Publish environment per department

At the beginning of a BSM project, you could define two pilot environments for two different departments. The components and impact relationships would be loaded from BAROC files, in the respective asset data sets BMC.ASSET.dept1 and BMC.ASSET.dept2. After an initial publication via the CLI command publish -e dept<i>, modifications would be published incrementally. If satisfied with the result of the pilot, the pilot's asset data set could be reconciled into the production data set. For every environment, the BMC Impact Publishing Server mirrors the last successful publish in the environment’s impact data set BMC.IMPACT.dept<i>. This approach is best suited for testing large service models where the effort to automate the tasks by script is acceptable in light of the volume of data being tested.
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Simulation environment

Additionally, it is possible to publish a single service model (an asset dataset) to multiple environments. For example, you can sent the production service model to production cells (for real-life monitoring and impact analysis) as well as to a test cell to simulate the impact of component failure. For the simulation publish environment, the simulation cell would be defined on the environment itself, not with cell aliases. For more information, see “Cell aliases” on page 455. Both the production publish environment and the simulation publish environment would use the production asset dataset BMC.ASSET. The last successful publish of the production publish environment is saved by the BMC Impact Publishing Server in BMC.IMPACT.PROD. The last successful publish of the simulation publish environment SIMULATION is saved by the BMC Impact Publishing Server in BMC.IMPACT.SIMULATION. A reconciliation merge to the BMC.ASSET dataset would trigger an automated publish on both environments.

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Cell aliases

Alternatively if you would want to do some simulations on a service model that is derived from the production service model, then your simulation publish environment would use an overlay asset dataset BMC.ASSET.SIMULATION with underlying dataset BMC.ASSET. Only if enabled, reconciliation merges to the BMC.ASSET dataset will trigger an automated publish on the simulation publish environment. See also “Enabling automated publication” on page 458.

Cell aliases
With the introduction of publish environments, there is a need to easily copy data from one publish environment to another and send it to different cells. To support this need, the BMC Impact Publishing Server uses the HomeCellAlias attribute in the asset data set to determine the cell (HomeCell) to which the instance should be sent. The assignments cellalias-to-cellname, for every publish environment, are stored in the class SIM_CellAlias, in the dataset BMC.ASSET. The assignments that were valid at the time of publishing are stored in the data set BMC.IMPACT.PROD. Only BMC Impact Publishing Server should touch these assignments. At the time of publishing, the assignments need to be defined. For the production environment, the assignments are defined when a cell is registered in BMC Impact Portal. For every production cell an alias with the same name is defined. For every BMC Impact Service Model Editor test environment, all existing aliases are mapped to the test cell as chosen in BMC Impact Service Model Editor for the test environment. For advanced staging and testing environments, the user is responsible to define in
SIM_CellAlias with datasetId BMC.ASSET an assignment for every used cell alias.
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The attribute EnvId should be set to the id of the publish environment. The attribute CellAlias should be set to the alias. The attribute CellName should be set to the name of a cell that is registered in BMC Impact Portal.

Different cell aliases can be assigned to the same cell. A cell can only be assigned to one alias in one publish environment. A cell alias with attribute CellAlias not set will be used for all CI's that have no HomeCellAlias set. This way the HomeCellAlias needs not to be set on CI's that need to be published to the default cell of an environment.

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Creating additional publish environments

If all data of an environment needs to be published to one cell, this cell can be defined on the publish environment via the parameter HomeCell. In this case, every CI will be sent to the environment's cell regardless the value of its HomeCellAlias attribute, enabling you to send the production service model to different cells and to one simulation cell without having to define cell aliases for the simulation publish environment.

Creating additional publish environments
This section contains examples of commands to create publish environments in two different scenarios: creating a production publish environment and creating a production publish environment as well as a simulation publish environment.
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Creating a production publish environment

To create an additional publish environment, execute the following command:
pinit -e environmentID open

The following figure is an example of using the penv command to create a publish environment. Figure 120 Using penv to create a publish environment
penv -e dept1

In this example, a publish environment is created with the environment id dept1. This environment' s data instances are in the BMC Atrium CMDB data set BMC.ASSET.dept1, by default a regular data set. A master copy of the published instances is kept by the BMC Impact Publishing Server in the BMC Atrium CMDB data set BMC.IMPACT.dept1.
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Creating a simulation publish environment

To create a simulation publish environment, as well as a production publish environment, using a production asset dataset, execute the following command:
penv -e SIMULATION -p “AssetDataSet=BMC.ASSET” -p “HomeCell=simulation”

To create a simulation publish environment with an overlay asset dataset:
penv -e SIMULATION -p “AssetDataSetType=Overlay” -p “HomeCell=simulation” -p “AutomatedPublish=T”

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Configuring the creation of a publish environment
This section contains information about how to configure the creation of a publish environment. The parameters for opening a publish environment are contained in Table 91. Table 91 Parameters for opening a publish environment
Function specifies the asset dataset name returns two possible values: Overlay or Regular gives the id of the underlying dataset for an overlay asset dataset defines whether automated publication is enabled or disabled on the publish environment. The default value is T, except for overlay publish environments. describes the environment gives the name of the environment specifies to which cell to publish. If HomeCell is set, the whole service model will be published to the given cell. In this case, CellAliases are not used. By default, this parameter is not set. PublishModeMgmtData

Parameter name AssetDataSetId AssetDataSetType AssetUnderlyingDataSetId AutomatedPublish

EnvDesc EnvName HomeCell

returns two possible values: Overlay or Current.
If the asset dataset is an overlay dataset, PublishModeMgmtData defines whether (with respect to management data instances) it should be approached as overlay (value Overlay) or as regular dataset (value Current).

PublishModeServiceModel

returns two possible values: Overlay or Current.
If the asset dataset is an overlay dataset, PublishModeServiceModel defines whether (with respect to components and impact relationships) it should be approached as overlay (value Overlay) or as regular dataset (value Current).

The BMC Impact Service Model Editor test publish environments have an overlay asset data set, with the production data set as underlying data set.
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To have all management data instances of the production dataset in the test environment, publish mode Overlay is used for PublishModeMgmtData. To be able to cut down the test to a limited number of components and impact relationships the publish mode Current is used for PublishModeServiceModel.

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Enabling automated publication

Enabling automated publication
When the BMC Impact Publishing Server is running in automated mode, termination of a reconciliation job will trigger an automated publication on those publish environments for which automated publication is enabled via the parameter AutomatedPublish. By default, automated publication is enabled on publish environments with regular asset datasets. Thus, when running in automated mode, a promotion from BMC Impact Service Model Editor will trigger an automated publish of the production service model. On publish environments with overlay asset datasets and an overlay publish mode, automated publication is by default disabled. Thus, when running in automated mode, a promotion from SME will not trigger an automated publish of SME's test service model.

Initializing a cell
The reinitialize action is performed with the CLI command pinit. Reinitialization deletes all existing service model data from the cell, creates a new copy from the BMC Atrium CMDB impact data set, and copies it to the cells. Typically, you use the reinitialize action (or pinit command) only when:
s s s

a cell is reinitialized or reinstalled (restart the cell with the -i option) a cell must be restarted for recovery purposes service model data in the cell is no longer in sync with the data in the BMC Atrium CMDB impact data set

When adding a new cell the BMC Impact Publishing Server will automatically initialize it with the service model management data. When you initialize the cells, the data in the impact data set (like BMC.IMPACT.PROD) is sent by the BMC Impact Publishing Server to the cells.

WARNING
When a cell is initialized, existing events will no longer be associated with components. This action overwrites data in the cell, including status; status information for component instances is lost.

To initialize a cell, execute the following CLI command:
pinit -n cellName

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Initializing the BMC Atrium CMDB with SIM data

For more information on reinitializing a cell, see “pinit—Initialize a cell with the BMC Atrium CMDB impact service model” on page 634.

Initializing the BMC Atrium CMDB with SIM data
SIM requires management data for successful operations. The production dataset is initialized with service model management data at the time of installation. For publish environments other than those with an overlay asset dataset with BMC.ASSET as the underlying dataset, initialization is required to be able to successfully perform a publication. Although possible, reinitialization of the production environment should in principle never be necessary. When you initialize a certain publish environment (production, test or another)
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s s

s

instances in the asset and in the impact data set of that environment will be initialized. existing instances in the impact data set are removed. existing instances in the asset data set are either removed, or kept but moved outof model, depending on the InitEffectively configuration parameter. new initial instances are copied from the initialization source.

For more information on initializing a publish environment, see “penv—Set up test environments” on page 628.

Configuring the initialization
Configuration parameters of the penv CLI command can be used on the command line by using the -p option, or in the CLI configuration file penv.conf. The penv.conf file is located in Windows: %MCELL_HOME%/etc/penv.conf UNIX: $MCELL_HOME/etc/penv.conf The parameters for initializing are:
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InitEffectivelyMgmtData—determines which management data instances are

removed from the BMC Atrium CMDB during initialization or reinitialization, based on the value in the SeviceModelSet class attribute

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ServiceModelSet attribute values

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InitEffectivelyServiceModel—determines which service model component and

impact relationship instances are removed from the BMC Atrium CMDB during initialization or reinitialization, based on the value assigned in the SeviceModelSet class attribute
s

InitMgmtData—specifies whether management data is initialized InitServiceModel—specifies whether service model data is initialized SourceBarocMgmtData—specifies the BAROC files from which the default/initial

s

s

management data instances are copied
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SourceBarocServiceModel—specifies the BAROC files from which initial

components and impact relationships are copied
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SourceEnvMgmtData—specifies publish environment. From its data sets the

default/initial management data instances are copied
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SourceEnvServiceModel—specifies the publish environment. From its data sets the

initial components and impact relationships are copied

ServiceModelSet attribute values
All SIM classes in the CDM have a ServiceModelSet attribute. Table 92
Value IN

ServiceModelSet attribute values
Description Value indicates the data instance is IN in the service model. In-model component instances are published to the cell. indicates the data instance is OUT not in the service model. Outof-model instances are not published to the cell OUT_OF_IN indicates the data instance was in the model but has since been removed from the model. At the next publication, the instance is removed from the cell.

OUT

OUT_OF_IN

For an impact relationship, the ServiceModelSet value is calculated from the ServiceModelSet values assigned to its two component instances and is determined in the manner shown in Table 93 on page 461.

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Table 93
Component Instance 1
IN

Determination of ServiceModelSet value for an impact relationship
Component Instance 2
IN IN OUT_OF_IN OUT OUT_OF_IN IN OUT OUT OUT

Resulting ServiceModelSet value for impact relationship
IN OUT_OF_IN

OUT_OF_IN IN OUT_OF_IN OUT OUT IN OUT

The determination is:
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s

s

If both instances are assigned IN, then the ServiceModelSet value for the impact relationship is IN. If either or both are assigned OUT_OF_IN, then the relationship is defined as OUT_OF_IN. If either or both are assigned OUT, then the relationship is defined as OUT.

InitEffectively parameters
The InitEffectively parameters determine the retention of the existing instances in the asset dataset when initializing. Only the IN and OUT values for ServiceModelSet attribute are taken into consideration.
InitEffectivelyMgmtData relates to management data instances. InitEffectivelyServiceModel relates to component instances and impact relationship

instances. Keeping existing data may be impossible when the instances in the BAROC file have mc_udid value set. In BMC Atrium CMDB the DatasetId and the ReconciliationIdentity needs to be unique.

InitEffectivelyMgmtData parameter settings and their results
Table 94 lists the possible values that the InitEffectivelyMgmtData configuration parameter can have and the subsequent actions taken during BMC Atrium CMDB reinitialization.

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InitEffectively parameters

Table 94

InitEffectivelyMgmtData parameter settings and results
Resulting actions on asset management data during Atrium CMDB reinitialization... If set to this default value, all current management data instances are removed from the BMC Atrium CMDB. Management data instances with the ServiceModelSet attribute value of IN or OUT_OF_IN are removed from the BMC Atrium CMDB. These actions occur:
s

InitEffectivelyMgmtData parameter setting InitEffectivelyMgmtData=IN,OUT

InitEffectivelyMgmtData=IN

InitEffectivelyMgmtData=OUT

Management data instances with ServiceModelSet attribute value of OUT are removed from the BMC Atrium CMDB. Management data instances with the ServiceModelSet attribute value of IN or OUT_OF_IN have their attribute value reset to OUT.

s

InitEffectivelyMgmtData=

If set to an empty list, these actions occur
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Existing management data instances are kept in the BMC Atrium CMDB. Instances with the ServiceModelSet attribute value of IN or OUT_OF_IN have their values reset to OUT.

s

Generally, you do not move management data in and out of model. Therefore, you do not want to keep existing management data instances. As a matter of fact, some of the default management data instances have a mc_udid set, which makes it impossible to keep them. In order to keep a backup of custom management data instances, useful in case re-initialization of the production environment is required, export them to BAROC files. This can be done with mquery. The default management data BAROC files are stored in BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/Impact/pubserv/etc/k b/data/.load.

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Source Parameters

InitEffectivelyServiceModel parameter settings and their results
Table 95 lists the possible values that the InitEffectivelyServiceModel configuration parameter can have and the subsequent actions taken during BMC Atrium CMDB reinitialization. Table 95 InitEffectivelyServiceModel parameter settings and results
Resulting actions on service model asset component instances and impact relationships during BMC Atrium CMDB reinitialization If set to an empty list (default), these actions occur
s

InitEffectivelyServiceModel parameter setting InitEffectivelyServiceModel=

All service model component or impact relationship instances are not removed from the BMC Atrium CMDB. Components and impact relationships with the ServiceModelSet attribute value of IN or OUT_OF_IN have their attribute value reset to OUT.

s

The default initialization does not contain any component or impact relationship. Generally, when reinitializing you don't want to lose components and impact relationships that were already defined or that were detected by a discovery tool. When reinitializing you will need to browse the existing components and decide if they still need to be in model. InitEffectivelyServiceModel=IN Components and impact relationships with the ServiceModelSet attribute value of IN or OUT_OF_IN are removed from the BMC Atrium CMDB. All components and impact relationships, irrespective of the value of ServiceModelSet being IN, OUT_OF_IN or OUT, are removed from the BMC Atrium CMDB.

InitEffectivelyServiceModel=IN, OUT

Source Parameters
The initial data can be from two sources:
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BAROC files, or another publish environment.

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Example scenario for working with baroc files

By default, the source for the production publish environment (BMC.ASSET and BMC.IMPACT.PROD) are the BAROC files in BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/Impact/pubserv/etc/kb/data/.load. For other publish environments the production environment is the source. If the source are BAROC files, then the baroc instances are copied to the asset dataset and the impact dataset. If the source is a publish environment, then the instances from the impact dataset of the source publish environment are copied to the impact dataset of the publish environment that is being initialized. Likewise, the instances from the asset dataset of the source publish environment are copied to the asset dataset of the publish environment that is being initialized. In copying to the asset dataset, the type (Overlay or Regular) and the publish mode (Overlay or Current) is taken into account. If the asset dataset is an overlay dataset and the publish mode is overlay and the initialization's source is the underlying asset dataset, then effectively no copies are taken.

Example scenario for working with baroc files
In this scenario, the goal is to initialize the publish environment for “dept1” with the default management data instances and with a number of components and impact relationships.

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Example scenario for working with baroc files

The following BAROC file, sm.baroc, defines the components and impact relationships of “dept1”: Figure 121 Example BAROC file defining components and impact relationships
BMC_BusinessProcess; mc_udid=test1; Name=test1; OwnerName='DSM PSR/I Lab'; OwnerContact='713.918.8800'; Description='BMC DSM - PSR and Interoperability Lab Test Business Process'; StatusModel=STANDARD; HomeCell=lopud; END BMC_BusinessService; mc_udid=test1_S0101; Name=test1_S0101; OwnerName='DSM PSR/I Lab'; OwnerContact='713.918.8800'; HomeCell=lopud; END BMC_ComputerSystem; mc_udid=test1_S0101_N01; Type='WINDOWS_SYSTEM'; Name=test1_S0101_N01; OwnerName='DSM PSR/I Lab'; OwnerContact='713.918.8800'; Description=Computer; HostName=test1_S0101_N01; HomeCell=lopud; END BMC_Application; mc_udid=test1_S0101_N01_A01; Name=test1_S0101_N01_A01; Type=app_type1; OwnerName='DSM PSR/I Lab'; OwnerContact='713.918.8800'; Description=Application; HomeCell=lopud; END BMC_Impact; mc_udid=test1_obj1<-obj2; provider_id=test1_S0101; consumer_id=test1; PropagationModel=DIRECT; provider_home_cell=lopud; consumer_home_cell=lopud; END

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BMC Atrium CMDB purges and hard deletions

The following tasks are performed:
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The sm.baroc file is placed in a new subdirectory sm of BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/Impact/pubserv/etc/kb. One line containing sm is included in the .load file. A cell alias is created for the “dept1” environment for the HomeCell specified in the BAROC file. The following command is executed:
penv -e dept1 -p "SourceBarocServiceModel=etc/kb/sm/.load" init -v

s

s

s

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The cell for “dept1” is running and will be initialized immediately when initializing the BMC Atrium CMDB.

When the initialization is terminated, the cell will have the components and the impact relationships.

BMC Atrium CMDB purges and hard deletions
It is recommended that instances are soft-deleted in BMC Atrium CMDB (MarkAsDeleted=Yes), until the BMC Impact Publishing Server has been able to process their deletion. Ensure that you have retention rules on the Reconciliation's Purge activities for SIM classes. Occasionally, when instances have been purged or hard deleted without being published, the BMC Impact Publishing Server will need to look after the hard deleted instances and publish them to avoid synchronization problems between cells and BMC Atrium CMDB data. For automated publishing, if CIs are purged from the asset dataset by a reconciliation’s purge activity, then the automated publisher will trigger, deleting the instances from the cells. For manual publishing, the publish CLI supports two new parameters: Purge and Merge. To have the BMC Impact Publishing Server look up instances that have been hard deleted (purged) from the asset dataset, and delete the instances from the cells, execute the following command: publish -p “Purge=T” By default, Purge=F and Merge=T.

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Troubleshooting publication failures

Troubleshooting publication failures
This section contains information on troubleshooting problems with the BMC Impact Publishing Server and publication failures.

BMC Impact Publishing Server service or daemon fails to start
Only one BMC Impact Publishing Server may be running at any given time. This is controlled in the log/ps.lock file, which is updated with a timestamp every minute by the BMC Impact Publishing Server as it runs. If the Impact Publish Server is stopped gracefully, then ps.lock is removed. If the BMC Impact Publishing Server service or daemon fails to start and displays the error message
Unable to launch BMC Impact Publishing Server. Another BMC Impact Publishing Server is already running

remove the ps.lock file in the following directory: BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/Impact/pubserv/log/ and restart the BMC Impact Publishing Server service (or daemon).

No publication after successful promotion
Even if promotion is successful, publication might still fail. Promotion and publication are asynchronous processes. If the Promotion Results dialog box in BMC Impact Service Model Editor indicates that the promotion was successful, but data does not appear in the BMC Impact Portal or BMC Impact Explorer, follow the guidelines in this section to troubleshoot the problem.

Verify automated publishing mode
Verify that the BMC Impact Publishing Server is running in automated mode with the CLI command psstat. If the psstat command returns Started - Automated mode, automated publisher is up and running.

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BMC Impact Publishing Server doesn't reply to any requests

If the psstat command indicates that the BMC Impact Publishing Server is not running in automated mode, it may be in manual mode. This might have occurred because the configuration parameter AutomatedStartMode in pserver.conf is manual, or because someone has switched the mode (pscontrol manual). If the BMC Impact Publishing Server is running in manual mode, you can request a publication using the CLI command publish. To switch to automated mode, execute the CLI command pscontrol automated.

Verify the Notify ARDBC plugin
Follow these steps to verify that the NotifyARDBC plugin is running:

To verify that the NotifyARDBC plugin is running 1 Log on to Remedy User. 2 Open the form NOTIFY:protocols and retrieve entries.
You should get one entry with version 1.

3 Open the form NOTIFY:servers and retrieve entries.
You should get one entry. If the port is not accessible for the BMC Impact Publishing Server to open a TCP/IP connection, verify the installation of the Notify ARDBC plugin. The port should be open for the BMC Impact Publishing Server to open a TCP/IP connection.

BMC Impact Publishing Server doesn't reply to any requests
The client and server use the JMS service of BMC Impact Portal for communication. Normally, the BMC Impact Publishing Server restores when the JMS service drops. If the JMS service remains down, the BMC Impact Publishing Server stops with a critical error. However, occasionally the communication is not restored and the BMC Impact Publishing Server doesn't stop, and the ps.trace file contains repeated warnings from org.jboss.mq.SpyJMSException. To resolve this situation, 1. Verify that BMC Impact Portal is running properly (or restart the BMC Impact Portal). 2. Restart the BMC Impact Publishing Server.
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Working with publication logs
This section contains general guidelines to remember when working with publication logs.
s

s

s

s

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After you submit a promotion request, the Promotion in Progress dialog box opens automatically, enabling you to monitor the progress of the promotion request. However, promotion results dialogs only report success or failure of a promotion and do not offer information about publication status. More detailed information about each publication is available in BMC Impact Publishing Server log files. A log exists for every publish request containing detailed information as to why publication failed and can be consulted to diagnose a publication failure. All publish logs are available in BMC Impact Service Model Editor's publish history. Publish logs can also be retrieved via the CLI command plog -s <requestId> | plogdisplay -@ (see “plog—Obtaining the XML log for a request” on page 637). It is recommended that you give every promotion a unique description because promotion descriptions are found in the publication log and will make locating each publish easier. Another way to find the correct publication in the log is to use the promotion id. BMC Impact Publishing Server includes detailed messages from the different components (such as BMC Impact Portal, BMC Atrium CMDB, and BMC Impact Managers) it communicates with. To understand and troubleshoot these messages, consult the documentation of those components.

Viewing promotion and publication history
At any time, you can use the Promote and Publish History command to review previous promotion and publication information, including failures. The Promote and Publish History command displays the status and date and time of requests. Information in the Publication errors section of the Publish tab can help you troubleshoot publication failures.

To view promotion history 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools => Promote and Publish History. 2 To view promotion details, select the Promotion tab, then select the promotion for
which you want to see details in the Promote History table area. The list of recent promotions is in reverse chronological order, that is, the most recent is listed first.

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Working with publication logs

To view publication history 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools => Promote and Publish History. 2 To view publication details, select the Publish tab, then select the publication for
which you want to see details in the Publication History table area. The list of recent publications is in reverse chronological order, that is, the most recent is listed first.

Viewing publication history details
This section contains information on viewing publication history details.

To view publication history details 1 From the menu bar, choose Tools => Promote and Publish History.
The list of recent publications is in reverse chronological order, that is, the most recent is listed first. By default, 100 publication log files are saved; when the 101st log is saved, the first log is deleted. All BMC Impact Publishing Server requests are counted (not only publish and initialization, but also classinfo (for example, export) requests). You can change the RequestHistorySize parameter in pserver.conf to modify the default number of logs saved.

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Figure 122 Reviewing previous promotion and publication requests

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Diagnosing publication failures

2 To view publication details, select the Publication tab, then select the publication
for which you want to see details in the Publication History table area.

A On the Publication Details tab, review the detailed information for the
publication you selected. Failures are displayed in red. If the failure is the result of a particular component instance, the component type and component name are included. To open a View with the component instance, select the failure and click Open in New View.

B On the Publication Errors tab (available only if there were failures associated
with the selected publication), review the failure information. You can sort on any column and, if the column width limit truncates the text, the tooltip displays the complete text string.

C In the Recommended Action area, review the action to correct the problem with
publish.

NOTE
You can replace the action recommended by BMC Software, add to it, or modify it by editing the pslog_error_solutions.properties file located in the BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME\appserver\websdk\tools\jboss\server\all\conf\resourc es\en_US\smsConsoleServer directory on the server running BMC Portal.

3 To close the dialog box, click Close.

Diagnosing publication failures
When a publication attempt fails, examine the details using the Publish History menu command (Tools => Publish History). Table 96 describes BMC Impact Publishing Server failure messages, what causes the problem, and what to do to correct the problem.

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Table 96

BMC Impact Publishing Server failure messages (part 1 of 6)
Cause Publication failure Action Use the -v option (publish -v) to return both generic and detailed (verbose) failure messages. Verify that the target cell instance is running. Restart it if necessary. Also verify that the cell’s location and encryption key are registered with BMC Impact Portal.

Failure message Publish returns generic failure message, such as Publish validation of Impact Manager failed Connection to IM cellName is not open OR Connection to IM cellName dropped

The BMC Impact Publishing Server is not able to connect to the BMC Impact Manager or the connection was dropped.

The minimum supported protocol version is 7. IM is not publish enabled.

The version of the target cell Uninstall the earlier version and instance is earlier than the required install the appropriate version. version. The ServiceModelPublish parameter in the $MCELL_HOME/etc/mcell.conf file is set to No. Reset the ServiceModelPublish parameter to Yes and restart the cell. Also, reinitialize the cell. (The cell’s service model may have been modified directly, that is, not using the BMC Atrium CMDB, while it was not publish enabled.) Use the Remedy User tool to fix read/write permissions. You may also need to run the task Synchronize User Groups from the BMC Impact Portal superadmin interface. In BMC Impact Service Model Editor, launch Tools => Export Cell Meta Data to generate an up-todate mc_sm_baroc.object file. Restart the BMC Portal. Replace the existing mc_sm_baroc.object file of the target cell in the $MCELL_HOME/etc/CellName/ kb/classes directory. Recompile the cell’s Knowledge Base, and restart the cell.

Publish validation of CMDB failed. The problem is with the CMDBRowLevelSecurity and CMDBWriteSecurity fields. They No user group defined with id have values that are not defined as 16296. id for groups in BMC Remedy AR System server. Classinfo is not synchronized. For various reasons, the class definitions in the BMC Atrium CMDB can become out of sync with the class definitions of published service model of the cells. For example, a class may be modified in the BMC Atrium CMDB after the service model is published to the cell.

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Diagnosing publication failures

Table 96

BMC Impact Publishing Server failure messages (part 2 of 6)
Cause Action A service component instance with The service model in the cell is the same mc_udid is already most likely not in sync with the published in the cell. master copy kept in the BMC Atrium CMDB impact data set. Reinitialize the cell. If reinitializing the cell fails because of invalid data, then the master copy is invalid. You will need to reinitialize the BMC Atrium CMDB.

Failure message Unique data identifier already in use.

Unique data identifier not in use.

The deletion of a component instance with a mc_udid that does not exist in the cell was requested by the BMC Impact Publishing Server.

The service model in the cell is most likely not in sync with the master copy kept in the BMC Atrium CMDB impact data set. Reinitialize the cell. If reinitializing the cell fails because of invalid data, then the master copy is invalid. You will need to reinitialize the BMC Atrium CMDB.

No user group defined with id {0}

In the BMC Atrium CMDB, a CI's Modify the CIs to point only to securities point to BMC Remedy existing user groups. AR System user group ids. In the BMC IM, a CI's securities point to BMC Impact Portal guids. BMC Impact Publishing Server maps the BMC Remedy AR System user group ids to BMC Impact Portal guids, via the user group info found in the AR form groups. This error typically occurs when
s

more than one BMC Impact Portal points to one BMC Atrium CMDB. Such a configuration is not supported.

s

user groups are not synchronized between BMC Impact Portal and BMC Remedy AR System server.
Define the cellAliases correctly.

The cell alias is not mapped to a cell name in the current environment

The attribute HomeCellAlias has value for which no entry exists in SIM_CellAlias with DatasetId BMC.ASSET and given EnvId.

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Table 96

BMC Impact Publishing Server failure messages (part 3 of 6)
Cause A CI of the class with the given id has ServiceModelSet IN or OUT_OF_IN, although the class is not flagged as a SIM class. Only instances of SIM classes should have ServiceModelSet IN or OUT_OF_IN. Action To make the class a SIM class, follow these steps: 1. Give it custom property 100050 via Remedy User's Class Manager Console. 2. Export the modified SIM class information with the CLI command pclassinfo -x. 3. Update the Knowledge Base of the cells and recompile. For more information, see “Adding new classes to the BMC Atrium CMDB” on page 436.

Failure message The component has a class id BMC_TRANSACTION that does not correspond with a SIM class.

Class info is not synchronized

Class definitions need to be the To synchronize the class same in BMC Atrium CMDB and definitions, follow these steps: in the cells.
1. Export the SIM class definitions from BMC Atrium CMDB to a .baroc file with the CLI command pclassinfo -x. 2. Distribute the file mc_sm_object.baroc to the cells (recompile the cells' KB and restart the cells). This error typically happens when an install includes a BMC Atrium CMDB extension that adds new SIM classes/attributes. Default cell classes are in sync with the SIM CMDB extension.

IM {0} failed to launch SMM (Service Model Manager)

In a cell's trace file you find the message Service Model Manager process ({0}) not active within expected delay. Please verify.

Increase the value of ServiceModelManagerStartTimeO ut.

The cell does fork a Service Model Manager (SMM) process. The mcell.conf parameter
ServiceModelManagerStartTime Out=60 gives the timeout.

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Table 96

BMC Impact Publishing Server failure messages (part 4 of 6)
Cause Action
s s

Failure message

Component alias "{0}" for This message may occur if two CIs component "{1}" is already used by have the same alias. component "{2}"

Make sure all CIs have unique aliases.

Publish the purge via CLI
publish -p "Purge=T"

See “BMC Atrium CMDB purges and hard deletions” on page 466 for more information. Consumer/Provider component with mc_udid {0} is not defined This message may occur if
s s

Make sure ServiceModelSet of impact relationship is correct .

an impact relationship is pointing to a non-existent CI. the impact relationship has ServiceModelSet IN, but consumer/provider has ServiceModelSet OUT_OF_IN or OUT

Such problems may occur when two promotions follow very quickly and the first promotion adds a relationship and the second promotion moves a CI out of model. Using automated publish for two promotions will prevent this failure.

Unknown home cell "{0}" for shadow component

The mcell.dir of the consumer's cell is not defining the provider's cell.

Correct mcell.dir.

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Table 96

BMC Impact Publishing Server failure messages (part 5 of 6)
Cause Action

Failure message

Provider_home_cell ({0}) is remote This error can occur as a result of a Correctly register the ports of the cells. but component {1} is local typo when registering cells. For example, cell X runs on port X, and cell Y runs on port Y. However, port X is mistakenly entered for both cells. While cell X is running, a provider component with cell name Y is sent to cell on port X, thus the cell X impact relationship is sent to the cell with name Y, thus
s s

the cell on port X is component local (same cell as relationship) provider_home_cell has value Y, so the provider_home_cell is remote (other cell as relationship)

The issue originates from the fact that although the CI is sent to cell Y, in reality, it is sent to cell X because that cell is listening on the (erroneous) port (X) of cell Y. Unique data identifier not in use This error may occur when the deletion or modification of a CI with udid that does not exist is requested. Such a situation typically happens when the service model in a cell is not in sync with service model in (the impact dataset of) the BMC Atrium CMDB, typically when a previous publish failed because of failure while applying publish on cell or BMC Atrium CMDB, or when cell has been restarted with id. IM {0} failed to upload service model from SMM This error message displays after a Re-initialize the cell and publish failure in the second phase of two- again (to avoid subsequent phase commit. publishes failing with the message "Unique data identifier not/already in use").

Reinitialize service models by executing the CLI command pinit -n cellName. If this solution fails, the data in the BMC Atrium CMDB may be invalid.

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Another publish request is ongoing

Table 96

BMC Impact Publishing Server failure messages (part 6 of 6)
Cause For instance, you will receive error messages when the number of CI's exceeds the limited number available with a trial license. These failures occur in the second phase of the two-phase commit. Action Re-initialize cell and publish again (to avoid following publishes failing with "Unique data identifier not/already in use").

Failure message

You may receive detailed failure messages the from BMC Atrium CMDB.

Another publish request is ongoing. The environment is not registered. Error with ids/udids for partial publish, i.e. publish of selected instances

See next section, “Another publish request is ongoing.”

See next section, “Another publish request is ongoing.”

Another publish request is ongoing
The messages in this section may be received when the BMC Impact Publishing Server does not accept or begin processing the request. You may receive the following messages:
s s s

Another publish request is ongoing. The environment is not registered. Error with ids/udids for partial publish, i.e. publish of selected instances.

Message: Another publish request is ongoing
The BMC Impact Publishing Server executes exactly one publication at a time (per environment). If you request a new publication via the CLI publish command while another is ongoing you will receive the message Another publish request is ongoing. If you receive such a message unexpectedly, verify whether the previous publication is still running. If a publication hangs (because of an uncached exception, which can be found in tmp/ps.err) then all following publications will result in error messages. In the latter case, contact support.

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Monitoring BMC Impact Publishing Server with BMC Impact Manager events

Monitoring BMC Impact Publishing Server with BMC Impact Manager events
This section describes how to monitor the BMC Impact Publishing Server using BMC Impact Manager events.

Generating BMC Impact Publishing Server log information and events
The BMC Impact Publishing Server creates status, error, and connection information that describes the internal state of the BMC Impact Publishing Server and its connections to the BMC Atrium CMDB, BMC Impact Portal, and BMC Impact Manager. It can also be sent to a BMC Impact Manager, which generates events that can be monitored in BMC Portal and BMC Impact Explorer. Messages with a priority higher than INFO can be sent to a cell. The BMC Impact Publishing Server also creates request events that can be viewed in BMC IX and BMC Impact Portal to monitor the requests handled by the BMC Impact Publishing Server. To send events to a BMC Impact Manager, you make changes in configuration files. Table 97 describes the types of events with an example, the configuration file for each, and the location of the configuration file. Table 97
Type of event

BMC Impact Publishing Server event generation
Example event Configuration Configuration file location file name on the BMC Portal computer pserver.conf
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/impact/ pubserv/etc

BMC Impact control—status events generated when BMC Impact Publishing Server Publishing Server starts or started stops in a controlled way

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Table 97
Type of event

BMC Impact Publishing Server event generation
Example event Configuration Configuration file location file name on the BMC Portal computer pserver.conf
BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/impact/pu bserv/etc

serverName connection connection—events failure. generated when the BMC Impact Publishing Server makes a connection with one of its surrounding components error—events that indicate there is a problem with the correct functioning of the BMC Impact Publishing Server serverName exception occurred: xxx

pserver.conf log4j.xml

BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/appserver/ websdk/tools/jboss/server/all/conf

To generate BMC Impact Publishing Server events 1 In the pserver.conf file, set the ImIpsEvents parameter to the name of the cell that
will receive the events. In the example, events are sent to the cell named “arwad.”

EXAMPLE
In the relevant section of the pserver.conf file:
#-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------#Events #-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------#Events to track Publsihing Server’s operation and errors are sent to IpsEventsIM #If only the cellName is given, then the cell’s settings are retrieved from the cell directory #ImIpsEvents=<cellName> | [<cellName>@<host>/<port>#<encryptionKey> #ImIpsEvents= #By default no IPS_EVENTS are generated ImIpsEvents=arwad #Operation events of the classes listed in IpsEventClasses are created. #By default events of all IPS_EVENT concrete subclasses are created #IPSEventClasses=IPS_START,IPS_STOP,IPS_CONNECT,IPS_PUBLISH,IPS_CLASSINFO #Enabling of error events (IPS_ERROR) is to be configured in ps’s log4j.properties

If you enter an incorrect cell name (a cell that is not registered in BMC Impact Portal), then no events are generated. In ps.trace you will find the error message
Unable to report ips events to im xxxx: IM xxxx is not registered in BIP.

2 For error events only, in the log4j.properties file, uncomment the following line by
removing the # at the beginning of the line.
#log4j.logger.com.bmc.sms.ps=DEBUG, IPSERROREVENTS

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Enabling generation of BMC Impact Manager events

EXAMPLE
In the relevant section of the log4j.properties file:
# Print messages of level DEBUG or above in the package #log4j.logger.com.bmc.sms.imapi=DEBUG #log4j.logger.com.bmc.sms.imapi.nls=DEBUG #log4j.logger.com.bmc.sms.imapi.gw=DEBUG #log4j.logger.com.bmc.sms.imobject=DEBUG log4j.logger.com.bmc.sms.ps=DEBUG, IPSERROREVENTS

Enabling generation of BMC Impact Manager events
s

To enable generation of BMC Impact Manager events, the configuration parameter IPSEventsIM in pserver.conf must point to a running cell. All events for monitoring BMC Impact Publishing Server are found in the collector By Location - System - Publishing Server, and can be viewed in BMC IX. By default, all operational events are generated, which include events of the classes IPS_START, IPS_STOP, IPS_CONNECT, IPS_PUBLISH and IPS_CLASSINFO. Besides operational events, which monitor the operations of the BMC Impact Publishing Server, error events can also be generated. To enable error events (IPS_ERROR class), uncomment the line
log4j.logger.com.bmc.sms.ps=DEBUG, IPSERROREVENTS in log4j.properties.

s

s

s

Event slot descriptions
This section contains descriptions of classes and slots that are used for monitoring BMC Impact Publishing Server.

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Event slot descriptions

IPS_CONNECT—Impact Publishing Server Connect
IPS_CONNECT contains events related to BMC Impact Publishing Server connections. Table 98 contains descriptions of the slots of this class. Table 98
Slot name destination

IPS_CONNECT slots
Slot label (as seen in BMC IX) Description Destination

type of the component that is being connected: BMC Impact Portal, BMC Atrium CMDB, BMC IM, or SMM (Service Model Manager)
name of the component that is being connected login used to connect

dst_location dst_name dst_user ips_request_id

Destination Location host/port Destination Name Destination User Request ID

the id of the request sent to the BMC Impact Publishing Server. The connection is required for the processing of this request
SCS (Success) when connection was successful, FLR (Failure) when connection failed

result

Result

Figure 123 on page 483 shows the connection events of IPS_CONNECT as displayed in BMC IX.

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Event slot descriptions

Figure 123 BMC Impact Publishing Server connection events as displayed in BMC IX

IPS_REQUEST—BMC Impact Publishing Server request
IPS_REQUEST contains events relating to information from a request. Table 99 contains descriptions of the slots of this class. Table 99
Slot name client_data

IPS_REQUEST slots
Slot label (as seen in BMC IX) Description Client Data Data coming from the client. For automated publishes resulting from a BMC Impact Service Model Editor promotion, this slot displays the ReconJobRunId and the PromotionId.

description

Description

the description that comes with the request. For automated publishes resulting from a BMC Impact Service Model Editor promotion, this slot displays the BMC Impact Service Model Editor promotion comment. For publishes from the CLI, this slot displays the description entered via the -s option.

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Event slot descriptions

Table 99
Slot name request_id

IPS_REQUEST slots
Slot label (as seen in BMC IX) Description Request ID

request_msg

Request Message

the id of the request sent to the BMC Impact Publishing Server. This id is necessary to retrieve the request log via a local BMC IX action, useful in diagnosing publication failures. See “Diagnosing publication failures” on page 472. the content of the request (for example: EnvId=PROD; Queue=T). This is the internal communication protocol, useful for debugging. initially UNK (unknown). Set to SCS (success) or FLR (failure) when processing is terminated. short terms describing the success or the failure of the handled request. For example, Request failed: Publish verification of IM(s) failed. More detailed failure messages are to be found in the request log. See “Diagnosing publication failures” on page 472.
enables you to follow the status of a request. When the request is sent to the BMC Impact Publishing Server, the severity is INFO. When the BMC Impact Publishing Server has finished the processing of this request, it updates the severity of the event: OK if the request is successful, WARNING if the request failed. the user id of the requestor. For automated publishes resulting from a BMC Impact Service Model Editor promotion, this slot displays the BMC Impact Service Model Editor user. For publishes from the CLI, this slot displays the user of the CLI or publish@hostname if the CLI is run locally without authentication.

request_result

Request Result

result_msg

Result Message

severity

Severity

user_id

User ID

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Event slot descriptions

IPS_PUBLISH—BMC Impact Publishing Server publish request
IPS_PUBLISH contains events relating to information from a publishing request. Table 100 contains descriptions of the slots of this class. Table 100 IPS_PUBLISH slots
Slot name publish_type Slot label (as seen in BMC IX) Description Publish Request Type possible values include: init, publish, or selected_publish.
s s

s

init is displayed when publish request is an initialization as with the pinit cli publish is displayed when the publish request is a delta/incremental publication as with automated publish or with the publish CLI command selected_publish is displayed when a publish request is a publication of selected objects, as with the publish -d CLI command

env_id

Environment ID

ID of publish environment:
s s

PROD for production environment TEST.user.1 for BMC Impact Service Model Editor test environment

Figure 124 on page 486 shows the publish request events of IPS_PUBLISH as displayed in BMC IX.

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Event slot descriptions

Figure 124 BMC Impact Publishing Server publish request events as displayed in BMC IX

IPS_CLASSINFO—BMC Impact Publishing Server classInfo request
IPS_CLASSINFO contains events relating to information from a classinfo request. Table 101 contains descriptions of the slots of this class. Table 101 IPS_CLASSINFO slots
Slot name classinfo_type Slot label (as seen in BMC IX) Description Class Info Request Type value can be validation or export
s

s

validation is displayed when the classInfo request happens with the pclassinfo -n cellname CLI command export is displayed when the classInfo request happens with BMC Impact Service Model Editor export meta data functions, or with the pclassinfo -x CLI command

Figure 125 on page 487 shows the classinfo events of IPS_CLASSINFO as displayed in BMC IX.

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BMC Impact Publishing Server error events

Figure 125 BMC Impact Publishing Server classInfo request events as displayed in BMC IX

BMC Impact Publishing Server error events
This section contains information on BMC Impact Publishing Server error events.

Unable to start automated publishing
If after switching to automated mode, you receive the following error event:
Unable to start automated publishing. ERROR-8755 The specified plugin does not exists. (BMC.ARDBC.NOTIFY).

the NotifyARDBC plugin may not be loaded when starting in automated mode.

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Trace files

Trace files
The following files can be used to help debug problems with publishing.
s

ps.trace

The file %PS_HOME%/tmp/pcli/ps.trace contains tracing information. By default, only trace information of level WARN or higher is logged. Enable debug tracing in %PS_HOME%/etc/log4j.properties by commenting out the last two sections.
s

ps.err

The file %PS_HOME%/tmp/ps.err might contain an exception that caused the BMC Impact Publishing Server to hang (Windows only).

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Configuring the BMC Impact Publishing Server

Configuring the BMC Impact Publishing Server
This section contains information you need to configure the BMC Impact Publishing Server.

pserver.conf file and parameters
Table 102 describes the pserver.conf file and its parameters. Table 102 pserver.conf file
Filename File path Description
IPSName

pserver.conf BMC_PORTAL_KIT_HOME/Impact/pubserv/etc contains the configuration settings that control the behavior of the BMC Impact Publishing Server Description name of this BMC Impact Publishing Server Default value not defined-if not defined the unqualified name of the BMC Impact Publishing Server host computer is used

Parameter name

LogDirName JNPServers
BIPServers

specifies the name of the log directory for the BMC Impact Publishing Server defines the location of JNP Servers.

log localhost:9379

The BMC Impact Portal host and port which contains localhost:3084 configuration data such as BMC Atrium CMDB settings and cell directory. BMC Impact Portal user name A valid BMC Impact Portal user password. The password is entered in plain text. When BMC Impact Publishing Server starts it encrypts the password. admin admin

BIPUserName BIPPassword

RequestHistory

sets the maximum number of request log files that are retained by the BMC Impact Publishing Server

-1 (the last 100 log files are kept)

CellConnectionTimeout

sets the length of time the BMC Impact Publishing 60 (seconds) Server maintains a connection to a cell when there is no activity from the cell

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Table 102 pserver.conf file
PreviewTimeout sets the length of time the BMC Impact Publishing Server waits for a commit or cancel request after a preview. When no commit is received, the publish request is canceled. When automated publishing is stopped, a possible ongoing publish will be canceled (if possible). The is parameter specifies the timeout for ack reply of the publishing request which returns requestID. If requestID is unknown, then the publish request will be canceled. AutomatedCancelScsFlrTimeout When automated publishing is stopped, a possible ongoing publish will be canceled if possible. AutomatedCancelScsFlrTimeout is the timeout for the final reply of the publish request which returns if the publish request was canceled or not. If the publish is canceled or if the final reply is unknown, then the publish will be retriggered when automated publish is restarted. AutomatedHeartbeatInterval the interval, in seconds, between the BMC Impact Publishing Server and the AR Notify plugin for heartbeating. A zero (0) or negative value disables heartbeating. Heartbeats are disabled by default. AutomatedHeartbeatTimeout AutomatedPublishRetryCount the timeout of the answer to a heartbeat from the AR Notify plugin. 5 (seconds) -1 (seconds) 900 (seconds) 3600 (seconds)

AutomatedCancelAckTimeout

5 (seconds)

the maximum number of times automated publishing is 12 retried after failures. n represents the number of repeated publication attempts. For example, n=0 means the publication will not be retried after a single publish. n=1 means the publication will be attempted, then retried once. If n<0, the BMC Impact Publishing Server will continue to retry until a publication is successful. Publications that are skipped are not counted as retry attempts, so AutomatedPublishRetryCount is the effective maximum number of retries. The default number of publication retries is 12.

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Configuring the Notify ARDBC plugin

Table 102 pserver.conf file
AutomatedPublishRetryPeriod period of retry; interval between two consecutive publish requests in case of publish failure When an automated publish requests fails because of reasons independent of model consistency (for example, when a cell is not available), the BMC Impact Publishing Server retries to publish a number of times. AutomatedPublishRetryPeriod sets the interval between two consecutive trials. If a previous publish request is not terminated when the interval times out, the next trial is skipped. AutomatedStartMode the publishing mode when the BMC Impact Publishing automated Server starts or restarts. When the BMC Impact Publishing Server is running, publishing mode may be changed via requests (using the CLI command pscontrol). By default, the BMC Impact Publishing Server starts in automated mode. defines the event classes for which BMC Impact Publishing Server events can be created all subclassess of IPS_EVENT 300 seconds

IPSEventClasses IPSEventsIM

defines the cell to which BMC Impact Publishing Server undefined, if events are sent undefined all leaf subclasses of ISP_EVENT

Configuring the Notify ARDBC plugin
The Notify ARDBC plugin adds real-time notification functionality to BMC Remedy AR System applications which enables clients to receive notification about changes in BMC Atrium CMDB. You can modify the Notify ARDBC options in ar.conf (UNIX) or ar.cfg (Windows), using a text editor. The default UNIX directory for the ar.conf file is arInstallDirectory/conf. The ar.cfg file Windows file is stored in the arInstallDirectory\conf folder. Table 103 ar.cfg file parameter descriptions (part 1 of 2)
Parameter BMC-ARDBC-NOTIFY-Verify-Log Description log file location Default value Remedy AR System/ Impact directory

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Configuring the Notify ARDBC plugin

Table 103 ar.cfg file parameter descriptions (part 2 of 2)
Parameter BMC-ARDBC-NOTIFY-Server-Port Description port number for the server If 0 is specified, the plugin allow the operating system to choose an available port and binds to that port. The actual port is visible in the NOTIFY:servers form. BMC-ARDBC-NOTIFY-Protocol-V1Encrypt switches encryption for V1 protocol on or off If encryption is switched on (T), it contains the key to use for encryption. If encryption is switched off (F), the NOTIFY:protocols property for the V1 protocol will be empty. BMC-ARDBC-NOTIFY-Mem-Trace enables or disables memory tracing You should enable memory trace only when BMC Customer Support requests it. BMC-ARDBC-NOTIFY-Event-Cache sets the number of events for the event cache When the size is 0, event caching is disabled 200 F (False) T (True) Default value 0

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4

Part 4

Appendixes
This part presents the following topics: Appendix A BMC SIM and EM CLI Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495 Appendix B mcell.conf file parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 559 Appendix C BMC Microsoft Windows services and UNIX processes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575 Appendix D Environment variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 579 Appendix E Default service model hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 583 Appendix F BMC Impact Publishing Server CLI Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 609

Part 4

Appendixes

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Appendix

A
496 497 498 499 501 503 504 510 513 515 519 521 522 527 528 531 533 535 536 542 547 549 550 552 553 554 556 557

A

BMC SIM and EM CLI Reference
This appendix provides reference information on the BMC Impact Solutions and BMC Impact Portal command line interfaces (CLI) and their configuration. It contains the following topics: BMC Impact Manager CLI commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mccomp—Compiling rules in the Knowledge Base. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcell—Starting a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcfgtrace—Configuring tracing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mclassinfo—Requesting class information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcollinfo—Getting information about a specific collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcontrol—Performing cell control operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcrtcell—Creating a new cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mcstat—Returning cell status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mdelcell—Deleting a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mgetinfo—Retrieving information about a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mgetrec—Obtaining a global record value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mkb—Updating the Knowledge Base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mkill—Stopping a cell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mlogchk—Performing consistency checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mpkill—Stopping mposter and msend server processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mposter and msend—Managing data, global records, and events . . . . . . . . . . . mquery—Retrieving objects from a cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mrecover—Recovering from a catastrophic data loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mrextract—Extracting cell state files to create new state files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mrmerge—Merging event objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . msetmsg—Modifying an event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . msetrec—Setting the value of a global record. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager CLI configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring tracing for BMC Impact Manager CLI commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC Impact Manager CLI trace configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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BMC Impact Manager CLI commands
Use the commands from the command line interface (CLI). All of the cell-related CLI commands are located in MCELL_HOME/bin. You can invoke the commands from a command prompt on Microsoft Windows, from a UNIX prompt, or from a script. A command can affect the cell, the Knowledge Base, or other files. Table 104 lists all of the available BMC Impact Manager commands along with a brief description of the purpose for each command. Table 104 BMC Impact Manager CLI command descriptions
Command mccomp mcell mcfgtrace mclassinfo mcollinfo mcontrol mcrtcell mcstat mdelcell mgetinfo mgetrec mkb mkill mlogchk mposter mrecover mrextract mrmerge mquery msend msetmsg msetrec Description compiles rules in the Knowledge Base starts a cell modifies tracing configuration of a running cell obtains class information from a cell obtains collector information from a cell performs control operations on a running cell creates a new cell returns the status of a cell deletes a cell retrieves information about a running cell retrieves the content of a global record views/updates the Knowledge Base stops a cell performs consistency checks sends or manipulates data, records, and events recovers catastrophic loss of data extracts cell state files to create new state files merges extracted cell state files retrieves objects from a cell sends an event to a cell modifies an event in a cell sets the value of a global record Page 499 501 503 504 510 513 515 519 521 522 527 528 531 533 536 547 549 550 552 552 552 553

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BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options

BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options
Many commands use the same options that perform the same functions in each command. Additional options that are specific to the command are listed in the section of this appendix that is dedicated to that command.

NOTE
A few commands have command-specific options that override the common CLI command options listed inTable 105. For example, the -p option for the mkb command prints the contents of the designated manifest.kb file, rather than assigning the specified value (Value) to the option Var. If a command has an option that overrides the common option, the

command-specific option is noted in the section of this appendix dedicated to that command. Table 105 describes the common command options that apply to all commands. Table 105 Common options for CLI commands
Option -c ConfigFile -h or -? -l HomeLocation -n cellName or -n @Host[/Port[#Key]] -p Var=Value -q -v -z Description specifies a configuration file to use instead of the default MCELL_HOME\etc\mclient.conf file displays help information, including syntax and options

specifies home directory (HomeLocation) for the command if it is not specified with MCELL_HOME starts the cell named cellName (as defined in mcell.dir). For more information, see “Using the -n option”. assigns the specified value (Value) to the option Var invokes quiet execution (no banner appears) activates verbose mode to display more information displays version information

Using the -n option
To interact with another cell, a cell uses the mcell.dir file, which maps cell names to a host name or to an IP address and port. With CLI commands, you can use the -n option to specify a cell by using either of the following formats that are used in the mcell.dir file:
s

Designate a cell name by specifying -n cellName. This format maps the cellName to the host, port, and encryption key in the
mcell.dir file.

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BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes

s

Designate the host, port, and encryption key by using -n @Host[/Port[#Key]], where — Host is either a host name or an IP address — Port is the port number — Key is the encryption key

The importance of setting a valid encryption key when using the -n option
If you do not specify Key or Key and Port, the default values are applied. The default value for Key is 0, and the default value for Port is 1828. Accepting the default value for Port means that your cell has to listen on port 1828, which is normally the case with the default installation procedure. When BMC Impact Manager is installed, the default installation procedure sets Key to mc, instead of 0. Unless you change the encryption key to 0 during installation or afterwards by manually editing the $MCELL_HOME/etc/mcell.dir file, you need to specify the Key explicitly. Otherwise, if you do not specify the Key, the CLI will not be able to connect to the cell. For security purposes, you should set Key to a valid value other than the default.

BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes
Table 106 describes the return codes common to all CLI commands. Some CLI commands have return codes that are specific to that command. If a CLI command has command-specific return codes, those codes are listed in the section of this appendix dedicated to that command. Table 106 Common return codes for CLI commands
Code 0 1 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Description success bad usage (command includes nonexistent options or an invalid combination of options and arguments) initialization failure trace initialization failed configuration initialization failed outbound communication setup failed inbound communication setup failed message handling initialization failed persistency setup failed

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Table 106 Common return codes for CLI commands
Code 17 20 25 26 27 28 Description port range limitation failed connection to cell failed memory fault command failed syntax error invalid answer received

mccomp—Compiling rules in the Knowledge Base
The mccomp command is the executable that calls the Knowledge Base compiler. The only required command option is the path to the manifest.kb file.

mccomp syntax
Figure 126 shows the syntax for mccomp. Figure 126 mccomp syntax
mccomp [-h|?] [-z] [-t] [-v [VERBOSE|INFORM|WARNING|ERROR|FATAL]] [-e ErrorLogFile] [-p prefix] [-n CellName | ManifestKBFilePath]

Table 107 lists the command-specific options for mccomp. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 107 mccomp options (part 1 of 2)
Option -e ErrorLogFile -n CellName | ManifestKBFilePath Description redirects error messages to a user-specified file; used primarily in scripts

specifies to use
$MCELL_HOME/etc/CellName/kb/manifest.kb as the KB manifest file. This option is ignored if ManifestKBFilePath is specified explicitly.

-p prefix

Creates a package named prefix.pkg

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mccomp—Compiling rules in the Knowledge Base

Table 107 mccomp options (part 2 of 2)
Option -t Description generates tracing calls in the resulting compiled files for debugging purposes. For more information, see “ mccomp example” on page 500.

- v sets the verbosity level of messages. Only messages of the [VERBOSE|INFORM|WARNIN specified level or higher are printed. If -v is not used, the G|ERROR|FATAL] default level is INFORM. If -v is used without specifying a level, the default level is VERBOSE.

The -t option enables extra cell runtime tracing by the rules engine if the cell configuration parameter TraceRuleLevel=2. The trace output goes to the standard cell trace in the RULES module. You can include the output in the transaction file by setting TraceRuleToXact=Yes.

WARNING
A Knowledge Base compiled for runtime rule tracing using -t can experience considerable runtime performance degradation.

mccomp example
Figure 127 shows an example of mccomp. Figure 127 mccomp example
mccomp -n cell1

This command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 128. Figure 128 Example output for mccomp
Parsing BAROC file classes/root.baroc Parsing BAROC file classes/intevt.baroc Compilation ended successfully

mccomp return codes
There are no command-specific return codes for mccomp. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498.

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mcell—Starting a cell

mcell—Starting a cell
The mcell command starts a specified cell.

mcell syntax
Figure 129 shows the syntax for mcell. Figure 129 mcell syntax
mcell [-h|-?] [-z] [-q] [-d] [-i [a][c][d][e]] [-r] [-n cellName] [-l HomeLocation] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"}

Table 108 lists the command-specific options for mcell. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 108 mcell options
Option -d -i Description runs in foreground instead of as a service or daemon initializes the cell repository; can combine with suboptions:
s s s s s

-i—-ied -ie—events -id—data--initializes all data -ic—EventCounter -ia—-iedc—initializes all data

Warning: Unexpected cell states can occur if you initialize only events or only data, because events and data may be correlated. -r runs in cell recovery mode

mcell example
On UNIX, mcell can be started from a command prompt as a daemon (running in background) or as a terminal program (running in foreground). On Microsoft Windows, mcell can be started from a command prompt as a service or as a terminal program. You can start the cell using any of the following methods:
s

To start the cell in the foreground rather than as a service or daemon on UNIX and Microsoft Windows platforms, type the command shown in Figure 130.

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mcell—Starting a cell

Figure 130 Starting a cell
mcell -n cellName -d

NOTE
When starting BMC Impact Solutions software as a daemon process on UNIX platforms, use the method described in “ Stopping or starting a cell on UNIX computers” on page 48.

s

To start the cell as a service on a Microsoft Windows platform, type the command shown in Figure 131.

Figure 131 Starting a cell as a service on windows
: net start mcell_cellName

When started from command prompt without the -d option, mcell contacts the Service Control Manager to start itself as a service. It uses mcell_cellName as the service name, with the cell name as specified with the -n option. Without the -n option, the host name is taken as cellName.
s

To start the BMC Impact Solutions service on Microsoft Windows and initialize the dynamic data in the cell, type the following command shown in Figure 132.

Figure 132 Starting the BMC Impact Manager service on Microsoft Windows
net start mcell_cellName -ia

WARNING
If you start a cell with the mcell -ia or mcell -id commands, you must re-register the cell with the BMC Portal.

mcell return codes
Table 109 lists the command-specific return codes for mcell. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 109 mcell return codes (part 1 of 2)
Code 2 3 4 5 Description bad home directory option usage no home directory specified invalid home directory specification application system initialization failed

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mcfgtrace—Configuring tracing

Table 109 mcell return codes (part 2 of 2)
Code 19 29 37 39 47 49 57 59 67 69 77 79 97 Description logging facility initialization failed Knowledge Base load failed message handling module initialization failed internal object initialization failed event processing module initialization failed save state reload failed query handling module initialization failed service activation failed internal event module initialization failed metrics initialization failed data processing module initialization failed metrics activation failed service setup failed

mcfgtrace—Configuring tracing
The mcfgtrace command modifies the tracing configuration of a running cell and takes the same argument format as a line in the mcell.trace file. See “ BMC Impact Manager CLI trace configuration” on page 557 for instructions on setting up CLI trace configuration files.

mcfgtrace syntax
Figure 133 shows the syntax for mcfgtrace. Figure 133 mcfgtrace syntax
mcfgtrace [-h|-?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName|-n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-1 HomeLocation] [-v] (Module Level Destination| Module SWITCH Switch Destination)

The -n option is required if the cell is remote or if cellName differs from HostName. See “ Using the -n option” on page 497 for more information.

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mclassinfo—Requesting class information

Table 110 lists the command-specific option for mcfgtrace. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 110
Option Module Level Destination

mcfgtrace option
Description See “ mcfgtrace parameters” on page 504.

mcfgtrace parameters
Table 111 lists the parameters for mcfgtrace. Table 111
Parameter Module Level SWITCH Destination

mcfgtrace parameters
Available values ALL | Module ALL | VERBOSE | INFORM | WARNING | ERROR | FATAL SwitchName no | stderr | console | DestinationFileName

mcfgtrace example
To activate maximum tracing for all modules and send the output to the file all.trace in the temporary directory for Cell1, which is by default MCELL_HOME\tmp\Cell1, type the command shown in Figure 134. Figure 134 mcfgtrace example
mcfgtrace -n Cell1 ALL ALL '%T/all.trace'

mcfgtrace return codes
There are no specific return codes for mcfgtrace. See “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498 for a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands.

mclassinfo—Requesting class information
The mclassinfo command retrieves class information about both event and data classes that are loaded in the cell. Information consists of class name, slot descriptions, and subclasses.

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mclassinfo—Requesting class information

You can retrieve the complete class tree in a hierarchical form, or you can retrieve only selected classes, instead of the whole hierarchy. You can retrieve associated definitions of enumerations used in the classes. These definitions are reported before the class tree.

mclassinfo syntax
Figure 135 shows the syntax for mclassinfo. Figure 135 mclassinfo syntax
mclassinfo [-h|-?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-1 HomeLocation] [-v] [-a Amount] [-d] [-e] [-x] [-u] [-r] [-o OutputFile] [{Class}]

Table 112 lists the command-specific options for mclassinfo. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 112
Option -a Amount -d -e -o OutputFile -r -u -x Class

mclassinfo options
Description specifies the amount of information: 0, 1, 2, 3 (See “ Information amount” on page 507); default is 2 reports data class definitions instead of event class reports enumeration definitions used in the classes produces the output in a file called OutputFile, instead of using standard output produces raw output for programs reports unique slots only, excluding redefined slots in subclasses reports enumeration definitions only (exclude classes) names of selected classes

mclassinfo output
You can request output in raw format for parsing by a program. You can also request standard output formatted for users, including verbose output that provides additional information. See Table 112 for the available options.

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mclassinfo—Requesting class information

Raw output format
The output consists of the class tree, optionally preceded by the enumeration definitions, as shown in Figure 136. The enumeration definitions are reported as EnumInfo. Figure 136 Raw output format for mclassinfo
EnumInfo EnumTypeInfo = = EnumTypeCount (EnumTypeInfo)*EnumTypeCount EnumTypeName EnumValCount (EnumValName)*EnumValCount

The class tree is reported depth-first, left-to-right, as ClassInfo, as shown in Figure 137. Figure 137 Class tree for mclassinfo
ClassInfo ClassCompInfo = ClassCompCount(ClassCompInfo)*ClassCompCount = ClassName ClassFlags ClassSlotCount (ClassSlotInfo)*ClassSlotCount ClassInfo ClassSlotInfo = ClassSlotName ClassSlotValType ClassSlotRepType ClassSlotFlags ClassSlotDefaultValueLength ClassSlotDefaultValueText ClassSlotValType = ClassSlotStructCode ClassSlotTypeCode ClassSlotStructCode = S | L ClassSlotTypeCode = i | r | p | s | e:EnumerationTypeName | c | c:BaseClass | q | q:BaseClass ClassSlotFlags = (r|R) (k|K) (p|P) (d|D) (h|H)

Slot value types (ClassSlotValType) are encoded by two characters. The first one indicates whether it is a simple slot (S) or a list (L). List slots are defined in BAROC as LIST_OF. The second character determines the type of the slot value. It corresponds to the BAROC definition as listed in Table 113. Table 113
Slot Type i r p s e;EnumerationTypeName c:BaseClass q:BaseClass

Type of slot value for mclassinfo
Definition INTEGER REAL POINTER STRING Enumeration ECF of BaseClass QUERY of BaseClass

A slot representation type (ClassSlotRepType) corresponds to the representation facet of the slot. If that facet is not specified, it is reported as an asterisk (*).

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Flags contain Boolean facets of the slot. For every facet, one character is reported. An uppercase character means the facet is TRUE; a lowercase character means it is FALSE. Table 114 lists the facets that are reported. Table 114
Facet r|R k|K p|P d|D h|H

Reported facets
Function read_only key parse dup_detect hidden

Table 115
Flag p|P

Class flags
Function publishable class

Standard output format
Standard output format is formatted for end-users but does not report the counts and represents the tree structure through indentation.

Information amount
The amount of reported information is limited as shown in Table 116. Table 116
Option -a 0 -a 1 -a 2 -a 3

Information amount limitation options for mclassinfo
Description reports only class names; no slot information is reported reports slot names adds slot names and representation type (default) adds slot flags and default value

mclassinfo examples
mclassinfo can be used as shown in the following examples.

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mclassinfo—Requesting class information

Obtaining a list of classes
To obtain a list of classes used by a cell named grace, type the command shown in Figure 138. Figure 138 Example of mclassinfo command for a list of classes
mclassinfo -n grace -a 0

Figure 139 Example output of mclassinfo command for a list of classes
Class: CORE_EVENT Class: MC_CELL_CONTROL Class: MC_CELL_START Class: MC_CELL_STOP Class: MC_CELL_TICK Class: MC_CELL_STATBLD_START Class: MC_CELL_STATBLD_STOP Class: MC_CELL_DB_CLEANUP Class: MC_CELL_CONNECT Class: MC_CELL_CONNECT_RESOURCES_EXPANDED Class: MC_CELL_CONNECT_SUSPENDED Class: MC_CELL_CONNECT_RESUMED Class: MC_CELL_CLIENT .

Obtaining a List of Slot Names
To obtain a list of slot names used by a cell named grace, type the command shown in Figure 140. Figure 140 Example of mclassinfo command for list of classes
mclassinfo -n grace -a 1

Figure 141 shows an example of the output. Figure 141 Example of mclassinfo command output for list of classes
Class: Slot: Slot: Slot: Slot: Slot: Slot: . . . CORE_EVENT event_handle mc_ueid source sub_source hostname origin

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mclassinfo—Requesting class information

Adding Slot names and representation types
To add slots names and representation types for use by a cell named grace, type the command shown in Figure 142 on page 509. Figure 142 Example of mclassinfo command for adding slot names
mclassinfo -n grace -a 2

Figure 143 shows an example of the output. Figure 143 Example of mclassinfo command output for adding slot names
Class: Slot: Slot: Slot: Slot: Slot: Slot: . . . CORE_EVENT -Flags: p event_handle - Type: INTEGER mc_ueid - Type: STRING source - Type: STRING sub_source - Type: STRING hostname - Type: STRING origin - Type: STRING

Adding slot flags and default values
To add slot flags and default values for use by a cell named grace, type the command shown in Figure 144. Figure 144 Example of mclassinfo command for adding slot flags
mclassinfo -n grace -a 3

Figure 145 shows an example of the output. Figure 145 Example of mclassinfo command output for adding slot flags
Class: Slot: Slot: Slot: Slot: Slot: Slot: . . . CORE_EVENT -Flags: p event_handle - Type: INTEGER - Flags: rkpd - Def: 0 mc_ueid - Type: STRING - Flags: rkPd - Def: source - Type: STRING - Flags: rkPd - Def: sub_source - Type: STRING - Flags: rkPd - Def: hostname - Type: STRING - Flags: rkPd - Def: origin - Type: STRING - Flags: rkPd - Def:.

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mcollinfo—Getting information about a specific collector

mclassinfo return codes
Table 117 lists the command-specific return codes for mclassinfo. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 117
Code 31

mclassinfo return codes
Description cannot read input file

mcollinfo—Getting information about a specific collector
The mcollinfo command retrieves information about collectors loaded in a cell. Information consists of collector name, permission settings, referenced classes and subcollectors. The complete collector tree is retrieved and reported in a hierarchical form. As an option, specific information about selected collectors can be retrieved instead of the whole tree.

mcollinfo syntax
Figure 146 shows the syntax for mcollinfo. Figure 146 mcollinfo syntax
mcollinfo [-h|-?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p “Var=Value”} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-1 HomeLocation] [-v] [-a Amount][-r] [-o OutputFile] ( -d | [-i] [-s] ( Collector | -f InputFile ) )

The -n option is required if the cell is remote or if cellName differs from HostName. See “ Using the -n option” on page 497 for more information. Table 118 lists the command-specific options for mcollinfo. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 118
Option -a Amount -d -f {InputFile} -i

mcollinfo options (part 1 of 2)
Description specifies the amount of information (0, 1, 2); the default is 2. For more information, see “ Information amount” on page 507. reports collector definitions reads collectors from InputFile instead of from command line reports collector object identifier (OID)

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Table 118
Option

mcollinfo options (part 2 of 2)
Description produces the output in a file called OutputFile, instead of using standard output produces raw output for programs reports collector status and severity counters specifies the collector name or OID with optional + suffix for closure

-o OutputFile -r -s Collector

mcollinfo output
You can request output in raw format for parsing by a program. You can also request standard output formatted for users, including verbose output that provides additional information. See the preceding table for the available options.

Raw output format
Raw output consists of the collector tree, as shown in Figure 147 on page 511. The collector tree is reported depth-first, left-to-right, as CollInfo. Figure 147 Raw output format for mcollinfo
CollInfo = CollCompCount (CollCompInfo)*CollCompCount CollCompInfo = CollName CollPerm CollClassCount (CollClass)*CollClassCount CollInfo CollPerm : CollPermR CollPermW CollPermX CollPerm_ : CollRoleCnt (CollRole)*CollRoleCnt

Standard output format
Standard output is essentially the same as raw output, but standard output does not report the counts. Standard output represents the tree structure through indentation. By default, it reports permissions as a sequence of role numbers. Classes are reported as object identifiers (OIDs). In verbose-formatted output, it reports roles and classes with their names instead of numbers or OIDs.

Information amount
The amount of reported information is limited as shown in Table 119. Table 119
Option -a 0

Information amount limitation options for mcollinfo (part 1 of 2)
Description reports only collector names

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Table 119
Option -a 1 -a 2

Information amount limitation options for mcollinfo (part 2 of 2)
Description add permissions add referenced classes

mcollinfo examples
Figure 148 shows an example of mcollinfo. Figure 148 mcollinfo example
mcollinfo -n dbg -o Net.Global 6.1

You can request user-formatted output in verbose mode as shown in Figure 149. Figure 149 mcollinfo command for verbose mode
mcollinfo -n dbg -v -o Net.Global Collector Net.Global OID=6.1

You can also request the number of events for each severity/status combination in the collector as shown in Figure 150. You must specify the collector name. Figure 150 mcollinfo command for number of events for severity/status
mcollinfo -n dbg -v -s Net.Global Collector Net.Global Severities=0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

mcollinfo return codes
Table 120 lists the command-specific return code for mcollinfo. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 120 mcollinfo return codes
Code 31 Description cannot read input file

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mcontrol—Performing cell control operations

mcontrol—Performing cell control operations
The mcontrol command performs control operations on a cell. The operation is stated as an argument.

mcontrol syntax
Figure 151 on page 513 shows the syntax for mcontrol. Figure 151 mcontrol syntax
mcontrol [-h|-?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-1 HomeLocation] [-v] Control

The -n option is required if the cell is remote or if cellName differs from HostName. See “ Using the -n option” on page 497 for more information. Table 121 lists the command-specific option for mcontrol. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 121 mcontrol option
Option Control Description specifies the control command to use. See Table 122 for the available control commands.

Table 122 lists the following controls that are available. Table 122 mcontrol controls (part 1 of 2)
Control metrics [on|off|reset] Description on = enables metrics off = disables metrics reset = resets running counters If an argument is not specified, metrics are reported by default. pause prop [{Destination}] suspends reception of adapter messages; events are no longer accepted if one or more Destinations are mentioned, only propagations to these destinations are retried; if no Destinations are specified, all pending propagation destinations are retried

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mcontrol—Performing cell control operations

Table 122 mcontrol controls (part 2 of 2)
Control reload [{dir|trace|conf|collect |kb|data|all}] Description reload cell configuration, for one or more categories; if you do not choose an argument, all categories reload
s s s s s s s

dir—mcell.dir trace—mcell.trace conf—mcell.conf, propagate, modify collect—collector definitions kb—Knowledge Base, classes, rules data—data instances all—all the categories

restart shutdown standby start statbld

stops and restarts the cell terminates the cell in fast shutdown mode; same as mkill -s switches cell to standby mode resumes reception of adapter messages; cell operates normally again forces the cell to perform a StateBuild immediately instead of waiting for the next scheduled StateBuild; mcontrol waits until termination of the forced StateBuild and, if successful, returns the path to the resulting saved state file terminates the cell in normal mode; same as mkill turns rule tracing on or off for all or some named rules; rules must be compiled for tracing (mccomp -t) to produce rule tracing effectively If you do not specify an argument, all rules apply.

stop trace (on|off) [{all|RuleName}]

mcontrol examples
mcontrol can be used as shown in the following examples.

Retrying pending propagations
To retry pending propagations for a cell named grace, type the command shown in Figure 152. Figure 152 Retrying Pending propagations with mcontrol command
mcontrol -n grace -v prop

Figure 153 shows an example of the output. Figure 153 Example of mcontrol command output for retrying pending propagations
Command on server grace acknowledged

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mcrtcell—Creating a new cell

Terminating a cell
To terminate a cell named grace, type the command shown in Figure 154. Figure 154 Terminating a cell using the mcontrol command
mcontrol -n grace -v stop

Figure 155 shows an example of the output. Figure 155 Example of mcontrol command output for terminating a cell
Command on server grace acknowledged

Reconfiguring a cell
To reconfigure cell grace after mcell.dir has been modified, type the command shown in Figure 156. Figure 156 Reconfiguring a cell
mcontrol -n grace reload dir

Figure 157 shows an example of the output. Figure 157 Example of mcontrol command output for reconfiguring a cell
Command on server grace acknowledged

The cell grace reconfigures without stopping and restarting.

mcontrol return codes
There are no command-specific return codes for mcontrol. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498.

mcrtcell—Creating a new cell
Use the mcrtcell command to create a new cell. You can only run the mcrtcell command on the local computer where you are creating the new cell.

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mcrtcell—Creating a new cell

Cell names
Cell names must be unique throughout the enterprise.

WARNING
Cells with identical cell names on different computers within your enterprise will cause unexpected results.

The cell name cannot contain spaces or special characters. You can use any alphanumeric string and underscores (_) in a cell name, such as the following:
s s s

my_cell spike12 oracle

Do not give a cell the same name as any item in the MCELL_HOME\etc directory, such as the kb directory or the mcell.conf, mcell.dir, or mcell.trace files. Using the mcrtcell command to add cells ensures that the cell names are unique.

TIP
When naming cells, adopt a naming convention for test and production cells that clearly identifies its purpose. For example, you could assign test cells names that use test as a prefix or suffix. A clear naming convention is important because in BMC Impact Explorer views there is no way to distinguish test and production cells other than by the cell name.

mcrtcell actions
The mcrtcell command performs the following actions:
s

determines if an entry exists in the mcell.dir file that matches the cell being created If a matching entry exists, the creation fails. You can use the -f option to force the creation of the cell.

s

creates the etc\cellName directory, which contains a Knowledge Base copied from the etc\default\Em\kb directory creates a services entry on Microsoft Windows NT, unless you specify the -m option adds an entry to the local mcell.dir file

s

s

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s

creates an entry in the startup scripts on UNIX platforms, unless you specify the -m option

UNIX files
When you install the cell or run mcrtcell -p PortNumber cellName on a UNIX system, you create the files listed in Table 123 that enable the cell to start on reboot and to stop on shut down. If you run mdelcell cellName, these files are automatically removed. Table 123 Files for UNIX
Platform AIX platforms HP-UX platforms Solaris platforms File etc/cellName.d sbin/init.d/mc_cellName etc/init.d/cellName etc/rc2.d/K99cellName etc/rc2.d/S99cellName Linux platforms etc/rc.d/init.d/mc_cellName etc/rc.d/rc3.d/K99mc_cellName etc/rc.d/rc3.d/S99mc_cellName

After you configure the cell, you must stop and restart it for the changes to take effect. For instructions, see “ Stopping or starting a cell on UNIX computers” on page 48.

mcrtcell syntax
Figure 158 shows the syntax for mcrtcell. Figure 158 mcrtcell syntax
mcrtcell -p PortNumber [-s SourceCell] [-l HomeLocation] [-f] [-m] [-z] [-h|-?] [-ie|-is] NewcellName

If you do not specify the -ie or -is option, you create a cell with an empty Knowledge Base, and the cell does not respond to requests.

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mcrtcell—Creating a new cell

Table 124 lists the command-specific options for mcrtcell. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 124 mcrtcell options
Option -f Description forces the creation of a cell when the mcell.dir file contains an entry of the same name; reinstalls the Knowledge Base If you do not use this option, mcrtcell exits without creating a new cell when it finds a duplicate entry in the mcell.dir file. -ie -is -m -p PortNumber installs the default BMC Event Manager Knowledge Base installs the default BMC Service Impact Manager Knowledge Base prevents automatic restart on reboot specifies the cell port number (PortNumber) Note: The -p option for mcrtcell overrides the common CLI -p option listed in “Table 105 Common options for CLI commands” on page 497. -s SourceCell NewcellName specifies the cell (SourceCell) from which to copy a Knowledge Base specifies the name for the cell being created. For information on cell naming conventions, see “ Cell names” on page 516.

mcrtcell example
Figure 159 shows an example of how to create a service using mcrtcell. Figure 159 Example of mcrtcell command
mcrtcell -p 2591 -is was05dal

Figure 160 shows the output produced. Figure 160 Example of output of mcrtcell
Service successfully created

Figure 161 shows an example of how to create another service using mcrtcell. Figure 161 Example of mcrtcell command
mcrtcell -s was05dal -p 2592 was04fra

Figure 162 shows the output produced. Figure 162 Example output of mcrtcell
Service successfully created

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mcstat—Returning cell status

mcrtcell return codes
NOTE
This command does not use the -ie or -is option. It makes a copy of the KB from the previous cell.

Table 125 lists the command-specific return codes for mcrtcell. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 125 mcrtcell return codes
Code Description -1 3 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 uname command failed MCELL_HOME environment variable not set or duplicate cell name or port definition in mcell.dir no MCELL_HOME environment variable is defined duplicate cell definition in mcell.dir existing cell with same name on a different host existing cell with same name on a different port existing cell with same name on a different host/port failed to create new directory cannot get OS failed to remove a cell

mcstat—Returning cell status
The mcstat command obtains the status of a cell. This command shows whether a cell is running or stopped.

mcstat Syntax
Figure 163 shows the syntax for mcstat. Figure 163 mcstat syntax
mcstat [-h|?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-v] [-t TimeOut ]

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mcstat—Returning cell status

Table 126 lists the command-specific option for mcstat. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 126 mcstat option
Option -t TimeOut Description specifies the length of time, in milliseconds, for the command to wait for answer before terminating; default is 60000, or 1 minute

mcstat example
To obtain the status for a cell named examplecell, type the command shown in Figure 164. Figure 164 mcstat example
mcstat -n examplecell

If the cell is not running, a message similar to the example in Figure 165 appears. Figure 165 Message for cell not running
Could not connect to Cell examplecell.

If the cell is running, the message shown in Figure 166 appears. Figure 166 Message for cell running
Running

mcstat return codes
There are no command-specific return codes for mcstat. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498.

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mdelcell—Deleting a cell

mdelcell—Deleting a cell
Use mdelcell to delete a specified cell on the local computer. Deleting a cell by using the mdelcell command removes the cell and its entry in the mcell.dir file. You can use this command only locally on the computer where the cell resides. Executing this command results in the following actions:
s s s

removes the entry in the mcell.dir file deletes the etc\cellName removes the entry from the services on Microsoft Windows or the startup scripts on UNIX

mdelcell syntax
Figure 167 shows the syntax for mdelcell. Figure 167 mdelcell syntax
mdelcell cellName [-z] [-h|?] [-k] [-w TimeOut]

Table 127 lists the command-specific options for mdelcell. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 127 mdelcell options
Option -k -w TimeOut Description keeps tmp and log directories of the cell specifies the length of time, in seconds, for the command to wait when terminating the cell.

mdelcell example
To delete a cell named grace, type the command shown in Figure 168. Figure 168 Deleting a cell using mdelcell
mdelcell grace

If grace is not currently running, this command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 169 on Microsoft Windows platforms: Figure 169 Output for mdelcell if cell is not running
Service successfully removed

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mgetinfo—Retrieving information about a cell

On UNIX platforms, the command does not produce output when it runs successfully. If grace is currently running, this command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 170. Figure 170 Output for mdelcell if cell is running
Warning! Cell grace was running and mdelcell tries to terminate it. Service successfully removed.

mdelcell return codes
Table 128 lists the command-specific return codes for mdelcell. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 128 mdelcell return codes
Code -1 31 Description uname command failed no MCELL_HOME environment variable is defined

mgetinfo—Retrieving information about a cell
The mgetinfo command retrieves information about a cell.

mgetinfo syntax
Figure 171 shows the syntax for mgetinfo. Figure 171 mgetinfo syntax
mgetinfo [-h|?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-1 HomeLocation] [-v] Information

The -n option is required if the cell is remote and defined in the mcell.dir file, or if the cell is local and named something other than HostName. Table 129 lists the command-specific option for mgetinfo. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497.

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mgetinfo—Retrieving information about a cell

Table 129 mgetinfo option
Option Description Information specifies the Information option to use. See Table 130 for the available Information options.

Table 130 describes the mgetinfo information options. Table 130 mgetinfo information options
Information activity Description retrieves the activity status of the cell 0 = standby 1 = limited 2 = full activity. retrieves configuration of a cell, including the cell name, home directory, Knowledge Base directory, and the full paths of all configuration files the cell uses retrieves information about the current connections that are open from and to the cell; see Table 131 for description of that information lists KB modules with version information from the cell’s loaded KB; information is displayed in raw format. When combined with the -v switch, it is returned in a more verbose and readable format. lists KB source files with version information from the cell’s loaded KB; information is displayed in raw format. When combined with the -v switch, it is returned in a more verbose and readable format. reports the metrics, collected by the cell, that are stored in MC_CELL_METRIC data objects retrieves the options found in the mcell.conf file This information does not necessarily represent the effective values of these options. If the value is set to an out-of-range value, that value is returned, but the effective value used internally will be the range boundary. services version reports service metrics counting the components and relationships displays the version number of the cell

config connect kbmodules

kbsources

metrics param

A connect request displays the information shown in Table 131. Table 131 Information from connect request (part 1 of 2)
Connect information All Connections direction IN for incoming and OUT for outgoing This information refers to the initiator of the connection. An incoming connection means a client contacted the cell, while an outgoing connection means the cell itself contacted another cell. In both cases, data can flow in both directions. type of client the client type, such as unknown, cell, browser, adapter, CLI, and EIF, which are reported as literal values Description

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Table 131 Information from connect request (part 2 of 2)
Connect information name of connected program source address destination address Incoming Connections name of user time delta sequence sequence Outgoing Connections time stamp sequence message message timestamp of last connection setup or trial sequence number of last outgoing message number of messages waiting for connection opening number of messages waiting for answer the name of the user; example: Admin between both sender and receiver in seconds, to be added to time stamps coming in to convert to the cell time sequence number of last incoming message sequence number of last answer Description the name of the connected program (for example: Impact Explorer, mposter, cellName) IP address/port of source side of the connection for inbound connections, this is the client; for outbound, it is the cell IP address/port of destination side of the connection for inbound connections, this is the cell; for outbound, it is the destination

mgetinfo examples
This section contains examples of mgetinfo.

mgetinfo config example
Figure 172 shows an example of mgetinfo config. Figure 172 Example of mgetinfo config
mgetinfo -n aspen config

On UNIX, this command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 173. Figure 173 mgetinfo config command output on UNIX
cellName=aspen HomeDir=/opt/mcell KBDir=/opt/mcell/etc/aspen/kb/ ConfigFile=/opt/mcell/etc/mcell.conf TraceConfigFile=/opt/mcell/etc/mcell.trace TraceDefaultFile=/opt/mcell/tmp/aspen/trace ServerDirectoryFile=/opt/mcell/etc/mcell.dir

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mgetinfo—Retrieving information about a cell

Figure 173 mgetinfo config command output on UNIX
PropagateConfigFile=/opt/mcell/etc/mcell.propagate ModifyConfigFile=/opt/mcell/etc/mcell.modify

On Microsoft Windows, this command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 174. Figure 174 mgetinfo config command output on Microsoft Windows
cellName=aspen HomeDir=C:/mcell/server KBDir=C:/mcell/server/etc/aspen/kb/ ConfigFile=C:/mcell/server/etc/mcell.conf TraceConfigFile=C:/mcell/server/etc/mcell.trace TraceDefaultFile=C:/mcell/server/tmp/aspen/trace ServerDirectoryFile=C:/mcell/server/etc/mcell.dir PropagateConfigFile=C:/mcell/server/etc/mcell.propagate ModifyConfigFile=C:/mcell/server/etc/mcell.modify

mgetinfo param example
Figure 175 shows an example of mgetinfo param. Figure 175 Example of mgetinfo param
mgetinfo -n aspen param

This command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 176. Figure 176 mgetinfo param command output
Trace=Yes TraceSrc=No TraceRuleLevel=1 TraceConfigFileName=mcell.trace TraceDefaultFileName=%T/trace LicenseServer= CellOperationLevel=Consolidation CellOperationRelax=No . . .

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mgetinfo services example
Figure 177 shows an example of mgetinfo services. Figure 177 Example of mgetinfo services
mgetinfo services

This command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 178. Figure 178 mgetinfo param command output
MC_SM_COMPONENT CONNECTIVITY IT_COMPONENT LOGICAL_COMPONENT SERVICE_LEVEL_AGREEMENT MC_SM_RELATIONSHIP IMPACT_RELATIONSHIP NULL_RELATIONSHIP Number Number Number Number Number Number Number Number of of of of of of of of MC SM Component Connectivity IT Component Logical Component Service Level Agreement MC SM Relationship Impact Relationship Null Relationship 87 11 22 47 7 126 126 0”

mgetinfo connect example
Figure 179 shows an example of mgetinfo connect. Figure 179 Example of mgetinfo services
mgetinfo connect

This command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 180. Figure 180 Output of mgetinfo connect
IN browser ImpactExplorer 10.0.10.17:1545 10.0.10.28:1828 Admin 0 2028 2071

mgetinfo return codes
Table 132 lists the command-specific return codes for mgetinfo. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 132 mgetinfo return codes
Code 31 Description not a SIM cell

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mgetrec—Obtaining a global record value

mgetrec—Obtaining a global record value
Use the mgetrec command to obtain the value of a global record.

mgetrec syntax
Figure 181 shows the syntax for mgetrec. Figure 181 mgetrec syntax
mgetrec [-h|?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] -r Record[.Slot]

The -n option is required if the cell is remote and defined in the mcell.dir file, or if the cell is local and named something other than HostName. Table 133 lists the command-specific option for mgetrec. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 133 mgetrec option
Option -r Record[.Slot] Description specifies the global record to be obtained, optionally limited to one of its slots

mgetrec example
Figure 182 shows an example of mgetrec. Figure 182 Example of mgetrec
mgetrec -r EM_KB_OPTIONS

The preceding command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 183. Figure 183 Output of mgetrec (part 1 of 2)
startup_script_enabled ----NO ----dfilter_enabled ----NO Appendix A BMC SIM and EM CLI Reference 527

mkb—Updating the Knowledge Base

Figure 183 Output of mgetrec (part 2 of 2)
----dnotification_enabled ----NO ----dpropagation_enabled ----NO ----default_location -----

mgetrec return codes
There are no command-specific return codes for mgetrec. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498.

mkb—Updating the Knowledge Base
Use the mkb command to create, view, or update the Knowledge Base. When you use the mkb command to create a new Knowledge Base, a manifest.kb file is also created. Use the mkb command primarily to check or modify a Knowledge Base with scripts, such as when you need to upgrade the Knowledge Base automatically for a number of cells installed across your network. After installing the files, compile using the mccomp command.

mkb syntax
Figure 184 shows the syntax for mkb. Figure 184 mkb syntax
mkb [-h|-?] [-z] [-q] [-v] [-n CellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]] ] [-f ManifestFile] [-b BinFile] [-c ClassFile] [-d DataFile] [-i Interp] [-j RecordFile] [-l LibFile] [-m Directory] [-o CollectorFile] [-p] [-r RuleFile]

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mkb—Updating the Knowledge Base

Table 134 lists the command-specific options for mkb. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 134 mkb options
Option -b BinFile -c ClassFile -d DataFile -f manifest -i Interp -j RecordFile -l LibFile Description binary file name imports the specified ClassFile.baroc that defines the class definitions imports the specified DataFile.baroc that defines data instances specifies the path to the manifest.kb file specifies interpreter type either: [a|l2|p4|s5|w4] imports RecordRile.baroc that defines the record definitions imports the specified library file (filename.wic). Note: The -l option for the mkb command overrides the -l option in “Table 105 Common options for CLI commands” on page 497. -m Directory -o CollectorFile -p creates a new Knowledge Base directory hierarchy based on the contents of the designated manifest.kb file imports the specified CollectorFile.mrl that defines that collector definitions

prints the contents of the designated manifest.kb file, along with the names of the .load files in the various directories comprising the Knowledge Base
Note: The -p option for mkb overrides the common CLI -p option listed in “Table 105 Common options for CLI commands” on page 497.

-r RuleFile

imports the specified RuleFile mrl that defines the rule definitions

Use the options described in Table 135 to add new files to the Knowledge Base that you specified with the -f option. The new files are also described in Table 135. Table 135 mkb new file options (part 1 of 2) (part 1 of 2)
mkb Option -b BinFile -i Interp Description adds the binary file (BinFile) for the architecture specifies the appropriate interpreter to use for the architecture; the KB is copied as designated by the Interp value to the appropriate directory for that architecture:
s s s s

l2 p4 s5 w4 -

Linux 5.2 and 6.0 AIX 4.0 (Power PC) Solaris 2.5 (Sparc) Microsoft Windows/NT 4.0 (Intel)

-c ClassFile

adds the class file (ClassFile) to the designated Knowledge Base

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mkb—Updating the Knowledge Base

Table 135 mkb new file options (part 2 of 2) (part 2 of 2)
mkb Option Description -o CollectorFile adds the collector file (CollectorFile) to the designated Knowledge Base -d DataFile -l LibFile adds the data file (DataFile) to the designated Knowledge Base adds the library file (LibFile) to the designated Knowledge Base Note: The -l option for the mkb command overrides the -l option in “Table 105 Common options for CLI commands” on page 497. -r RuleFile adds the rule file (RuleFile) to the designated Knowledge Base

Each of the above options causes mkb to copy the designated files into the proper Knowledge Base directory and adds information to the .load file of that directory.

mkb examples
This section contains UNIX and Microsoft Windows examples.

UNIX example
Figure 185 shows an example of mkb on UNIX. Figure 185 mkb command on UNIX
mkb -f ./manifest.kb -p

This command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 186 on a UNIX computer named spud. Figure 186 mkb output on UNIX (part 1 of 2)
classes = \mcell\server\etc\spud\kb\.\classes load file: .load root.baroc intevt.baroc . . . patrol.baroc collectors = \mcell\server\etc\spud\kb\.\collectors load file: .load collectors.mrl internal.mrl Adapters.mrl catchall.mrl

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mkill—Stopping a cell

Figure 186 mkb output on UNIX (part 2 of 2)
data = \mcell\server\etc\spud\kb\.\data load file: .load lib = \mcell\server\etc\spud\kb\.\lib load file: .load can not open file: \mcell\server\etc\spud\kb\.\lib\.load rules = \mcell\server\etc\spud\kb\.\rules load file: .load new.mrl records = \mcell\server\etc\spud\kb\.\records load file: .load intrec.wic

Microsoft Windows example
Figure 187 shows an example of mkb on Microsoft Windows. Figure 187 mkb command on Microsoft Windows
mkb -f kb\manifest.kb -m new_kb

This command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 188 on Microsoft Windows. Figure 188 mkb command output on Microsoft Windows
manifest directory tree created successfully

mkb return codes
There are no command-specific return codes for mkb. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498.

mkill—Stopping a cell
Use the mkill command to stop a running cell or gateway.

mkill syntax
Figure 189 shows the syntax for mkill.

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mkill—Stopping a cell

Figure 189 mkill syntax
mkill [-h|?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-l HomeLocation][-v] [-s]

If you do not specify a cell to stop, this command stops the default cell, HostName. You must use the -n cellName option on multiple cell hosts. Table 136 lists the command-specific option for mkill. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 136 mkill option
Option -s Description performs rapid shutdown termination; bypasses StateBuilder

mkill example
Figure 190 shows an example of mkill. Figure 190 Example of mkill
mkill -n examplecell

The preceding command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 191. Figure 191 Output of mkill
server examplecell terminated

NOTE
The mkill -s command terminates a cell and bypasses the StateBuilder. If a user has cells set to run the StateBuilder before terminating, then mkill -s -n cellName overrides the StateBuilder option.

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mlogchk—Performing consistency checks

mkill return codes
There are no command-specific return codes for mkill. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498.

mlogchk—Performing consistency checks
The mlogchk command performs consistency checks on the persistency directory MCELL_HOME\log\cellName. This directory could be in an inconsistent state after abnormal cell or StateBuilder termination. It is an interactive tool that tells the operator what is wrong and what should be corrected. You must shut down the cell before running the checks because a running cell might modify the log directory during a check. The mlogchk command does the following:
s

determines whether an mcdb.lock file exists and, if so — checks for a running statbld and waits for termination — reports trailing lock file and removes it (after confirmation)

s

determines whether an xact.1 file exists and, if so, reports and instructs the user to run statbld determines whether an mcdb.0 file exists and, if so, reports and proposes to rename or remove it

s

mlogchk syntax
Figure 192 shows the syntax for mlogchk. Figure 192 mlogchk syntax
mlogchk [-h|?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-l HomeLocation] [-v]

There are no command-specific options for mlogchk.

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mlogchk—Performing consistency checks

mlogchk example
Figure 193 shows an example of mlogchk. Figure 193 Example of mlogchk
mlogchk -n spud -v

For a cell named spud, the preceding command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 194. Figure 194 Output of mlogchk
Warning: Cell spud is running - this may influence the consistency check. To ensure correct results, you should shutdown the Cell now. Do you want to continue (y/n) ?

The output continues with the message shown in Figure 195 on page 534 if you respond with y. Figure 195 mlogchk message
No inconsistency found.

mlogchk return codes
Table 137 lists the command-specific return codes for mlogchk. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 137 mlogchk return codes
Code 21 Description cannot access cell log directory

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mpkill—Stopping mposter and msend server processes

mpkill—Stopping mposter and msend server processes
Use the mpkill command to stop a running mposter or msend process. When an msend or mposter command is started in persistent buffering mode (for example, using the -j option), a second msend or mposter process is started in background—this is the msend or mposter server process. When the server is already running and an msend or mposter command starts using the same buffer directory as the existing server, an additional server is not started; msend or mposter (client) just connects to the server.

NOTE
This msend or mposter server process, which is hidden to the user, automatically stops itself when it is idle for 10 minutes. “Idle” means that there is no msend or mposter client connected to it and every event in the buffer has been sent and acknowledged by the destination cell. A new server will be started by the client as soon as a msend or mposter client requires it. This feature considerably limits the need to use mpkill.

mpkill syntax
Figure 196 shows the syntax for mpkill. Figure 196 mpkill syntax
mpkill [-h|?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] (-a | -j Bufdir)

Table 138 lists the command-specific option for mpkill. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 138 mpkill option
Option -a -j Bufdir Description kills all msend or mposter server processes kills msend or mposter server processes on a specified persistent buffer

mpkill example
Figure 197 shows an example of mpkill. If msend has been started as
msend -n cell1 -j "C:\bufdir\cell1"

to stop the running msend server process, you would enter the mpkill command as shown in Figure 197.

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mposter and msend—Managing data, global records, and events

Figure 197 Example of mpkill
mpkill -j "C:\bufdir\cell1

The preceding command produces output similar to the example shown in Figure 198. Figure 198 Output of mpkill
BMC Impact MposterKiller 7.0.00 (Build 10891339 - 30-Mar-2006) Copyright 1998-2006 BMC Software, Inc. as an unpublished work. rights reserved. All

mpkill return codes
There are no command-specific return codes for mpkill. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498.

mposter and msend—Managing data, global records, and events
NOTE
The mposter and msend commands can both be used to send or modify events, but mposter also can be used to send or modify data.

Use the msend command to manage events in a cell.

NOTE
BMC Software recommends that you use the msend command instead of the mposter command when you do not need to access or modify dynamic data or global records. The msend command is a more secure command because it is more restrictive than mposter. BMC Impact Solutions does not support using the mposter command to create or to edit service model component instances.Although it is possible to use the mposter command to create and to edit the service model class instances on a cell, these changes are made to only the BAROC service model running on the cell, not to the cell’s standard (reference) published service model in the CMDB. This causes a loss of service model integrity and subsequent service model publishings will fail.

Use the mposter command to manage data, global records, and events in a cell. You can modify global records and create, modify, and delete data instances and events using the mposter command.

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mposter and msend—Managing data, global records, and events

You can use the mposter command to modify dynamic data objects in the cell even when the cell is paused.

mposter and msend syntax
Figure 199 shows the syntax for mposter. Figure 199 mposter syntax
mposter [-h|?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-y] [-f DirFile] [-v] [-i] [-I] [-x] [-u] [-w MSecAnswerWait] [-t MSecTerminationWait] [-j BufDir] [-d] [-e] [ - | {SourceFile} | -a Class [-o Source] [-m Message] [-r Severity] [-b SlotSetValue] | -l EventID [-b SlotSetValue]]

Figure 199 shows the syntax for msend, which is identical to the syntax for mposter. Figure 200 msend syntax
msend [-h|?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-y] [-f DirFile] [-v] [-i] [-I] [-x] [-u] [-w MSecAnswerWait] [-t MSecTerminationWait] [-j BufDir] [-d] [-e] [ - | {SourceFile} | -a Class [-o Source] [-m Message] [-r Severity] [-b SlotSetValue] | -l EventID [-b SlotSetValue]]

Table 139 lists the command-specific options for mposter and msend. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 139 mposter and msend options (part 1 of 2)
Option -a Class -b SlotSetValue -d -e -f DirFile -i -I -j BufDir Description input from standard input stream sends an object of class Class adds SlotSetValue settings (format: “slot=value;...”) sends as data instead of as an event specifies to use EIF instead of MCELL format specifies the directory file path; the default value is MCELL_HOME\etc\mcell.dir sets to interactive mode reinitializes persistent buffers makes the buffer directory persistent

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Table 139 mposter and msend options (part 2 of 2)
Option -l EventID Description modify the specified event instead of a new event Note: The -l option for the mposter command overrides the l option in “Table 105 Common options for CLI commands” on page 497. -m Message -o Source -r Severity sets event message to the specified Message text sets event source to the specified Source sets the event severity value to the Severity specified

-t MSecTerminationWait sets the length of time in milliseconds to wait for trailing answers before terminating; default is 5000 -u -w MSecAnswerWait -x -y leave messages unanswered sets the length of time in milliseconds to wait for message answer; default is 0 examine timings immediately terminate upon connection failure

mposter examples
NOTE
All examples and information in this section also can apply to msend.

Figure 201 shows an example of mposter. Figure 201 Example of mposter
mposter -n aspen -v -

The information for the event is entered using BAROC-style input as shown in Figure 202. Figure 202 mposter BAROC-style input
HOST_DOWN; origin='HOST_DOWN'; msg='host blue is down'; END

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The output of the mposter session is similar to what is shown in Figure 203. Figure 203 mposter BAROC-style output
Event time stamp : 943392578 Sending event Message 1 - #0 Message 1 - #1 - evtid = 0

Then, the following would be input, as shown in Figure 204. Figure 204 mposter BAROC-style input
HOST_DOWN; origin='HOST_DOWN'; msg='host orange is down'; END

And the mposter output would be similar to what is shown in Figure 205. Figure 205 mposter BAROC-style output
Event time stamp : 943392646 Sending event Message 2 - #2 - evtid = 0 Message 2 - #2

In the example shown in Figure 206, mposter adds an instance of the DATA class AppByHost to the host aspen. The example uses dynamic data technology in the following ways:
s s s

specifying that the instance to add is an instance of AppByHost defining the host as aspen specifying that it defines applications as word or excel

You can use the mposter command to change any one of definitions without changing any of the others. Figure 206 Definition changes using mposter
mposter -n aspen -d -a AppByHost -b "host='aspen'; applications=['word','excel']"

The preceding command does not produce any output.

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NOTE
On Microsoft Windows, the mposter and msend commands accept only double quotes with the -b option. If you use single quotation marks with the -b option on Microsoft Windows, the event is not sent, and no error message appears. On UNIX, with the with the -b option, the command accepts both single and double quotation marks.

Enabling persistent buffering
To enable persistent buffering, first create a writeable directory (BufDir in Figure 207), then use the syntax shown in Figure 207. Figure 207 Enabling persistent buffering using mposter
mposter [current options] -j BufDir

The mposter.lck, mposter.buf, and mposter.pos files are placed in BufDir after the mposter (or msend) command is executed. Multiple instances of mposter (and/or msend) can use the same BufDir directory if the destination cells are the same. When persistent buffering is enabled, both mposter and msend can send events to one of a list of cells. To supply a list of cells, use the -n option or the ServerName option and separate each of the cells in the list with a colon, as shown in Figure 208 on page 540. Figure 208 Supplying a list of cells for mposter
mposter -n cell1:cell2:cell3 -j BufDir

Write access for persistent buffering
To successfully start the mposter or msend CLI commands in a persistent buffering mode, you must ensure that you have write access to the buffers file. You can locate the buffers file at:
s s

UNIX—/etc/itm/.reg/Buffers Microsoft Windows—HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/SOFTWARE/BMC Software/BMC
Impact/mposter/Buffers

The Microsoft Windows registry key for the Buffers file is not created by default; it is created the first time the mposter (or msend) command is executed using the -j option in a persistent buffering mode.

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If the Buffers file is not writable, you will receive the error message shown in Figure 209. Figure 209 Error message if buffers files are not writable
Launching mposter server... OK Getting Server Port number... OK (33992) Connecting mposter server... Fatal error! Cannot negotiate connection with mposter server. Check if the cell(s) name, location, port and encryption key are the same as those running server (protocol error: 4) Fatal error! Client initialization failed. A current cause of this problem is a wrong/unavailable cell destination (hostname, port, encryption key).

Decreasing the buffer size
The persistent directory may contain the following three files:
s s s

mposterbuf.buf mposterbuf.pos mposterbuf.lck

The purpose of the mposterbuf.lck file is to provide a file-locking mechanism when multiple mposter-like servers are started at the same time.
The mposterbuf.pos file contains a positive integer, between 0 and the size, in bytes, of mposterbuf.buf. This value, pos corresponds a position in mposterbuf.pos; every event or data contained in the first pos bytes of mposterbuf.buf has been sent to and

acknowledged by a cell. Every event contained between pos and the end of file either has not been sent yet or has been sent but has not been acknowledged by the cell yet.
The size of the mposterbuf.buf file is decreased when all the following conditions are

met:
s

The size of mposterbuf.buf is at least 50000 bytes (50 KB). The percentage of events sent and acknowledged must make up at least 30% of the total file size. For instance, if mposterbuf.buf is 10 MB, at least 3 MB of acknowledged events must be in mposterbuf.buf for its size to be decreased. This means that mposterbuf.pos should contain a number larger than 3,000,000.

s

mposter and msend return codes
Table 140 lists the return codes for mposter and msend. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498.

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mquery—Retrieving objects from a cell

Table 140 mposter and msend return codes
Code 2 3 4 Description failed to initialize in Server mode failed to find a valid cell failed to close the client connection

mquery—Retrieving objects from a cell
The mquery command retrieves objects from a cell.

mquery syntax
Figure 210 shows the syntax for mquery. Figure 210 mquery syntax
mquery [-h|-?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-l HomeLocation] [-v] [-r] [-f Format] ( [-d] [-a Class] [-w Where] [-s SlotList | -x SlotList] [-i Collector] [-o OrderSlot] | -Q Query | - | {File} )

Table 141 lists the command-specific options for mquery. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 141 mquery options (part 1 of 2)
Option -a Class -d -f Format -i Collector -o OrderSlot Description performs queries as read from standard input stream select from a specified Class (default is either CORE_EVENT or CORE_DATA). select data objects instead of event objects format using: quoted, BAROC, CSV, or XML selects only in a collector (optional + suffix for closure) sorts on the specified slot order (OrderSlot). Set the sort order by appending a suffix to the OrderSlot value that you specify. Append a plus sign (+) for ascending sort or a minus sign (-) for a descending sort. -Q Query -r perform the specified query sets output to be raw output. For more information, see “ Raw output format” on page 511.

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Table 141 mquery options (part 2 of 2)
Option -s SlotList Description selects specific slots from the comma-separated SlotList; the default is ALL). Use special value COUNT to retrieve only the number of selected items. Use special value DELETE to delete the selected items. specifies a where condition on the specified Class excludes specific slots from the comma-separated SlotList (selecting ALL) performs queries as read from one or more specified files

-w Where -x SlotList File

mquery output
Output of the mquery command is available in raw format for parsing by a program, and in printed format for users, with several variations.

Raw output format
The output consists of the number of solutions, terminated with RS (Record Separator, ASCII code 30), and followed by the solutions. Each solution is terminated with RS. A solution consists of a sequence of slot values, separated by FS (Field Separator, ASCII code 28). There is no FS after the last slot value (that is followed by the RS solution terminator). Empty slot values, or nonexistent slots, are represented by an empty value, such as two FS with nothing in between. Figure 211 shows an example of a raw output specification. Figure 211 Example of raw output specification
RawOutput = SolutionCount RS Solution RS ... Solution RS Solution = SlotValue FS ... SlotValue

Standard output format
By default, solutions are printed in sequential order. For every solution, the values of the requested slots are printed, one per line. Empty or nonexistent slot values take an empty line. A slot value containing a new line will occupy more than one line. It is not possible to detect these values in standard format.

Verbose mode
In verbose mode, every solution is preceded by a line of the form as shown in Figure 212 on page 543. Figure 212 Verbose mode options
-----N/M-----

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where
s s

N is the number of the solution (starting from 1) M is the total number of solutions.

The last solution is followed by a line of the form as shown in Figure 213. Figure 213 End of form
-----END-----

Special quoted format
In this variant of the standard format, slot values are quoted when necessary.

Special BAROC format
In this variant of the standard format, every solution is represented by a BAROC instance. This consists of the class name, terminated by a semicolon (;) as shown in Figure 214. Figure 214 Special BAROC format
slotname=slotvalue;

Values have quotes when needed. Nonexistent slots are not printed. The solution is terminated with an END on a line.

Special XML format
In this variant of the standard format, every solution is represented by an XML instance. Nonexistent slots are not printed.

Special CSV format
In the Comma Separated Value (CSV) variant of the standard format, solutions are printed in multiple columns over several rows. In non-verbose mode, each solution is printed on one row. Slot values are placed in columns in the same order as in the column selection. If ALL slots are requested, the order is determined by the cell and depends on the class definitions. In verbose mode, solutions can be on multiple rows. For an explicitly specified selection of columns, the first row contains those column names. If you request ALL slots, every solution row is preceded by a row containing the slot names. This is required, as the returned slots may vary depending on the class of the object.

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Columns are separated with a comma (,). A value that contains a comma (,) or a quote ("), or a new line, is quoted with a quote ("). A quote (") within such a value is doubled.

Query specification
You can specify a query either with command line options or with the -Q option through standard input. Using -Q with standard input, you must specify the query in MRL syntax. You can use the options described in Table 142 to specify the query with CLI. Table 142 mquery query options
Option -d -a Class Description retrieves data instances instead of events selects instances of class Class or its subclasses If omitted, a default value of CORE_EVENT or CORE_DATA is assumed (depending on whether the -d option is specified) -w Where imposes one or more conditions on the instance slot values The Where value is a general MRL expression as used in a Where clause. Several subexpressions can be combined with a comma (,) or AND. Quotes may be needed to escape from shell interpretation. -s SlotList selects the slots listed in SlotList, a comma-separated sequence of slot names Special values are
s s s

ALL—gets all slots COUNT—gets no slots, only a count of matching objects is returned DELETE—all matching objects are deleted, returning a count of these

The default is ALL. -x SlotList excludes the slots listed in SlotList, a comma-separated sequence of slot names All slots are reported except for these. -i Collector retrieves only matching object instances that belong to one of the collectors specified in Collector This is a comma-separated sequence of collector object identifiers (OIDs), names, or both. Each one can be suffixed optionally with a + to include its subcollectors as well. -o OrderSlot sorts the slots mentioned in OrderSlot This is a comma-separated sequence of slot names. Each one can be suffixed optionally with a + to indicate ascending order or a - to indicate descending order. Without suffix, a + is assumed. Ordering is done first on the first slot, then on the next one, and so on.

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mquery examples
This section contains examples of the mquery command.

Selecting events with a severity level
Use the command shown in Figure 215 to select all MC_CELL_CONTROL events with severity of at least MINOR, and non-closed status. This query returns the indicated slots and the effective class name. Figure 215 Example of mquery—Select events with severity status
mquery -a MC_CELL_CONTROL -w "severity: >= MINOR AND status: != CLOSED" -s "mc_ueid,CLASS,severity,msg"

The command shown in Figure 216 selects all events from the ByHost collectors for hosts host1 and host2 including all of their subcollectors, if any. The result is ordered on status in ascending order beginning with OPEN, and for each equal status value, descending on severity beginning with DOWN. Figure 216 Example of mquery—Select events from collector
mquery -i "'By Host'.host1+,'By Host'.host2+" -s "mc_ueid,CLASS,severity,hostname,msg" -o "status,severity-"

NOTE
The current implementation of the mquery command has the following limitations:
s

The XML format is experimental and may change in future BMC Impact Solutions product releases. The list slot values in XML are printed as strings, not as XML lists.

s

Deleting events using the mquery command
You can use the value DELETE with the -s option to delete events, as shown in shown in Figure 217. Figure 217 Deleting events using mquery
mquery -n cellName -s DELETE -w "event_handle: == 123"

This command removes the event with handle 123.

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mrecover—Recovering from a catastrophic data loss

mquery return codes
Table 143 lists the command-specific return codes for mquery. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 143 mquery return codes
Code 21 Description syntax error in input

mrecover—Recovering from a catastrophic data loss
Use the mrecover command to recover the state of a cell after a catastrophic loss of data. Typically, a catastrophic data loss is caused by a system failure. You use the mrecover command locally on the computer hosting the cell from which the data was lost. The process recovers the data from other cells that received events from the local cell and that sent events to the local cell. The command cannot recover unpropagated events sent directly from adapters.

NOTE
The mrecover command recovers only propagated events.

The mrecover command contacts each of the cells that you list in the TargetCell option and requests that each target cell produce an up-to-date saved state. The events that were propagated from the local cell are extracted from each target cell and stored locally. After all of the target cells have been prompted and the propagated events are retrieved, they are merged into a new saved state for the local cell. Then, the saved state is processed by the local cell during a recovery process. If the local cell is running or contains an mcdb file, the recovery process aborts. If the recovery process cannot connect to a target cell, you are prompted to choose to stop or continue the recovery process. If you choose to continue, you are prompted to choose to include events collected from the previous session. After the recovery process completes, the saved state is used to restart the recovered cell.

NOTE
If the data loss includes the BMC Impact Solutions product executables or the Knowledge Base definition of the cell, you must reinstall the cell software, the Knowledge Base, and a dedicated recovery Knowledge Base (if applicable) before using the mrecover command.

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mrecover syntax
Figure 218 shows the syntax for mrecover. Figure 218 mrecover syntax
mrecover [-h|-?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p “Var=Value”} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-1 HomeLocation] {TargetCell} . . .

Table 144 lists the command-specific option for mrecover. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 144 mrecover option
Option TargetCell Description specifies the name of the cell that propagated events or to which events have been propagated

mrecover example
To fix a broken cell with input from cella, cellb, and cellc, type the command shown in Figure 219. Figure 219 Fixing a broken cell using mrecover
mrecover -n broken_cell cella cellb cellc

mrecover return codes
Table 145 lists the command-specific return codes for mrecover. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 145 mrecover return codes
Code 2 3 5 6 7 Description failed to send the command that started the StateBuilder on a remote cell could not obtain information from one or more neighbor cells could not launch an external program (mrmerge or mcell) mrmerge exited abnormally mcell (in recovery mode) exited abnormally

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mrextract—Extracting cell state files to create new state files

mrextract—Extracting cell state files to create new state files
Events are extracted from the remote cell repository for the local cell being recovered. The mrextract command is one step in the recovery process. For more information, see “ mrecover—Recovering from a catastrophic data loss” on page 547.

WARNING
This command is used by mrecover and should be avoided by end users.

The cell must be stopped before using the mrextract command.

mrextract syntax
Figure 220 shows the syntax for mrextract. Figure 220 mrextract syntax
mrextract [-h|-?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p Var=Value} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-1 HomeLocation] [-i InputStateFile] [-o OutputFile] {TargetCell} . . .

Table 146 lists the command-specific options for mrextract. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 146 mrextract options
Option -i InputStateFile -o OutputFile TargetCell Description specifies to use input from InputStateFile; the default is the cell’s mcdb sends output to the specified OutputFile file; the default is to send output to standard output specifies the name of the cell to which events have been propagated; separate multiple cell names with a space

mrextract example
Figure 221 shows an example of mrextract. Figure 221 Example of mrextract
mrextract -n CellTwo -o \tmp\mcdb.CellOne

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mrextract return codes
Table 147 lists the command-specific return codes for mrextract. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 147 mrextract return codes
Code 37 47 67 97 Description failed to enable tracing cannot access state builder failure loading kb classes cannot start while state builder is active

mrmerge—Merging event objects
The mrmerge command is one step in the cell recovery process. This command merges events recovered from other cells into a new saved state for the local cell being recovered. For more information, see “ mrecover—Recovering from a catastrophic data loss” on page 547.

WARNING
This command is used by mrecover and should be avoided.

mrmerge syntax
Figure 222 shows the syntax for mrmerge. Figure 222 mrmerge syntax
mrmerge [-h|-?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p “Var=Value”} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] [-l HomeLocation] [-o OutputFile] {InputFile}

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Table 148 lists the command-specific options for mrmerge. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 148 mrmerge options
Option -o OutputFile Description specifies the file (OutputFile) to which to send command output; the default output target is terminal; the path name of the recovery cell’s database file (mcdb) to be created by this command specifies the input file for the mrextract command

InputFile

mrmerge example
Figure 223 shows an example of mrmerge. Figure 223 Example of mrmerge
mrmerge -n Cellone -o $MCELL_HOME\log\Cellone\mcdb\tmp\mcdb.X1 \tmp\mcdb.X2

mrmerge return codes
Table 149 lists the command-specific return codes for mrmerge. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 149 mrmerge return codes
Code 37 47 67 97 Description failed to enable tracing cannot access StateBuilder failure loading kb classes cannot start while StateBuilder is active

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msetmsg—Modifying an event

msetmsg—Modifying an event
Use the msetmsg command to modify the status value of an event in a specified cell. Use the -s option to modify the slot value.

msetmsg syntax
Figure 224 shows the syntax for msetmsg. Figure 224 msetmsg syntax
msetmsg [-h|-?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] -i EventId -C -O -B -A -G -S "Slot=Value[{;Slot=Value}]"

Table 150 lists the command-specific options for msetmsg. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 150 msetmsg options
Option -i EventId -C -O -A -G -B Description specifies the event handle of the event to be modified sets the status value of the specified event to CLOSED sets the status value of the specified event to OPEN sets the status value of the specified event to ACK sets the status value of the specified event to ASSIGNED sets the status value of the specified event to BLACKOUT

-S "Slot=Value[{;Slot=Value}]" specified the slot to be modified and the changes to be made to the slot’s value

msetmsg example
To close an event whose event ID (event_handle) is 12981, type the command shown in Figure 225. Figure 225 Using msetmsg to close an event
msetmsg -n cellName -i 12981 -C

If this command is successful, it does not produce output.

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msetrec—Setting the value of a global record

msetmsg return codes
Table 151 lists the command-specific return codes for msetmsg. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 151 msetmsg return codes
Code 31 32 Description no event handle specified failed to set message

msetrec—Setting the value of a global record
Use the msetrec command to set the field values in a global record. Global records are +defined in the records directory of a Knowledge Base. The cell uses global records as global variables in rules.

msetrec syntax
Figure 226 shows the syntax for msetrec. Figure 226 msetrec syntax
msetrec [-h|?] [-z] [-q] [-c ConfigFile] {-p "Var=Value"} [-n cellName | -n @Host[/Port[#Key]]] -r Record -S Slot -V Value

Table 152 lists the command-specific options for msetrec. For a list of common command options that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common command options” on page 497. Table 152 msetrec options
Option -b -r Record -S Slot -V Value Description specifies slot value assignment specifies the global record containing the Slot to be modified specifies the Slot to be modified specifies the Value to set for the specified Slot

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msetrec example
Figure 227 shows an example of msetrec. Figure 227 Example of msetrec
msetrec -n <cellName> -r test_rec -S slot_list_int -V ‘[4,5,6]’

msetrec return codes
Table 153 lists the command-specific return codes for msetrec. For a list of common return codes that apply to all CLI commands, see “ BMC Impact Manager CLI common return codes” on page 498. Table 153 msetrec return codes
Code 31 Description failed to set record slot

BMC Impact Manager CLI configuration
The mclient.conf file contains the default client options for configuring CLIs. Most of the cell configuration options also can be specified for CLIs. For a more information, see “ Cell configuration parameters” on page 560. The configuration options use the following syntax: option=value, where value equals one of the following:
s s s s

Boolean: Yes | On | No | Off Number String Path

Table 154 describes the CLI configuration parameters. Table 154 BMC Impact Manager CLI configuration parameters (part 1 of 3)
Option
ServerName ServerLocation ServerDirectoryName

Description/Default specifies the name of the cell; an alternative for the -n cellName option the host name or IP address of the cell specifies the name of the cell directory file

Default value HostName HostName mcell.dir

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Table 154 BMC Impact Manager CLI configuration parameters (part 2 of 3)
Option
ServerPort

Description/Default

Default value

specifies the TCP/IP port number where the cell listens 1828 for all in-bound requests from sources, such as the BMC Impact Explorer, CLIs, and adapters enables or disables encryption to and from the cell used by encryption process as part of the encoding key the maximum time, in seconds, that a CLI command attempts to establish a connection to a cell If the connection with the cell cannot be completely established within this timeframe, the command aborts. Note that if the cell is busy with a database cleanup, it may be impossible to connect the CLI with the default values. A database cleanup has a duration limit defined by the EventDBCleanupDurationLimit option, with a default value of 30 seconds. With a default ConnectionSetupTimeOut of 10 seconds, the connection cannot be established within the first 20 seconds of a cleanup.
Yes

Encryption EncryptionKey ConnectionSetupTimeOut

no default
10 (seconds)

ConnectionPortRange

specifies the range of ports to use for outgoing connections It is the port used on the client side. This is useful only to pass the event through firewalls with high restrictions. Most firewall configurations ignore source port information but require destination port information. However, firewall configuration usually can restrict the source ports as well. The syntax is PortRange = PortSequence {,
PortSequence} PortSequence = Port [- Port]

empty

Warning: On Windows platforms, when using ConnectionPortRange for a CLI running on the same machine as the cell, it is possible that the CLI will not be able to connect. This can occur when the CLI needs more than one attempt to connect (for instance, because the cell was too busy during the first attempt). Subsequent connection attempts will fail due to limitations of the OS.

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Configuring tracing for BMC Impact Manager CLI commands

Table 154 BMC Impact Manager CLI configuration parameters (part 3 of 3)
Option
ConnectionPortReuse

Description/Default indicates whether or not the ports specified in ConnectionPortRange should be reused as much as possible By default the cell tries to reuse ports from the specified range, in the given order. When ConnectionPortReuse=No, for every new connection within the same session, the next free port from the specified range is used. Only when it reaches the end of the range will it restart at the beginning of the range.

Default value
Yes

MessageBufferSize

the number of messages, or events, retained in the buffer 2000 when the cell is unable to send, or when waiting for an answer; a message that is not sent because the destination is down, for example, or a message that was sent but not yet answered, remains in the buffer
10 600

MessageBufferCleanupPercentage MessageBufferReconnectInterval the time interval, in seconds, in which the cell attempts

reconnection to a destination if the original connection failed
MessageBufferKeepWait

The amount of time, in seconds, that messages are retained in the buffer until they can be sent. Once the specified time elapses, the retained messages are removed from the buffer.

3600

MessageBufferKeepSent MessageBufferResendCount

the time, in seconds, to keep sent messages buffered while waiting for an answer the number of times to resend unanswered messages

300 1

Configuring tracing for BMC Impact Manager CLI commands
You configure CLI command tracing in the MCELL_HOME\etc\mclient.trace file. The mclient.trace file uses the same parameters as the mcell.trace configuration file. For details on the cell tracing configuration, see “ Configuring cell tracing” on page 72.

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BMC Impact Manager CLI trace configuration
Tracing of CLIs is configured in the MCELL_HOME\etc\mclient.trace file. To send tracing output to a text file, add the line of code shown in Figure 228 to the
mclient.trace file.

Figure 228 command to send tracing output to text file
ALL ALL out.txt

This line produces tracing to the MCELL_HOME\tmp\mclient\out.txt file.

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Appendix

B
560 560 562 564 565 567 570 570 571 572 573 573

B

mcell.conf file parameters
This appendix discusses all of the parameters in the mcell.conf file and contains the following topics: Action result event parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cell configuration parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Client communication parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Encryption parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Event repository cleanup parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heartbeat parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal cell monitors parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KB parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Propagation parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reporting client connection parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . StateBuilder parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trace parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Action result event parameters

Action result event parameters
Table 155 lists the action result event parameters. Table 155 Action result event parameters
Parameter ActionResultInlineLimit Description Type Default value the size limit, in bytes, for an action result to be number 4096 (4 KB) included directly in the action result event slots This applies to both the output stream (slot "output_val") and the error stream (slot "error_val"). If the respective result is larger than the indicated size, it is stored in a file. Instead of placing the value directly in the *_val slot, the reference to the file is placed in the corresponding *_ref slot. ActionResultKeepPeriod the period, in seconds, that an action result is kept on behalf of a (Browser) client The client should retrieve the result within that period. After the period has expired, the result is dropped. This is independent of the action result event. A generated action result event is not influenced by this parameter. It exists as long as other events. number 120 (2 minutes)

Cell configuration parameters
Table 156 lists the cell configuration parameters. Table 156 Cell configuration parameter descriptions (part 1 of 3)
Parameter CellDescription CellOperationLevel Description used as the initial value of the cell_description slot of the internal MC_CELL_INFO record indicates the level on which the cell must operate The operation level determines from which clients the cell accepts connections and events. The default value can accept connections from any computer. Type string string Default value BMC Impact Manager Consolidation

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Table 156 Cell configuration parameter descriptions (part 2 of 3)
Parameter CellOperationRelax Description indicates whether the operation level should be lowered in case there is no license available for the desired level, as set by CellOperationLevel Typically, more license tokens are available for lower operation levels. ConnectionPortRangea specifies the range of ports to use for outgoing connections For a cell, this applies to forward propagation. It is the port used on the client side (or on the propagating cell side). This is useful only to pass the event through firewalls with high restrictions. Most firewall configurations ignore source port information but require destination port information. However, firewall configuration usually can restrict the source ports as well. ConnectionPortReusea indicates whether or not the ports specified in ConnectionPortRange should be reused as much as possible By default, the cell or command line interface (CLI) tries to reuse ports from the specified range, in the given order. When ConnectionPortReuse=No, for every new connection within the same session, the next free port from the specified range is used. Only when it reaches the end of the range will it restart at the beginning of the range. number ProcessingLimitPerce specifies limitation of event processing speed ntage At 100% the cell accepts events as fast as it can. At x% it does not accept events during (100-x)% of the time. The purpose is to limit the cell’s utilization of the CPU. ServerAllInterfaces determines whether the cell listens on one specific interface or on all available interfaces When ServerAllInterfaces=Yes, the cell communicates on all network interfaces on the host. When ServerAllInterfaces=No, the cell only communicates with the network interface that has the IP address that is specified in the mcell.dir file of that cell. ServerDirectoryNamea specifies the name of the cell directory file ServerPort
a

Type Boolean

Default value No

string

empty

Boolean

Yes

100%

Boolean

Yes

path

mcell.dir 1828

number specifies the TCP/IP port number at which the cell listens for all in-bound requests from sources, such as the BMC Impact Explorer console, CLIs, and adapters

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Client communication parameters

Table 156 Cell configuration parameter descriptions (part 3 of 3)
Parameter SystemLogDirName SystemTmpDirName
a

Description specifies the path to the default system-defined log directory specifies the path to the default system-defined tmp directory

Type path path

Default value %H/log %H/tmp

Can also be used in the mclient.conf configuration file, which affects the behavior of all of the BMC Impact Solutions CLI commands. These parameters retain the same qualities and definitions in the mclient.conf file as they have in the mcell.conf file.

Client communication parameters
Table 157 lists the client communication parameters. Table 157 Client communication parameters
Parameter ClientCleanupInterval Description the interval, in seconds, between clean-ups of pending clients After each such period, clients that did not give the cell a notice of life are disconnected. ClientPollTimeOut the maximum time, in milliseconds, the cell waits for a client request before it continues processing the time interval, in milliseconds, that the cell has to send a packet to a client on the lowest communication level the format used to display timestamps in the date slot A default value of CIM indicates use of the Common Information Model (CIM) format from the Desktop Management Force Group. DateFormat parameters use the syntax of %[letter]. Table 158 on page 563 lists the DateFormat parameters for Solaris; for other operating systems, see their documentation. SynchronizeTimeOut the maximum time, in milliseconds, the cell waits for synchronization before dropping a connection number 5000 milliseconds number 200 milliseconds Type number Default value 300

ClientSendTimeOut

number

1000 milliseconds

DateFormat

string

CIM

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If the cell receives an event with an empty value for the date slot, it sets the date slot to the textually formatted value of the date_reception slot. That value is determined by the DateFormat parameter. This assignment is performed only once, when the event first enters the cell. If the cell is shut down and restarted, the value of date remains the same even if the DateFormat parameter has been modified in the interval. The CIM format is yyyymmddhhmmss.mmmmmmsutc, where:
yyyy = year mm = month dd = day hh = hour, based on 24-hour clock mm = minutes ss = seconds mmmmmm = microseconds s = + or utc = offset in minutes from UTC; UTC is the Universal Time Coordinate system

Table 158 lists the parameters from the Solaris platform. Other platforms, including UNIX and Microsoft Windows platforms, may have slight differences. Table 158 Date and time format parameters for Solaris (part 1 of 2)
Parameter %% %a %A %b %B %c %C %d %D %e %h %H %I %j %k %l %m %M %n Description same as % locale’s abbreviated weekday name locale’s full weekday name locale’s abbreviated month name locale’s full month name locale’s appropriate date and time representation locale’s date and time representation as produced by date (1) day of month [1,31]; single digits are preceded by zero (0) date as %m/%d/%y day of month [1,31]; single digits are preceded by a space locale’s abbreviated month name hour (24-hour clock) [0,23]; single digits are preceded by zero (0) hour (12-hour clock) [1,12]; single digits are preceded by zero (0) day number of year [1,366]; single digits are preceded by zero (0) hour (24-hour clock) [0,23]; single digits are preceded by a blank hour (12-hour clock) [1,12]; single digits are preceded by a blank month number [1,12]; single digits are preceded by zero (0) minute [00,59]; initial 0 is permitted but not required insert a new line

Appendix B

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Encryption parameters

Table 158 Date and time format parameters for Solaris (part 2 of 2)
Parameter %p %r %R %S %t %T %u %U %V Description locale’s equivalent of A.M. or P.M. appropriate time representation in 12-hour clock format with %p time as %H:%M seconds [00,61] insert a tab time as %H:%M:%S weekday as a decimal number [1,7], where 1 represents Sunday week number of year as a decimal number [00,53], where Sunday is the first day of week 1 week number of the year as a decimal number [01,53], where Monday is the first day of the week If the week containing January 1st has four or more days in the new year, then it is considered week 1. Otherwise, it is week 53 of the previous year, and the next week is considered week 1. %w %W %x %X %y %Y %Z weekday as a decimal number [0,6], where 0 represents Sunday week number of year as a decimal number [00,53], where Monday is the first day of week 1 locale’s appropriate date representation locale’s appropriate time representation year within century [00,99] year, including the century. (for example, 2006) time zone name or abbreviation, or no bytes if no time zone information exists

Encryption parameters
Table 159 lists the encryption parameters. Table 159 Encryption parameters (part 1 of 2)
Parameter AllowAdapterFrom Description Type Default value 0./0 specifies the adapters within the range of IP addresses string These are adapters that use the BMC Impact Solutions communications protocol. AllowBrowserFrom specifies the BMC Impact Explorer and the BMC Impact Portal connections within the range of IP addresses specifies the cells within the range of IP addresses specifies the command line interfaces (for example, mkill or mcstat) within the range of IP addresses string 0./0

AllowCellFrom AllowCLIFrom AllowConnectionFrom

string string

0./0 0./0 0./0

specifies the client within the range of IP addresses that string is allowed to connect to a cell

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Event repository cleanup parameters

Table 159 Encryption parameters (part 2 of 2)
Parameter AllowEIFFrom Encryption EncryptionKey ForceEncryption Description specifies the EIF event sources (for example, a postemsg) within the range of IP addresses specifies to use encryption specifies the encryption key specifies if encryption is to be forced Type string Default value 0./0

Boolean Yes string (empty) Boolean No

Event repository cleanup parameters
Table 160 lists the event repository cleanup parameters. Table 160 Event Repository cleanup parameters (part 1 of 2)
Parameter EventAutoClose Description Type Default value Yes automatically closes a duplicate event Boolean in the database when an event arrives with status=CLOSED, or it is closed in the Refine rule phase If the default value is left as Yes, the event is dropped and the duplicate is closed. If the value is set to No, there is no duplicate detection and the CLOSED event is not dropped. EventDBCleanupDurationLimit the maximum duration, in seconds, of a number single cleanup After expiration of that period, the cleanup is interrupted. Normal operation proceeds for an equal duration. Then cleanup is resumed, with the same limit again. EventDBCleanupInterval the time interval, in seconds, between periodic cleanups of the repository number 3600, or 1 hour minimum = 60; no maximum 10 minimum=5; no maximum 30

EventDBCleanupPercentage

the percentage of free space required at number termination of an EventDB cleanup With a default EventDBSize of 100000, this means that at least 10000 places must be available at termination of a completed cleanup.

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Event repository cleanup parameters

Table 160 Event Repository cleanup parameters (part 2 of 2)
Parameter Description Type Boolean Default value No EventDBCleanupOnDateReception indicates the preference for deleting events from the repository based on when they were received instead of when they were last modified EventDBCleanupPreferClosed

indicates the preference for cleaning up Boolean closed events rather than older events When there is not enough free space after removing all expired events, additional, unexpired events are removed. These are selected, oldest first, either from any events or from the closed ones first. The default is no, meaning that the event status value is not taken into account when selecting events for removal.

No

EventDBKeepClosed

the minimum age, in seconds, of CLOSED events before they are removed from the repository Note: Any modifications to the EventDBKeepClosed parameter should be carefully considered. Events of these classes remain in the event repository until you manually delete them.

number

604800, or 7 days; no minimum; no maximum

EventDBKeepNonClosed

the minimum age, in seconds, of nonclosed events before they are removed from the repository

number

2592000, or 30 days minimum value=0; maximum value = 4294967295, or 136 years 100000 minimum value=100; no maximum empty SMC_STATE_ CHANGE

EventDBSize

the number of events to retain in the repository The default size is 100000.

number

EventDBNoCleanupClosed EventDBNoCleanupNonClosed

list of classes in which closed events will not be deleted from the repository list of classes in which non-closed events will not be deleted from the repository; comma separated

string Boolean

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The related group of event cleanup parameters gives you control over which events are removed, limits the duration of the cleanup, and specifies a preference for cleaning up closed events rather than older events. A cleanup first removes expired events. Expired events are those that are older than the times in the EventDBKeepClosed and EventDBKeepNonClosed parameters, for closed and non-closed events, respectively. After this cleanup, if there is still less free space than specified in the EventDBCleanupPercentage parameter, additional, unexpired events are removed. As many events are removed as needed to reach the desired amount of free space. Older events are removed first, with one possible exception. If parameter
EventDBCleanupPreferClosed=Yes, closed events are removed first, even if some older unclosed events remain. In EventDBPreferClosed=No mode, all events are

considered, starting with the oldest first. The mc_date_modification slot is considered to determine the time of an event. However, if parameter EventDBCleanupOnDateReception=Yes, the date_reception slot is considered instead. Cleanup is interrupted if it takes longer than the value of the EventDBCleanupDurationLimit parameter. By default, this value is 30 seconds. If the cleanup period was not long enough to remove all expired events, a new cleanup is scheduled for a later time with the same amount of time as the duration limit. If all expired events were removed, the next cleanup is scheduled after the normal interval value of EventDBCleanupInterval.

Heartbeat parameters
Table 161 lists the heartbeat parameters. Table 161 Heartbeat parameters (part 1 of 2)
Parameter HeartbeatEnabled HeartbeatInterval Description Type Default value Yes 60 3 indicates whether the heartbeat monitoring Boolean mechanism is enabled or not the default interval between two beats, if not specified in the data object number number

HeartbeatMissedCritical the default number of consecutive missed beats that are needed to generate a critical event, if not specified in the data object

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Heartbeat parameters

Table 161 Heartbeat parameters (part 2 of 2)
Parameter HeartbeatMissedMinor Description the default number of consecutive missed beats that are needed to generate a minor event, if not specified in the data object Type number Default value 2

HeartbeatMissedWarning

the default number of consecutive missed number beats that are needed to generate a warning event, if not specified in the data object

1

The heartbeat feature allows a specific cell, called the monitoring cell, to monitor one or more cells, called the monitored cell or cells, for enabled access by the monitoring cell. The parameter in the mcell.conf file of the monitored cell should be HeartbeatEnabled=Yes. By default, the monitored cell sends a beat every 300 seconds. Heartbeats are configured through MC_CELL_HEARTBEAT dynamic data objects in the monitoring cell. An MC_CELL_HEARTBEAT dynamic data object contains information, such as the name of the cell to be monitored, the length of the expected time intervals between the heartbeats, and the number of heartbeats that must be missed to generate corresponding internal events in the monitoring cell. The cell receives the dynamic data object either by loading it from the data directory, receiving it through an mposter call, or viewing it in the Administrative View of the BMC Impact Explorer. The monitoring cell sends a request to the monitored cell. The monitored cell sends a heartbeat back to the monitoring cell at the specified intervals. If the monitoring cell does not receive a heartbeat in the expected timeframe, the monitoring cell generates an alert that can be viewed in the BMC Impact Explorer console. The default settings for missing heartbeats are as follows:
s s s

1 missed heartbeat generate a warning event 2 missed heartbeats generate a minor event 3 missed heartbeats generate a critical event

For example, in Figure 229 on page 569, cell 1 is the monitoring cell, which sends a request to cell 2, the monitored cell. If it does not receive a response at a specified interval, then the monitoring cell sends an alert that can be seen in the BMC Impact Explorer.

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Figure 229 Example of Heartbeat Request
cell 1 cell 2

Heartbeat

After a monitoring cell terminates and restarts, it is aware of prior requests for heartbeats because it rereads the dynamic data objects that are stored in the cell repository mcdb. After it rereads the data, the monitoring cell attempts to resend the request to the monitored cell. If the monitored cell terminates, the monitoring cell resends the request for heartbeats at the specified intervals. Table 162 lists the MC_CELL_HEARTBEAT slots. Table 162 Heartbeat slots
Slot cell enable last_time interval Description target monitored cell name 0 = disabled, 1 = enabled time last heartbeat was received length of interval between heartbeats Specify zero (0) to use the default, as determined by the HeartbeatInterval configuration parameter. missed_warning number of missed heartbeats before a WARNING event is generated Specify zero (0) to use the default, as determined by the corresponding HeartbeatMissedWarning configuration parameter. Specify -1 to disable generation of the corresponding event. missed_minor number of missed heartbeats before a MINOR event is generated Specify zero (0) to use the default, as determined by the corresponding HeartbeatMissedMinor configuration parameter. Specify -1 to disable generation of the corresponding event. missed_critical number of missed heartbeats before a CRITICAL event is generated Specify zero (0) to use the default, as determined by the corresponding HeartbeatMissedCritical configuration parameter. Specify -1 to disable generation of the corresponding event. missed number of consecutive missed heartbeats

NOTE
Deleting an instance of an MC_CELL_HEARTBEAT data object from a monitoring cell terminates the monitoring of the corresponding cell or cells.

Appendix B

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Internal cell monitors parameters

Internal cell monitors parameters
Table 163 lists the internal cell monitor parameters. Table 163 Internal cell monitors parameters
Parameter CellEventEnable Description a flag that indicates whether the cell should generate internal events, such as start, stop, and heartbeat; does not include events generated by the rules indicates whether an event processing error should produce a special internal event to flag that error, or not Type Boolean Default value Yes

CellErrorEvents

Boolean Boolean number

Yes Yes 600

CellMetricsEnabled determines whether metrics for cell performance are collected or not CellTickInterval the time interval, in seconds, between generation of cell heartbeat events (ticks) The purpose of such heartbeats is to send a sign of life from the cell. A zero (0) value disables cell ticks without disabling other internal events. This parameter operates only if the CellEventEnable is set to Yes. RuleLoopDetect

a flag that requires the cell to check for certain conditions Boolean that can induce infinite looping of events Setting this parameter to Yes can cause mild cell performance degradation.

No

KB parameters
Table 164 lists the KB parameters. Table 164 KB parameters
Parameter KBDirName Description the path to the active KB directory Type path Default value the kb directory in the cell’s cell-specific configuration directory kbrecovery

KBRecoveryDirName

the path to an alternate kb directory to be used path for recovery from catastrophic damage For more information, see “mrecover— Recovering from a catastrophic data loss” on page 547.

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Propagation parameters
Table 165 lists the propagation parameters. Table 165 Propagation parameters
Parameter
MessageBufferKeepSent MessageBufferKeepWait
a

Description

Type

Default value

the time, in seconds, to keep sent messages number 300 buffered while waiting for an answer The amount of time, in seconds, that messages are retained in the buffer until they can be sent. Once the specified time elapses, the retained messages are removed from the buffer. number 3600, or 1 hour

MessageBufferReconnectInte the time interval, in seconds, in which the rval cell attempts reconnection to a destination

number 600

if the original connection failed The cell continues to reestablish a connection as long as there are messages in the buffer.
MessageBufferResendCount

the number of times to resend unanswered number 1 messages number 20000 the number of messages, or events, retained in the buffer when the cell is unable to send, or when waiting for an answer; a message that is not sent because the destination is down, for example, or a message that was sent but not yet answered, remains in the buffer A cell maintains one buffer for each destination. Such buffers have the same size, as set by the parameter.

MessageBufferSize

PropagateBufferSize

the number of requests for propagation to retain in the propagation buffer Such a request corresponds to firing a Propagate rule. There is one propagate buffer per cell with as many places for requests as set by the parameter.

number 20000; minimum=10 maximum=1,000,000

PropagateConfigFileName the name of the propagation configuration path file
a

mcell.propagate