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Urine as Liquid Fertilizer in

Agricultural Production in the


Philippines
Gina S Itchon MD MMedSc
Health and Hygiene Specialist,
Sustainable Sanitation Center
Xavier University

2nd ADB-DMC and Partners Sanitation Dialogue, Asian Development Bank, Manila
2nd ADB-DMC and Partners Sanitation Dialogue, Asian Development Bank, Manila
Composition of household wastewater

volume nutrient content organics


(l/person/year) (kg N,P,K/person/year) (kg COD/person/year)

10000 5 20

8000 4 16

3.0 – 5.3
6000 3 12

14.1
4000

12.3
2 8
2000
500 1 4

0.7-1.2
50

3.6
0
0 0

0.8
urine
faeces urine urine
greywater faeces faeces
greywater greywater

2nd ADB-DMC and Partners Sanitation Dialogue, Asian Development Bank, Manila
2nd ADB-DMC and Partners Sanitation Dialogue, Asian Development Bank, Manila
2nd ADB-DMC and Partners Sanitation Dialogue, Asian Development Bank, Manila
2nd ADB-DMC and Partners Sanitation Dialogue, Asian Development Bank, Manila
2nd ADB-DMC and Partners Sanitation Dialogue, Asian Development Bank, Manila
The reuse-oriented sustainable sanitation approach and
the consideration of urine and feces as valuable resource
that can be productively used as fertilizers and soil
conditioners in agriculture, are slowly gaining popularity
in the Philippines. Several good practice examples from
all over the Philippines show that human waste can be
turned into effective community assets. Particularly the
easy-to-treat and nutrient-rich human urine has a high
potential to provide a permanent liquid fertilizer source
that is freely and immediately available. It can help
reduce the dependence on expensive synthetic fertilizer
resources and can have a considerable impact on the
mitigation of poverty, malnutrition and food insecurity.

Urine as Liquid Fertilizer in Agricultural Production in the


Philippines: A Practical Field Guide
Robert Gensch, Analiza Miso, Gina Itchon