Individua Assignment Coversheet (Onlline vers al C sion

)
DETA OF ASSIG AILS GNMENT STUD DENT NAME EMAIL ADDRESS UNIT CODE * NAME T E ASSE ESSMENT TITL LE TUTO OR’S NAME: And drew COLE 720 08383@student.swin.edu.au Sho Essay Topic ort Emma Beddows
.

ID NUMBER N PHO CONTACT ONE T

7208383 +61 407 38 998 84

SCI – Cultural Perspectives o Science and Technology I17 P on d DAT OF SUBMIS TE SSION: 09/ /01/2011

DECL LARATION

I dec clare that ( the first four boxe must be co e es ompleted for th assignment to be accept he ted):

X This assignmen does not co any matterial that has previously be submitted for assessme at this or any other unive nt ontain een ent ersity. X This is an origin piece of work and no pa has been co nal art ompleted by any other student than signe below. a ed X I have read and understood the avoiding plagiarism guiidelines at http p p://www.swinb burne.edu.au/lltas/plagiarism m/students.htm and m
no pa of this work has been co art opied or parap phrased from any other source except where this has been clearly acknowledged in w s the body of the ass b signment and included in th reference li st. he

X I have retained a copy of this assignment in the event o it becoming lost or damag d s of ged. X (o optional) I agr to a copy o the assignm being rettained as an exemplar for fu ree of ment e uture students (subject to identifying details s
being removed). g

Stud dent ackn nowledgeme ( by ent typin your nam you ng me agre to the abo ee ove):
DETA OF FEED AILS DBACK

Date: Andrew E Edward COLE E 09 9/01/2011

Offic Use Only ce Date Received Total Mark / Grade
Individual Assignment Co oversheet as of No 2009.doc ov

Receive by ed Marker

  LEWIS  WOLPERT  SUGGESTS  THAT  SCIENTISTS’  “…OBLIGATIONS  ARE  ONLY  THAT  THEY  MUST  INFORM  THE  PUBLIC  ABOUT  THE  POSSIBLE  IMPLICATIONS  OF  THEIR  WORK  AND,   PARTICULARLY  WHERE  SENSITIVE  SOCIAL  ISSUES ARISE, THEY MUST BE CLEAR ABOUT THE RELIABILITY OF THEIR STUDIES.”   DISCUSS  THE  FOLLOWING  IN  1000  WORDS.  'CONSIDER  THE  SCIENTIST’S  ROLES  AND  RESPONSIBILITIES  AS 
BOTH  CITIZENS  AND  AS  SCIENTISTS,  THE  IMPACT  AND  MANAGEMENT  OF  SOCIAL  VALUES  IN  SCIENTIFIC  PRACTICE, AND THE ROLE THAT GOVERNMENT HAS REGARDING HOW SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE IS USED .'    

  Scientists  attempt  to  expand  our  understanding  of  how  the  universe  works.  The  theories  and knowledge gained during this work are applied as technology, and can either improve  or make worse our lives. Discoveries such as the atomic bomb and genetic engineering have  the potential to affect society in ways that may not be immediately apparent; some argue  that it is therefore the responsibility of the scientists themselves to consider the impact of  their  work.  The  government  also  has  a  part  to  play  in  the  application  of  scientific  discoveries.  Robert  Merton  (cited  in  Anderson  et  al.  2010)  developed  a  set  of  norms  for  scientist’s  behaviour. He specifically excluded behaviour that he considered to be technical in nature,  focusing  instead  on  norms  “believed  right  and  good”  (Merton,  R  cited  in  Anderson  et  al.  2010).  These  norms  where  communality  (sharing  of  information),  universalism  (not  excluding  participants  for  any  reason),  disinterestedness  (objectivity),  and  organized  scepticism  (transparency).  Anderson  et  al.  demonstrated  in  their  study  (2010)  that  these  norms are considered “as part of the communal property of science” (Anderson et al. 2010  p. 391).  The  International  Council  for  Science  (ICSU)  are  an  international  body  who  aims  to  “strengthen  international  science  for  the  benefit  of  society”  (ICSU  2008).  In  a  brochure  developed  by  the  councils  Committee  on  Freedom  and  Responsibility  in  the  Conduct  of  1   

  Science (CFRS 2008), several responsibilities of scientists are outlined. These are divided into  two  categories,  with  responsibilities  to  the  scientific  community  based  on  Merton’s  work,  and responsibilities to society being based on the ICSU vision, including the responsibility to  “… minimize the potential dangers of applications of science” (CFRS 2008, p. 12).  In contrast to the position held by the ICSU, Wolpert (1994) suggests that scientists hold all  the  normal  responsibilities  of  citizens,  and  in  their  role  as  a  scientist,  the  additional  responsibility to “inform the public about the possible implications of their work” (Wolpert  1994, pg. 152), and “be clear about the reliability of their studies” (Wolpert 1994, pg. 152).  He  suggests  that  these  are  the  only  additional  responsibilities  scientists  hold.  Wolpert’s  position is that the scientists themselves should only consider the social values inherent in  their work in order to better inform society; that it is not the responsibility of the scientists  to  decide  on  whether  the  application  of  their  work  is  socially  acceptable  or  in  the  best  interests of society.   Karr (2006) refers to unwritten social contracts between citizens, government and scientists.  He states that scientists, through their acceptance of public monies to fund their work, have  an  obligation  to  the  people  to  “make  science  available  to  the  people  and  to  inform  the  public about the scientific consequences of human actions” (Karr 2006). He also states that  governments have a similar obligation to the people, to “use collected taxes to understand  the world and to use knowledge to make decisions that will protect the public’s well‐being”  (Karr 2006).  In  considering  what  role  government  plays  in  the  application  of  scientific  knowledge  it  is  important  to  keep  in  mind  that  a  democratic  government  acts  on  behalf  of  the  people;  it  should only act in the peoples best interests. The ICSU suggests that the government’s role  2   

  in  science  should  be  promoting  ethical  guidelines,  supporting  research,  and  monitoring  good  research  practice  (CFRS  2008,  p.  19).  They  also  emphasize  that  governments  should  respect  the  freedoms  they  outline  as  necessary  for  scientists,  including  the  freedom  of  movement, of association, expression and access.   The  Australian  Government,  through  the  Department  of  Innovation,  Industry,  Science  and  Research,  promotes  both  research  and  the  practical  application  of  technology.  The  Department  outlines  its  efforts  in  its  annual  report  (DIISR  2010).  It  lists  two  outcomes  it  measures success against, covering “national leadership in converting knowledge and ideas  into  new  processes,  services,  products  and  marketable  devices”  (DIISR  2010  p.  21)  and  “investment in research, research training and infrastructure”.  In discussing the responsibilities of scientists and the consideration of social views on these  responsibilities two opposing points of view have been discovered. While there seems to be  an agreement that scientists have a responsibility to each other to be impartial and proper  in  their  endeavours,  their  responsibilities  to  society  are  in  dispute.  Wolpert  holds  that  scientists  are  responsible  only  to  the  extent  that  the  social  implications  of  their  work  are  disclosed;  whereas  the  ICSUs  position  is  that  the  scientists  must  minimize  the  dangers  presented in the application of their work. Wolpert’s view is perhaps correct as it applies to  pure  science;  the  ICSU  appears  to  be  taking  a  more  holistic  view.  In  the  discussion  of  a  governments  role  in  science  greater  consensus  has  been  found,  with  the  Australian  Government appearing to support research and development of technologies as suggested  by the ICSU.     

3   

  References  Anderson,  M  &  Ronning,  E  &  De  Vries,  R  &  Martinson,  B  2010,  ‘Extending  the  Mertonian  Norms: Scientists’ Subscription to the Norms of Research’, The Journal of Higher Education,  vol. 81, no. 3, pp. 366‐392.  ICSU’s  Mission  2008,  International  Council  for  Science  (ICSU),  viewed  January  9  2010,  <http://www.icsu.org/5_abouticsu/INTRO_IntroMiss_1.html>.  Committee  on  Freedom  and  Responsibility  in  the  Conduct  of  Science  (CFRS)  2008,  Responsibility and Universality of Science, International Council for Science, Paris.  Wolpert, L 1994, The Unnatural Nature of Science, Harvard University Press, Cambridge.  Karr, J 2006, ‘When government ignores science, scientists should speak up’, BioScience, no.  56.4, pp. 287‐288.  Department  of  Innovation,  Industry,  Science  and  Research  (DIISR)  2010,  Annual  Report  2009‐2010, Canberra. 

4   

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful