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Inside Today
Greater
Mercer County
Community
Calendar
Memorial Day Salute
Car Care Guide
May 27
Johnny Appleseed Classic
Eldora Speedway,
New Weston
May 27
Ft. Recovery Memorial
Parade & Program 7pm
Monument Park, Ft.
Recovery
June 3
Mercer Co. Chamber’s
Ugly Pants Open
Golf Outing
Mercer County Elks
June 10, 11
Relay for Life
Mercer County
Fairgrounds
June 16-19
Ft. Recovery Jubilee
Ft. Recovery
June 17,18
Zuma Days
Zuma Park, Montezuma
June 17-19
Rockford Community Days
Rockford
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Established 1884
THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2011 75
¢
By Martha Schoen
Just over 30 years
ago the concept of Get
R.E.A.L. was planted
in one young teacher,
Jerry Kanney’s mind
who was completing his
first year of teaching
at St. Henry Schools.
He was approached by
his principal to attend
a program in Van Wert
with a few students.
The program challenged
Kanney and the students
to go back to their school
and help to educate
others on what could
be done in the school
system to promote good
character building.
The program
was known as the
Junior Educational
Development Institute
or JEDI. It slowly
developed into Chemical
Awareness Days.
Several years later
when Kanney came to
Coldwater, he felt the
need for Coldwater to
have such a program. He
got a group of students
together and they came
up with the name Get
R.E.A.L. which stands
for Responsible Enough
About Life. Now over
the past 14 years, Get
R.E.A.L. has spread
throughout Mercer
County and even into
Darke County. A
fitting end for Kanney’s
teaching career was
this years Get R.E.A.L.
that brought Coldwater
and St. Henry schools
together.
Get R.E.A.L. was
held May 18 - May 20

at
Coldwater and St. Henry.
This years theme was
“Walk the Talk: Words to
live by are just words…
unless you actually live
by them.” The students
participated in character
building sessions and
activities. Several of
the small group sessions
involved stories and
activities provided by
local people. The main
presenter for this year
was Larry Scott from the
“Rachel’s Challenge”
program. Rachel Scott
was the first person
killed at Columbine
High School on April
20, 1999. Her acts of
kindness, along with her
six diaries, challenges
students to look for the
best in others, dare to
dream, choose positive
influences, use kind
words, and start a chain
reaction. Then on
Thursday evening, both
schools, which are fierce
rivals on the playing
fields, came together
to share a carbo-loaded
dinner to prepare for the
5K challenge on Friday.
“Rachel’s Challenge”
community presentation
was held following the
meal. Look for more of
“Rachel’s Challenge”
story in a future article.
Friday was one of the
few nice days this Spring,
and it was a great day
for students in grades
5-8 along with staff and
community members to
run the 5K which is the
students favorite part
of Get R.E.A.L. You
could see a mass of red
shirts dotting the streets
of St. Henry, and a mob
of orange shirts along
the streets of Coldwater.
The 5K challenge
promotes a healthy
lifestyle and gives
students the opportunity
to do something that
they never thought about
doing before in their
lives. To cross the finish
line whether it is first or
last is a feeling like no
other. Students showed
their compassion for
their fellow classmates
by encouraging them
and cheering them on.
This is exactly the kind
of character that all
students need to see,
understand, and share.
Get R.E.A.L. 2011 – Walk the Talk
Pictured is the Get R.E.A.L. meal on the evening of May 19 with St. Henry and
Coldwater Schools. Guest speaker of Rachel’s Challenge, Larry Scott, is pictured at
right.
Jerry Kanney, Coldwater Middle School Principal,
and Julie Garke, St. Henry Middle School Principal, at
the Rachel’s Challenge community presentation.
Graduating high school seniors competed for fve
scholarships sponsored by the Coldwater Legion. The
Scholarship Committee awarded all fve scholarships to
Coldwater high school seniors.
The students were judged on the basis of the American
Legion motto, “For God and Country”, which considered
their activities in high school, service to community and
the involvement in their church.
The Scholars attended the May membership meeting
at Coldwater Legion for recognition and the awards of
$500 each.
Coldwater Legion Scholars
Pictured left to right are: Front Row-Ashley
Klosterman, daughter of Kerry and Rebecca
Klosterman, Sarah Wenning, daughter of Nate and
Karen Wenning, and Krista Hemmelgarn, daughter of
Tim and Cindy Hemmelgarn.
Back Row-Veronica Bruns, daughter of Mike and
Lorraine Bruns, Don Livingston, Post 470 Commander,
and Tyler Siefring, son of Ken and Karen Siefring
The Coldwater Memorial Park swimming pool
is scheduled to open May 30, Memorial Day, at 1
p.m. (weather permitting). The sale of season tickets
will begin May 23. Tickets may be purchased at the
swimming pool bath house from 4 - 8 p.m. Prices
for season tickets have been set at: Family-$100,
Individual-$50; Individual session prices have been
set at: Adult-$4 and Child-$3. Registrations for group
swimming lessons will also be accepted beginning
May 23. The fee for group lessons has been set at
$20. Registration forms for group lessons may be
obtained from the bath house during normal pool
hours. The “Total Body Fitness “ program will again
be offered this year. Information and registration for
this program can be obtained in the bath house.
Coldwater Pool
to open May 30
By Martha Schoen
William “Bill” Bettinger
volunteered to join the Navy
when he was 17. This was
in 1944 during World War
II. Bettinger like many other
service personnel left high
school prior to graduation.
These people went off to fght
for our country and gave up
the opportunity to receive their
High School Diploma.
William Bettinger is the son
of the late Arthur and Regina
(Hemmelgarn) Bettinger.
Bill was number six of the 12
Bettinger children who grew
up in Coldwater. On May
4, 1944, Bill left to begin his
eight weeks of training in
Great Lakes, Illinois. He then
had a two week visit with his
family before he was shipped to
California. From California he
would go to fght in the Pacifc
Campaign. En route his ship
had an eight hour layover in
Hawaii. Bill was hoping to see
his older brother, Paul, who was
also in the Navy and stationed
in Hawaii. Paul fnally got the
word and just missed the ship as
it was pulling out of the harbor.
Bill’s ship was an escort
carrier which was a small, slow
aircraft carrier used to defend
convoys from enemy threats
and was not typically part of the
main feet of ships. The ship,
originally named Midway, was
the St. Lo. The name was given
to commemorate the great
American victory in France
when the heavily fortifed town
of St. Lo was captured. It was
said that the ship being renamed
was a bad omen.
From October 18-24, 1944,
during the Battle of Leyte Gulf,
St. Lo was giving air support to
General MacArthur’s troops.
The St. Lo was one of 13
boats called the Taffy 3 which
consisted of aircraft carries
and small destroyers. Then
on October 25, at the Battle of
Samar, a large Japanese feet
unexpectedly came upon this
small feet of 13. During the
battle, the 13 ships sent up black
smoke to create a smoke screen
so that the Japanese could not
effectively see where they
were shooting. Taffy 3 was
able to attack the enemy and
send up enough black smoke
to make the Japanese ships turn
and leave. The main action of
the battle was over, but about
45 minutes later Kamikazes,
Japanese suicide planes, began
to attack. Bill was in the after
engine room at the time a
Kamikaze hit the St. Lo and Bill
and the other shipmates in this
area had no chance of getting
out and were likely instantly
killed due to the frst of several
explosions on the ship. Those
surviving abandoned ship and
were picked up by the other
ships of the Taffy 3. The St.
Lo was the frst ship sunk by a
Kamikaze plane. Of the over
800 men aboard there were 126
deaths. This battle on October
25 would go down in Naval
history as a turning point for the
Navy.
Bettinger was not the only
Coldwater native killed that
day. Paul Buschur had enlisted
with Bill, and they were both
stationed on the St. Lo. It has
been told that after the main
action of the battle, Paul went
to check on his friend Bill just
prior to the Kamikaze hitting
the ship. A picture of the St.
Lo is proudly displayed in the
meeting room at the Coldwater
Library.
Bill’s family has received
many metals and honors
including the Purple Heart for
Bill’s service to his country.
Many of these memories are
in an album compiled by the
family. Recently, Bill’s family
received the Veterans Diploma
of Graduation to add to the
album.
The Veterans Diploma is a
high school diploma awarded
to any veteran who left prior to
graduation to serve in the armed
forces during WWII, Korean
War, or Vietnam War. According
to the Mercer County Veterans
Service Offce, the Veterans
Diplomas have been available
for several years. Proof of
honorable discharge, school
attended and other information
is needed. To apply for the
Diploma, an appointment can be
set up with the Veterans Offce.
Carl Bettinger, Bill’s youngest
brother, flled out the necessary
paperwork and he received the
Diploma on April 12, from the
Coldwater Board of Education.
Carl said that it needed to be
done so that it could be placed
with Bill’s other honors.
On this Memorial Day, May
30, please take a moment to
remember Bill and all those who
have died serving our country.
Veteran receives Diploma 67 years later
William Bettinger’s High School Diploma is presented
by Coldwater Superintendent Rich Seas to William’s
brother, Carl Bettinger
the mercer county chronicle
Page 2 • may 26, 2011
area obituaries
PI-SPAD110502_100255
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Class of 2011
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Benefit Knights of St. John
Maria Stein, Ohio
SATURDAY, MAY 28
a communi t y of f ri ends
Virginia L. Boeckman, 82, St. henry, died at 2:30 a.m.
may 20, at the Gardens at St. henry.
She was born may 4, 1929, in celina.
She was married october 11, 1952, in celina, to Alfred A.
Boeckman, and he preceded her in death march 23, 2001.
She is survived by a son and spouse, tim and Denise
Boeckman, St. henry; four grandchildren; and four great-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by her mother regina (Beckstedt)
Ahlers-lechleiter and step-father urban lechleiter.
She was a member of St. henry catholic church, and
catholic Knights, cassella. She was a former member of
nativity of the Blessed Virgin mary church, cassella, and the
ladies Sodality of the church.
mass of christian Burial was held may 23, at St. henry
Catholic Church, St. Henry, with Fr. Tom Hemm offciating.
Burial followed in nativity of the Blessed Virgin mary
cemetery, cassella. condolences may be left at hogenkampfh.
com.
John P. Brunswick, 78, coldwater, died at 10:02 p.m. may
17, at miami Valley hospital, Dayton.
he was born June 22, 1932, in Ft. recovery, to the late
lawrence and Justine (Braun) Brunswick.
he was married June 28, 1958, in St. Sebastian, to madonna
Jutte, and she survives in coldwater.
he is survived by three sons and spouses, michael and cecelia
Brunswick, everett, Washington, Dan and cindy Brunswick,
St. henry, and carl and cindy Brunswick, coldwater; a
daughter, linda Brunswick, coldwater; a daughter and spouse,
Janice and Joe Gordon, Beavercreek; eight grandchildren; two
step-grandchildren; three brothers and spouses, robert and
erma Brunswick, maria Stein, Arthur and Dorothy Brunswick,
Beavercreek, and Bill and Vera Brunswick, Florida; a sister,
Bea Flaherty, Iowa; fve brothers-in-law and spouses, Mark
Schwieterman, St. henry, orville Schwieterman, coldwater,
Donald and Dorothy Jutte, Sidney, thomas and Vivian Jutte,
Bellefontaine, and Fr. edgar Jutte c.PP.S., mexico; and a
sister-in-law, Delores Schwieterman, maria Stein.
he was preceded in death by a son, Steve Brunswick, two
brothers and spouses, melvin and mildred Brunswick, and
richard and rita Brunswick, four sisters and their spouses, rita
and Frank tumbusch, mary catherine Brunswick, ruth and
ed Goubeaux and Wilma Brunswick, his parent-in-laws, t.e.
and mary Jutte, two brothers-in-law, mike Flaherty and roger
Schwieterman and two sisters-in-law, rosemary Schwieterman
and helen Schwieterman.
he was retired from the former mersman Plant, celina. he
was a member of holy trinity catholic church, the coldwater
Knights of columbus, the ohio Progressive Sportsman, Ft.
recovery, the Ft. recovery V.F.W. and was a hunter Safety
instructor.
mass of christian Burial was held on may 21, at holy
trinity catholic church, coldwater, with Fr. louis Schmidt,
offciating. Burial followed in St. Elizabeth Cemetery,
coldwater. condolences may be left at hogenkampfh.com.
Constance Spriggs Havel Giraud, 88, midland, michigan,
died may 15.
She was born march 21, 1923, in celina, to the late lisle and
Amelia Spriggs.
She was married to Gerald A. havel, and he preceded her in
death. She then married George h. Giraud, and he preceded her
in death.
She is survived by two sons and spouses, Kirk and Sandra
havel and randy and Joetta havel; stepdaughter and spouse,
Arlene and Roland Giraud Wiltz; a brother and spouse,
charles and Jeane Spriggs; nine grandchildren; and 15 great-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by a grandson.
trained as a nurse during World War ii, she later worked as a
nurse and homemaker. in 1982, she was commissioned as a lay
professional church worker for American lutheran church. She
was a member of trinity lutheran church, midland, michigan,
and Phi Beta Psi sorority.
A memorial service was held may 20 at the church. A
service and interment of ashes will take place in celina during
the summer. memorials may be directed to the Seminary tuition
Fund or the trinity Adult mission Group Fund, 3701 Jefferson
Avenue, midland, michigan 48640. Arrangements are being
handled by Ware-Smith-Woolever Funeral Directors.
Andrew N. Hemmelgarn, 81, St. henry, died at 10:15 a.m.
may 22, at his home.
he was born october 1, 1929, in Wendelin, to the late henry
and Amelia (Stammen) hemmelgarn.
he was married August 2, 1952, in maria Stein, to Velma
Berning, and she survives in St. henry.
he is survived by seven sons and spouses, Dave and
cindy hemmelgarn, and tim and cindy hemmelgarn, all of
coldwater, Bob and theresa hemmelgarn, north Star, mark
and Kathy hemmelgarn, and larry and lynn hemmelgarn,
all of maria Stein, Bill and Deb hemmelgarn, and Brian and
candy hemmelgarn, all of St. henry; two daughters and
spouses, connie and merle hein, coldwater, and Sharon and
carl Koesters, maria Stein; thirty grandchildren; three great-
grandchildren; three sisters, marcella Bailey, Brookville, Flora
Dippold, maria Stein, and Agnes miller, Brookville; and a sister-
in-law, mary Ann hemmelgarn, St. henry.
he was preceded in death by a grandson, a granddaughter,
four brothers, cyril hemmelgarn, cletus hemmelgarn, urban
hemmelgarn and ernest hemmelgarn, two sisters, rita harmuth
and Betty hemmelgarn, and brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law,
melvin Bailey, Agnes hemmelgarn, clara hemmelgarn, martin
harmuth, cyril Dippold and ralph miller.
he was retired from maintenance at community hospital,
coldwater, in 1991 and formerly worked at h.A. Dorsten, inc.
in minster. he was a member of St. henry catholic church, and
the St. henry Knights of columbus.
mass of christian Burial was held may 25, at St. henry
catholic church, St. henry. Burial followed in St. henry
cemetery, St. henry. condolences may be left at hogenkampfh.
com.
Alice V. (Gehle) Smith, 88, celina, died at 4:50 p.m. may
20, at laurels of Shane hill, rockford.
She was born February 23, 1923, in Van Wert, to the late
Joseph and esther (Grote) Germann.
She was married to clarence Gehle, and he preceded her
in death September 11, 1976. She then married on September
28, 1991, to lloyd Smith, and he preceded her in death July
27, 2010.
She is survived by three sons and spouses, Donald
and roberta Gehle, and Kenneth and Diane Gehle, all of
celina, Bernard and Paula Gehle, lima; a daughter, Karen
Gehle, celina; three daughters and spouses, Patricia and
tony Baliey, roanoke, Virginia, Susan and larry Downam,
celina, and emma and ray tregembo, Fresno, california; 18
grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren; a brother and spouse,
howard and marvalle Germann, St. marys; and a sister-in-law,
lois Germann, celina.
She was preceded in death by sons, rudy Gehle, Wilfred
Gehle, Dale Gehle; brothers and their spouses, elmer and
Bernice Germann, Arthur and Pauline Germann, lester and
nina Germann, Paul and yvonne Germann, herbert Germann;
sisters and their spouses, Agnes and millard teboe, mildred
and Fredrick Germann, mable and Ada Prichard, ireta and
harold Grace, helen and Fred Searight, norma and charles
Zizelman and Laura and William Kahn.
She graduated from Van Wert high School in 1941. She
was a member of the immaculate conception catholic church,
celina, and the Altar rosary Sodality of the church. She was a
member of the Celina Senior Citizens and the Mercer County
council on Aging. She was a member of the Sunshine Singers,
a member of the celina V.F.W. Post #5713 Auxiliary and was a
hospital worker for the military order of the cooties.
mass of christian Burial was held at may 24, at the
immaculate conception catholic church, with Fr. Ken Alt
offciating. Burial followed in Mercer Memory Gardens,
celina. condolences may be made at lhDfuneralhome.com.
memorials may be made to the i.c. endowment Fund.
Rita Anne Strukamp, 50, rockford, died at 1:30 p.m. may
20, at laurels of Shane hill, rockford.
She was born July 19, 1960, in Van Wert, to the late elmer
and Virginia (houser) Strukamp. her mother survives in
rockford.
She is survived by two sons, chad Strukamp, rockford, and
William Black, celina; a daughter, Alyssa Black, rockford;
lifelong companion, robert Black, celina; a sister, teresa
Strukamp, rockford; a sister and spouse, Pamela and randy
Severns, mendon; a brother and spouse, Kevin and lynette
Strukamp, Decatur, indiana; one granddaughter; and a
nephew.
She worked for 20 years at Veyance technologies, formerly
Good year tire and rubber company, St. marys. She was
a member of eagles Auxiliary #1292, rockford, where she
served in many offces and presently was a trustee. She
graduated in 1978 from Parkway high School.
Funeral services were held may 25, at Ketcham-ripley
Funeral home, rockford. Burial followed in riverside
cemetery, rockford. memorials may be directed to the
children. condolences may be sent to ketchamripley.com.
Sr. Rose Ann Winkeljohn, 85, died may 16, at Good
Samaritan hospital, Dayton.
She was born may 13, 1926, in celina, to the late harry
and edna (hartings) Winkeljohn. She entered the Sisters of the
Precious Blood August 8, 1942, and received the name Sr. mary
robert.
She is survived by a brother, Donald Winkeljohn, celina; three
sisters, mary ellen Winkeljohn and Dorothy Winkeljohn, both of
Peoria, Arizona, and Rita Poindexter, Cottonwood, Arizona.
She was in charge of the museum and chapels at maria Stein
center for six years prior to her 1994 retirement. in 2001, she
returned to the motherhouse in Salem heights, Dayton. She
had been a sister of the Precious Blood for 68 years. She served
in elementary schools as teacher and/or principal for 24 years
in Ohio, Missouri, California, Indiana and Arizona. She was
librarian at moeller high School, cincinnati.
A Funeral mass was held may 20, at Salem heights.
interment followed in the Salem heights cemetery.
Judy A. Jansen, 68, St. henry, died at 1:15 p.m. may 23,
at her home.
She was born June 23, 1942, in Dayton, to the late irenus
and Delphina (Stelzer) Quinter.
She was married June 25, 1966, in Philothea, to Paul J.
Jansen, and he survives in St. henry.
She is survived by a daughter, elaine Jansen, Dayton; two
sons and spouses, chris and carrie Jansen, Fairborn, and
mike and Alicia Jansen, noblesville, indiana; a son, Bob
Jansen, Chicago, Illinois; fve grandchildren; two brothers
and spouses, Dan and Marlene Quinter, Duluth, Georgia,
and Bill and Mary Jo Quinter, Coldwater; and two sisters and
spouses, Diane and lowell Franck, Burkettsville, and Sharon
and mike roessner, St. Peter.
She was preceded in death by a brother, Jim Quinter.
She was a homemaker. She was a member of St. henry
catholic church, where she was a member of the church
choir, a cantor, a communion distributor, and taught ccD for
28 years. She was a graduate of Ball State university.
mass of christian Burial will be held at 10:30 a.m.
may 27, at St. henry catholic church, St. henry, with Fr.
Thomas Hemm, offciating. Burial will follow in St. Henry
cemetery, St. henry. Friends may call at the hogenkamp
Funeral home, St. henry, on may 26 from 2 - 8 p.m. and
may 27 from 9 - 10 a.m. condolences may be left at hogen-
kampfh.com.
CALL
Subscriber Services
The Mercer County Chronicle
For delivery service-related inquiries.
419-678-2324
the mercer county chronicle
May 26, 2011 • Page 3
A Look
Back
MERCER COUNTY
CHRONICLE
Vol. 114 no. 21
USPS 339-15560
419-678-2324
www.mercercountychronicle.com
The Mercer County
Chronicle is published
Thursdays at 124 W. Main St.,
Coldwater, Ohio by Mercer
County Publications, Inc.
Entered in the post office
in Coldwater, Ohio 45828 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Coldwater, Ohio.
Available by mail in Mercer,
Auglaize, Darke, Jay or Van
Wert County, $36 per year.
Outside these counties, $45
per year.
Kami Phlipot
General Manager
chroniclegm@bright.net
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to:
Mercer County Chronicle,
P.O. Box 105, Coldwater, OH
45828
Letters are welcome
We welcome letters to the editor. Letters must contain
the writer’s name (one only), address and daytime phone
number. All letters will be verified by phone prior to pub-
lication. Only one letter per household, per thirty days.
We encourage our readers to submit letters on a vari-
ety of topics. Letters will be edited for grammar, possible
libel or slander, and may be shortened because of space
limitation. Acceptance of a letter is no guarantee that it
will be published.
Send letters to: Mercer County Chronicle,
P.O. Box 105, Coldwater, OH 45828,
or e-mail them to chroniclegm@bright.net.
From the Archives of the
Mercer County Chronicle
10 YEARS AGO (2001)
Ohio Governor Bob Taft read
from Minster author Rich Stein’s
book “Ohio’s in Room 3-Z”
to Beverly Granger’s second
grade students at Celina West
Elementary School to recognize
the local Ohio Reads program.
Twenty-nine members of
the Fort Recovery FFA Chapter
attended the 73rd State FFA
Convention in Columbus on May
4-5. Two members, Jeff Fortkamp
and Jessica Westgerdes, were
recognized as American FFA
Degree recipients, which is the
highest degree a FFA member
can achieve.
25 YEARS AGO (1986)
The Coldwater Cavaliers
won the AA District baseball
tourment with a 30-0 record and
St. Henry Redskins won the A
District Championship with a
5-4 win over Midwest Athletic
Conference foe Parkway.
Members of the Philothea
Hustlers 4-H club, in a combined
effort with the Butler Township
trustees, recently removed
approximately fve tons of litter
from 30 miles of township
roads, according to Trustee Stan
Ebbing.
50 YEARS AGO (1961)
The Coldwater Cavaliers
won their 19th straight game
against Ayersville 3-1 Saturday
afternoon to advance to the State
baseball tournament for the frst
time since 1938.
Coldwater High School
will graduate 78 seniors at
commencement exercises May 28.
Pat Schindler will be Valedictorian
and Mary Brinksneader will
give the Salutatory address.
Superintendent Thomas Ryan
will present the class and School
Board President will present the
Diplomas.
Are you having trouble
trying to decide whom to
believe about the warnings
on activity at Grand Lake
St. Marys? Some say it is
OK to eat the fsh and to
boat and swim and then the
Ohio Department of Natural
Resources comes out with this
statement: COLUMBUS,
OH - “Recreational users of
the three public beaches at
Grand Lake St. Marys State
Park are advised against
swimming and wading,
water should not be swal-
lowed, and surface scum
should be avoided, accord-
ing to the Ohio departments
of Environmental Protection,
Natural Resources, and
Health. Advisories will be
erected at West, East, and
Camp beaches which are
located at the eastern end
of the lake.” This would
sound to me as though the
State of Ohio, along with
all the testing and such, is
more concerned then those
locally. I wish someone
would get things straight,
as there are lots of people
who are depending on the
summer business to make
a living. Let’s hope all this
confusion gets settled soon
especially before Memorial
Day holiday.
With all this rain we have
had and with more on the
way you have to wonder just
what the farmers will do if
they can’t get in the felds
to plant. Some are say-
ing they may drop the corn
crop and just do soybeans.
That will be a hard decision
for some farmers to make.
But it doesn’t make sense
to plant a corn crop that late
and not get enough growth
to make it proftable. I sure
don’t envy any farmer hav-
ing to make those kind of
decisions. Let’s just hope
this rain will hold off long
enough for the crops to get
in the ground and the farm-
ers can have a good crop.
That’s My Opinion........
What’s Yours??
An Outrageous
Deal Day At
McDonald’s®!
ONE DAY
ONLY!

Thursday,
May 26th
from 4pm-9pm
McDonald’s
will be serving up$1.00 Big Mac’s!

That’s right…Get up to ten, Big Mac’s…
for only $1.00 each at McDonald’s.

Limit 10 per order-No special orders
Celina, Coldwater, Wapakoneta, St. Marys

Advertorial
FINANCIAL FOCUS
“Munis” Can Still Work for You
- Even in Tough Times
Advertorial
FINANCIAL FOCUS
401(k) Review and Rollover
Can Be Rewarding
MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING
106 S. Second St.
P.O. Box 67
Coldwater, OH 45828
Bus. 419-678-3252
TF. 866-678-3252
John.yoder@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Ed-
ward Jones Financial Advisor.
Edward Jones, its employees and fnancial advisors are not estate
planners and cannot provide tax or legal advice. Consult a qualifed tax
specialist or attorney for professional advice about your situation.
Financial Focus is a weekly column courtesy of...
John M. Yoder, Financial Advisor
Your 401(k) offers tax-deductible contributions, tax-deferred growth of
earnings potential and a variety of investment options — so it’s a great tool
for building retirement savings. Yet like all tools, your 401(k) must be used
properly to get the best results. That’s why you should review your 401(k) at
least annually and make whatever adjustments are needed.
Depending on where you work, you may get some 401(k) review help
from your plan provider. But if that assistance isn’t available, you might want to
consult with a financial professional to make sure you’re getting the maximum
benefit from your plan.
As you begin to review your 401(k), your first question should probably
be this:
“How much should I contribute?” At the very least, try to put in enough to
receive your employer’s matching contribution, if one is offered. If you don’t
earn this match, you are essentially walking away from “free money.” Beyond
this, though, the amount you put into your 401(k) might depend on what other
retirement savings vehicles you have available. For instance, if you’re eligible,
you may also want to contribute to a Roth IRA, which offers tax-free growth
potential, provided you’ve had your account for five years and don’t start
taking withdrawals until you’re 59½.
Of course, it’s not only how much you put into your 401(k) that determines
its success — it’s also how you choose to allocate your investment dollars.
(Keep in mind that asset allocation does not guarantee a profit or protect
against loss.) Your 401(k) may have a dozen or more investment choices,
such as stock funds, bond funds and money market funds. To choose the right
investment mix, you’ll need to consider a variety of factors, including these:
• Your age — Generally speaking, the younger you are, the more
aggressive you can afford to be with your 401(k) investments, because
you’ll have decades in which to potentially overcome the inevitable down
periods of the market. As you get older, you may wish to invest somewhat
more conservatively, but you’ll still need some growth potential in your 401(k)
portfolio.
• Your goals — Everyone has different goals for retirement. You might
want to retire early and travel the world, while your co-worker desires to
work as long as possible and then, upon retirement, stay close to home and
pursue hobbies. Because you each have different goals, with different income
needs, you also may need to follow different investment strategies within your
401(k).
• Your other retirement income sources — If you have a variety of
retirement income sources — a pension from another job, an IRA, a spouse
with generous retirement benefits — you may need to invest differently,
perhaps less aggressively, than if you had fewer options for retirement
income.
Apart from putting away as much as you can into your 401(k) and
choosing the right investment mix, what else can you do to get the most out
of your plan? Here’s a suggestion: If you have worked at various jobs and
acquired multiple 401(k)s, consider rolling them over into one account. You
might save money on fees and reduce paperwork, but more importantly,
you’ll be able to concentrate your resources and pursue a unified investment
approach, with your investment dollars working together toward your ultimate
retirement goals.
As you can see, a 401(k) review and rollover can reward you in many
ways — so do whatever it takes to maximize your 401(k)’s performance.
Listen to us daily at noon on WCSM 96.7 FM
MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING
106 S. Second St.
P.O. Box 67
Coldwater, OH 45828
Bus. 419-678-3252
TF. 866-678-3252
John.yoder@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Ed-
ward Jones Financial Advisor.
Edward Jones, its employees and fnancial advisors are not estate
planners and cannot provide tax or legal advice. Consult a qualifed tax
specialist or attorney for professional advice about your situation.
Financial Focus is a weekly column courtesy of...
John M. Yoder, Financial Advisor
No matter where you live, the chances are good that a state or local
government near you may be having some difficulty in balancing its budget. As
a citizen, you’re probably concerned about how this situation will affect your life
and your community. But as an investor, you may also wonder how this might
affect any municipal bonds you own. Fortunately, the outlook might be brighter
than you think.
Of course, taken to the extreme, the financial challenges of some state and
local governments could conceivably affect their ability to fulfill the payment
obligations on their municipal bonds. But investment-grade quality municipal
bond default rates historically have been very low, especially when compared to
those of corporate bonds. And municipalities are cutting spending, eliminating
nonessential programs and, in some cases, raising taxes or fees. In short, they
are taking steps that, while potentially painful to residents, are likely to help them
continue making timely payments of interest and principal on their municipal
bond obligations. Furthermore, municipalities must still fund various projects,
and even one bond payment default could impact their future ability to borrow
money in the form of new municipal bonds.
So are munis right for you? The answer depends on your situation — your
goals, need for investment income, current investment mix, risk tolerance and
so on. But if you want to receive interest payments that are exempt from federal
taxes, you may well be interested in exploring municipal bonds. Keep in mind,
though, that municipal bonds may be subject to state and local taxes and the
alternative minimum tax (AMT).
In addition, you’ll want to be familiar with “taxable-equivalent yield.” Typically,
municipal bonds pay an interest rate that’s lower than those paid by taxable
bonds. Since this interest is free from federal taxes, however, the rate may not
be as low as it appears. The taxable-equivalent yield measures the rate you’d
have to earn on a taxable bond to match the income from a tax-exempt municipal
bond. And the higher your tax bracket, the higher your taxable-equivalent yield.
Suppose that you’re in the 35% marginal tax bracket, and you are
considering a tax-exempt municipal bond with a 3.33% yield. You simply divide
3.33% (0.0333 in decimal form) by 1 minus 0.35 (your tax bracket), which would
give you 0.0512, or 5.12%. In this tax bracket, a muni with a 3.33% yield is
equivalent to a taxable bond with a 5.12% yield. (This example is for illustration
purposes only.)
Keep in mind that, before investing in bonds, you should understand the
risks involved, including interest rate risk, credit risk and market risk. Bond
investments are subject to interest rate risk such that when interest rates
rise, the prices of bonds can decrease, and you can lose principal value if the
investment is sold prior to maturity. So it’s best to discuss municipal bonds with
your financial and tax advisors.
By adding quality municipal bonds to your portfolio, you can show faith in
your municipality, your investment dollars can help support worthwhile projects
in your area, and you receive a steady source of tax-exempt income.
Listen to us daily at noon on WCSM 96.7 FM
By Justice Pfeifer
Water is one of those essentials
of life that we tend to take for
granted. We turn on the faucet
and expect clear, clean, drinkable
water to fow smoothly into the
sink. But when John and Virginia
Voleck had a different experience
with their water supply, their
troubles turned into a legal journey
that ended, at least temporarily,
here – at the Supreme Court of
Ohio.
The Volecks live in the village
of Powhatan Point, in Belmont
County, and they pay the village to
provide water to their home. But
according to John and Virginia,
the water is visually dirty,
contains an unacceptable level
of contamination, and it smells.
When they complained about the
water, the village reimbursed them
for some water flters, but that
didn’t solve the problem.
In 2006, the Volecks
complained to the Ohio
Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) about sediment – sand or
gravel – in their water line. The
EPA investigation determined
the village water supply to be in
compliance with both state and
federal standards, so it took no
enforcement action against the
village. No one else using the
same water main had complained
to the village, but a study conducted
by the county water department
in December 2007 indicated that
water tested at the tap-in location
for the water main contained iron
and manganese at levels within the
suggested federal EPA standards,
whereas water inside the Volecks’
home had much higher levels. The
village concluded that the problem
was in the line between the main
water source and the Volecks’
water flter, which is the residents’
own responsibility.
The Volecks then hired an
engineer. After testing, the engineer
concluded that their water was
“visually dirty and contaminated,
undrinkable and unsuitable for
use.” He also found that the water
had levels of iron and manganese
that exceeded the federal EPA’s
secondary standards.
According to the engineer, the
source of the contamination was
outside the Volecks’ household
water pipes and was likely caused
by acid mine drainage leaching
into the village’s well feld.
In November 2008, the
Volecks fled a petition in the
court of appeals for a writ to
compel Powhatan Point to provide
“visually-clean and chemically-
pure water” to them. The
Volecks argued that their claim
was premised upon the village’s
“contractual duty when failing to
provide clean and pure drinking
water to a customer’s home.” But
the court of appeals denied the
writ, and after that, the case came
before us for a fnal review.
The question before us focused
on procedure, not the purity of
the Volecks’ water. The Volecks
requested a special writ from the
court of appeals to compel the
village to provide visually clean
and chemically pure water to
them. But the writ they seek
is not typically issued when the
people fling the complaint have
an adequate remedy available to
them in the ordinary course of
law.
Does such a remedy exist?
Let’s take a look at the means for
setting water standards.
The federal Safe Drinking
Water Act establishes a national
safe drinking-water program.
The federal EPA sets primary
and secondary drinking-water
standards, which are enforced
by federal and state authorities.
The Ohio EPA administers laws
pertaining to the public water
supply under the Safe Drinking
Water Act. And the director of
the state EPA administers and
enforces those laws.
According to one of those
laws, the remedy for a claim that a
public water system is impure and
dangerous to health is a complaint
fled with the Ohio EPA. Following
the investigation of the complaint,
the EPA director may enter an order
as necessary, request the attorney
general to commence appropriate
legal proceedings, dismiss the
complaint, or commence a hearing
before taking action. Someone
fling a claim – such as the Volecks
– may appeal to the environmental
review appeals commission to
challenge the director’s action.
The appeals commission has
exclusive, original jurisdiction over
these matters. Anyone adversely
affected by the commission’s order
may then take their complaint to
the court of appeals.
In July 2006 the Volecks
complained to the Ohio EPA
about sand or gravel in their water
line. Following an investigation,
the state EPA determined that
their water was safe, and no
enforcement action was taken
against the village.
Insofar as the Volecks challenge
the failure of the EPA director to
take action on their complaint or
attempt to raise a separate claim
concerning the purity of their
water, their exclusive remedy
is through the comprehensive
procedure involving the appeals
commission. That procedure
cannot be bypassed; it’s required
by state law.
But the Volecks claimed that
they were not relegated to the
exclusive administrative procedure
because they were asserting rights
that are beyond the standards
prohibiting impure and dangerous
drinking water.
They claimed that although the
quality of their water does not
violate the primary drinking-water
regulations establishing maximum
contaminant levels, it exceeds the
secondary standards for certain
contaminants, which include iron
and manganese.
These secondary standards
apply to contaminants that “affect
aesthetic qualities relating to public
acceptance of drinking water;”
they aren’t federally enforceable,
and are intended as guidelines by
the state.
But even if the Volecks’ claim
could be construed as outside of
the administrative procedure that
is required by law, their claim
would still lack merit because they
failed to specify the legal duty
that is legislatively imposed on
the village to provide water that
is superior in quality to the Safe
Drinking Water Act requirements
of federal and state law.
Therefore, we concluded –
by a seven-to-zero vote – that
the Volecks have not established
their entitlement to the requested
relief by the writ. They haven’t
established a clear legal duty on
the part of the village to provide
them with water of better quality
than that required by the Safe
Drinking Water Act.
This doesn’t mean, however,
that they’re simply out of luck.
They have an adequate remedy
in the ordinary course of law by
either the administrative procedure
outlined above, or a breach-of-
contract action in the common
pleas court.
Dirty Water
the mercer county chronicle
Page 6 • may 26, 2011
FIRST CHOICE
CREDIT UNION, INC.
MAKE US YOUR “FIRST CHOICE”
300 West Sycamore Street, Coldwater, OH
419-678-3335 • 1-866-700-6428
www.1stchoicecu.com
NEED TO
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THAT OLD
CAR??
Rates as low as
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*
Purchase or refnance from another
fnancial institution
*Rates based on credit score and/or year of
vehicle. Rates subject to change
Certain restrictions may apply.
Just like always,
we’re making auto
loans.
“You’ve got a strong bank behind you”.

The
Peoples Bank
Co.
Coldwater – Celina – St. Marys
Rockford – Burkettsville
www.pbcbank.com
Toll Free 1-866- PBC BANK
Member FDIC – Equal Housing Lender

Hydraulic Crane Service Office
419-586-7599
Mobile
Bryan: 419-852-2182
Donna: 419-852-2199
Hydraulic Crane Service Office
419-586-7599
Mobile
Bryan: 419-852-2182
Donna: 419-852-2199
Hirschfeld
Lifting, Inc.
CELINA, OHIO
COOPER
FARMS
FORT RECOVERY, OHIO • 419-375-4116
ST. HENRY, OHIO • 419-678-4853
www.cooperfarms.com
RISH
Plumbing,
Inc.
PLUMBING IS OUR
BUSINESS!
NEW INSTALLATION
• Sales & Service •
115 E. Main
Coldwater, Ohio • 419-678-2812
CARRIAGE
WERKES
Specializing In Collisions Foreign & Domestic
• FREE ESTIMATES •
421 N. Eastern Ave., St. Henry, Ohio
419-678-4530
TRUCKING SERVICES
AND LOGISTICS
Fort Recovery, Ohio
800-537-6695
www.cheeseman.com
We Support The
FFA!
The St. Henry Bank
We Care About Our Customers
231 E. Main Street • Box 330 • St. Henry • (800) 482-3001
COLDWATER, OHIO
419-678-2397
Welding Supplies & Rental
LEFELD
“We salute the
Agriculture Industry,
the foundation of
our area!
Lefeld
Implement
(Division Of The Kenn-Feld Group)
Coldwater, Ohio 419-678-2375
Willshire, Ohio 419-495-2937
2961 St. Rt. 219 • Coldwater
419-942-1300
Buyer Of Sheep, Goats & Hogs
Drainage Projects
Backhoe & Bulldozing
Sewage Systems
Farm Drainage
CYSCHWIETERMAN,
INC.
1663 CRANBERRY ROAD, ST. HENRY, OHIO
419-925-4290
NEW KNOXVILLE, OHIO 753-2559
36"-60" Corrugated
Polyethlene Pipe
Meets All Your
Stormwater Needs
Brookside
Companies
Maria Stein . 419-925-4457
Lima ........... 419-224-7019
Findlay ....... 419-421-6771
Brookside Trucking, Inc.
Clair H. Corporation
"The Stone Slinger"
B&S Hauling Co., Inc.
Brookside Wood Products
Brookside
Companies
L.L.C.
Metzger
Oil
419-375-2885
800-752-2485
P.O. Box 436
Fort Recovery, Ohio
COLDWATER
GRAIN
---------- NORTH
9421 State Route 118 • Rockford, Ohio
419-363-2700 • Fax 419-363-2218
Grain Marketing
Drying & Storage • Seeds
Liquid & Dry Fertilizers
Custom Applications
Monty Heiby, CCA, Manager
E-mail: coldwaternorth@bright.net
Coldwater
Young Farmers
Association
310 N. Second St., Coldwater
419-678-4821
Proud
Supporters
Of The
FFA!
INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
2411 Cassella-Montezuma Road
Maria Stein, Ohio
419-925-7222
Fax: 419-925-6222
BIG K
MILLS INC.
2485 Sharpsburg Rd.,
Ft. Recovery
419-375-4578
Mike
Kahlig &
Son, Inc.
Mike
Kahlig &
Son, Inc.
Farm Drainage
Masonry Contractors
Septic System Installation
1200 Commerce Drive, Fort Recovery
419-375-3012
OVERMAN
TRUCKING, LLC
2795 State Route 49 • Fort Recovery
419-375-4926
Gravel
Fill Dirt
Top Soil
OVERMAN
TRUCKING, LLC
MARION
YOUNG
FARMERS
Proud
Supporter
Of The
Mercer
County
Cattlemen’s
Association
Mercer
County
Cattlemen’s
Association
FORT RECOVERY
INSURANCE AGENCY
110 North Wayne Street,
Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-4041
419-375-4181
ZEHRINGER
S TAT E RE P RE S E NTAT I VE
Jim
Proud To
Be A Part
Of The
Farming
Community
& The FFA
Program
Paid for by Citizens for Zehringer, Dave Wolters, Treasurer, 2191 Oak Street, Maria Stein, Ohio 45860
Coldwater
Animal
Clinic
Dr. Dan J. Hellwarth
Dr. Urban Seger
Dr. Bret Rochotte
Dr. Kim Forthofer
Dr. Tim Barman
110 Harvest Drive • Coldwater
Cel ebrate FFA
Growing strong and building character
Here’s to the FFA, an organization dedicated to making
a positive difference in the lives of young people
through leadership, growth and career success.
The staff at Farm Credit Services of Mid-America
supports and salutes the members
and advisors of FFA.
1225 IRMSCHER BLVD., CELINA, OHIO
1-800-953-8330 • 419-586-4229
JIM HIGHLEY
Mercer County
Clerk of Courts
Paid For By Jim Highley • P.O.Box 515, Celina
Hemmelgarn
& Sons
3763 Philothea Road,
Coldwater, Ohio
419-678-2351
Superior
Quality Eggs!
REINHARD
Dairy Products LLC
1639 St. Peter Road,
Ft. Recovery, Ohio
419-375-4742
HELENA
AGRONOMIC
CENTER
3971Burkettsville-St. Henry Road,
Coldwater, Ohio
419-678-2267
4581 State Route 127, Celina, Ohio
419-268-2550
Check Out Our New
2010 Tractor Line-Up
Your Frenching
& Work Clothing
Headquarters!
John E.
Bruns
MERCER COUNTY COMMISSIONER
PAID FOR BY BRUNS FOR COMMISSIONER, JENNY BRUNS, TREASURER
3891 TOWNSHIP LINE ROAD, FORT RECOVERY, OHIO 45846
Congratulations
To All Of The
Youth In
Agriculture!
THE MERCER COUNTY
CHRONICLE
120 South First Street,
Coldwater, Ohio
419-678-2324
News From Your
Hometown Area!
EMS Body Parts & Service, Inc.
EMS Rhino
Linings
Full Line Of Truck Accessories!
Quality Collision • Auto/Truck Repair
SPRAYED-ON TRUCK BED LINERS
4151 Burrville Road, Coldwater, Ohio
419-375-4854
MATT SCHOENHERR
SCOTT GRIESHOP
www.marionmutual.com www.marionmutual.com
6420 State Route 119 (Cassella),
Maria Stein, Ohio
419-925-4567
“Big Company Capabilities
Small Company Passion”
“Big Company Capabilities
Small Company Passion”
6420 State Route 119 (Cassella),
Maria Stein, Ohio
419-925-0335
BURKETTSVILLE, OHIO
419-375-4186
937-338-3281
www.werlingandsons.com
Werling
and Sons, Inc.
FAMILY OPERATED SINCE 1886
OH LIC #28130
LAKE SHORE REALTY
419-586-6427
Judy McCullough
ROCKFORD, OHIO
419-363-2977
FOR ALL YOUR REAL
ESTATE NEEDS!
COBA
Since 1946
DAIRY BEEF
For Service Call :
Mike Long : 419-925-5509
Dustin Brown: 419-678-3196
Also, take the opportunity to visit SELECT SIRES, INC
(That’s where the Bulls live) 2 Miles North of State Route 33
on U.S. 42 between Delaware and Plain City, Ohio
GET THE RESULTS OF
GOOD BREEDING...
through the Mercer County Unit of
COBA/Select Sires, Inc.
Maria Stein....419-925-4511
Celina............419-586-2329
St. Marys ......419-394-4141
Mercer County
Dairy Association
Mercer County
Dairy Association
Proud Supporter
Of The FFA!
Minnich
Poultry
8563 E. 300 N.
Portland,
Indiana
Minnich
Poultry
419-942-2378
As a Former
FFA Member,
I am a Proud
Supporter of
the Agriculture
Industry!
St. Henry ................ 419-678-2348
Celina ..................... 419-586-7443
Chickasaw .............. 419-925-4326
New Weston ........... 937-338-5741
Coldwater ............... 419-678-2369
CW Service ............. 419-678-4811
B
&
L
282 Buckeye Dr.
St. Henry, Ohio
419-678-4674
CONSTRUCTION
B
&
L
DUES
LUMBER
MIL
Buyer & Seller
Of Hardwood
4162 Philothea Road,
Philothea, Ohio
419-678-2102
1737 State Route 49,
Fort Recovery, Ohio
Phone: 419-375-2330
HERE ARE THE GRAPHICS TO BE USED ON THE FFA WEEK PAGES!!
RepaiR
419-678-4949
SaleS
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419-678-4166
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• mobile service available
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(nAPSA)—car buyers
no longer have to choose
between buying a new car
or a used one. A new
category is attracting the
attention of cost and qual-
ity conscious drivers.
that category is certi-
fied preowned and it offers
several benefits. Buyers
don’t have to spend top
dollar to get the cars they
long for but, on the other
hand, they don’t face
many of the risks associ-
ated with buying a used
car. certified pre-owned
programs don’t just take
any car. For example,
not all pre-owned lexus
vehicles are worthy of
the certified Pre-owned
(cPo) designation. if a
model is older than six
years or driven for more
than 70,000 miles, it’s
immediately rejected.
every vehicle in the
program must pass a
comprehensive 161- point
inspection by a lexus
trained technician.
if any discovered flaws
cannot be repaired to the
manufacturer’s standards,
the vehicle won’t be certi-
fied.
Because each vehi-
cle is reconditioned and
inspected, lexus offers
a three-year-from-the-
date-of-purchase or
100, 000- t ot al - vehi cl e-
mile limited warranty,
which ever occurs first.
this is included in the
purchase price. if you are
considering buying a cer-
tified pre-owned vehicle,
you may want to be sure:
• the vehicle is certi-
fied by the manufacturer
rather than the dealer.
According to edmunds.
com, manufacturer-certi-
fied programs are more
reliable, as they tend to
go through more rigorous
testing.
• you are entitled to
a carfax vehicle history
report. this can help both
you and the dealer iden-
tify potential problems
that might otherwise be
difficult to detect.
• that you receive
24-hour roadside assis-
tance, trip interruption
coverage and dealership
amenities.
A strict certification
process can eliminate
many of the risks associ-
ated with financing pre-
owned vehicles.
Before you make a
decision, ask yourself the
following questions:
What does certification
mean and what does it
cover?
Get the details, and
if you don’t understand
something, ask more ques-
tions. For example, does
certification mean that
parts that were used for
any necessary mechanical
repairs are warranted by
the manufacturer?
• When can you take it
for a spin? even though
the car has been repaired
by a factory technician,
take it for a test-drive
and give it the once-over.
Do the doors open easily?
Does the paint match?
check for the Vin num-
ber.
What’s the price?
Before you buy, go online
to a recognized site such
as edmunds.com or Kelley
Blue Book and see what
the certified pre-owned
price should be. then you
have a ballpark figure to
discuss.
What are you getting
for the price? under pre-
owned certification pro-
grams, you may get the
same kind of warranty and
extras that you get with a
new car. the lexus cPo
program, for example,
entitles you to 24-hour
roadside assistance, trip
interruption coverage and
dealership amenities. in
addition, the vehicle’s
first basic service is com-
plimentary and a loaner
vehicle will be provided
for qualified repairs.
For more information,
visit www.lexus.com/cpo
or see your lexus cPo
dealer for details.
What you need to
Know to Buy A certified
Pre-owned Vehicle
A manufacturer’s certi-
fied vehicle program can
be used across the coun-
try and won’t leave you
stranded if your dealer-
ship shuts down.
THIS SPACE CAN BE YOURS!
Advertise your Specials of the Week, Lunch
Menu, Employee of the Week or any special
sale or event that you would like to highlight.
Call The Mercer County Chronicle
Today at
419-678-2324
P
e
o
p
le
w
h
o

k
n
o
w
u
s
e

V
a
lv
o
lin
e
THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
May 26, 2011 • Page 7
FORT RECOVERY, OHIO
419-375-4116
www.cooperfarms.com
COOPER
FARMS
State Route 119,
Fort Recovery, Ohio
www.cheeseman.com
Over 30 Late-Model Vehicles To Choose From!
FORT RECOVERY, OHIO • 419-375-4617
www.hastingsauto.com
EMS Body Parts & Service, Inc.
EMS Rhino Linings
SPRAYED-ON TRUCK BED LINERS
4151 Burrville Road, Coldwater, Ohio
419-375-4854
MATT SCHOENHERR • SCOTT GRIESHOP
Full Line Of Truck Accessories!
Quality Collision Auto/Truck Repair
Metzger Oil L.L.C.
P.O. Box 436 • Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2885
800-752-2485
JUTTE'S
SELF STORAGE
JACK JUTTE
1795 St. Peter Road, Fort Recovery, Ohio • 419-375-2609
MERCER COUNTY MERCER COUNTY
ELECTRIC, INC ELECTRIC, INC. .
Instant Farm Power By
Featuring KATOLIGHT By MUT Onsite Energy
Box 549, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2514
AUTHORIZED KATOLIGHT
GENERATOR SALES & SERVICE STATION
OH License # 27353
NAPA
Auto Parts
205 N. Wayne Street • Fort Recovery, OH
419-375-4137
308 W. Chestnut • Union City, IN
765-964-3191
110 North Wayne Street, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-4041 • 419-375-4181
FORT RECOVERY
INSURANCE AGENCY
WESTGERDES
Floor Covering
Chuck & Lisa Westgerdes
111 N. Wayne Street, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2572
Medler’s Medler’s Medler’s Medler’s Medler’s
Furniture Furniture Furniture Furniture Furniture
524 N. Meridian, Portland, Indiana
260-726-4570
Open: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9-5 • Wed. & Sat. 9- Noon
Fort Recovery
ATHLETIC
BOOSTERS
Proud To Support The Indians!
We’re your
convenience
store and a
whole lot
more!
219 North Wayne, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2534
HOME • AUTO • FARM
8085 STATE ROUTE 119, MARIA STEIN, OHIO • 419-925-5259
L
a
m
m
'
s
INSURANCE
AGENCY
Wishing The Indians An Outstanding Year!
Specializing In Livestock Confinement Buildings
1215 Brittany Lane, Celina, Ohio
419-586-3234
Providing sporting event, lifetime,
photographic memories!
Miracle
Lanes
1848 Union City Road,
Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-4274
FORT RECOVERY I NDI ANS
FORT RECOVERY I NDI ANS
The Mercer County
CHRONICLE
120 South First St., Coldwater, Ohio
419-678-2324
The “Good News” Of The Hometown Area!
Use this Mercer
County Chronicle ad
as a filler on any page
you need it!
Refer to last year’s
Sports Tab for ex-
ample.
FORT RECOVERY, OHIO
419-375-4116
www.cooperfarms.com
COOPER
FARMS
State Route 119,
Fort Recovery, Ohio
www.cheeseman.com
Over 30 Late-Model Vehicles To Choose From!
FORT RECOVERY, OHIO • 419-375-4617
www.hastingsauto.com
EMS Body Parts & Service, Inc.
EMS Rhino Linings
SPRAYED-ON TRUCK BED LINERS
4151 Burrville Road, Coldwater, Ohio
419-375-4854
MATT SCHOENHERR • SCOTT GRIESHOP
Full Line Of Truck Accessories!
Quality Collision Auto/Truck Repair
Metzger Oil L.L.C.
P.O. Box 436 • Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2885
800-752-2485
JUTTE'S
SELF STORAGE
JACK JUTTE
1795 St. Peter Road, Fort Recovery, Ohio • 419-375-2609
MERCER COUNTY MERCER COUNTY
ELECTRIC, INC ELECTRIC, INC. .
Instant Farm Power By
Featuring KATOLIGHT By MUT Onsite Energy
Box 549, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2514
AUTHORIZED KATOLIGHT
GENERATOR SALES & SERVICE STATION
OH License # 27353
NAPA
Auto Parts
205 N. Wayne Street • Fort Recovery, OH
419-375-4137
308 W. Chestnut • Union City, IN
765-964-3191
110 North Wayne Street, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-4041 • 419-375-4181
FORT RECOVERY
INSURANCE AGENCY
WESTGERDES
Floor Covering
Chuck & Lisa Westgerdes
111 N. Wayne Street, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2572
Medler’s Medler’s Medler’s Medler’s Medler’s
Furniture Furniture Furniture Furniture Furniture
524 N. Meridian, Portland, Indiana
260-726-4570
Open: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9-5 • Wed. & Sat. 9- Noon
Fort Recovery
ATHLETIC
BOOSTERS
Proud To Support The Indians!
We’re your
convenience
store and a
whole lot
more!
219 North Wayne, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2534
HOME • AUTO • FARM
8085 STATE ROUTE 119, MARIA STEIN, OHIO • 419-925-5259
L
a
m
m
'
s
INSURANCE
AGENCY
Wishing The Indians An Outstanding Year!
Specializing In Livestock Confinement Buildings
1215 Brittany Lane, Celina, Ohio
419-586-3234
Providing sporting event, lifetime,
photographic memories!
Miracle
Lanes
1848 Union City Road,
Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-4274
FORT RECOVERY I NDI ANS
FORT RECOVERY I NDI ANS
The Mercer County
CHRONICLE
120 South First St., Coldwater, Ohio
419-678-2324
The “Good News” Of The Hometown Area!
Use this Mercer
County Chronicle ad
as a filler on any page
you need it!
Refer to last year’s
Sports Tab for ex-
ample.
EMS Body Parts & Service, Inc.
EMS Rhino Linings
SPRAYED-ON TRUCK BED LINERS
4151 Burrville Road, Coldwater, Ohio
419-375-4854
MATT SCHOENHERR • SCOTT GRIESHOP
Full Line Of Truck Accessories!
Quality Collision Auto/Truck Repair
FORT RECOVERY, OHIO
419-375-4116
www.cooperfarms.com
COOPER
FARMS
State Route 119,
Fort Recovery, Ohio
www.cheeseman.com
Over 30 Late-Model Vehicles To Choose From!
FORT RECOVERY, OHIO • 419-375-4617
www.hastingsauto.com
EMS Body Parts & Service, Inc.
EMS Rhino Linings
SPRAYED-ON TRUCK BED LINERS
4151 Burrville Road, Coldwater, Ohio
419-375-4854
MATT SCHOENHERR • SCOTT GRIESHOP
Full Line Of Truck Accessories!
Quality Collision Auto/Truck Repair
Metzger Oil L.L.C.
P.O. Box 436 • Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2885
800-752-2485
JUTTE'S
SELF STORAGE
JACK JUTTE
1795 St. Peter Road, Fort Recovery, Ohio • 419-375-2609
MERCER COUNTY MERCER COUNTY
ELECTRIC, INC ELECTRIC, INC. .
Instant Farm Power By
Featuring KATOLIGHT By MUT Onsite Energy
Box 549, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2514
AUTHORIZED KATOLIGHT
GENERATOR SALES & SERVICE STATION
OH License # 27353
NAPA
Auto Parts
205 N. Wayne Street • Fort Recovery, OH
419-375-4137
308 W. Chestnut • Union City, IN
765-964-3191
110 North Wayne Street, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-4041 • 419-375-4181
FORT RECOVERY
INSURANCE AGENCY
WESTGERDES
Floor Covering
Chuck & Lisa Westgerdes
111 N. Wayne Street, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2572
Medler’s Medler’s Medler’s Medler’s Medler’s
Furniture Furniture Furniture Furniture Furniture
524 N. Meridian, Portland, Indiana
260-726-4570
Open: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 9-5 • Wed. & Sat. 9- Noon
Fort Recovery
ATHLETIC
BOOSTERS
Proud To Support The Indians!
We’re your
convenience
store and a
whole lot
more!
219 North Wayne, Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-2534
HOME • AUTO • FARM
8085 STATE ROUTE 119, MARIA STEIN, OHIO • 419-925-5259
L
a
m
m
'
s
INSURANCE
AGENCY
Wishing The Indians An Outstanding Year!
Specializing In Livestock Confinement Buildings
1215 Brittany Lane, Celina, Ohio
419-586-3234
Providing sporting event, lifetime,
photographic memories!
Miracle
Lanes
1848 Union City Road,
Fort Recovery, Ohio
419-375-4274
FORT RECOVERY I NDI ANS
FORT RECOVERY I NDI ANS
The Mercer County
CHRONICLE
120 South First St., Coldwater, Ohio
419-678-2324
The “Good News” Of The Hometown Area!
Use this Mercer
County Chronicle ad
as a filler on any page
you need it!
Refer to last year’s
Sports Tab for ex-
ample.
Sports Sports
Coldwater Baseball
Regional Highlights
THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
Page 13• June 4, 2009 - June 10, 2009
P H O T O S B Y B U C K H A L L & F R E D K R E M E R
Coldwater Baseball
Regional Highlights
Photos by Fred Kremer
Marion Local Flyers vs. McComb Panthers softball
OFF THE WALL
Observations ... by John Bruns
UNIQUE
One might think it would be
a little boring to play the same
golf course on a weekly basis
for many years. I would reply
that conditions on the course are
constantly changing and even
after years of play I occasionally
found myself hitting from a place
I had never been before. I have
watched thousands of Big League
baseball games and had assumed
I had seen just about everything
that could happen at least once,
but I was proven wrong a couple
of Sundays ago. The Reds were
in a celebratory mood as they had
a 9-2 lead in the top of the ninth,
were completing a three-game
sweep of their arch divisional
rivals, the Cardinals. The win
would advance the Reds from
second place in the division to
frst, with a game and a half lead. 

The ninth inning was unique for
major league baseball. The Reds
brought in the fastest arm in
baseball, Aroldis Chapman,
and it was painful to watch.
Chapman simply could not
throw the ball even near the
plate. Many of us who have
watched Little League baseball
games when the pitcher is
throwing the ball all over the
place and walking batter after
batter, saw similarities. Soon
his teammates in the feld, the
fans, even the opposition, were
hoping he will throw a strike
so the game could continue.
Chapman looked like the Little
Leaguer who was bouncing one
ball and throwing the next head
high. Major league pitchers
have standards for control or
location that are exacting. A
low strike is expected to be
with a two-inch margin of the
bottom of the zone. At the Big
League level two inches is the
norm for acceptable margin of
error. I have seen Major League
pitchers issue many walks, some
with three bases loaded, but they
are missing their target by inches,
not yards. Chapman can perhaps
throw the baseball as hard as
anyone who has ever played the
game but if he cannot fgure out
this control thing, we may see his
teammates getting as bored as
Little Leaguers and even taking
a seat in the grass until the strikes
start coming.
 Last mid-season,
the Reds held a divisional lead
when the Cardinals came to town
and swept a three-game series,
took over frst place, and left
Cincinnati with all the momentum
of a piece of road kill. Contrary
to everyone’s expectations, the
Cardinals lost their momentum
and series after series. The Reds
regrouped from their St. Louis
beatings and won their share
of games and eventually the
pennant.
 The other weekend the
Cardinals came into Cincinnati
with a one-game lead in the
division. This year the Reds
were the sweeper, won three
straight from the Cardinals, and
took back frst place. It appeared
Cincinnati had all the momentum
to win the division for the second
year, except it was almost like
Yogi’s “deja vu” all over again.
As of last Sunday, the Red’s
hard earned confdence from the
Cardinal series had disappeared
like Chapman’s control. They
were swept by Pittsburgh and the
Indians, and found themselves
looking up at St. Louis, trying to
fgure out what was happening. 

Local baseball: There is a maxim
in basketball coaching; “If your
intrasquad scrimmages are close
and you have ten players of nearly
equal talent, you have a very
good or a very ordinary team.”
There was some reason to believe
that MAC baseball was having
an ordinary year. There were
numerous upsets and no clearly
dominate team. The Delphos St.
John’s Blue Jays did win their
frst baseball MAC title and are
making a trip to the regionals in
Division IV. Perhaps equality
meant superiority this year rather
than mediocrity. Minster, who
had three conference losses, will
be playing in the fnal sixteen
in Division IV in the state
tournament and St. Henry, who
lost six league games, will be in
the fnal sixteen in Division III.
In Division I boys district track
action, the Celina boys fnished
in sixth place at Tiffn over the
weekend as the Bulldogs totaled
37 points in the meet.
Janson Finkbeiner advanced to
the regional meet with a second
place fnish in the pole vault (13-
6). Celina’s 800 relay team of
Braelen Bader, Andrew Sutter,
Brad Buxton and Steffan Miller
also advanced after fnishing third
(1:33.16).
The green and white’s Logan
Laux moves on with a third place
fnish in the 300 hurdles (40.92)
and Miller took third in the 110
hurdles (15.65).
The Bulldogs’ Derek Jones
fnished in eighth place in the shot
put with Bader fnishing seventh
in the 300 hurdles. Derek Pease
took ffth in the 1600 run as well.
Bader, Sutter, Buxton and
Miller also combined to take ffth
in the 400 relay.
Bulldog boys take sixth
The Division II track meet
was held last weekend with the
girls portion being hosted by Lima
Shawnee.
Celina took second place
with 123 points while Coldwater
fnished fourth at 70-1/2 as each
school advanced several athletes on
to the regionals.
Celina’s Katie Sutter claimed a
district title in the long jump with
a leap of 16-4-1/4 while teammate
Gina Strable moves on as well after
taking third (15-11-3/4). Lizz Carr
took frst in the high jump (5-4) and
Hannah Fleck captured the 800 run
(2:19.28) and fnished second in the
1600 run (5:20.98).
Lexi Mills moves on in the 300
hurdles (second) and 100 hurdles
(third) while Carr fnished second
in the 100 hurdles to advance as
well. The Bulldogs’ Andrea Bell
took fourth in the 3200 run to move
on to regionals.
Bulldog relay teams advancing
include the 1600 relay (Michaela
Wenning, Mills, Strable, Fleck)
which took second, while the
800 relay (Wenning, Mills, Carr,
Strable) fnished fourth. Celina’s
3200 relay team of Wenning,
Andrea Bell, Ashley Coon and
Fleck took frst with a time of
9:40.38.
Coldwater’s Rachel Schmitz
advanced with a fourth place fnish
in the shot put (34-0) while also
moving on in the discus after taking
third (109-0). Abbey Kunk fnished
fourth in the long jump (15-11)
and pole vault (9-8) to advance
in both events. Brittanie Niekamp
also moves on with a third place
fnish in the pole vault (9-8).
The Cavaliers’ Christina Seas
and Jill Kanney fnished second and
third in the 3200 run, respectively,
to advance as well. Coldwater’s
3200 relay squad consisting of
Seas, Kanney, Larissa Kohn and
Veronica Bruns fnished second in
9:43.51. Bruns also advanced in the
800 run with a third place fnish.
Other placers for the lady
Bulldogs include Kayla Fortkamp
(shot put, ffth), Sutter (shot put,
sixth), Paige Dorsten (discus,
ffth), Kacy Stachler (pole vault,
sixth), Katlin Robinson (3200 run,
seventh), Angie Evers (300 hurdles,
seventh), Wenning (400 dash,
sixth), Carr (400 dash, eighth),
Strable (100 dash, sixth) and Alex
Parker (100 dash, eighth),
Celina’s 400 relay of Kendra
Fennig, Evers, Parker and Stachler
took eighth place.
Also picking up points for the
orange and black were Janelle
Moorman (shot put, seventh), Bruns
(high jump, sixth), Kohn (800
run, ffth), Niekamp (300 hurdles,
eighth) and Kelsey Rammel (100
hurdles, sixth).
Coldwater’s 800 relay team of
Jamie Bills, Jama Brown, Kohn
and Kelsey Rammel took seventh.
Bulldogs, Cavaliers send
several on to regionals
Coldwater’s hopes of a
Midwest Athletic Conference
win came to a disappointing
end last week as the Cavaliers
came up short 3-2 at Delphos St.
John’s in eight innings.
Mitch Heyne led the Cavalier
offense with a single and a home
run while Reese Klenke added
three singles. Aaron Rammel
and Randal Muhlenkamp
chipped in singles as well for
the orange and black.
Eric Schmackers took the
loss for the local squad, allowing
seven hits and two walks while
fanning four. Klenke struck out
one and gave up two walks and
a hit in two innings of work as
well.
Coldwater ends its season
with a record of 15-11 overall
while fnishing 6-3 in the
conference
Coldwater Baseball
Most of Mercer County’s track
teams took part in the Division III
district at Minster last weekend
with many athletes enjoying
success at the meet.
In the girls meet, Marion
Local fnished second behind
host Minster with Fort Recovery
fnishing seventh, Parkway ninth
and St. Henry 14
th
.
Marion Local’s Rachel Hess
and Gina Kramer led local
runners with Hess picking up a
championship in the 400 dash,
completing the race with a time of
59.50 while Kramer won the long
jump with a leap of 16-5-1/2.
Other Flyer advancers included
Mindy Hartings (pole vault,
second), Olivia Hemmelgarn (pole
vault, fourth), Kramer (high jump,
fourth), Renee Dirksen (discus,
fourth) and Brianna Hess (200
dash, fourth).
Parkway’s Bailey King moves
on after a fourth place fnish in the
100 hurdles and a second place
fnish in the long jump while Fort
Recovery’s Jessica Vogel took
fourth in the 1600 run to continue
her season. The Indians’ Holly
Brunswick took third in the high
jump and Kylie Kahlig ended up
third in the shot put. The Indians’
duo of Ellie Sutter and Sam Tobe
also advanced after taking second
and third, respectively, in the 3200
run.
Fort Recovery’s 3200
relay team of Elle Sutter, Sam
Tobe, Jessica Vogel and Abby
Huelskamp took fourth in 10:29.04
while Marion Local’s 1600 relay
of Josie Winner, Alyssa Homan,
Kramer and Rachel Hess fnished
third.
The Flyers’ quartet of Homan,
Hartings, Brianna Hess and Rachel
Hess also advanced in both the
800 relay (second) and 400 relay
(third).
Also scoring points was the
Marion Local 3200 relay team of
Brie Jutte, Alyse Bergman, Claire
Schwieterman and Margaret
Schwieterman, which took sixth.
St. Henry’s 3200 relay squad
of Alison Langenkamp, Courtney
Kunk, Janel Vogel and Tessa
Quinter took seventh while
Shannon Joseph, Emilie Baker,
Cami Hellwarth and Alexis Bates
combined for a seventh place fnish
for Parkway in the 1600 relay.
Other area individuals to place
included Marion Local’s Margaret
Schwieterman (1600 run, ffth),
Bates (400 dash, sixth and 200
dash, seventh), Kramer (400
dash, ffth), the Flyers’ Molly
Berning (300 hurdles, eighth),
Fort Recovery’s Abby Huelskamp
(800 run, seventh), Dirksen (shot
put, seventh), St. Henry’s Cathy
Delzeith (discus, sixth), Parkway’s
Eleesha Long (discus, eighth and
shot put, sixth), Marion Local’s
Janel Schulte (shot put, eighth),
St. Henry’s Sarah Niekamp (pole
vault, seventh) and the Redskins’
Janel Vogel (pole vault, eighth).
The Redskin duo of Alison
Langenkamp and Courtney Kunk
took ffth and sixth, in that order.
The Indian 400 relay team of
Holly Brunswick, Alex Shelton,
Kelsey Fiely and Kylie Kahlig
took eighth in the 400 relay.
On the boys side, the Panthers
took third place followed by
St. Henry (fourth), Coldwater
(seventh) and Marion Local
(eighth).
The Flyers’ Mitch Kremer
captured the pole vault with a
jump of 13-7 while Alex Obringer
took second in the long jump at
19-11-1/2. St. Henry’s Mitchell
Schulze captured the 1600 run in
4:28.04 as well. Coldwater’s Mike
Seas took frst in the 3200 run
in 9:53.22 and St. Henry’s Ryan
Goettemoeller won the 400 dash
in 51.26.
Parkway’s Shawn Miller took
third in the long jump (19-8) and
Coldwater’s Kevin Mestemaker
tied for third in the high jump
(5-10) as each move on to the
regionals. Parkway’s Jason Ford
also advances following a fourth
place fnish in the discus (145-9).
Miller also took third in the 100
dash for the Panthers.
Other advancers included St.
Henry’s Aaren Hemmelgarn (3200
run, second), Parkway’s Cameron
Strunk (3200 run, fourth and
1600 run, seventh), the Redskins’
Jacob Rindler (800 run, second),
Parkway’s Phillip Schlemmer
(800 run, fourth), the Panthers’
Hank Bevington (110 and 300
hurdles, second),
St. Henry’s 1600 relay
team of Craig Knapke, Brian
Reichert, Jacob Rindler and Ryan
Goettemoeller was fourth in
3:41.16. St. Henry (Goettemoeller,
Rindler, Kevin Knapke, Schulze)
and Coldwater (Seas, Zach
Muhlenkamp, Riley Kuess, Jacob
Lorton) also saw their 3200 relay
teams qualify for regionals after
fnishes of second and fourth,
respectively.
Other placers for Marion Local
include Clint Knapke (800 run,
sixth), Ellis Pohlman (110 and 300
hurdles, ffth), Dustin Schemmel
(300 hurdles, eighth) and A.J.
Homan (400 dash, sixth). St.
Henry point-getters were Kevin
Mestemaker (pole vault, seventh),
Mitchell Schulze (3200 run,
eighth) and Kevin Knapke (1600
run, sixth).
Scoring for the orange and
black were Jake Kramer (shot put,
eighth), Mike Rios (discus, eighth),
Justin McHenry (100 and 200
dash, ffth), Jacob Lorton (800 run,
seventh), Riley Kuess (1600 run,
eighth) and Aaron Mestemaker
(110 hurdles, sixth).
Hank Bevington (long jump,
seventh), Kyle Bergman (high
jump, ffth), Miller (400 dash,
ffth), Cody Carmean (100 dash,
eighth) and Cameron Strunk
(1600 run, seventh) all placed for
Parkway. Coldwater’s 400 relay
team of Caleb Siefring, Keith
Buening, Seth Dippold and Justin
McHenry took ffth.
The Panther 3200 relay squad
of Landon Brehm, Cameron
Strunk, Aaron Brehm and Phillip
Schlemmer took ffth with Clint
Knapke, Trevor Homan, Mark
Wuebker and David Evers
combining for an eighth place
fnish for Marion Local.
Marion Local (A.J. Homan,
Trevor Homan, Alex Obringer,
Mitch Kremer) fnished seventh
in the 800 relay with Coldwater
(Caleb Siefring, Alex Pax, Seth
Dippold, Justin McHenry) taking
eighth.
County tracksters fare
well at Minster
Coldwater’s Aaron Rammel
and Parkway’s Emily Crowell
were named baseball and softball
Player of the Year honors in vot-
ing recently by coaches of the
Midwest Athletic Conference.
Crowell took the softball
Player of the Year award and
Parkway head coach Mark
Esselstein was named Coach of
the Year as well.
Panther teammates Megan
Ketchum, Khelley Adams and
Morgan Cron also were named to
the MAC frst team. The Marion
Local trio of Jodi Otte, Gina
Heitkamp and Kari Koesters also
picked up frst team honors as did
St. Henry’s Kendra Rindler, Maria
Stammen, and Ashley Heitkamp.
The Coldwater duo of Shannon
Stucke and Kiya Dues and Fort
Recovery’s Taylor Guggenbiller
also were tabbed as frst team
players.
The lady Indians put four play-
ers on the second team in Andi
Sutter, Janelle Schwieterman,
Kendra Brunswick and Shelby
Brunswick. The Parkway duo of
Taylor Walls and Kylie Snyder
were named to the second team
as was Coldwater’s Larissa
Goubeaux.
Named honorable mention
in the MAC were Amanda Post
(Coldwater), Sarah Wenning
(Coldwater), Kelsey Koesters
(Coldwater), Olivia Thien (Fort
Recovery), Olivia Schwieterman
(Fort Recovery), Nicole
Schwieterman (Marion Local),
Kristen Subler (Marion Local),
Mindy Puthoff (Marion Local),
Lindsey Walls (Parkway), Olivia
Smith (Parkway) and Michelle
Bruns (St. Henry).
Rammel took Player of the
Year honors in baseball while
Delphos St. John’s Dan Metzger
was named Coach of the Year.
The Cavaliers’ Reese Klenke
also picked up frst team honors
as did Parkway’s Chris Brazle
and the Marion Local duo of
Danny Liette and Kyle Mescher.
St. Henry’s trio of Kurt Koesters,
Chase Kessen and Tyler Bruns
also were named to the frst team.
Coldwater’s Drew Klosterman
and Parkway’s Jonathon Fent gar-
nered second team honors.
Receiving honorable mention
were Ethan Bettinger (Coldwater),
Alex Stammen (Coldwater),
Jordan Klosterman (Coldwater),
Randal Muhlenkamp (Coldwater),
Craig Niekamp (Marion Local),
Jordan Rethman (Marion Local),
Tucker Smith (Marion Local),
Lee Pierron (Marion Local),
Riley Bransteter (Parkway), Caleb
Heitkamp (St. Henry), Alex Post
(St. Henry), Brad Heitkamp (St.
Henry) and Devin Froning (St.
Henry).
Rammel, Crowell named
Players of the Year
Divisional and regional
football assignments were
announced last week as each
county school found out who
it will be competing with for
playoff berths.
Division VI will be host to
three county squads in Region
24 with Fort Recovery, Marion
Local and St. Henry all in the
region. Other area schools are
Ada, Hardin Northern, Sidney
Lehman, Fort Loramie, Ansonia,
Arcanum, Minster, New Bremen,
Ridgemont, Riverside, Upper
Scioto Valley and Waynesfeld
Goshen.
Two other county schools
will take part in Division V,
Region 20 as Coldwater and
Parkway each were assigned to
this region. Local schools that
are also included in this region
are Anna, Fairbanks, Riverdale
and Versailles.
Celina will take part in
Region 8 as the Bulldogs will
battle for a playoff berth in
Division II.
Lima Senior and Wapakoneta
are also part of the 29 team
region.
Regional FB assignments announced
the mercer county chronicle
Page 8 • may 26, 2011
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THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
Page 10 • May 21, 2009 - May 27, 2009
Celina Couple Receives Albert Heckler
Award from Cheryl Ann Programs
louis and Dorothy hoyng never imagined that they’d be-
come involved with cheryl Ann Programs.
they were raising three happy, healthy boys in their celina
home. louie operated his custom upholstery shop next door,
and Dorothy worked in the high school cafeteria. they were a
typical family.
then a very atypical thing happened. their middle son,
Brian, was struck by lightning in 1981 when he was 16. With
that bolt out of the blue, the hoyngs’ lives changed forever.
the odds of being struck by lightning are one in 280,000,
but the hoyngs couldn’t afford to spend much time thinking
about their terrible luck. they had a son who needed them
more than he ever had. the first years after Brian’s accident,
which left him with severe disabilities, were very difficult,
they said, as they searched for someone who could help them
help Brian.
their school district helped as much as it could.Finally, then-
Superintendent ralph Stelzer recommended a place the hoyngs
knew about but had never visited as parents: cheryl Ann.
“cheryl Ann was the best thing that ever happened to us,”
louie hoyng said. “it gave Brian his life back.”
the people of cheryl Ann helped Brian with his everyday
life. they gave him a place to go and jobs to do. he made new
friends, and enjoyed everything about his experiences there,
up to and including the bus ride out to mud Pike.
“When he would see Sam morden (his bus aide) he would
just smile, and the people in Adult Day Services really knew
how to make him laugh,” Dorothy hoyng said.
it wasn’t long before the hoyngs were finding ways to re-
pay cheryl Ann for its help. they were regular volunteers.
louie hoyng completed upholstery jobs for the unique
equipment used at cheryl Ann, and often, said Superintendent
mike overman, “louie would forget to send us a bill.” he
also served a term on the county mrDD board and was the
board president.
For all that, and for their tireless advocacy on behalf of
their son, the hoyngs received the Albert heckler Award at
the staff appreciation banquet in march. the award is given
each year to a cheryl Ann family that exemplifies service and
advocacy.
“the hoyngs both served as good examples of first-rate
advocates for their son,” overman said. “they rarely ever
missed a day spending time with him, and they always spoke
up to be sure his needs were being met. they were really spe-
cial parents for Brian, and really good supporters of our pro-
gram.”
Brian hoyng died in February 2008 at the age of 43. in the
years after the lightning strike he taught his family a lot about
patience, hope, endurance and acceptance. he introduced the
hoyngs to a world they had only seen from the outside—but it
was a world where they found welcome and acceptance.
“We met some wonderful people during our years at cheryl
Ann,” Dorothy hoyng said. “they worked their hearts out
helping us with Brian.”
Dorothy and Louis Hoyng
Stateline Writers meet
At the April meeting of the Stateline Writer’s club, members read
profiles they had written about someone, living or dead or make-
believe, and member eileen Whitsett’s special activity of having mem-
bers combine pictures of particular scenes with a person or people
assigned to them to put into that scene brought interesting results.
Sue miller and Gretchen Bollenbacher’s proposal for a special
meeting designed to attract new members was described and approved.
members will be hosted by the coldwater Public library in June for
a reading of their best work.
At the next meeting, which will be on Saturday, may 16, mem-
bers will rehearse for their special program in June.
Stateline club members meet the 3rd Saturday of each month at
10 a.m. at the celina mercer county library. Anyone interested in
coming to a meeting or becoming a member is cordially invited to
attend.
celina rotary Dog Park Dedicated
BY: BETTY LOU DENNEY/HALL
opening day at the celina rotary Dog Park received
rave revues from the dogs. As the gates opened for the first
time on tuesday may 12, dogs of all sizes were seen mak-
ing their way to the park to get a chance to run in over 3
acres of wide open spaces of the chain-linked fenced in
area. Small dogs area is an acre and the large dogs have
over 2 acres. the new park, which is one of newest and
biggest things happening in the State Parks around the coun-
try, was made possible due to the efforts of Deborha Borns,
rotary club President. her friend, Darlene lynskey, is also
working on getting a State Dog Park in her home town of
St. marys. the two dog lovers along with many volunteers
worked many hours with the help of the State and craig
morton, who is the regional manager of Grand lake St.
marys. together they cleared away debris from the previ-
ously unused land. the Park is located at the end of West
Bank road
Deb Borns saw her idea come to life with the help of the
celina rotary club’s major donation and businesses as well
as individuals who helped with labor and monetary dona-
tions. the idea came to her after visiting another dog park.
At the dedication ceremony Deb thanked many of the
people who made the park possible. Jeff larmore, Past
rotary President and celina city council member spoke
as his 150 pound newfoundland, Bentley checked out the
park. Jeff is also a large contributor to the park in honor of
the recovery of Bentley after he had been lost for several
days. craig morton, regional manager of State Park Gand
lake St. marys and John hunter, Assistant chief of the
Division of Parks and recreation also spoke at the dedica-
tion ceremony. Deb concluded her speech with some wise
lessons that she has learned from her own dogs. A few of
which were: never leave home without your leach and
your iD. if you stare at someone long enough, you will get
what you want. last, if it is not wet and sloppy it is not a
real kiss.
one of the many visitors enjoying running free on dedi-
cation day was a lab /poodle mix owned by Dave hochstien,
professor at Wright State university. he has other dogs at
home but decided to only bring one at a time. he com-
mented that this was the first time his dog had this much
exercise since he got him a year ago.
there are a few small problems to work out with the
park, such as the water faucet would not shut off and there
was a small hole under the fence in the small dog side of
the park, which of course was found by one of the little
furry visitors on dedication day. these problems will be
easily fixed. memberships ($10) to Fur ever Friends are
being sold to help with the upkeep of the park. the use of
the park is free to the public. one of the additions they
would like to have is benches added to the park for the
comfort of the owners.
the green stations placed around the fence for the dog
wastes were given at a discount by Florida based company
named DogiPot. Gary Brown, Assistant operations man-
ger, heard about the plans for the park and wanted to help
by giving discounts on the pots. the company has all oxi-
biodegradable bags inside the pots for your dog waste. Gary
flew in from Florida to be a part of the ribbon cutting and
opening of the park. more of their products can be found
by going to: www.propet.org.
if visiting the park remember to follow the rules that are
posted at the entrance. common sense is your guide such
as:
Dogs should have their current shots
the park has little dog and big dog sections, keep
dogs in their own spaces.
Don’t leave dog unattended
Do not bring a dog that shows aggressive behavior
Keep small children under close supervision
clean up after your own dog
never bring a dog to the park that has an illness.
these are just a few precautions to remember. check
the rules before entering the park and you and your dog
will have a great time the Park is open daylight to dark
everyday.
Deb Borns prepares to cut the ribbon at the Dedication of the Celina Rotary Club Dog Park. Helping to hold the ribbon
is Darlene Lynskey and John Hunter, assistant chief of the Ohio’s Division of Parks and Recreation. On left is Craig
Morton, Regional Manager of Grand Lake St. Marys. Right: Jeff Larmore and Bentley. Photo by Roy Hall.
44th Annual
Knights of
Columbus Picnic
Council 1991, Coldwater, OH
Held on the Grounds of Holy Trinity Church
June 4th & 5th, 2011
If you are a practicing Catholic man, age 18 or older, we welcome
you to join the leading organization of Catholic laymen.
Saturday June 4th
Picnic Opens – 6 p.m.
Co-ed Corn Hole Tournament sign-up – 7 p.m.
Corn Hole Tournament begins – 7:30 p.m.
Karma’s Pawn 8 – 11:30 p.m.
Picnic Closes – 11:30 p.m.
Sunday June 5th
Picnic Opens – 1 p.m.
Kiddie Tractor Pull – 1:30 p.m. Start
Euchre Tournament begins – 2:15 p.m.
Bean Bag Tournament begins – 2:15 p.m.
Talent Show – 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Lininger Pony Rides – 2:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Roger DeMange Performs – 4:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Barbeque Chicken Dinners – 4:00 – 7:00 p.m.
The Wannabies Band 6 – 10 p.m.
Drawing for Prizes – 10:00 p.m.
Picnic Closes – 10:30 p.m.
area births
Baby Boy Bechtol
Kimo and lisa (hein) Bechtol, Ft. recovery, announce the birth of a son, Kolson Kaikala
Bechtol, at 12:10 p.m. may 11, at mercer health. he weighed 7 pounds 1/2 ounce and was
19 inches long.
maternal grandparents are cheryl and the late David hein, Fort recovery. Paternal
grandparents are Danny and mollie Bechtol, Fort recovery. maternal great-grandparents are
evelyn Kunkler, Fort recovery, and the late Frederick Kunkler, and mark and irene hein,
coldwater. Paternal great-grandparents are the late David, Sr., and the late ellen Kaikala,
hana, maui, hawaii, and Betty Bechtol, Fort recovery, and the late ralph Bechtol.
Baby Girl Homan
Kenny and Bonnie (Wendel) homan, new Weston, announce the birth of a daughter, Julia
elizabeth, at 8:30 p.m. on may 9, at mercer health. She weighed 7 pounds 13 1/2 ounces
and was 20 1/2 inches long.
She was welcomed home by a brother, Josh, age 11, and sisters, Jackie, age 7, and Jenna,
age 3.
maternal grandparents are larry and cathy Wendel, Saint henry. Paternal grandparents
are hilda homan, Saint henry, and the late cletus homan.
Baby Girl Moeller
Dan and leslie (Goettemoeller) moeller, announce the birth of a daughter, Brooklyn marie
moeller, at 1:11 a.m. may 14, at mercer health. She weighed 7 pounds 4 1/2 ounces and was
19 1/2 inches long.
maternal grandparents are Dale and Agnes Goettemoeller, maria Stein. Paternal
grandparents are lavern and Kathy moeller, coldwater.
Daniel and mary Ann hemmelgarn, St. henry,
announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their
daughter, elizabeth hemmelgarn, to ryan huwer, son of
David and Denise huwer, St. henry.
the bride-elect is a 2007 graduate of St. henry high
School and earned an associate degree in applied science
from rhodes State college in 2009. She is employed
as an occupational therapy assistant for rehabilitative
Services, inc., at celina manor.
the prospective groom is a 2007 graduate of St.
henry high School and will graduate from Wright State
university with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics with
an education concentration in June.
the couple is planning a June 25 wedding at St. Francis
catholic church, cranberry.
Engagement
fort notes
by Betty Lou Denney/Hall
What’s Happening
around the Fort…..

make your reservations
for the annual Fort recovery
Alumni Banquet to be held
June 18 at the Fort recovery
American legion hall.
the Fort recovery Jubilee
begins on June 16. Pie bak-
ing contest will be on Friday
with the iGA rib cook off
judging on Saturday. Phil
Wood art work auction will
be on Saturday. the annual
Firemen’s Parade is on Sunday
afternoon. Presale of the ride
tickets can be purchased at
Kaup’s Pharmacy, any of the
local banks, Big Al’s and the
Wayne iGA.
the concert series in the
Van trees Park begins June 12
with the ohio Valley British
Brass Band performing. they
will be playing Show tunes,
overtures, marches and
Patriotic pieces from the past.

thouGht For the
WeeK: children were asked
at school what would be the
one thing that they would
change about their moms.
Answers: “i would get rid
of those eyes in the back of
her head.” “my mom has a
weird thing about me keep-
ing my room clean.” “i would
make my mom smarter, then
she would know that it was
my sister that did it instead
of me.”

until neXt WeeK
rememBer: Be happy, love
one another and remember that
there is a miracle out there that
can change your life.
news from st. henry
A memorial Day mass will
be held at 9 a.m. on may 30 at
St. henry church.
the St. Vincent De Paul
clothing Drive will be the
weekend of June 11. Donations
will be accepted beginning at 9
a.m. June 11 until the truck is
full. the truck will be parked
behind St. henry church.
the St. henry Altar rosary
Sodality is asking each member
to donate three items or $15 for
the fancy stand at the picnic.
All donations can be dropped
off at Vicki Koesters, 5072 St.
rt. 119, St. henry, or teresa
Poling, 112 Sunset Ave, St.
henry. if you have questions,
please call Vicki at 419-678-
3451 or teresa at 419-678-
4457.
Vacation Bible School will
be held July 18 - 22, from
6:30 - 9 p.m. in the St. henry
church basement. the theme
is “Dare to be a h.e.r.o. 4
God”. registration forms are
available at the various church
entrances. Deadline to register
is June 30. Grades K-5/2011-
2012 school year
if you have news from the
Saint henry area, please contact
Jenny Sutter at 419-678-2324
or mccnews@bright.net.
Sarah’s Key
By tatiana de rosnay

Sarah’s Key is a
remarkable novel-taking
place in Paris , France . it
covers two eras beginning
with July 1942 and
alternating with may 2002.
the chapters alternate back
and forth between the dates.
this is a riveting, stay
with you book that pierces
your heart and opens the
mind to many questions. the
very frst paragraph grabbed
me and i was captivated
for hours. it is 1942 and
thousands of Jewish families
are being rounded up and held
at the Velodrome d’hiver,
a sports arena outside the
city of Paris . When the
Paris police knock on the
apartment door, 10-year-old
Sarah Starzynski locks her
younger brother, michel,
in a secret cupboard and
promises, “i’ll come back
for you later.” She puts the
key in her pocket. Sarah has
possession of this key when
she passes away 45 years
later.
Sarah’s Key is fction
based on facts that need
to be reread, talked about
and shared with everyone. i
did not realize the role that
France authorities played in
the deportation of the Jewish
families to Auschwitz from
Drancy .
the story continues
in Paris, may 2002, with
American born journalist,
Julie Jarmond, being assigned
to cover the 60
th
anniversary
of the Vel’ d’hiv’. She is
married to a Frenchman,
they have a daughter
and they are preparing to
move into a refurbished
apartment recently vacated
by her mother-in-law. this
is the same apartment from
which Sarah’s family was
confscated in 1942. The
father-in-law shares a
60-year-old secret with Julia
that changes hers and her
family’s life forever. A
few of the chapters go
rather slowly but the story
soon picks up again and
the powerful ending comes
much too soon.
So many words
describe this book. A few
include haunting, riveting,
memorable and emotional. it
will stay with you long
after you read the last
page. Sarah’s Key is the book
for June of the library’s
Book Discussion Group.
i know it will be a lively
dialogue full of comments
and annotations. happy
reading
Wellhung
Doors & Windows

*Clopay Garage Doors * Liftmaster Openers
Simonton Windows • Entry Doors
*Commercial/Residential Sales & Service
419-733-2932 Coldwater, Ohio
THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
May 26, 2011 • Page 9
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419-375-4617
VISIT US 24/7
www.hastingsauto.com
• Pictures •Prices •Options
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 7:00 a.m.-5 p.m.
Wed. 7 a.m.-8 p.m.
Sat. 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
CARS
VANS SUVs
11 Buick LaCrosse CXL
SE, 17,000 miles $27,500
10 Nissan Altima 2.5S
8,000 miles ....... $18,800
08 Buick Lucerne CXL
33,000 miles ..... $19,900
08 Pontiac G6 V6
p/sunroof........... $13,200
08 Pontiac G6 V6
44,000 miles ....... $12,900
07 Honda Accord Hybrid
31,000 miles.. ........$16,900
07 Buick Lucerne CXL
32,000 miles ..... $17,900
07 Pontiac Grand Prix
P/sunroof .......... $12,900
08 GMC Envoy SLT 4x4
38,000 miles ..... ..$20,800
08 GMC Envoy SLE 4x4
P/Sunroof .......... ..$19,200
06 Saturn Relay 3
DVD, leather .... $13,200
018 Education/
Instruction
LOSE WEIGHT, tone
muscles with the Stone Ti-
ger fitness program. Kick
boxing, cardio, plyomet-
rics, resistance training
and more. (419) 733-6828
NOW ENROLLING In-
fants through 12 years old
for childcare and pre -
school programming. Our
school-age summer pro-
gram includes four field
trips every week. We are
a 2 Star Rated Program
through Step Up To Qual-
ity. We are a preschool li-
censed by ODJFS. All
meals and snacks are pro-
vided for all children en-
rolled. We even provide
formula and baby food for
infants. We open at 4:30
a.m. and close at 10:30
p.m. Monday-Friday. We
are the only center in Mer-
cer County that gives you
the opportunity to see your
children all day while they
are at Li ttl e Fl ower
through Blossom Cam.
For a tour and more infor-
mation about our program
at Little Flower Learning
Cent er, pl ease cal l
419-586-8030 or email us
at admin@littleflowerlc.com.
You can also visit our
website at www.littleflow-
erlc.com. Please remem-
ber: “We Don!t Grow Flow-
ers, We Grow Kids!”
018 Education/
Instruction
STONE-TIGER Dojo Mar-
tial arts classes, ages 4
year and up. Self defense,
di sci pl i ne, grappl i ng,
weapons and more (419)
733-6828, 306 East An-
thony Street, Celina.
020

For Rent
TWO BEDROOM Home in
Coldwater, central air,
washer and dryer, appli-
ances, and garage door
opener. Call 419-305-4307
025

For Sale
CENTRAL BOILER Out-
door Wood & Corn Fur-
naces. Stop paying high
energy prices and use re-
newable energy. Call for
current specials. Classic
Comfort Heating & Supply.
Gr e e n v i l l e , Oh i o .
888-296-3875.
CLEARANCE-DISCON-
TINUED , scratch and
dent, one-of-a-kind floor
displays up to 75% off
Kerns Fireplace and Spa;
5217 Tama Road, Celina,
Ohio 419-363-2230.
DRY ANIMAL BEDDING
Semi!s-100 cu yards. M.L.
Enterprise, LLC, Phone
260-341-8928.
025

For Sale
MOPED SALE, over 100
new and used mopeds.
Parts, service & repairs.
Lyle!s Moped Sales, 12th
and Mai n, Del phos.
419-692-0249.
POND STOCKING and
Supplies. Amurs, min -
nows, and other fish varie-
ties. Aeration systems,
windmills, fountains, and
pond chemicals. Free
brochure. Free delivery
with minimum order. One
mile west of Kalida on St.
Rt.224. 419 532-2335
remlingerfishfarm.com
RECLINER, LOTS OF
nice sofas, recliner sofa,
sleeper sofas, sectionals,
table and chairs, wicker
set, glider/rocker w/otto-
man, futon, twin bed,
roll-a-way beds, stackable
bookshelf, tvs, lamps,
child-size folding chairs,
baby crib, upright freezer
and much more. Nice
clean furniture/fraction
cost of new! Yesterday!s
Treasures, 973 S. Merid-
i an, Por t l and, I nd.
260-726-8175,
Monday-Friday 12:30-5
and Saturday 10-2. $1 off
DVD!s. $2 off video
games. See our ad at jay-
coshopping.com.
035

Help Wanted
ADMITTING SERVICES
Manager. Excellent op-
portunity to join the leader-
ship team of a progressive
healthcare organization.
Joint Township District
Memorial Hospital cur -
rently has a full time open-
ing for a Manager in our
Admitting Services De -
partment. The Manager
plans, directs, organizes,
and evaluates Registration
and Scheduling functions
and activities. BS degree
in Business or Communi-
cations. Excellent com-
munication and manage-
ment skills with sufficient
previous experience in
health care environment.
Apply online www.grand-
lakehealth.org.
URGENT CARE RN or
LPN. Joint Township Dis-
trict Memorial Hospital
currently has a part time
opening for an RN or LPN
in our Urgent Care Depart-
ment, M-F 5p-11p and oc-
casi onal weekends
10a-10p. Current Ohio
nursing licensure and
BCLS Healthcare Provider
CPR required. 2-4 years
previous medical/surgical
nursing experience pre-
ferred, with strong pediat-
ric background. Must
have outstanding critical
thinking, organizational,
prioritization and customer
service skills. Must be
able to function autono-
mously with good decision
maki ng ski l l s demon -
strated. ACLS & PALS
highly recommended for
RN!s, but not required.
Apply online www.grand-
lakehealth.org.
035

Help Wanted
WOULD YOU like to be
an in-home child care pro-
vider? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at
1- 800- 922- 2916 or
419-225-5465.
040

Notices
***ARE YOU A Bargain
Hunter?*** Welcome to
Repl ay Consi gnment
Shop where there are
deals on every rack. Lo-
cated in downtown St. Ma-
ry!s on the corner of
Spring and Vine Street at
702 E. Spring Street. New
and Gently used Men!s,
Women!s, Teen!s and
Children!s clothing. Many
items are marked $1.00
each. Hurry in while sup-
plies last. Currently ac-
cepting Spring and sum-
mer apparel in all sizes.
Visit our website for more
information www.replay-
consignmentshop.com or
call 419 300-8847. Hours:
Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. to
6:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00
a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Find us
on facebook.
040

Notices
CASH FOR Gold. Scrap
Gold, Gold jewelry, Silver
coins, Silverware, Pocket
wat ches, Di amonds,
Raines Jewelry, 2330
Shawnee Road, Lima,
(419) 229-2899
041

Services
DCF POWDER Coating.
Quality Custom Powder
Coating. Automotive, Mo-
torcycle, Metal lawn furni-
ture, Clay/Concrete and
Metal Products, Batch
work available, Oven sizes
4!x6! & 10!x10”, Over 150
colors in stock and more
to choose from! Ask about
bulk pricing! Greenville,
Ohi o 937- 569- 1400.
www.dcfpowdercoating.co
m.
041

Services
FULL SERVICE Detail.
Make your vehicle look
new again. Free pick up &
delivery. Mobile service
available. 937-547-9476
L.S. CONSTRUCTION -
Over 20 years experience.
Free estimates. Roofing,
Siding, Windows, Doors,
Remodel jobs, Concrete
Work, Decks and more.
Building pole barns for 10
years. Wind and storm
damage repair. Phone
1-260-724-1934.
LIGHT HAULING, House,
barn, garage, basement,
clean outs, Tree cutting,
falling tree clean up, Brush
removal, pressure wash-
ing, painting inside and
out, Blacktop driveway
coating, firewood for sale.
419-953-8421
WE POWERWASH
houses by hand from top
to bottom with soft 4 inch
brushes and we do a qual-
ity job. We will power -
wash anything anywhere.
Call Greg for information
at 419 296-3433.
045

Wanted

Lost & Found
WILLIAMS AUTO PARTS
We buy l ate model
wrecks. We have late
model used auto and truck
parts, late model re -
buildable wrecks. 127 De-
troit Avenue, Portland, IN.,
1-800-669-5762.
050

Work Wanted
AGAPE LANDSCAPING.
Commercial and residen-
tial mowing. Remulching
and landscaping mainte-
nance. Owner Darl Strable
(419) 305-2836.
D-LINN CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling: vinyl siding;
windows and doors; dry-
wall; new construction:
room additions, garages;
roofing; Free Estimates
260-251-4559.
WENDEL SEAMLESS
GUTTERING. For all your
guttering and leaf cover
needs. Call us for a free
quote. Cal l Ji m at
260-997-6774 or Steve at
260-997-1414.
Drivers-Regional: Home
Weekly! Start .40cpm. 4wks
Vacation! 401K. CDL-A, 1yr
exp. Recruiting: 800-497-2100
Apply:
www.continentalexpressinc.com
classifieds
Have News?
Email us at
mccnews@bright.net
The Coldwater Tree
Commission sponsored an
essay contest for Coldwater
seventh and eighth graders.
The essay needed to be
an informal essay, stating
facts as needed, but also
expressing the writer’s
feelings or memories about
the subject. The topics to
choose from included:
Coldwater is a “Tree City.”
Explain what this means, its
importance, etc.; How are
trees important for wildlife?
Be specifc;Research Arbor
Day and explains its history,
importance, ways to observe
it, etc.; “Urban Forestry” is
a fairly new team. Explain
what it means, its importance,
jobs it could include, etc.;
Write about the importance
of trees in your life or in
the world, or of one specifc
tree and your memories and
feelings about it.
The prizes were Chamber
of Commerce gift certifcates,
which can be used in most
businesses in Coldwater. For
each grade, there was three
prizes: frst-$25; second-$15;
third-$10. The winners were
also invited to participate in
the Arbor Day tree-planting
ceremony.
First place Winner #1
(7-A)
Tree Importance to
Wildlife
By: Dan Seas
Trees provide food,
like its fruit, or other tree
bearings, for organisms,
homes to many animals, and
even help lower the amount
of carbon dioxide in earth’s
atmosphere. Most people see
trees everyday and don’t even
think much of it, but really
they should look around and
see what would happen if life
had no trees. If it did, almost
all birds wouldn’t have any
homes, or fruit to eat from the
trees. In ecosystems, such
as a rainforest, life evolves
around its massive layers of
trees. Without the trees, all
the organisms would have to
move and adapt to new areas,
or just die.
Another reason we need
trees is to help lower the
amount of air pollution in
the air. Every person in the
United States makes about
4,600 pounds of carbon
dioxide a year. A good tree
only takes in, give, or take
a few, 13 pounds of carbon
dioxide a year. This means it
takes about 354 trees to clean
up one Americans carbon
dioxide. We defnitely need
our trees considering that
there’s about 7 billion people
on earth. The amounts of
carbon dioxide in the
atmosphere push back some
of the heat the earth lets go.
The build up of heat causes
unnatural warming, resulting
in polar melting, which can
destroy polar habitats, more
hurricanes, and other storms
that affect habitats.
From all this I strongly
feel we need many more
trees on this earth and need
to appreciate them much
more than we do now. Arbor
Day is a great day to show
our gratitude towards trees
and to plant more of them.
Hopefully, in the future
everyone knows and feels
how trees support and are
important to earth’s wildlife.
First place Winner #1
(8-D)
Arbor Day
by: Teresa Langenkamp
Arbor Day is a very
important holiday across the
world. In America, it is
observed by all 50 states.
It was offcially founded in
Nebraska by Julius Sterling
Motion, the third United States
Secretary of Agriculture, and
was frst celebrated on April
10 1872. By the 1920s,
forty-fve states, as well as
some of the territories, had
passed a law on which day
Arbor Day was to be held.
It is now a national holiday
and offcially held every year
on the fnal Friday of April.
This year it is on April 29.
While Arbor Day is held in
April, some states celebrate
it in other months due to the
diverse growing conditions
across the United States.
Arbor Day is also celebrated
in many other countries, all
over the planet, on different
days.
I feel Arbor Day is a
very important holiday.
It recognizes the value of
trees. Trees are vital to life
all over the world. They
supply the very oxygen we
breathe. Trees also provide
food and shelter for many
animals. We need trees to
survive. Planting them is
benefcial for the earth and
our environment. It can also
be fun!
In the United States,
schools, businesses, and
groups of people get together
to celebrate Arbor Day by
planting and caring for trees.
Schools also educate students
about the importance of trees
on this day. In China, each
citizen is required to plant
a tree every year on March
12, or pay for the amount of
labor it takes to plant a tree.
But how can you
personally get involved with
Arbor Day? Planting a tree
is one of the best ways, but
if you don’t have a backyard
or a green thumb, there are
other ways. You can simply
go outside and spend some
time with Mother Nature’s
many gifts. Go for a hike
or a walk around your local
park, and observe all the
beautiful trees. You could
see how many different types
of leaves you could fnd, and
put them in a book. Over
time you can add to this
book as you fnd additional
leaves.
Overall, I feel Arbor Day is
a great holiday, and everyone
should take time to celebrate
it. It’s all about trees which
beneft everything living on
this earth, including you!
First place winners of Essay Contest sponsored by the Coldwater Tree Commission
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Health/Beauty CDL
Drivers - Relocate for tons
of Great Paying Texas Frac
work! Great company/Paid
benefts! Must have bulk
pneumatic trailer experience.
Call Today! 888-880-5922.

Help Wanted COMPANY
TEAM DRIVERS: $5,000
Sign-On Bonus. Excellent Pay
Plus Benefts! CDL-A HazMat
2 years OTR. 1-877-628-3748
www.DriveNCTrnas.com

Hel p Want ed
CONSTRUCTION No exp.
needed. Paid training, good
salary & benefts, vacation. $
for school. HS grads ages
17-34. Call Mon-Fri.
1-800-282-1384, or jobs_
ohio@navy.mil.

Help Wanted Driver -
Arriving Now 2012 Volvos
and internationals. Plenty
of miles! Local Orientation.
Daily or Weekly Pay! CDL-A,
3 months current OTR experi-
ence. 800-414-9569. www.
driveknight.com.
MISSING IS a dark tiger,
neutered male cat. Name
is Buddy. Cash reward.
Please call 419-733-1383.
the mercer county chronicle
Page 10 • may 26, 2011
Have A Website?
Tell the World!
SHOP
Online 24/7
Call 419-678-2324
to be included in next weeks directory
Assisted Living
newspAper
groceries
Hospice cAre
AutomobiLes
Briarwood Village
100 Don Desch Dr., Coldwater 419-678-2311
www.briarwood-village.com
AutomobiLe pArts
Williams Auto Parts, Inc.
127 Detroit Ave., Portland, IN 800-669-5762
www.williamsautopartsinc.com
State of the Heart Hospice
230 W. Main St., Coldwater 419-678-4808 • 800-584-9853
www.stateoftheheartcare.com
Hull Brothers Inc.
520 E. Boundary St., Ft. Recovery • 800-336-8279
www.hullbros.com
Gels IGA
451 Stachler Dr., St. Henry • 419-678-4249
“YOUR ONE STOP SHOP SERVING OUR FRIENDS
AND NEIGHBORS FOR OVER 60 YEARS!”
www.gelsiga.com
St. Marys Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Inc.
500 McKindley Rd., St. Marys
419-394-7970 • 800-589-8073
www.stmaryschrysler.com
Kerns Ford, Lincoln-Mercury
1000 W. Logan St., Celina • 419-586-5191 • 800-211-9667
“A $200 gas card with any used vehicle purchase”
www.kernssuperstore.com
Hastings Auto Sales
110 S. Wayne St., Ft. Recovery 419-375-4617
www.hastingsauto.com
Bud’s Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep
New Certified & Pre-Owned Sales, Service & Parts
“YOU CAN’T BEAT A BUD’S DEAL”
419-586-7000
www.budschrysler.com
C.A.R.S.
Repair Sales
419-678-4949 419-678-3969
SEE ALL WE CAN DO FOR YOU!
www.carscoldwater.com
Pictures,
Prices & Options
The Mercer County Chronicle
124 W. Main St, Coldwater • 419-678-2324
www.mercercountychronicle.com
FArm equipment
reAL estAte
Homan Real Estate
120 W. Main St., Coldwater, OH 419-678-3229
www.homanrealestate.com
The Sharper Image
937-547-9476
www.sharperimageautodetailing.com
veHicLe detAiLing
(419) 678-8711 • Coldwater, OH
www.raysrefrigeration.com
©2010 WaterFurnace is a registered trademark of WaterFurnace International, Inc.
*Based upon ARI13256-1 (GLHP - Part Load Ratings)
visit us at waterfurnace.com
Today’s fossil fuel furnaces and air conditioners simply can’t “measure up”
to an Envision geothermal comfort system from WaterFurnace. The Envision
series sets a new standard in performance with a cooling efficiency of
30 EER and a heating efficiency of 5 COP — the highest ratings of any unit
ever certified by AHRI* (the trade association responsible for industry
performance standards & certification). WaterFurnace units tap into the
clean, renewable energy found in your own backyard to provide savings
up to 70% on heating, cooling and hot water. With added benefits like
safe, clean, quiet, reliable operation, it’s plain to see that an Envision makes
ordinary units seem small by comparison. Contact Ray’s Refrigeration
today for more information.
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it was an accident in
1820 when Surveyor James
Watson riley fell into Deer
creek. Due to that unfortunate
accident, James Watson riley
and his father captain James
riley will be honored during
Bluffton’s Sesquicentennial
celebration, June 24-July 2,
2011.
this story began in 1819,
after the treaties at St. marys
between the u.S. Government
and tribes of native
Americans. As the native
Americans were moving west,
ohio’s Governor Brown was
looking to develop ohio’s
interior, and to establish a canal
system in ohio. After captain
James riley had returned from
being enslaved by the muslims
of the Sahara Desert, edward
Tiffn, Surveyor General of
the united States, on June 23,
1819, appointed captain James
riley as Deputy Surveyor in
the northwest territory. As
of november 20, 1819, riley
was reporting to Tiffn, from
the head of the Wabash
river, near the fort, known
as Fort recovery. captain
riley moved his family to a
log home on the St. marys
river and platted the village
of Willshire in 1822. captain
riley’s son James Watson
riley also was a surveyor.
in Putnam county, ohio,
James Watson riley, worked
with surveyors between
1819 and 1822. An accident
occurred while J.W. riley
was surveying Deer creek,
formerly called “Big tawa” by
the indians. When J.W. riley
and his crew were surveying
the north line of Section 36,
in ottawa township, where
it crosses the creek, riley
attempted to cross the stream
on some drift, and in doing
so, he fell in and lost his
Jacob Staff and could not
recover it. this point is near
the site where the creek joins
the Blanchard river, about
seven miles downstream
from Pandora. riley had
to quit and go home, until
he could repair his loss. he
had to make one himself,
as there was none to be had
nearer than Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania. his staff was
somewhere in the north in use
yet in 1878; his tripod was
never found.
the riley name became
a part of that creek’s
history. the name of “Deer
creek” was changed to “riley
creek,” by the united States
Surveyor General. riley creek
begins near the riley creek
Baptist church, in hancock
County. The Creek fows
through Allen county and
then enters riley township
of Putnam county, and ends
in ottawa township, Putnam
county, downstream from
riley creek united methodist
church, and joins Blanchard
river. thomas Gray built a
cabin on riley creek in 1832,
and attempted to plat the town
which he named “rileyville,”
which is adjacent to the
christian Schumacher house
of 1842. rileyville never
grew beyond Gray’s cabin,
but riley creek and riley
township names remain.
monday and thursday,
June 27 and 30, 7 p.m., at
Bluffton’s town hall (the
tallest building downtown),
local historian Darrell
Groman will frst give a
presentation about captain
James riley, including
the story of James Watson
riley’s surveys of riley
creek. Following Groman’s
presentation about riley,
the flm will be presented of
“Skeletons on the Zahara” by
Dean King, complimented with
interviews of Descendants of
captain James riley. (many
of you have visited the mercer
county library at celina and
borrowed the flm, “Skeletons
on the Zahara.”)
i plan to attend the
monday evening presentation
about captain riley and enjoy
the festivities of Bluffton’s
Sesquicentennial, June 24 –
July 2. that week they are
hosting a car Show, various
musical performances,
Weaving demonstrations and
Sewing arts, native American
programs, Quilt exhibits, a
Flea market, and civil War
encampment. i am proud
to see the mercer county
historical Society’s mission
accomplished when ohio
communities preserve their
history and educate the public
about their history by planning
celebrations honoring their
history.
[the mercer county
historical Society President
Joyce Alig, may be contacted
at 3054 Burk-St. henry
road, Saint henry, oh
45883, or histalig@bright.
net or 419-678-2614.]
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Contribution is part of a
million egg donation campaign
statewide
Just in time for may national
egg month, Ft. recovery
equity, of Ft. recovery; rindler
Poultry, of St. henry; and
hemmelgarn & Sons, inc., of
coldwater, are helping local
families in need by donating
388,800 eggs, with a retail value
of $45,000 to the Akron-canton
Foodbank; cleveland Foodbank;
the Foodbank, inc.; Freestore
Foodbank; mid-ohio Foodbank;
Second harvest Foodbank
of mahoning Valley; Second
harvest Foodbank of north
central ohio; Second harvest
Foodbank of Southeast ohio;
and Shared harvest Foodbank.
“During these tough
economic times with rising food
and fuel prices, we are humbled
to give back to those in our local
community in need,” said Jerry
Knapke, operations manager of
Ft. recovery equity.
in addition to Ft. recovery
equity, rindler Poultry,
and hemmelgarn & Sons’
contribution, seven other ohio
egg farmers and the family
farmers that grow for them
are making egg donations this
may to the state’s 12 regional
foodbanks that are part of the
ohio Association of Second
harvest Foodbanks (oAShF).
ohio egg farmers who are
participating in the contribution
include: ohio Fresh eggs of
croton; hillandale Farms of
Akron; hertzfeld Poultry Farms
of Grand rapids; Weaver
Brothers, inc. of Versailles; and
cal-maine Farms of rossburg.
the total statewide donation is
1,004,400 eggs.
“ohio’s egg farmers have a
long-standing partnership with
the state’s foodbanks and we
are proud to give back to those
who are less fortunate,” said Jim
chakeres, oPA executive vice
president. “even though we
recognize this donation does not
begin to meet the demand, we
hope it will make a signifcant
difference in the lives of ohioans
who need it most.
in addition to providing
ohio families with a natural,
unprocessed source of high-
quality protein, eggs and their
nutrients offer several health
benefts. The incredible egg
provides 13 essential nutrients,
while only containing about
75 calories. Additionally, a
new uSDA study reveals
that eggs are now 14 percent
lower in cholesterol and 64
percent higher in Vitamin D
than previously thought. the
nutrients in eggs can play a role
in weight management, muscle
strength, healthy pregnancy,
brain function, eye health and
more.
ohio is the second-largest
egg producing state in the
nation, producing more than
seven billion eggs each year
at an estimated retail value of
more than $585 million. ohio
egg farmers are committed to
providing safe affordable food
for consumers and caring for
their focks and the environment.
For more information regarding
ohio’s egg community or
for delicious recipes, please
visit www.ohioeggs.com.
three local egg farmers donate more than 388,000 eggs to local foodbank
As ohioans plan their
memorial Day barbeques and
trips to the pool, the American
cancer Society and its partners
remind ohioans to go beyond
sunscreen to protect themselves
from skin cancer, the most
common cancer – and a very
preventable one.
Skin cancer is on the rise in
the united States, killing one
person every hour. Skin cancer
outnumbers all other forms of
cancer combined. An estimated
68,130 Americans will be
diagnosed with malignant
melanoma, the most deadly form
of skin cancer this year, and
another 2 million will get basal
or squamous cell skin cancer. to
protect yourself and your family:
• Slip on a shirt
• Slop on a generous amount
of sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher
every two hours, especially after
swimming or sweating
• Slap on a hat, especially one
with a wide brim.
• Wrap on sunglasses if you
can, seek shade and avoid the
sun from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Burns
can occur when it is cloudy. use
extra caution near the water and
sand as they refect damaging
rays and increase the chance of
a sunburn. Avoid tanning and
tanning beds. Get vitamin D
safely through food and vitamin
supplements. “make every day
Don’t Fry Day,” said Dr. charles
Fixler, a cincinnati dermatologist
and American cancer Society
board member. “A suntan is a
sign of skin damage and also
causes wrinkles and premature
aging. you can take steps to
reduce your risk of skin cancer
today.” most skin cancers are
caused by overexposure to uV
radiation. check the uV index
which ranges from 1 (low) to
11+ (extremely high) from the
uS ePA’s at www.epa.gov/
sunwise/uvindex.html. Sign up to
receive emails with your local
UV forecast at https://envirofash.
epa.gov. Download an app for
your mobile device at www.epa.
gov/sunwise. AccuWeather.com
also has an hourly uV index
forecast information and a video
on skin cancer prevention. Kristin
Schoumacher of cincinnati was
just 24 when she was diagnosed
with skin cancer four years ago.
“my melanoma could come back
anytime,” said Schoumacher.
“tanning is not safe.” the
American cancer Society
estimates that 11.790 people died
from skin cancer in 2010, mostly
due to malignant melanoma,
which is among the fastest rising
cancers in the u.S. melanoma is
the second most common form
of cancer for young adults 15-29
years old. the number of women
under age 40 diagnosed with
basal cell carcinoma has more
than doubled in the last 30 years;
the squamous cell carcinoma rate
for women has also increased
signifcantly.
the “ABcD rule” is an
easy guide to the usual signs of
melanoma. talk to your doctor if
you notice:
• A is for ASYMMETRY: one
half of a mole or birthmark does
not match the other.
• B is for BORDER: the edges
are irregular, ragged, notched, or
blurred.
• C is for COLOR: the color
is not the same all over and may
include shades of brown or black,
or sometimes with patches of
pink, red, white, or blue.
• D is for DIAMETER: the
spot is larger than 6 millimeters
across (about 1/4 inch — the
size of a pencil eraser), although
melanomas can sometimes
be smaller than this. Another
very important sign of possible
melanoma is a change in the size,
shape, or color of a mole or the
appearance of a new spot. Some
melanomas do not ft the ABCD
rule described above. other
warning signs include:
• a sore that does not heal
• spread of pigment from the
border of a spot to surrounding
skin
• redness or a new swelling
beyond the border
• change in sensation —
itchiness, tenderness, or pain
• change in the surface of
a mole — scaliness, oozing,
bleeding, or the appearance of
a bump
• a mole that looks very
Go Beyond Sunscreen: “Don’t Fry Day” May 27