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REPUBLIC OF MOZAMBIQUE

External Market Task Force External Market Study No. 3 (5)
ANNEX 5 TO THE STUDY ON THE EXPORT MARKETING PROSPECTS OF SIX SELECTED MOZAMBICAN COMMODITIES FOR THE SOUTH AFRICAN MARKET

REPORT ON GROUNDNUTS

This product report forms part of an overall report and should be read in conjunction with the Main Report that covers general items regarding all six products and the market evaluation. Also, these reports make suggestions based on certain assumptions and market conditions. Conclusions are derived from interviews and experience collected from a variety of sources. Although all the information recorded has been collected from reputable sources and in good faith, the External Market Task Force cannot be held responsible for the accuracy or the lack of success in marketing any of the researched products.

External Market Task Force
National Directorate of Trade (DNC) of the Ministry of Industry and Trade (MIC) Office for the Promotion of the Commercial Agricultural Sector (GPSCA) of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MADER) Institute for Export Promotion (IPEX) Confederation of Economic Associations of Mozambique (CTA) National Institute of Standards and Quality (INNOQ)
Supported by the EC/FAO Facility for the Provision of Consultancy Services and the Marketing Management Assistance Project MIC/FAO/EC

Maputo March, 2004

TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE

1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0

Introduction Mozambique Supply Analysis South African Market Supply Analysis
2.1 Production 2.2 Prices 2.3 Marketing 2.4 Packaging 3.1 Production 3.2 Consumption 3.3 Marketing 3.4 Imports and regulations

1 2 4 8 8 9 10 10 12 14 16 17 18 19

Pricing and Logistics Analysis SWOT Analysis Conclusions Recommended Future Action Contacts Interviewed List of Tables
Table 1: Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Table 5 Table 6 Table 7 Table 8 Table 9 Table 10 Table 11 Table 12 Table 13 Table 14 Table 15 Harvested area, production and yields of groundnuts in Mozambique, per province (2001/02 and 2002/03) Differences between the two most important groundnut-growing regions in Mozambique Wholesale prices of Small seeded peanuts (Spanish) in selected Mozambique Provinces Wholesale prices of Large seeded peanuts (Virginia) in selected Mozambique Provinces Wholesale prices of Small seeded peanuts (Spanish) in selected Mozambique Provinces Producer prices (at farm gate) of Small seeded peanuts (Spanish) in selected Mozambique Provinces Producer prices (at farm gate) of Large seeded peanuts (Virginia) in selected Mozambique Provinces Guestimate prices for groundnuts (EXW CP) Indication Retail Prices for groundnuts in Maputo Plantings, production and the yield of groundnuts from 1997/98 to 2002/03 Groundnuts, not roasted or otherwise cooked, whether or not shelled or broken Guestimate prices for groundnuts (EXW CP) (selected provinces) Estimated delivery price for large groundnuts to Johannesburg (Per Metric Ton) Estimated delivery price for small groundnuts to Johannesburg (Per Metric Ton) Price Competitiveness of grountnut exports to South Africa

2 3 4 5 5 6 6 7 8 9 13 14 14 15 15

List of Figures
Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Area planted to and production of groundnuts (1994/95-2002/03) Utilisation of groundnuts for the local market during 2002/2003 Average R/ton and total production (1995 to 2002) Imports and exports of groundnuts (1992 to 2002) 9 10 11 13

Appendices
Appendix A Prohibited and Restricted Goods Index Appendix B The Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act No. 54 of 1972) (Will be made available in electronic format) Appendix C Maximum level and sampling plan for total aflatoxins in peanuts intended for further processing (Will be made available in electronic format) Appendix D Codex standards for Peanuts (Will be made available in electronic format) Appendix E Draft regulations relating to the grading, packing and marking of groundnuts destined for sale in the RSA Appendix F Voluntary system relating to grading, packing and marking of groundnuts presented for sale in the RSA Appendix G Costing Analysis (Also available electronically) 20 22 23 24 25 42 58

EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT

GROUNDNUTS

Analysis of Groundnuts as a target product for the development and export from Mozambique and in particular to South Africa 1. Introduction
Groundnuts are an important source of vegetable protein and fat for the Mozambican population. In the southern region, although general throughout the country, many culinary dishes are based on groundnut including matapa, coconut curry, chiguinha, pumpkin curry, mshawa, cowpea curry, canana, cassava, and also several deserts. Although it is an oilseed, it belongs to the legume family, therefore contributing to soil fertility, while preventing wind and rain erosion. World annual production of groundnut is about 30 million MT of which about 60 per cent is produced in China and India. Internationally, it is 13th on the list of dry crops and 121st when based on fresh groundnut. These estimates are on an "in-shell" basis (A shelling percentage of 60-75% should be allowed for). The success of groundnut relies on its wide adaptability, being grown between the latitudes of 400N and 400S. Soil moisture should be optimal in the pod zone and an average temperature of 300-350 is critical for good yields. A minimum of l00mm of rain per year (500mm during the growth season) is required. It is grown preferably on slightly acidic, sandy to sandy-loamy soils. Pod losses increase when planted in heavier soils. It is accepted that water must be adequately available during the flowering period, the peg formation (about 6-8 weeks after planting), and the pod formation and filling. Harvesting should be done when most (more than 80%) of the pods show signs of maturity, i.e. by the darkening of the in-side of the pods. Although used largely in cooking, groundnut has many applications1 and is most commonly used in preparations that include peanut butter (90-95% roasted peanut content), cereal additives, snacks and baking. As it has high protein content it is also added as a filling to many meat products. Some of the problems impairing the consumption of groundnut are the high aflatoxin levels, and the allergic reactions found by some people. Besides human food use, there are a few non-food uses that include being part of animal feeds and used as high quality forage (dairy animals).

Groundnut has good nutritional value: protein (26%), fatty acids (49%), and carbohydrates (16%). New varieties now contain high levels of Oleic acid (80-85%) and lower levels of Linoleic acid (2%) instead of the 45-70% and 1336% respectively in older varieties.
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24 0.Departamento de Aviso Prévio FAO .5 0. (The rainy season is from early September to late February).National Early Warning System for Food security MADER . hence groundnuts are grown by about a third of the farmers. The Northern Region has a longer and more dependable rainy season (From early November to April). According to MADER statistics. which account for over 62 per cent of production.55 0.32 0.3 0.41 0.5 0. 2.4 0.317 2001/2002 Country total Cabo Delgado Niassa Nampula Zambezia Tete Manica Sofala Inhambane Gaza Maputo 111174 17693 1757 33318 18895 5158 1788 3631 18880 6375 3680 109915 18050 1792 34027 19373 4817 1210 3411 19654 4259 3322 2002/2003 Country total Cabo Delgado Niassa Nampula Zambezia Tete Manica Sofala Inhambane Gaza Maputo Source: Sistema Nacional de Aviso Previo . per province (2001/02 and 2002/03) Province Harvested area (ha) Private Family Total sector sector 279787 44166 3902 60559 32575 16095 4392 8011 72601 26507 10979 276734 45059 3980 61848 33400 16077 4127 8304 75965 17698 10277 2088 263 13 96 29 96 67 529 57 222 715 2088 263 13 96 29 96 67 529 57 222 715 277766 43903 3889 60463 32547 15999 4392 7481 72544 26285 10264 274714 44796 3967 61753 33371 15981 4127 7775 75907 17476 9562 Total Production (ton) Private sector Production Yield (ton) (ton/ha) 932 132 7 63 18 38 31 265 18 67 293 932 132 7 63 18 38 31 265 18 67 293 0.58 0.45 0.26 0. 2 2 .446 0.46 0.4 0.46 0.405 0. the total national production was 111 174 tons and 109 115 tons for 2001/2002 and 2002/2003. yet still account for more than 99 per cent of national production.3 0.63 0. lnhambane in the south3.5 ha each. respectively (See Table 1).33 0.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE 2.286 0.58 0.32 0.4 0.24 0.45 0.259 0. accounts for about 17 per cent of national production. in comparison to the one’s mentioned.5 0.446 0.984 MT – 2002/2003).GCP/MOZ/060/EC It is also evident from Table 1 that most of the groundnuts produced are by the small 'Sector Familiar' farmers (108.66 0.5 0. production and yields of groundnuts in Mozambique.5 0.66 0.4 0. only contributes marginally to total production. 3 The Southern Region is usually drier than the rest of the country and also where dry spells occur most common. Zambezia and Cabo Delgado.55 0. Most of the Mozambique’s production originates from the Northern Provinces2 of Nampula (highest production and surplus).DINA .299 0. The remaining provinces.63 0.45 0. Table 1: Harvested area.4 0.1 Mozambique supply analysis Production Groundnuts feature as the most important oilseed crop in Mozambique. They rarely plant more than about 0.5 0.41 Family sector Production Yield (ton) (ton/ha) 110243 17561 1750 33255 18877 5120 1757 3367 18862 6308 3387 108984 17918 1785 33964 19355 4778 1179 3146 19636 4193 3029 0.397 0.397 0.32 0.

The best practice is to plant groundnut with the first rains at a spacing of 45x10cm (222.RMP12 and Nametil. and cassava and/or sorghum in the North. with lower yields being obtained in the South (250-350 kg/ha) and somewhat larger yields in the North (450-600 kg/ha). The acceptance of the smaller seeded varieties are further fuelled by the fact that there is an increasing demand for the smaller seeds. small seeded groundnuts tend to fetch 3 .long duration (120-180 days) Large grain Semi-erect to prostrate plants Dormant seeds High yield (500-700 kg/ha) Virginia type Pure or intercropped with cassava Characteristics of the varieties With the exception of seed distribution during emergency relief actions. increasing the variability of the purchased grain and reducing its quality.000 plants/ha) for prostrate varieties. The planting season starts earlier in the South (August-September) than in the North (November to February). 2. and by following basic cropping practices.000 plants/ha) for erect varieties. which resulted in these varieties gaining acceptance by the northern producers. as well as with maize in the South of the country. Yields can easily be doubled with the use of rosette. very little improved seed is available. Relief agencies distributed large quantities of small seeded varieties (Natal Common and/or Sellie). Sellie and Mamane.2 Wholesale and producer prices vary between provinces. On the other hand. rust and leaf spot resistant varieties. Another distinct difference between groundnut production in the North and the South are different varieties that are produced. North . Farmers usually save seed from one season to the other. but seem to remain quite stable over time within the same province. Table 2: Differences between the two most important groundnut-growing regions in Mozambique Region Objective of production South Food (family) Short duration (90-120 days) Small grain Erect plants Non-dormant seeds Low yield (200-300 kg/ha) Spanish type Pure or intercropped with maize North Market Medium . In the South. and 45x20 cm or 60x10 cm (112. Table 2 summarised the differences between the South and the North in respect of groundnut production. especially in the South.Bebiano branco. which has put upward pressure on prices. the national average yield is around 400 kg/ha.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS At present.000 to 167. most groundnut farmers intercrop groundnut with cowpea. Although occasionally grown as a sole crop. Runner types). small grain groundnuts (Spanish type) are popular while in the North a large proportion of the area is allocated to the planting of the large seeded groundnuts (Virginia. Presently a few varieties are recommended for production: • • Prices South .

(See Tables 3 and 5. From 2001 to 2003 the imported product was. 11 per cent higher than the local product. higher that the local product. Over the period 1999 to 2000 the average price of imported groundnuts was. on average. respectively 6 and 4 per cent.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE systematically better prices than the large seeded varieties. Table 5 shows that the price of imported small seeded groundnuts is also more expensive than the locally produced one’s. Table 3: Wholesale prices of Small seeded groundnuts (Spanish) in selected Mozambique Provinces (MZM/kg) Province Year 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2001 2002 2003 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2000 2001 2002 2003 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 1999 2000 2001 2003 Jan Feb Mar Apr 12611 May Jun 10177 Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov 11652 Dec Maputo 11726 17054 12332 15487 10056 11493 9860 12867 13330 34134 17067 16435 8273 9229 9585 14539 10114 Gaza Inhambane Sofala Manica Nampula 17626 8850 12600 12563 12490 11735 12832 12295 12168 11915 11062 11062 10509 11062 11864 11032 11763 11357 12021 12734 16150 17810 11434 11943 13085 12166 12336 12405 12426 12324 11830 11441 11118 11311 11280 11452 11290 20751 1011 11340 10151 10361 9297 9329 9617 10182 10344 16435 13217 10683 9769 10315 9351 9654 10664 10952 10056 11062 11478 11174 10225 11921 11379 11036 10631 11493 11370 11414 11493 11548 11493 10224 9194 9374 10141 10088 10918 12883 12930 13021 17622 12535 13723 12377 14328 10191 17356 18762 26970 24378 26204 37916 8133 13064 16856 12535 13723 12377 14328 10191 8678 9381 13485 9166 13102 18958 16435 14460 16585 8737 8850 7378 7522 7501 7452 8477 8715 9292 8934 9945 9777 9798 10038 8850 8850 8850 8883 9608 9608 9735 9418 11016 11378 10114 8850 8850 8850 9166 8850 9482 12010 15171 11378 10114 9798 8850 10114 10114 10114 10114 10114 10367 10114 10114 10114 4936 6608 6923 6779 9060 8428 Average 10915 12606 12285 11862 17432 12157 11795 18119 9169 11144 11057 10970 14226 20740 12684 12749 15979 8285 9431 9797 10899 10114 4936 6770 11705 8850 Source: MADER . 2003. 4 . prices not deflated).SIMA database.

2003.SIMA database.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS Table 4: Wholesale prices of Large seeded groundnuts (Virginia) in selected Mozambique Provinces (MZM/kg) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr 2002 Maputo 2000 2003 14008 13961 2001 Gaza 2002 9363 9372 9585 9984 2003 14715 14149 1998 1999 9047 9173 9482 8325 2000 9924 10612 14501 13035 Inhambane 2001 9483 10364 10625 10483 2002 10584 10493 10469 10627 2003 12030 11173 8510 15767 2001 Sofala 2002 15524 11687 11603 13583 2003 14230 15524 14230 13762 1999 8959 8649 9702 9372 2000 9764 10047 9897 10004 Manica 2001 9681 9702 11255 11643 2002 13368 14230 12290 11643 2003 10349 10392 10349 10349 Zambezia 2001 1998 1999 Nampula 2000 7439 2001 16258 6727 Source: MADER .SIMA database. 2003. Province Average 9937 11604 13168 13692 13283 19289 9214 28761 11493 10861 10631 6321 8850 9861 5 . Province May Jun Jul Aug 10188 Sep 11250 9296 9373 11387 9672 9473 9429 9418 9402 9363 9429 9532 8880 8526 9873 8820 9340 8997 8967 10139 8820 10197 8232 8967 9580 10039 11614 Oct Nov Dec Average 10188 11250 13985 9932 9486 14432 8703 8939 10397 9675 9990 11870 13920 11729 14437 8476 9647 9803 11207 10360 9393 6918 6095 6311 11493 9628 9758 10129 10584 9602 9702 9183 9362 8795 9708 10479 8255 8449 8820 8855 8681 8307 9114 8820 9675 9851 13368 18542 10996 10631 7678 8231 13152 10220 11122 16326 7611 10206 10349 10888 7482 9056 9056 10241 7124 9056 9056 10349 7469 9056 9056 10349 8906 9056 9056 10349 9393 4528 6918 7662 5625 5710 6468 8883 9832 9056 10349 8840 9832 9379 10177 8711 9961 10349 10246 Table 5: Wholesale prices of Small seeded imported groundnuts (Spanish) in selected Mozambique Provinces (MZM/kg) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1998 9015 9808 10988 1999 11897 13123 11633 12371 11563 10790 10994 12067 10887 10088 11898 11938 2000 12316 12460 12657 12634 14196 13818 13431 12721 13119 13440 13274 13946 Maputo 2001 13744 13293 13817 14924 14712 13717 13496 13481 12560 13180 2002 13274 12583 11866 11994 12537 12500 12713 12990 12852 13662 15282 17146 2003 19358 19006 18879 19912 2002 9214 Gaza 2003 28761 1998 11493 Inhambane 2001 11206 10401 10918 10918 2002 10737 11727 11445 10344 8902 Sofala 2002 6321 2001 8850 Manica 2002 9861 Source: MADER .

On average there is not much difference between the small and large seeded producer prices for groundnuts. on average. SIMA database. 2003. 6 . SIMA database. 2003. It also appears that Manica received the better prices of the perdiods shown. Table 7: Producer prices (at farm gate) of Large seeded groundnuts(Virginia) in selected Mozambique Provinces (MZM/kg) Province Year Jan Feb Inhambane 2001 1998 5566 1999 2000 Sofala 2001 2002 3234 2003 5544 1998 7867 7917 1999 7556 8333 2000 8333 8000 Manica 2001 8581 9789 2002 8303 9056 2003 8797 8797 1998 2973 Nampula 2002 1999 2000 10000 Tete 2001 2002 2003 8000 Cabo 1998 5476 5772 Delgado Mar Apr 5566 2772 5175 2911 6192 8500 8000 9980 9056 8874 3896 7833 7917 8778 9918 9056 8797 May 3881 2517 4312 3528 3528 7867 7922 8528 9494 9056 Jun 3881 2531 3528 Jul Aug 5194 3405 2953 Sep 7762 3570 3157 Oct Nov Dec Average 6478 4312 2866 4662 3412 3983 5544 7669 7666 8647 8756 8721 8816 2780 1617 5497 10000 1294 4641 8000 5189 2531 4500 3136 3528 3234 3928 3234 2940 5292 7889 7876 9573 7762 7877 3822 8583 7431 8528 9056 8898 3602 8167 6590 8407 7146 8797 7708 6900 9638 6486 8797 6037 6278 7958 9573 7818 8797 8056 7484 7881 9554 8346 2587 7529 8528 9487 8617 1617 5333 5660 1294 9968 5598 1294 5536 5045 4528 4366 8000 1764 2940 3881 Source: MADER. Table 6: Producer prices (at farm gate) of Small seeded groundnuts (Spanish) in selected Mozambique Provinces (MZM/kg) Year 2002 Inhambane 2001 1998 1999 2000 Manica 2001 2002 2003 Zambezia 2001 1998 1999 Nampula 2000 2001 Tete 2003 1998 Cabo Delgado 1999 Province Jan 3287 Feb 3456 Mar 3576 Apr 2663 8292 8583 8675 9903 10367 8597 May 2571 8300 8333 8425 9218 8597 Jun 3287 Jul 3287 Aug Sep 5991 8542 6550 8324 6983 8850 Oct 2823 8708 6953 9418 7841 8913 Nov 5162 8375 8012 9355 7824 8850 Dec 3103 8056 7876 9355 7640 8850 6500 3000 2809 4750 5000 4899 2500 4000 2809 5000 3448 2809 5000 5000 2809 2212 2809 8417 8833 7549 7426 7476 7793 8000 8000 8913 10254 9060 8156 9896 8822 Average 3161 3978 8411 7883 8473 8734 9190 8597 6500 3500 2690 4066 3757 25284 4899 2500 8333 8208 8458 8222 8786 8833 8333 8000 8000 8260 9208 9702 8746 10114 10114 8597 8597 8597 1580 1580 4000 25284 Source: MADER.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE Table 6 and 7 show the producer price per province for small and large seeded goundnuts. did not do well. whereas Nampula.

Maputo. 02 December 2003 0 2. Table 8 shows the average “guestimate” prices delivered at the consolidation points for groundnuts in the 4 main producing provinces of Mozambique. Moreover.62 1. the average exchange rate for the period. price “guestimates” was developed that they believe are more appropriate for purposes of this study.00 = MZM24050.27 2. 7 . Cabo Delgado and Nampula.35 0.00 = ZAR6. Prices vary substantially between the provinces.89 1.500.35 0. Zambezia.76 1. the prices are not calculated by estimating the transport costs from the farmers to the consolidation point. These provinces are Manica. i.00 Large Not Selected * 2002 prices. Based on these considerations and comments received at the seminar on the 30th of September 2003.29 0.00 0. especially averages. This was USD1.No questimates made because these areas do not produce enough for exports.25 0. The exchange rate for the Mozambique Metical (MZM) to the USD is based on the exchange during the period of the study. USD1. but based on a qualified guess based on statistical information about the wholesales prices at the consolidation point. they are shown in Table 8. 01 October 2003 to 31 December 2003 taken from the official South African Customs and Excise published rates.27 0. These price “questimates” are based on the expert opinion of those knowledgeable in the Mozambique groundnut market.76 0.25 0. In addition. Table 8: Guestimate prices for groundnuts (EXW CP)4 Province Consolidation Point Maputo Maputo Maxixe Beira Chimoio Tete Quelimane Nampula Montepuez Lichinga Variety Small Large Small Large Small Large Small Large Small Large Small Large Small Large Small Large Small Large Small Producer price guestimate MZM/kg 4000** 6500** 4200 8500 8500 6000 6500* 3500*** 2200*** 3700 5000 Wholesale guestimate MZM/kg 13500 12000 14000 11000 12000 10000 14000 13300 10000 10000 10000** 8000 8000** MZM/kg Not Selected Not Selected Not Selected Not Selected Not Selected Not Selected Not Selected Not Selected 8500 8500 Not Selected Not Selected 6500 6000 6500 6000 7000 6500 Not Selected Guestimates USD/kg ZAR/kg MAPUTO GAZA INHAMBANE SOFALA MANICA TETE ZAMBÉZIA NAMPULA CABO DELGADO NIASSA 0.30 2. ** 2001 prices. more than what the transport cost differential indicate.e.00 1.30 0.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS Notwithstanding the fact that some conclusions can be derived from the information shown in the Tables above. from 01 June 2003 to 30 September 2003. for purposes of this study only those provinces with a production large enough for exports needs were included for purposes of price determination. Reference: EMTF. the Ministry of Industry and Trade and the FAO project/EC in the Ministry of Industry and Trade in Mozambique.3 4 Marketing For the purposes of this report. *** 2000 prices .27 0. one should be careful in using the data as it is for purposes of this study.62 1.76 1.

and World Vision. 8 .40 1.18 1. Table 9: Indication Retail Prices for Groundnuts in Maputo (in 1 kilogram packs) Retailer SHOPRITE. iii. See Table 9 for retail prices in Maputo. For retail purposes. Maputo LUZ. mostly larger cites like Beira. supported by NGOs like CLUSA.67 6.67 9. However it is best to store groundnuts while still in the shell. Marketing is usually organized in a two-tier system:5 i. store and truck groundnuts to the south.4 Packaging There is no evidence of formal packaging in the regional distribution of groundnuts.70 USD/kg 1. 2. In many areas local retailers and itinerant traders make up for the bulk of the marketed groundnut. Larger companies (like V & M wholesalers in Nampula) also buy.03 5 Note that there are no processing units nor sorting or cleaning equipment in Mozambique.20kg. CARE. retailers in Mozambique pack the groundnuts in 1kg or 2kg plastic bags and price their product accordingly.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE In the southern part of the country most of the harvest is used for home consumption and only a small portion (usually not larger than 30%) is actually sold in the market. In the North it has become an important cash crop. a few farmer associations have been established and became involved in the production and marketing process of groundnut. In Nampula and Zambezia. although some farmers pack in Hessian bags in sizes ranging from 10kg . This makes the product much more resistant to pests and diseases and maintains higher germination percentages. Maputo Central People’s Market MZM/kg 28 500 33 700 28 500 25 000 ZAR/kg 7.10 7. in central Mozambique.18 1. which may then be linked to larger wholesalers and transporters with the responsibility of carrying the product to the final markets. Sometimes groundnuts are shipped in containers by coastal shipping from Nacala to Beira and Maputo. and Maputo and other southern towns. ii. Maputo LM.

The area. 3. 2003. 2003.37 1. In Mpumalanga and the Limpopo Province groundnuts production is lower. The price of diverse/split nuts varies between R3 800 (USD584) MT and R6 600 (USD1015) MT and that of crush grade between R3 000 (USD462) MT and R3 500 (USD539) MT.1 South African Demand Analysis Production Groundnuts are produced mainly in the North-western regions of South Africa.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS 3. Table 10 and Figure 1 show the total area planted and production of groundnuts in South Africa. indicated that choice grade groundnuts are bought from local producers for between R6 500 (USD1000) MT and R7 500 (USD1150) MT. is much lower than the previous years and mainly due to exceptional high maize prices as well as slight dry conditions during the planting period. and the Northern Cape (9%). 9 .11 1. production and the yield of groundnuts from 1997/98 to 2002/03 Season 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 Plantings (ha) 94 550 82 600 165 250 94 160 50 300 Production (t) 98 250 113 550 183 840 120 485 66 205 Yield (t/ha) 1.28 1. namely the Western and North-western Free State (31%). as well as the production. Theron (2003). The price for imported divers/split grade is between R6 200 (USD954) MT and R6 700 (USD1030) MT.32 Source: NDA. Figure 1 shows that the 2002/03 was totally below the norm with only 50 300 hectares planted and an expected crop of 66 205 tons. Table 10: Plantings. the North West Province (56%). 200 180 160 '000 tons 140 120 100 80 60 40 1994/95 1995/96 1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 190 170 150 '000 ha 130 110 90 70 50 30 Area planted Production Figure 1: Area planted to and production of groundnuts (1994/95-2002/03) Source: NDA.04 1.

This trend is not expected to continue since prices of the other crops decreased drastically.1% Other 1. During the 2002/03 marketing year. Direct consumer market 47. Although no formal average price was available at the time of the study expectations are that prices remained relatively high.36 kg. 3. According to Grain South Africa (2003) groundnuts is the only oilseed crop that can be produced profitably for the export market and it is also a very good rotation crop in the western grain production area. The price ranges are exclusive of the preparation costs from receiving the groundnuts to the processing thereof. hence moving back to planting groundnuts again. as against 1. 2003 3. the current season is abnormal in that the production is very low due to less area planted and very high prices for crops like maize.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE Specific cognisance must be taken of the fact that the 2002/03 season was a total undersupply situation and that the high prices that realised are most likely not to be seen easily in the future. As mentioned.2 Consumption In South Africa groundnuts are mainly used for human consumption.3% Peanut butter 32.2% Crushed for oil and oil cake 19.93 kg for 2000/01. 25 800MT for peanut butter and 37 600MT for the direct edible market.4% Figure 2: Utilisation of groundnuts for the local market during 2002/2003 Source: SAGIS. The per capita consumption is estimated at 1. 1 040MT for other). 10 . (15 200MT of groundnuts were used for oil and oilcake.3 Marketing Figure 3 shows the average producer price in comparison with the production. approximately 85 000MT of groundnuts were consumed. To supply the local demand of 130 000 MT (±80 000MT local use and +50 000MT exports) it will be necessary to increase the area planted to groundnuts with 133% to 117 000 ha.

this may be a market opportunity for Mozambique. They have a contract with a company who is responsible for obtaining the groundnuts from local producers under contract and there are very strict specifications to adhere to. South Africa does not produce any of the large kernel cocktail groundnuts (while Mozambique does) and imports between 3 000 and 4 000 tons per annum.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT 2 750 2 500 2 250 2 000 1 750 R/ton 1 500 1 250 1 000 750 500 250 0 1995 1996 1997 1998 Production 1999 2000 2001 2002 GROUNDNUTS 200 200 182 000 163 800 145 600 127 400 109 200 91 000 72 800 54 600 36 400 18 200 0 2003* ton Producer price Figure 3: Average R/ton and total production (1995 to 2002) Note: The price for the current season could not be supplied. a Tiger Food Brands product. According to Theron (2003). approximately 37 per cent (9 546 MT) of the peanut butter market share is held by Black Cat. They also hold 65 per cent (±10 000MT) of the peanut oil market. The producers receive payment according to the sample grading percentage for choice. It will be safer to transport the groundnuts in bags as it is easier to handle and the ventilation is also better (Du Preez. According to Du Preez (2003). 2003 In South Africa the representation of the role-players in the groundnut market is through the Groundnut Forum. 2003). the informal sector in South Africa buys a lot of the production directly from the farm. especially so during June to September. They prefer not to do this because it increases the preparation cost before the nuts can be processed into peanut butter. the trader will have to find another use for it because Tiger do not accept groundnuts that do not fall in the range of their specifications. diverse/split and crush groundnuts. The Forum was formed for negotiation and other lobby power. They receive the groundnuts shelled and raw at their various silos where a sample is extracted and graded. This is a voluntary organization with no statutory binding powers. If this level is too high. In terms of transport it was suggested that groundnuts should be transported by ship and kept in very dry conditions after ensuring that the moisture content is correct. They utilize the groundnuts to generate income for the household through roasting and packing of the groundnuts to be sold on the side of streets and roads. Groundnuts are tested at the silo facility for the levels of aflatoxins present. Source: NDA. 11 . Under very exceptional conditions if they accept the affected groundnuts will they use a process called blazing to remove the peel of the nut and reduce the level of aflatoxins present.

Depending on availability and prices it was indicated that they would be interested in future negotiations for the imports of groundnuts from Mozambique. they buy between 3 000 and 4 000 tons of choice grade groundnuts per annum. blazed. after which it is roasted. glazed and packed for sales at retail outlets. i. 12 .3 per cent of its groundnut needs from Mozambique. According to Opperman (2003). Note that local suppliers must also service existing export contracts that have been growing on average at 27 per cent over the last four years. the origin of groundnuts from Malawi could be from other countries in the region too. Simba is also a buyer of groundnuts for packing and distribution. They also require that the aflatoxin levels must be between 5 and 10 micrograms per kilogram (µg/kg). depending on the availability. as well as prices. According to De Wit (2003). Attempts to find more detailed information on imports from Malawi failed. If the indication from the market players was correct. He also indicated that any samples sent to them beforehand must be representative of the crop and trustworthy marketing must be conducted from the beginning. and 2003 mirrored 1995. The South African import tariffs for groundnuts are shown in Table 11. They prefer the more rounded Spanish type of nut and with sizes 50/60. At present South Africa imports 63 per cent of its groundnuts from China and 22 per cent groundnuts from Malawi. then imports could be as high as 51 000MT for local consumption. They receive raw shelled groundnuts from another factory at their factory. He did indicate that potential suppliers must contact him for further negotiations on possible future relations.e. They also prefer split nuts. packed and sold to retailers. In 2002 South Africa imported about 0. 3. they buy 700 tons of shelled nuts per annum. Another buyer of raw groundnuts is South African Dried (SAD) Foods Ltd and according to Mulder (2003). Further specifications are that the groundnuts must be of the 70/80 or 80/100 size with preferably high oil content. South Africa is a net exporter of groundnuts during normal production years. 60/70 and 70/80. They also import if necessary. The aflatoxin must be very low. Nola products use between 600 and 700 tons of groundnuts per annum for the production of Yum-Yum peanut butter. this is because the split nuts roast more evenly and the grinding is also easier. but could prove to be important in the light of a large informal sector participating in crossborder trade in Southern Africa.4 Imports and regulations Figure 4 shows the quantity of groundnuts imported and exported during 1992 to 2002. but would prefer to appoint an importer to be responsible for the importation thereof.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE Theron (2003) further indicated that they are willing to be involved in negotiations for contract production for groundnuts. Although no formal statistics have been published yet. Currently they obtain the groundnuts from companies that sort it and not directly from producers. indications are that during 2003 groundnuts had to be imported close to the same levels as in 1995 to complement local supply (see Figure 3 for low production). The groundnuts are roasted.

EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT 55 000 50 000 45 000 40 000 35 000 tons 30 000 25 000 20 000 15 000 10 000 5 000 0 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 GROUNDNUTS 2000 2001 2002 Import quantity Export quantity Figure 4: Imports and exports of groundnuts (1992 to 2002) Source: NDA. 54 of 1972) (see Appendix B). In terms of the latter the importer must provide the foreign supplier with a copy of the SPS permit as well as the conditions attached to the permit. Zambezia (CP is Quelimane). 1972 (Act No. The foreign supplier must ensure that the NPPO of Mozambique issues a phyto-sanitary certificate that certifies that the permit conditions are met. as well as a draft output grading concept regulation for where sorting and sizing have been done (Appendixes E and F).36 of 1983).10 (In the shell) 1202. respectively. 1983 (Act no. Nampula (CP is Nampula) and Cabo Delgado (CP is Montepuez) Provinces. 13 .20 (Shelled or broken) free free EU free free OTHER COUNTRIES 10% 10% In terms of the Agriculture Product Standards Act 1990. 2003 In terms of regulations and standards compliance is necessary in terms of South African Customs (Act 91 of 1964) (see Appendix A). whether or not shelled or broken SADC 1202. Codex related standards (see Appendix C and D) and the Agricultural Pests Act. not roasted or otherwise cooked. Pricing and Logistics Analysis This section shows how the DDP price of groundnuts delivered to Johannesburg from Manica (CP is Chimoio). was derived. Table 11: Groundnuts.and sizing grading done. the NDA is currently involved in the process of drafting concept regulations for groundnuts. 4. the Foodstuffs. Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act. There is a draft concept regulation for grading by the producer who delivers unshelled raw groundnuts to the first level of sales without any sorting .

68 342. USD69.26. Reference: EMTF.1 to G.30 56.93 1 040 51. USD32. Nampula and Cabo Delgado. Maputo. respectively.2.75 342.2 and shown in Table 8. respectively. Zambezia.29 0.26. Table 12: Guestimate prices for groundnuts (EXW CP) (selected provinces) Province MANICA ZAMBÉZIA NAMPULA CABO DELGADO Consolidation Point Chimoio Quelimane Nampula Montepuez Variety Small Large Small Large Small Large Small Large CP price guestimate MZM/kg 8500 8500 6500* 3500*** 2200*** 3700 5000 Wholesale guestimate MZM/kg 10000 10000 10000** 8000 8000** Guestimates MZM/kg 8500 8500 6500 6000 6500 6000 7000 6500 USD/kg 0.19.62 1.43 Estimated Price FOB/FCA Mozambique USD/MT 415.61. The prices used were discussed in Section 2. USD338. Nampula 6 Take note of comments on these costs in the “Main Report” in section 2. Zambezia. The FOB/FCA costs of small groundnuts for Manica. USD57.13 per MT for Manica.8 in Appendix G). USD32.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE The first step was to establish an acceptable price delivered to the respective consolidation points (i. Note . the estimated DDP price Johannesburg for large groundnuts is USD478. For easy reference these prices are duplicated in Table 12 for the applicable provinces.00 per MT for Manica.61 281. documentation and customs formalities.36 1 040 57.43 per MT.93 and USD393. 14 .25 0.04.76 1.30 1.26 23.00 393.70 Delivery costs Estimated DDP Average DDP market (If shipped in FCL) price Johannesburg demand price in Johannesburg* USD/MT USD/MT USD/MT 63.11 and USD364.13 32. (See Tables 13 and 14.25 and USD51. USD23.76 * 2002 prices. an EXW Chimoio.62 1.75. Nampula and Cabo Delgado. Nampula and Montepuez prices). USD294. USD23.30 and USD56.25 0. USD342. Zambezia. Quelimane.70 per MT for Manica. ** 2001 prices. Nampula and Cabo Delgado.36. If these costs are added to the EXW price for large groundnuts at the CP’s then the estimated FOB/FCA Mozambique prices are USD415.35 0. Zambezia.Delivery estimates include all consolidation. 02 December 2003 The second step was to calculate the FOB/FCA costs. as well as Tables G.19 272. respectively.89 1. This is USD63.25 338.35 0.506. transport.3.No questimates made because these areas do not produce enough for exports.27 0. Zambezia. To get the estimated DDP price in Johannesburg the delivery cost per ton must be added.77.27 0. In respect of small groundnuts the estimated FOB/FCA Mozambique prices are USD415.69. Nampula and Cabo Delgado are USD50. respectively.e.27 ZAR/kg 2.30 2. Zambezia.07 per MT.70 per MT for Manica.13. USD281.50 478. The FOB/FCA costs of large groundnuts for Manica. *** 2000 prices .70 1 040 * This price is calculated from the observed retail prices for choice grade groundnuts in South Africa at the time of the study.69 1 040 69. respectively. Nampula and Cabo Delgado are USD50.19. Thus. Table 13: Estimated delivery price for large groundnuts to Johannesburg (Per Metric Ton) Province MANICA ZAMBEZIA NAMPULA CABO DELGADO Consolidation point CHIMOIO QUELIMANE NAMPULA MONTEPUEZ FOB/FCA Costs Mozambique 50.84 and USD57.76 1.68 and USD342. USD303. USD272.

EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS and Cabo Delgado.11 364.77 32.36 and USD415. Note . The competitive margin depends on the price of the product in Mozambique. as well as a sensitivity analysis7.79 827 57. USD363.19 294. documentation and customs formalities.75 363.84 57. i. Zambezia. Electronic versions (in MS Excell format) of the information shown in Appendix E can be used to calculate the price competitiveness of the product with different prices at the consolidation point.13 827 * This price is calculated from the observed retail prices for choice grade groundnuts in South Africa at the time of the study.13 for Manica. the product must meet additional requirements set by the importer such as quality and packaging. Finally. respectively (See Table 13). even if the price in South Africa drops by 20 per cent groundnuts from the shown provinces will still be competitive.07 Estimated Price FOB/FCA Mozambique USD/MT 415.50 478.26 23. 7 15 .4. It is clear that even if the price in South Africa drops by 50 per cent it would leave a margin of competitiveness.13 Delivery costs Estimated DDP Average DDP market (If shipped in FCL) price Johannesburg demand price in Johannesburg* USD/MT USD/MT USD/MT 63. Nampula and Cabo Delgado.25 360. Table 15: Price Competitiveness of grountnut exports to South Africa Size Actual price to Actual price compete in SA Province CP (moz) (calculated back to CP Moz) Metical Metical CABODELGADO 6 500 21 577 MANICA 8 500 21 595 NAMPULA 6 000 22 354 ZAMBEZIA 6 000 22 274 CABODELGADO 7 000 16 600 MANICA 8 500 16 617 NAMPULA 6 500 17 378 ZAMBEZIA 6 500 17 298 Price competitive YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES If the price in South Africa fluctuates up or down.69. the exports of groundnuts must also comply with the different standards and regulations mentioned in Section 3. transport. Hence.04 303. Moreover. respectively Table 14: Estimated delivery price for small groundnuts to Johannesburg (Per Metric Ton) Province MANICA ZAMBEZIA NAMPULA CABO DELGADO Consolidation point CHIMOIO QUELIMANE NAMPULA MONTEPUEZ FOB/FCA Costs Mozambique 50. adjusting the South African price up and down with intervals of 10 per cent.e. it was decided to include a sensitivity analysis. % -20% 17 262 17 276 17 883 17 819 13 280 13 294 13 902 13 838 -10% 19 419 19 436 20 119 20 047 14 940 14 955 15 640 15 568 +10% 23 735 23 755 24 589 24 501 18 260 18 279 19 116 19 028 +20% 25 892 25 914 26 825 26 729 19 920 19 940 20 854 20 758 LARGE SMALL Besides the prices. For small groundnuts the estimated DDP price Johannesburg is USD 478.79.69 827 69. USD360.36 827 51.Delivery estimates include all consolidation. to be successful. as well as with different prices in the South African market. Table 15 provides the price competitive indicators for Mozambique.00 415. as well as on the situation in the South African market.

Already limited (0.Imports especially from China and Malawi.Bureaucratic delays at expediting export/import formalities associated with SPS compliance. . (Even Malawi) . . SA already importing from Mozambique. .There are existing trade associations that can be used to promote the concept of export.Not as perishable as most crops post harvest treatment is efficient. . .Low Yields (SA 1. This could add to the cost of exporting.formal and informal. . documentation.There is significant demand from South Africa.The crop is well known and already produced economically in different regions. . Weaknesses .3 MT/ha . etc.Access to irrigation could improve yield.Aflatoxin levels are high. hence quicker returns to investment than most other crops. .Consistency problems as far as quality are concerned. pest risk assessment.Already a strong local market that could hamper exports.42MT/ha). at least for the scope of production in Mozambique at this stage. Opportunities . .Shorter distance to market outlets compared with major competitors. . issuing import permits.There exists definite opportunity for the larger kernel groundnuts. which probably has less strict requirements to adhere to. . . .In general easy to grow. Threats .A relatively high value crop. .GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE 5.Large informal market.Low level of knowledge on Mozambican side in terms of export tasks.Mozambique 0.3%) export to South Africa.Various different market outlets/marketing channels . 16 .High level of supply variability. . SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths .

) Within these farmers associations identify specific growers of groundnut in Mozambique and match them with the targeted buyers in South Africa. these exporters need to develop strong sustainable associations and linkages with producers in order to guarantee stability of supply for the export market. Once international and formal quality requirements have been met with consistency. The reason for this is that the high transaction costs of gaining the necessary tacit knowledge and core competencies to engage in successful exports could be the single most inhibiting factor to export. especially unnecessary delays at the border posts. The informal market also presents opportunities. This is not a sales mission but rather an education initiative. trade and agronomic specialists with knowledge of Mozambican and South African circumstances and which has the ability to establish the necessary networks and to assist in negotiations. dominated by smallholder farmers. but this must be expanded to satisfy South African authorities). Conclusions Groundnut is a crop with good potential. government departments or parastatals. The Nampula and Zambezia farmer’s associations could be a start to this (Manica and Cabo Delgado can also learn from this. there is a need to clearly identify potential exporters within these areas and the greater Mozambique market. Initial funding for such an initiative could come from donor agencies. It is strongly recommended that contact is made with the Groundnut Forum in South Africa. after which the concerned groups should take over such funding if deemed necessary at all. SPS and pest control requirements for the South African (and other) international markets (Some toxin control is in place.) It is strongly recommended that consideration be given to use intermediaries to oversee and guide initial and subsequent efforts to export (such efforts entail basically all the issues mentioned above). Intermediaries could comprise of marketing.) Vitally important will be to train the nominated representatives in the complicated Codex. especially since South Africa is prone to short supplies. (The 34 year Abuja Treaty plan for the African Union referred to in the General Report refers. Part of this training should include increasing the production yield of the farmers. introduce the community representatives to prospective and established South African companies that have established marketing channels. (Arrange for a sponsored reciprocal factfinding visit/mission so that potential growers and potential buyers can see first-hand what the problems are and thus empathize with each other so that common ground is established. Negotiate through the Southern African Development Community (SADC) so that unnecessary 'red-tape' can be cut to expedite import formalities. They could provide valuable information and could assist in technology transfers where needed. Due to the existing production system. However. Basically all companies contacted indicated that they would be willing to investigate imports from Mozambique.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS 6. as it is already a cash crop with an established marketing system. but the cost competitiveness in this market will be crucial. due to the dominance of informal traders (local resident and itinerant traders). 17 .

use of chemicals and post harvest handling on farm level. etc IPEX Gov Incentive Program DNC / MIC MADER Better economies of scale to undertake capital investments (i. This state of affairs could be rectified by introducing storage facilities (micro. Quality preservation and management. Such investment should be concentrated in the most Better use of technology and post important production regions and back-up by research institutions. storage) as was done successfully in some West African countries. harvesting techniques. -transport. e. Senegal. especially as far as storage is concerned. No organized marketing. Shared information/experience will lead to overall improvement produce grown and Due to the dominance of informal traders. Learn from the informal Better negotiating power. (local and itinerant) there is a need to clearly identify processed and better yield efficiency EXPORTERS within these areas. and convey those lessons to other -seed stock -finance industry bodies or councils farmers/farming areas. research and training related to improved genetic material.e. remains a problem. such as the university.g. Get the growers in the various districts to organize themselves into representative bodies. CPI MADER Government Incentive Programs Properly stored produce at farm level can then be moved to consolidation points. Infrastructure Infrastructure. groundnuts arrive at consolidation points which could significantly reduce transaction costs. production methods. Storage). Exacerbating the problem is the storage of untreated ground nuts. Improved seed stock. Increase the yield. Proper implementation and adoption on farm level would ensure that quality is largely uniform when Improved financial feasibility. This collaboration could spearhead the establishment of a ground nut/peanut research programme and assist in setting priorities. Recommended future action Action Ground Nuts Projected outcome Agencies responsible DNC / MIC MADER Ministry of Education PoDE (Technical Learning programme – TLC) INNOQ Problem/Challenge identified Production related problems The magnitude and scope of ground nut production most probably justifies intensive investment in Better trained and informed farmers. as well as the greater Mozambique area. . farmer’s association in Nampula and Zambezia. As far as research into the different production aspects are concerned close collaboration with the Consistency in supply and quality South African Ground nut forum is suggested. The combination of this results in poor quality nuts and losses. It would also allow for segregation between different ground nut types. especially in thr area of complex Codex.Ability to manage sales better.GROUNDNUTS REPORT FORCE EXTERNAL MARKET TASK 7. SPS and pest control requirements.

P. Kwazulu-Natal Fruit & Veg City Freshmark. J Ford. NO COMMENTS Potential Buyer (Agent) Potential Buyer General Information & Logistics Potential Buyer (Agent) Potential Buyer Potential Buyer Potential Buyer Potential Buyer S. M Smith. Centurion. D Theron. Cape Town. NAME Adam.) 19 . The general attitude was helpful and willing to assist Mozambique with this undaunting task. C Holtzhausen. A Taylor. INTERVIEWS IN SOUTH AFRICA SPECIFICALLY FOR GROUND NUTS. M Holtzkampf. Bloemfontein. Ian Tully. S Richards. Limpopo Simba Groundnut Forum Woolworths. Kwazulu-Natal Tiger Foods Who’s Nuts Freshmark. Eastern Cape Freshmark. N Woolworths G Clark & Assoc Freshmark. B Hamilton. Free State Freshmark. M Breslin. M Clark. Some contacts may need Government/Diplomatic support in the interests of regional trade and SADC commitment. D Waterboer.(NPPO) Johannesburg Fresh Products The Snack Factory Toppies Nuts SAD Foods Freshmark. Gauteng Metro Nola (Yum-Yum Peanut Butter) Freshmark.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS 8. J Muller. Polekwane. J De Wit. Centurion. Certification Potential Buyer Potential Buyer Potential Buyer Buyer Potential Buyer (Agent) Potential Buyer (Agent) Potential Buyer Potential Buyer Potential Buyer (Agent) Potential Buyer Potential Buyer (Agent) Potential Buyer (Agent) Potential Buyer (Agent) Contract Buyer Potential Potential Buyer Potential Buyer (Agent) Contacts interviewed (The nature and number of these alliances/partnerships depends on the envisaged product and amount to be exported to South Africa. Eastern Cape 021 407 9111 021 581 2722 TEL. We would like to give credit and thanks to all those who participated in providing information and assistance. Charlotte Lowenthal.S. Frif Du Preez. G Claussen. N Stock. K Palley. D Lubbe. L Nedzanani. Cape Town. Cape Town Epping Fresh Produce Market Nat Plant Protection Org. Durban. Port Elizabeth. J Mulder. A Naude. Durban. Gauteng 011 974 4517 011 822 0500 011 613 4590 011 613 5393 083 236 0964 021 531 2191 012 319 6100 011 613 2049 013 933 3105/6 011 811 1857 021 864 8639 05885 22012 COMPANY Freshmark. Eastern Cape Freshmark. For the purposes of this report the following companies and individuals were interviewed in Mozambique and in South Africa. S Opperman.

GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE Prohibited and Restricted Goods Index (South African Customs Act 91 of 1964) Appendix A 20 .

EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS Prohibited and Restricted Goods Index (South African Customs Act 91 of 1964) Appendix A (continued) 21 .

Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act. 1972 (Act No.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE Appendix B The Foodstuffs. 54 of 1972) (Maximum Limits for Pesticide Residue) WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORMAT (Abobe file) 22 .

EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS Appendix C MAXIMUM LEVEL AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR TOTAL AFLATOXINS IN PEANUTS INTENDED FOR FURTHER PROCESSING CODEX STAN 209-1999. 1-2001 (Abobe file) WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORMAT (Abobe file) 23 . Rev.

GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE CODEX STANDARD FOR PEANUTS CODEX STAN 200-1995 (Abobe file) Appendix D WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORMAT (Abobe file) 24 .

............... Obtaining a working sample ................................ INSPECTION METHODS: GENERAL Determination of musty............................................................... SAMPLING General ............... Determination of percentage broken and open pods in the case of groundnuts in pod form .............. and determined that the said regulations shall come into operation on date of publication...................................................................................................................................................................EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS Appendix E AGRICULTURAL PRODUCT STANDARDS ACT...... Determination of percentage kernels of another class .................................................................................................................................................................................................. Determination of percentage pods and foreign matter ............................... 1990 (ACT No............................... SCOPE OF REGULATIONS ........................................................ PACKING AND MARKING OF GROUNDNUTS DESTINED FOR SALE IN THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA The Minister of Agriculture has under section 15 of the Agricultural Product Standards Act.................... Groundnuts grades ................... Standards for grades (General) .................... Prohibited particulars . sour or other unacceptable odours......... Determination of kernel content .................................... blemished and soiled kernels ....................................................... PACKING REQUIREMENTS Containers ............................ Determination of percentage split kernels ................... Sampling by hand............ RESTRICTIONS ON SALE OF GROUNDNUTS ........... Determination of whole kernels in a consignment of split kernels ............................................................. insects and noxious seeds ................. 1990 (Act No............... MARKING REQUIREMENTS Particulars .....................................................................................5 g) ............. Determination of percentage shrivelled kernels .............................. Determination of percentage unsound............................................................... harmful substances..................... Determination of percentage of kernels on a specific screen ................................... Determination of class ...................... Determination of count (number of kernels per 28................. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18-19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 25 ...... made the regulations in the Schedule............................................................................................................................................ Sampling with a grain probe ...................................................................................................................................... Regulation No................................................................. 119 of 1990) – (a) (b) CONTENTS DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................................................................ Determination of percentage damaged testa and percentages broken kernels separately .. QUALITY STANDARDS Classes ............................................................ Deviating sample ... Specifications for classes .. Determination of percentage foreign matter and shelled kernels ................................................................................................. 119 OF 1990) DRAFT REGULATIONS RELATING TO THE GRADING................................ Sampling with a shovel ............................................................................

. 1947 (Act No........ cracked or have split off for more than one third. such kernels shall not be regarded as blemished kernels................ Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act..... 32 33 34 1.. "defective kernels" means unsound kernels............. are permissible for the treatment of pests and diseases and which do not exceed the prescribed maximum residue limit in terms of the Foodstuffs. "broken kernels" means kernels of which a part has been broken off........... (b) "container" means a bag.......... "chemical residues" means residues of agricultural remedies which in terms of the Fertilizers....... "class" means a class referred to in regulation 4.. delivery note or delivered by the same vehicle... the shell of which are mouldy or blackened over more than half of their surface........... OFFENCES AND PENALTIES . "foreign matter" in relation to a consignment of (a) pods. Farm Feeds. In these regulations any word or expression to which a meaning has been assigned in the Act..... 54 of 1972)....... each quantity of each of the different classes or grades.. excluding split kernels. Determination of moisture content ... delivered at any one time under cover of the same consignment note... 36 of 1947)... 26 ......... "consignment" -(a) means a quantity of groundnuts............ "blemished kernels" means whole kernels which show any coloured streaks or blotches in or on the testa: Provided that kernels with rust blotches where the discoloration is limited to the embryo or the veins........ broken kernels and shrivelled kernels and sun-dried kernels.. Agricultural Remedies and Stock Remedies Act.. soiled kernels. 1972 (Act No...... SCHEDULE Definitions Regulation No. "broken and open pods" means pods of which the shells have been broken or which are open in any way. blemished testa. or if such a quantity is subdivided into different classes or grades..... shall have that meaning and – "blackened pods" means pods. "damaged testa" means kernels of which the testa is loose.. which belongs to the same producer or owner.............. excluding kernels and pods.... damaged kernels...........GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE Determinaiton of percentage blackened and soiled pods ... or any other immediate container or wrapper in which groundnuts are packed.. means all matter (including the raisins).....

grooved or dented appearance: Provided that whole kernels of which the veins are raised or crinkled. Crotalaria spp. "soiled pods" means pods with soil clinging to the shells thereof: Provided that pods of which the shells are discoloured by soil.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS (b) kernels. "inspector" means the Executive Officer or an inspector under his or her control. including seeds of Convolvulus spp. Datura spp. "insect" means any live insect which is injurious to stored groundnuts. means the kernels in the consignment concerned which are not enclosed in shells. Lolium temulentum. Ipomoea purpurea. Ricinus communis or Xanthium spp. of which the kernel content cannot be recovered during the shelling process. shall not be regarded as soiled pods. "soiled kernels" means whole and split kernels which are soiled to such an extent that their appearance is affected. "groundnuts" means the underground fruit of the plant Arachis hypogaea. "kernels" means the seeds and parts of seeds of groundnuts which are obtained after shelling the pods. means the mass of the kernels in the consignment concerned. means all matter (including the raisins). "shelled kernels" in relation to a consignment of pods. "shrivelled kernels" means whole kernels which have a shrivelled. expressed as a percentage of the mass of the pods (after the foreign matter and shelled kernels has been removed) in the consignment concerned. "grade" means a grade referred to in regulation 6. or an Assignee or an employee of an Assignee. "mould-infested kernels" means kernels (a) (b) where mould growth appear and is visible to the naked eye. shall not be regarded as shrivelled kernels. excluding kernels and split kernels. irrespective of the stage of development thereof. shrivelled pods. contains a single kernel.. "raisins" means hard. 27 . "pods" means groundnuts or parts of groundnuts whereby the kernels have not yet been shelled. "other class" in relation to a specific consignment of groundnuts. or which are damaged or discoloured as a result of mould growth. means any class other than the class of which that consignment mainly consists. "noxious seeds" means the seeds or parts of seeds of plant species that may represent a hazard to human or animal health when consumed... "kernel content" in relation to the consignment of pods. whether kernels or pods.. with or without kernels. "one-kernelled pod" means a pod which according to the formation of the shell thereof. excluding the raisins.

15 mm slotted perforations. a yellow.75 mm slotted screen" means a screen having 20.0 mm by 7. or show internally or when the testa thereof is removed.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE "split kernels" means the separated halves or parts of separated halves of kernels which do not pass through the 7.75 mm slotted perforations. "5. "8. "the Act" means the Agricultural Product Standards Act.0 mm slotted screen" means a screen having 20.0 mm slotted screen" means a screen having 20.0 mm slotted perforations.0 mm slotted perforations.20 mm round-holed screen" means a screen with round perforations 7.15 mm slotted screen" means a screen having 20. 1990 (Act No.25 mm slotted perforations. unless the groundnuts complies with the grades and standards for the grade concerned set out in regulations 6 and 7. "9.0 mm by 6.0 mm by 9. unless the groundnuts are packed in accordance with the packing requirements set out in regulations 8.70 mm in diameter.20 mm round-hole screen.0 mm by 5. 28 . brown.0 mm by 6.20 mm in diameter. These regulations are the minimum standard applicable to groundnuts that are destined for sale in the Republic of South Africa but does not include (a) (b) groundnuts in retail quantities. "sun-dried kernels" means kernels of which the testa is easily removed when rubbed lightly between the hands. "7. (1) No person shall sell groundnuts in the Republic of South Africa(a) (b) (c) (d) unless the groundnuts are sold according to the classes and specifications for classes set out in regulations 4 and 5.25 mm round-holed screen" means a screen having 20.50 mm slotted screen" means a screen having 20. red or any other colour which is not typical of sound kernels or are sprouted: Provided that sprouted kernels shall be regarded as unsound only if the embryo has broken the testa.0 mm by 8. or those that have not yet undergone sieving and sorting processes. "unsound kernels" means mould-infested kernels and kernels which are decayed or chalky or damaged by heat or insects. "7.50 mm slotted perforations. "6. purple. 119 of 1990). Scope of regulations 2. "6.70 mm round-holed screen" means a screen with round perforations 7. 9 and 10. and if such groundnuts contain a substance that renders it unfit for human consumption or for processing into or utilisation thereof as food or feed. Restrictions on sale of groundnuts 3. and "7.

Class C. Robbie. Sellie. Akwa. entirely or partially to any person on such conditions as he or she deems necessary. if it contains at least 97% of the Virginia runner-type of groundnuts (for example Selmani). Class D or Class E groundnuts. Grades for groundnuts 6. from the provisions of subregulation (1). if it contains at least 97% of the Red Spanish type of groundnuts (for example Harts). The grades for the different classes groundnuts are (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h) (i) (j) (k) (l) (m) (n) (o) Choice Grade Standard Grade Machine cleaned choice grade Machine cleaned standard grade Machine cleaned sundry grade Machine cleaned crushing 100/130 Machine cleaned splits Hands cleaned splits Selection fall off Crushing Grade Sundry machine cleaned 80/100 Sundry hand cleaned 80/100 Crushing hand cleaned 100/130 Pods hand cleaned Grade Other 29 . Class B.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS (2) The Executive Officer may grant written exemption. if it contains at least 97% of the runner-type of groundnuts (for example Norden). namely – (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Class A. There are 5 classes of groundnuts. Class C. Class B. and Class E. Class B. Specifications for classes 5. Jasper. QUALITY STANDARDS Classes 4. and Class E. if it contains at least 97% of the Spanish type of groundnuts (for example Natal Common. if it contains groundnuts that cannot be classified in accordance with these standards and requirements as Class A. Class D. Class D. A consignment of groundnuts is classified as – (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Class A. Selection 5. Kwarts and Anel). Agaat.

54 of 1972). the count. contain not more than 10 micrograms per kilogram of total aflatoxin. (b) (c) (d) (e) 30 . Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act. 77 of 1973). with the exception of Grade Other be free from insects. comply with the requirements for plant injurious organisms of phytosanitary importance as determined by the Director of the Directorate of Plant Health. contain no chemical residues that exceed the prescribed maximum residue limit. (1) All containers that contain groundnuts shall be marked clearly and legibly on each container or on a label that is affixed thereto with the following particulars: (a) The name and address or registered trade mark of the owner: Provided that it may be substituted by a code which has been approved beforehand in writing by the Executive Officer. be free from a substance which renders it unfit for human or animal consumption or processing into or utilisation thereof as food or feed. sour and any other undesirable odour. The processor's code that have been approved by the executive officer in writing on request of the processor: Provided that such a code may form part of a lot number. The class. The lot number of the consignment concerned. with the exception of or grade other have a moisture content of not more than 7%.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE Standards for grades General 7. of which not more than 5 micrograms per kilogram may be aflatoxin B1: Provided that groundnuts destined for further processing may not contain more than 15 micrograms per kilogram total aflatoxin. in the sequence of class. The net mass of the contents as prescribed in terms of the Trademetrology Act. (1) All grades of groundnuts should (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) be free from a musty. other than Ricinus communis. and comply with the requirements as set out in Table 1. 1973 (Act No. grade and where applicable. grade and count of the contents: Provided that these may be indicated by means of a series of symbols as set out in subitem (3). than permitted in terms of the Foodstuffs. (f) (g) (h) (i) MARKING REQUIREMENTS Particulars 8. be free from seeds from Ricinus communis and not contain more noxious seeds. 1972 (Act No.

(xii) D 80/100 in the case of groundnuts graded as sundry hand cleaned 80/100. (xiii) P 100/130 in the case of groundnuts graded as crushing hand cleaned 100/130. (iii) C in the case of groundnuts classified as Class C. (v) DM in the case of groundnuts graded as machine cleaned sundry grade. (vi) PM in the case of groundnuts graded as machine cleaned crushing grade. (iv) SM in the case of groundnuts graded as machine cleaned standard grade. should be clearly indicated that such groundnuts is not intended for direct human consumption. (b) grades are: (i) K in the case of groundnuts graded as Choice Grade. (3) The symbols as mentioned in subitem (1)(d) for the different (a) classes are: (i) A in the case of groundnuts classified as Class A.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS (f) The country of origin. (x) P in the case of groundnuts graded as crushing grade. (ii) S in the case of groundnuts graded as Standard Grade. (xiv) NC2 in the case of groundnuts graded as hand cleaned pod. (vii) HM in the case of groundnuts graded as machine cleaned splits. (2) All containers that contain groundnuts which exceed the prescribed maximum total aflatoxin level of 10 mg per kg. (viii) HU in the case of groundnuts graded as hand cleaned splits. and 31 . (ii) B in the case of groundnuts classified as Class B. (xi) DM 80/100 in the case of groundnuts graded as sundry machine cleaned 80/100. and (v) E in the case of groundnuts classified as Class E. (iv) D in the case of groundnuts classified as Class D. (iii) KM in the case of groundnuts graded as machine cleaned choice grade. (ix) DA in the case of groundnuts graded as selection fall out.

32 . sampling the particular consignment at random with a shovel or in at least four different places in the container as set out in regulation 13. odourless and strong enough. sampling by hand at least 28% of the bags in the particular consignment chosen at random as set out in regulation 12. dry. clean. (1) Groundnuts of different classes (with the exception of Class C) and grades may not be packed in the same container. a random sample of groundnuts should be taken according to the following manner: (a) In the case of a consignment of pods – (i) sold in bulk quantities. Sampling by hand 12.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE (xv) F Grade Other. illustration or other means of expression which constitutes a misrepresentation which directly or by implication. A consignment of groundnuts is sampled by hand as follows: (a) Open the bags selected from the particular consignment. Prohibited particulars 9. (2) A sample taken according to this regulation is considered to be representative of the consignment from which it is taken. shall appear on a container which contains groundnuts. No wording. SAMPLING General 11. (1) For the purpose of this regulations. (2) A consignment of groundnuts shall for the purposes of the application of these regulations be packed in containers that are suitable. creates a misleading impression of the contents. PACKING REQUIREMENTS Containers 10. and sampling with a grain probe as set out in regulation 14 at least 28% of the bags in the consignment at random. intact. sold in bags. (ii) (b) In the case of a consignment of kernels – (i) (ii) sampling by hand as set out in regulation 12 at least 28% of the bags in the consignment chosen at random.

EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS (b) In the case of a consignment of kernels. A consignment of pods should be sampled with a shovel as follows: (a) Insert the shovel with a slight shaking movement into the groundnuts at each position selected in the particular bulk container. Take approximately equal quantities of material at each position selected. Repeat the procedure described in paragraph (b) above alternately at different depths in each bag and place the material so obtained into the container mentioned in paragraph (c). Empty the material in the probe into a suitable clean container. In the case of a consignment of pods. Place the material removed into a suitable container. into each bag selected from the particular consignment and with the opening thereof facing downwards until the point of the probe is approximately in the middle of the bag. Sampling with a grain probe 14. insert an opened hand into each such container. mix the material thus obtained thoroughly and divide it by means of a sample divider so that the sample of the particular consignment consists of a sample of at least 30 kg. close the hand with a fist and thereafter withdraw it uniformly. take approximately equal quantities of material from each bag selected from the particular consignment. (b) (c) (d) 33 . Repeat the procedure described in paragraph (a) alternately at different depths at each position selected in the relevant bulk container and then place the material thus obtained in the container as mentioned in paragraph (b). Withdraw the probe with a slight shaking movement and at diminishing speed from the particular bag so that a relatively even and progressive flow of kernels is maintained through the opening nearest to the side of the bag. (c) (d) (e) (f) Sampling with a shovel 13. insert the opened hand into each container and rake the pods out. Turn the probe on its longitudinal axis through approximately 180° so that the opening faces upwards. (1) A consignment of kernels is sampled with a grain probe as follows (a) Insert the tapering point of such probe upwards at an angle of approximately 30 degrees with the horizontal line. (b) (c) (d) (e) Mix the material thus obtained thoroughly and divide it by means of a sample divider so that the sample of the particular consignment consists of at least 30 kg. and then lift the shovel gradually while keeping it horizontal. Place the material in the shovel into a suitable container.

middle and bottom of each bag and place the material thus obtained in the container. pouring the sample contained in the collecting tray referred to in paragraph (a) through the multiple-slot divider. (2) The division of a sample with a multiple-slot divider shall be done by (a) (b) (c) (d) placing the sample in an empty collecting tray. and repeatedly pouring that part of the sample that is collected at one selected set of chutes. (1) If it appears during the taking of a deviating sample or during an examination of the groundnuts taken from different containers in a consignment. Mix the material thus obtained thoroughly and divide it by means of a sample divider so that the sample from the particular consignment consists of two parts of at least 30 kg each. Take out approximately equal quantities of material from each container selected from the particular consignment. INSPECTION METHODS: GENERAL 34 . until a working sample of the required size is obtained. Deviating sample 15. (2) A sample taken according to this regulation is considered to be representative of the consignment from which it is taken. and consists of a cylindrical tube with a tapering point and an opening near the point.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE (e) (f) (g) Repeat the procedure described in paragraphs (a). (2) A grain probe mentioned in subregulation (1) shall (a) (b) be long enough so that the point thereof will reach the middle of the container that is sampled. and each group of containers of a particular class in the consignment is considered a separate consignment for purposes of these regulations. through the multiple-slot divider after the collecting tray in which it was collected has been exchanged for an empty collecting tray. Obtaining a working sample 16. that the contents of those containers differ significantly -(a) (b) (c) the respective containers must be separated from one another. (1) A working sample shall be obtained by dividing the representative or deviating sample with a multiple-slot divider. (b) and (c) alternately at the top. as indicated in these regulations. placing an empty collecting tray underneath each of the two sets of the multiple-slot divider's chutes. all the containers in the particular consignment must be sampled with a view to such classification and separation.

(e) Such a percentage represents the percentage groundnuts of the particular class in the consignment.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS Determination of musty. sour or other unacceptable odour. Determination of class in the case of pods 18. sour or any other unacceptable odour. Remove all pods belonging to another class from the working sample and determine the mass of the remaining quantity. Remove all kernels of another class from the working sample and determine the mass of the remaining quantities. The class of a consignment of kernels is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Obtain two working samples of at least 200 g each from the consignment after all foreign matter. Determination of percentage foreign matter and shelled kernels 35 . Determination of class in the case of kernels 19. it contains any noxious seeds. Determine the average of the two percentages thus obtained. it contains groundnuts in or on which a substance occurs which makes it unfit for human consumption or for processing into or application as food or feed. kernels with damaged testa and kernels without testa have been removed. Such a percentage represents the percentage groundnuts of a particular class in the consignment. harmful substance. Express the mass thus determined as a percentage of the working sample. and it contains any insects. insects and noxious seed 17. Express the mass thus determined as a percentage of the mass of the working sample. A consignment or a sample of a particular consignment of groundnuts is sensorial or chemically analysed in order to determine whether -(a) (b) (c) (d) it has a musty. (d) Determine the average of the two percentages thus obtained. The class of a consignment of pods is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) Obtain two working samples of at least 200 g each from the sample of the consignment after all foreign matter and shelled kernels have been removed.

Sundry grade. Hand cleaned splits. determine the respective mass of each and express each respective mass as a percentage of the mass of the working sample. The percentage kernel content of a consignment of pods is determined as follows: 36 . Now take an additional sample of at least four x 50 kg bags as a working sample. Hand cleaned 80/100 or Hand cleaned 100/130 and such percentage represents the percentage of foreign matter and pods in the consignment in the case of Machine cleaned Choice grade. Machine cleaned 100/130. If this number exceeds the limit permissible for Choice grade. Standard grade.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE 20. If this number exceeds the limit permissible for Choice grade. as the case may be. (c) (d) (e) (f) Determination of kernel content 22. Remove all foreign matter and shelled kernels separately from the working sample and determine the respective mass of each. Express the respective masses of the foreign matter and shelled kernels thus determined separately as a percentage of the working sample. Remove all pods and foreign matter separately from the working sample and determine the number of pods and foreign matter. (d) Determination of the percentage pods and foreign matter 21. Hand cleaned 80/100 or Hand cleaned 100/130 as set out in Table 1. Machine cleaned Standard grade. Determine the total number of pods and foreign matter obtained in paragraph (b) and (e) or the average of the percentages obtained in paragraphs (b) and (e). Such total represents the total number of foreign matter in the consignment concerned in the case of Choice grade. Such percentages represent respectively the percentage foreign matter and shelled kernels in the consignment. The percentage foreign matter and shelled kernels in a consignment of pods is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) Obtain a working sample of at least 10 kg from the sample of the consignment. Standard grade. is determined as follows: (a) (b) Obtain a working sample of at least 10 kg from a sample of the consignment. Machine cleaned 80/100. Standard grade. Allow the contents of the bags to flow in a thin stream onto a sorting belt or sorting table in such a manner that the foreign matter and pods can be spotted. Selection fall off and Crushing grade. If soils clings to the pods. Machine cleaned splits. Hand cleaned splits. Hand cleaned 80/100 or Hand cleaned 100/130 as set out in Table 1. The percentage of pods and foreign matter in a consignment of kernels. Hand cleaned splits. measure 200g pods and wipe off the soil by hand and the percentage thereof determined added to the percentage foreign matter to indicate the total percentage of foreign matter. determine the respective mass of each and express each respective mass as a percentage of the mass of the working sample. Remove all pods and foreign matter separately from the working sample and determine the number of pods and foreign matter.

from the consignment. 37 . Determination of the percentage of unsound. Determine the respective mass of the damaged testa and broken kernels so obtained and express each as a percentage of the mass of the working sample. free of foreign matter and shelled kernels. Express each of the mass thus determined as a percentage of mass of the respective working sample. Such percentage shall represent the percentage kernel content of the consignment concerned. Such percentages represent respectively the percentages of damaged kernels and broken kernels in the consignment concerned. Sort the working sample in such a manner that the damaged testa and broken kernels are retained separately. The percentage of kernels of another class is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) Determine the mass of the kernels of another class which have been removed from the working samples as set out in subregulation 19(b). Determination of the percentage of kernels of another class 24. blemished and soiled kernels 25. Determine the average of the percentages thus obtained. Such percentage represents the percentage of kernels of another class in the consignment concerned. The percentage of damaged testa and the percentage of broken kernels is respectively determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Obtain two working samples of at least 200 g each from the sample of the consignment. Determine the average of the percentages thus obtained. Determination of damaged testa and percentage of broken kernels respectively 23.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Obtain two working samples of at least 200 g groundnuts. Express the mass thus obtained as a percentage of the working sample. blemished and soiled kernels (a) in the case of a consignment of pods is determined as follows: (i) Obtain a working sample of at least 5 kg of pods from the sample of the consignment and shell the pods (ii) Weigh off at least 2 kg of kernels of the working samples. The percentage of unsound. Shell the pods in each of the working sample with the hand and determine the mass of the kernels thus obtained in each of the respective working sample.

(vi) Sort the working sample in such a manner that the unsound kernels are retained. blemished and soiled kernels with a sample divider: Provided that if the total mass of unsound. blemished and soiled whole and split kernels as a percentage of the working sample. The percentage of split kernels is determined as follows: (a) (b) Obtain two working samples of at least 200 g each from a sample of the consignment. (v) Such percentages represent the percentages of the unsound blemished and soiled kernels in the consignment concerned. blemished and soiled kernels are retained separately and determine the respective mass of each. (v) Obtain a working sample of at least 500 g by dividing the total mass of unsound. (vi) The sum of the percentages obtained in paragraph (v) represents the collective percentage of unsound. (iv) Such percentage represents the collective percentage of unsound. blemished and soiled kernels are retained separately and determine the mass thereof. (vii) Determine the mass of the unsound kernels and express it as a percentage of the working sample in (v) with the use of the following formula: mass determined in paragraph (vii) paragraph (ii) X 100 mass of the working sample in paragraph (v) 1 (viii) X mass determined in 10 kg Such percentage represents the percentage of unsound kernels in the consignment concerned. (iii) Express the mass of the unsound. blemished and soiled kernels is less than 500 g. Sort each of the working sample in such a manner that the split kernels are retained. Determination of the percentage of split kernels 26. blemished and soiled kernels in the consignment concerned. (b) in the case of consignment of kernels is determined as follows: (i) Obtain a working sample of at least 10 kg from the sample of the consignment. (iv) Express the respective mass of the unsound. (ii) Sort the working sample in such a manner that the unsound.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE (iii) Sort the working sample obtained in (ii) in such a manner that the unsound. the total mass of the working sample should be taken. 38 . blemished and soiled kernels as a percentage of the working sample obtain in (ii). blemished and soiled kernels in the consignment concerned.

7.50 mm. Determine the mass of the kernels that remains on each separate slotted screen and express each as a percentage of the mass of the working sample.15 mm slotted screens (or applicable sieve of the Class D) that is placed in the mentioned sequence on top of each other with a pan underneath the screens. Such percentage represents the percentage of whole kernels in the consignment concerned. 6. Determination of the percentage of kernels on a specific screen 28.00 mm and 5. The percentage of kernels on a specific screen is determined as follows: (a) (b) Obtain two working samples of at least 200 g each from a sample of the consignment. after the split kernels. Determine the average of the two percentages thus obtained. Determine the average of the two percentages thus obtained.25 mm.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS (c) (d) (e) Determine the mass of the split kernels thus obtained in each of the respective working samples and express each as a percentage of the mass of the working sample. Sort each of the working sample in such a manner that the whole kernels are retained. The percentage of whole kernels in a consignment of split kernels is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Obtain two working samples of at least 200 g each from a sample of the consignment. Sieve each of the working sample thoroughly on the 8. 39 . Determine the mass of the whole kernels thus obtained in each of the respective working samples and express each as a percentage of the mass of the respective working sample.75 mm. pods and foreign matter have been removed. Such percentage represents the percentage of kernels on a specific screen in the consignment concerned. Sort each of the working sample in such a manner that the shrivelled kernels are retained. (c) (d) Determination of the percentage of shrivelled kernels 29. Such percentage represents the percentage of split kernels in the consignment concerned. Determination of the percentage of whole kernels in a consignment of split kernels 27. 6. The percentage of shrivelled kernels is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) Obtain two working samples of at least 200 g each from a sample of the consignment. Determine the mass of the shrivelled kernels thus obtained in each of the working sample and express each as a percentage of the mass of the working sample.

(d) Determination of the percentage blackened and soiled pods 32.5 g are determined as follows: (a) Obtain three working samples of 28. Determine the mass of the broken and open pods thus obtained in each of the respective working sample and express each as a percentage of the mass of the respective working sample.5 g kernels each from a sample of the consignment.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE (d) (e) Determine the average of the two percentages thus obtained. Determine the average of the number of kernels per 28. 40 .5 g) 30.5 g) of the kernels of the consignment concerned. The number of kernels per 28. The percentage blackened and soiled pods in the case of a consignment of pods is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) (d) Obtain two working samples of at least 200 g each from a sample of a consignment after foreign matter and shelled kernels have been removed. Sort each of the working sample in such a manner that the broken and open pods are retained. the foreign matter. The percentage of broken and open pods in the case of a consignment of pods is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) Obtain two working samples of at least 200 g each from a sample of the consignment. after all foreign matter and shelled kernels have been removed. defective kernels and split kernels have been removed. Determine the average of the two percentages thus obtained. Count the number of kernels in each working sample. Such percentage represents the percentage of shrivelled kernels in the consignment concerned. Sort each working sample in such a manner that the blackened and soiled pods are retained. after kernels from another class.5 g of the three working samples. Determine the mass of the blackened and soiled pods in each working sample and express it as a percentage of the working sample. Determination of count (number of kernels per 28. Such percentage represents the percentage of broken and open pods in the consignment concerned. (b) (c) (d) Determination of the percentage of broken and open pods in the case of a consignment of pods 31. Such number represents the count (number of kernels per 28.

..................................... Sampling with an air suction apparatus ...... Any person who contravenes or fails to comply with any provision of these regulations shall be guilty of an offence and upon conviction be liable to a fine not exceeding R8 000 or imprisonment for a period not exceeding two years or to both that fine and that imprisonment...................... SCOPE OF SYSTEM ........................................................................EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS (e) Such percentage represents the percentage blackened and soiled pods in the consignment concerned......................... Appendix F VOLUNTARY SYSTEM RELATING TO THE GRADING.......................................... harmful substance 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 41 ........................................... Obtaining a working sample ....................................................... Sampling with a grain probe ..................................................... Standards for grades (General) ............. SCHEDULE CONTENTS Clauses No.................................................................... Deviating sample .................................................................................. packing and marking of (producer) groundnuts presented for sale in the Republic of South Africa....................................................…................................ The moisture content of a consignment of groundnuts may be determined according to any suitable method: Provided that the results thus obtained are in accordance with the results obtained by means of the IUPAC method number 1........................................................................................................................................... DEFINITIONS .....................................................................….... Representative sample ............121 for the determination of moisture and volatile matter content.............. Sampling with a hand rake ................................................................................ INSPECTION METHODS: GENERAL Determining of musty......................................…......................................... Grades for groundnuts ...............….....................................…............... as set out in the Schedule hereto... PACKING AND MARKING OF (PRODUCER) GROUNDNUTS PRESENTED FOR SALE IN THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA It is hereby notified for general information that the Department of Agriculture has decided to introduce a voluntary system of grading....................................... Offence and penalties 34.............. Specifications for classes ......................................................... sour or other objectionable odour...………… QUALITY STANDARDS Classes .............................. Sampling with a shovel .................................................... Determination of moisture content 33.... SAMPLING General ........….............. Prohibited particulars ............................. PACKING REQUIREMENTS Containers ...........................

....... Determination of percentage kernels of another class ... "consignment" means a quantity of groundnuts.......... damaged kernels..... such kernels shall not be regarded as blemished kernels.... or if such a quantity is subdivided into different classes or grades........... Determination of mould-infected kernels ....................... "damaged testa" means kernels of which the testa is loose... Determination of class ..... Determination of percentage sticks.................... which belongs to the same producer or owner................................... cracked or have split off for more than one third.... "broken kernels" means kernels of which a part has been broken off...................... or delivered by the same vehicle. 1972 (Act No..............…........... each quantity of each of the different classes or grades. INSPECTION METHODS Steps for grading groundnuts in kernel form ..... 36 of 1947)..... delivered at any one time under cover of the same consignment note...... sun-cured kernels............................ "defective kernels" means unsound kernels.. Agricultural Remedies and Stock Remedies Act.....… Steps for grading of pods ... delivery note or receipt note............................ 1947 (Act No........ 54 of 1972)..................... Determination of percentage pods and foreign matter ................. Determination of moisture content ......... 42 .. blemished kernels..........…......................... In this voluntary system unless inconsistent with the context -"blackened pods" means pods............ "blemished kernels" means whole kernels which show any coloured streaks or blotches in or on the testa: Provided that kernels with rust blotches where the discoloration is limited to the embryo or the veins..................................... "container" means a bag.. Farm Feeds.. foreign matter and sprouted kernels .... 18 ......... excluding split kernels.. Determination of kernel content ................GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE and noxious seed .........19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 SCHEDULE Definitions 1.. Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act....... or any other immediate container or wrapper in which groundnuts are packed..... are permissible for the treatment of pests and diseases and which do not exceed the prescribed maximum residue limit in terms of the Foodstuffs................................ "chemical residues" means residues of agricultural remedies which in terms of the Fertilizers....... "class" means a class referred to in clause 3........................... "broken and open pods" means pods of which the shells have been broken or which are open in any way............... soiled kernels.............................. broken kernels and shrivelled kernels....... and in the case of groundnuts in pods form............. the shell of which are mouldy or blackened over more than half of their surface..

20 mm round-hole screen and from which all defective kernels have been removed. 6. Crotalaria spp. "other class" in relation to a specific sample of groundnuts. whether in kernel or pod form. means all matter (including the raisins). means any class other than the class of which that sample mainly consists.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS "edible groundnuts" means those kernels in a consignment which remain after being screened on a 6. shrivelled small pods. means the mass of the kernels in the consignment concerned. means all matter (including the raisins). excluding kernels..50 mm slotted screen. "insect" means any live insect which is injurious to stored groundnuts. including seeds of Convolvulus spp. "raisins" means hard. and in a kernel form. irrespective of the stage of development of the insect. Ricinus communis or Xanthium spp. 6. pods and sticks or parts thereof... "noxious seeds" means the seeds or bits of seeds of plant species that may represent a hazard to human or animal health when consumed. "pods" means pods or parts of pods containing kernels. "expressing groundnuts" means all kernels other than sundry and edible kernels.75 mm slotted screen. split kernels or parts of kernels.00 mm slotted screen and 7. expressed as a percentage of the mass of the pods (after the foreign matter. "inspector" means the Executive Officer or an inspector under his or her control. "one-kernelled pod" means a pod which according to the formation of the shell thereof. "mould-infested kernels" means kernels and parts of kernels (a) (b) Where mould growth appear and is visible to the naked eye.75 mm slotted screen and the 7. or which are damaged or discoloured as a result of mould growth. with or without kernels. "groundnuts" means the underground fruit of the plant Arachis hypogaea. "foreign matter" in relation to a consignment of groundnuts (a) (b) in a pod form. 43 . or an Assignee or an employee of an Assignee. Datura spp.70 mm round-hole screen. excluding kernels. "grade" means a grade referred to in clause 5. contains a single kernel. Lolium temulentum. "kernels" means the seeds and parts of seeds of groundnuts which are obtained after shelling the pods.. excluding the raisins. Ipomoea purpurea. of which the kernel content cannot be recovered during the shelling process. sticks and shelled kernels have been removed) in the consignment concerned. and in the case of Class D on the 7. "kernel content" in relation to the consignment groundnuts in pod form.

GROUNDNUTS REPORT

EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE

"shelled kernels" in relation to a consignment of groundnuts in a pod form, means the kernels in the consignment concerned which are not enclosed in shells; "shrivelled kernels" means whole kernels which have a shrivelled, grooved or dented appearance: Provided that whole kernels of which the veins are raised or crinkled, shall not be regarded as shrivelled kernels; "soiled kernels" means whole and split kernels which are soiled to such an extent that their appearance is affected; "soiled pods" means pods with soil clinging to the shells thereof: Provided that pods of which the shells are discoloured by soil, shall not be regarded as soiled pods; "split kernels" means the separated halves or parts of separated halves of kernels which do not pass through the 7,20 mm round-hole screen; "sticks" in relation to a consignment of groundnuts in pod form, means foreign matter in that consignment which consists of parts of the groundnut plant; "sun-dried kernels" means kernels of which the testa is easily removed when rubbed lightly between the hands; "unsound kernels" means mould-infested kernels and kernels or parts of kernels which are decayed or chalky or damaged by heat or insects, or show internally or when the testa thereof is removed, a yellow, purple, brown, red or any other colour which is not typical of sound kernels or are sprouted: Provided that sprouted kernels shall be regarded as unsound only if the embryo has broken the testa; "5,15 mm slotted screen" means a screen having 20,0 mm by 5,15 mm slotted perforations; "6,0 mm slotted screen" means a screen having 20,0 mm by 6,0 mm slotted perforations; "6,75 mm slotted screen" means a screen having 20,0 mm by 6,75 mm slotted perforations; "7,50 mm slotted screen" means a screen having 20,0 mm by 7,50 mm slotted perforations; "7,20 mm round-holed screen" means a screen with round perforations 7,20 mm in diameter; and "7,70 mm round-holed screen" means a screen with round perforations 7,70 mm in diameter. Scope of voluntary system 2. This system shall serve as a voluntary system for the grading, packing and marking of unprocessed groundnuts delivered for sale in the Republic of South Africa. QUALITY STANDARDS Classes 3. There are 5 classes of groundnuts, namely – (a) (b) Class A; Class B;

44

EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT

GROUNDNUTS

(c) (d) (e)

Class C; Class D; and Class E.

Specifications for classes 4. A consignment of groundnuts is classified as – (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Class A, if it contains at least 97% of the Red Spanish type of groundnuts (for example Harts); Class B, if it contains at least 97% of the Spanish type of groundnuts (for example Natal Common, Selection 5, Sellie, Agaat, Jasper, Robbie, Akwa, Kwarts and Anel); Class C, if it contains groundnuts that cannot be classified in accordance with these standards and requirements as Class A, Class B, Class D or Class E groundnuts; Class D, if it contains at least 97% of the runner-type of groundnuts (for example Norden); and Class E, if it contains at least 97% of the Virginia runner-type of groundnuts (for example Selmani).

Grades for groundnuts Farmer stock grading 5. The grades for the various classes of groundnuts (a) in pod form is: Choice grade (OK) Standard Grade (OS) Sundry Grade (OD) Crushing Grade (OP) Grade other (F-Pods) Choice Grade (K) Standard Grade (S) Sundry Grade (D) Crushing Grade (P) Grade other (F-kernels)

(b)

in kernel form are:

Standards for grades General 6. (1) All grades, except Grade other of groundnuts should (a) (b) (c) be free from a musty, sour and/or any other undesirable odour; be free from insects; be free from a substance which renders it unfit for human or animal consumption or processing into or utilisation thereof as food or feed;

45

GROUNDNUTS REPORT

EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE

(d) (e) (f) (g) (h)

contain no chemical residues that exceed the prescribed maximum residue limit; be free from seeds from Ricinus communis and not contain more noxious seeds, other than Ricinus communis, than permitted in terms of the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act No. 54 of 1972); have a moisture content of not more than 7%; comply with the requirements for plant injurious organisms of phytosanitary importance as determined by the Director of the Directorate of Plant Health and Quality; contain not more than 10 micrograms per kilogram of total aflatoxin, of which not more than 5 micrograms per kilogram may be aflatoxin B1: Provided that groundnuts destined for further processing may not contain more than 15 micrograms per kilogram total aflatoxin; may not contain more than 20 micrograms per kilogram total aflatoxin in the case of consignment of choice and standard grade groundnuts; may not contain more than 50 micrograms per kilogram total aflatoxin in the case of Consignment Sundry grade groundnuts; may not contain more than 100 microgram per kilogram total aflatoxin in the case of Crushing grade groundnuts. comply with the minimum and maximum requirements as set out in Table 1; and groundnuts which does not comply with the requirements for choice, standard, sundry and crushing grade will be graded as grade other. PACKING REQUIREMENTS

(i) (j)

Containers 7. (1) Groundnuts of different classes (with the exception of Class C) and grades may not be packed in the same container. (2) A consignment of groundnuts in kernel form shall for the purposes of the application of this voluntary system be packed in containers that are suitable, intact, clean, dry, odourless and strong enough. Prohibited particulars 8. No wording, illustration or other means of expression which constitutes a misrepresentation or which directly or by implication, creates a misleading impression of the contents, shall appear on a container which contains groundnuts. SAMPLING General 9. For the purpose of this voluntary system, a random sample of groundnuts should be taken according to the following manner so that the sample obtained is representative of the consignment concerned by: (a) In the case of groundnuts in pod form –

46

(i) (ii) Sampling by hand (kernels) and rake (pods) 10. Place the material in the shovel into a suitable container. (ii) (b) delivered in containers. sampling by hand at least 5% of the containers as set out in clause 10. A consignment of groundnuts is sampled by hand rake as follows: (a) (b) (c) (d) Open the container selected from the particular consignment. mix the material thus obtained thoroughly and divide it by means of a sample divider so that the sample of the particular consignment consists of a sample of at least 10 kg (i) (ii) Sampling with a shovel 11. (e) (f) (b) 47 . in the case of groundnuts in kernel form. Repeat the procedure described in paragraph (b) above alternately at different depths in each container and place the material so obtained into the container mentioned in paragraph (c). Place the material enclosed by the hand rake.5 kg each. Insert a hand rake into each such container close the hand in a fist and then withdraw it gradually (rake out in the case of pods). into a suitable container. and then lift the shovel gradually while keeping it horizontal. take approximately equal quantities of material from each bag selected from the particular consignment. sampling the particular consignment at random with a shovel or air sucked in at least four different places in the container as set out in clauses 11 and 12.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS (i) delivered in bulk quantities. In the case of groundnuts in kernel form – sampling by hand at least 5% of the containers chosen at random in the consignment as set out in clause 10. A consignment in bulk quantities in pod form of groundnuts is sampled with a shovel as follows: (a) Insert the shovel with a slight shaking movement into the groundnuts at each position selected in the particular bulk container. or sampling with a grain probe at least 50% of the containers chosen at random in clause 13. consists of a sample of at least 2. in the case of groundnuts in pod form consists of a sample of at least 10 kg each.

Sampling with a grain probe 13. (b) Place a suitable collecting tray under the air suction apparatus. (c) (d) (e) Repeat the procedure described in (a). Mix the material thus obtained thoroughly and divide it by means of a sample divider so that the sample of the particular consignment consists of at least 10 kg material each. (1) A consignment of groundnuts in kernel form is sampled with a grain probe as follows (a) Insert the tapering point of such a probe upwards at an angle of approximately 30 degrees with the horizontal line. Take approximately equal quantities of material at each position selected. Mix the material thus obtained thoroughly and divide it by means of a sample divider so that the sample of the particular consignment consists of at least 10 kg material each. Mix the material thus obtained thoroughly and divide it by means of a sample divider so that the sample from the particular consignment consists of two parts of at least 2. A consignment of groundnuts in pod form should be sampled with an air suction apparatus as follows: (a) Insert the air suction apparatus as deep as possible to the bottom of the bulk container. alternatively at different depths in that particular container and place the material so obtained in the collecting tray mentioned in (b).0 kg each.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE (c) Repeat the procedure described in paragraph (a) alternately at different depths at each position selected in the relevant bulk container and then place the material thus obtained in the container as mentioned in paragraph (b). Take approximately equal quantities of material at each position selected. middle and bottom of each bag and place the material thus obtained in the container. (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) 48 . Repeat the procedure described in paragraphs (a). Withdraw the probe with a slight shaking movement and at diminishing speed from the particular bag so that a relatively even and progressive flow of kernels is maintained through the opening nearest to the side of the bag. Take out approximately equal quantities of material from each container selected from the particular consignment. Turn the probe on its longitudinal axis through approximately 180° so that the opening faces upwards. into each bag selected from the particular consignment and with the opening thereof facing downwards until the point of the probe is approximately in the middle of the bag. (d) (e) Sampling with air suction apparatus 12. (b) and (c) alternately at the top. Empty the material in the probe into a suitable clean container.

(1) A working sample shall be obtained by dividing the random sample with a multiple-slot divider. harmful substance and noxious seed 17. the containers in the particular consignment must all be sampled. and repeatedly pouring that part of the sample that is collected at one selected set of chutes. If an inspector should notice during the process of drawing the random samples or during the inspection that any of the quantities of groundnuts taken from any container are obviously inferior to or differ significantly: (a) (b) (c) the respective containers must be separated from one another. pouring the sample contained in the collecting tray referred to in paragraph (a) through the multiple-slot divider. Deviating sample 14. sour or any other objectionable odour. 12. A consignment or a sample of a particular consignment of groundnuts is sensorial or chemically analysed in order to determine whether: (a) it has a musty.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS (2) A grain probe mentioned in subclause (1) shall (a) (b) be long enough so that the point thereof will reach the middle of the container that is sampled. Representative sample 15. Obtaining a working sample 16. sour or other objectionable odour. 11. and consists of a cylindrical tube with a tapering point and an opening near the point. 10. A sample taken according to clauses 9. (2) The division of a sample with a multiple-slot divider shall be done by (a) (b) (c) (d) placing the sample in an empty collecting tray. INSPECTION METHODS: GENERAL Determining of musty. 13 and 14 is considered to be representative of the consignment from which it is taken. and each group of container of a particular class or grade in the consignment is considered a separate consignment for purposes of this voluntary system. 49 . through the multiple-slot divider after the collecting tray in which it was collected has been exchanged for an empty collecting tray. placing an empty collecting tray underneath each of the two sets of the multiple-slot divider's chutes. until a working sample of the required size is obtained.

Express the respective masses of the sticks. (d) 50 . Express the mass thus determined as a percentage of the working sample. and it contains any insects. damaged kernels and kernels without testa have been removed. Determination of class 18. Remove all pods belonging to another class from the working sample and determine the mass of the remaining quantity. Such a percentage represents the percentage groundnuts of a particular class in the consignment. foreign matter and shelled kernels separately from the working sample and determine the respective mass of each. Remove all sticks. The class of a consignment of groundnuts in pod form is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) (d) Prepare a working sample by measuring out at least 200 g from the sample of the consignment after all sticks. foreign matter and shelled kernels thus determined separately as a percentage of the working sample. it contains castor seeds or other poisonous seeds. (1) The percentage sticks.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE (b) (c) (d) it contains groundnuts in or on which a substance occurs which makes it unfit for human consumption or for processing into or application as food or feed. measure 200 g pods and wiped off the soil by hand and the percentage thereof determined and added to the percentage sticks and foreign matter to indicate the total percentage of sticks and foreign matter. foreign matter and shelled kernels have been removed. Such a percentage represents the percentage groundnuts of the particular class in the consignment. Remove all kernels of another class from the working sample and determine the mass of the remaining groundnuts. Express the mass thus determined as a percentage of the working sample. foreign matter and shelled kernels in the consignment. Such percentages represent respectively the percentage sticks. foreign matter and shelled kernels in a consignment of groundnuts in pod form is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) Prepare a working sample by measuring at least 10 kg from the sample of the consignment. If soil clings to the pods. 19. Determination of percentage sticks. foreign matter and shelled kernels 20. The class of a consignment groundnuts in kernel form is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) (d) Prepare a working sample by measuring out at least 200 g from the consignment from which all foreign matter.

Calculate the sum of the masses of pods and foreign matter determined according to paragraph (b) and express the mass thus calculated as a percentage of the working sample. Express the mass thus determined as a percentage of mass of the working sample.0 kg from the sample of the consignment. The percentage kernel content of a consignment of groundnuts in pod form is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) (d) (f) Prepare a working sample of at least 200 g groundnuts. Shell loss adjustment: A deduction of 1. free of sticks. is free from foreign material. Remove all pods and foreign matter separately from the working sample and determine the respective masses of each. (d) (e) (f) Determination of kernel content 22. from the consignment. The percentage pods and foreign matter in a consignment groundnuts in kernel form is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) Prepare a working sample by measuring out at least 2. Express the mass of the foreign matter determined according to paragraph (b) as a percentage of the working sample. Such percentage represents the joint percentage of pods groundnuts and foreign matter in the particular consignment. Shell the pods in the working sample with the hand and determine the mass of the kernels thus obtained. The mass of mould-infected kernels per 2 kg in a consignment groundnuts should be done as follows: (a) Prepare a working sample by measuring out 2 kg kernels from the sample of the consignment which (i) (ii) in the case of groundnuts in pod form is obtained by shelling pods. Such percentage represent the percentage kernel content of the consignment concerned.5 percentage points should be deducted from the above-mentioned kernel content as determined in (e) above to provide for physical loss adjustment.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS Determination of the percentage pods and foreign matter 21. Such percentage represents the percentage foreign matter in the particular consignment. foreign matter and shelled kernels. and in the case of groundnuts in kernel form. Determination of mass of mould-infected kernels 23. 51 .

121 for the determination of moisture and volatile matter content. B.00 mm slotted screen. represents the mass mould-infected kernels per 2 kg in the consignment concerned. The moisture content of a consignment of groundnuts may be determined according to any suitable method: Provided that the results thus obtained are in accordance with the results obtained by the IUPAC method number 1. the 6. Obtain a working sample of approximately 200 g kernels which is free from foreign matter and pods and screen over the 6. Such percentage represents the percentage of kernels of another class in the consignment concerned.20 mm round-hole screen and a pan in the case of Class A. the 7. The percentage of kernels of another class is determined as follows: (a) (b) (c) Determine the mass of the kernels of another class which have been removed from the working sample as set out in paragraph 19(b). Determine the percentage moisture as described in clause 25. Smell for objectionable odour and look for insects and chemical substances discernible on the kernels. Mix and divide the kernels thoroughly using a small multiple-slot divider.75 mm slotted screen. (c) Determination of percentage of kernels of another class 24. The grading for class D groundnuts should be done exactly the same way as in class A. Determine the mass of mould-infected kernels as described in clause 23. The mass thus determined. Express the mass thus obtained as a percentage of the working sample. INSPECTION METHODS Steps for grading groundnuts in kernel form [Determine the grade of groundnuts in kernel form and where applicable using Table 1] 26. Determination of moisture content 25. Determine the class as described in clauses 18 and 19.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE (b) Remove all the mould-infected kernels and determine the mass thereof: Provided that kernels which are presumably mould infected should be cut and opened in order to determine whether there is mould growth therein. (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) 52 . The grade of a consignment of groundnuts in kernel form should be graded as follows: (a) Obtain approximately 2 kg of material and determine the percentage foreign matter and pods by first determining the mass of foreign matter expressed as a percentage of the working sample and thereafter the mass of the pods expressed as a percentage of the working sample and thereafter 50% of the mass of the pods as sundry grade. C and E.

75 mm slotted screen. the mass of the unsound kernels above the 6. broken and shrivelled kernels on the 6. B.75 mm slotted screen and expressed as a percentage of the kernels above the 6.75 mm slotted screen. the mass of the unsound.00 mm slotted screen. the mass of the unsound kernels on the 6.70 mm the mass of the kernels above the 6.75 mm becomes 6.75 mm 7. C and E except that the screens differ and the following changes should be brought in relation to screens and determine: Class A. the total defective kernels on the 6.20 mm round hole screen.75 mm slotted screen and express as a percentage.75 mm slotted screen and express as a percentage.75 mm slotted screen and express as a percentage of kernels on the 6.75 mm slotted screen. the mass of the damaged. the total mass of defective kernels above the 6. the mass of the unsound. the mass of damaged. (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) (xi) (xii) (xiii) (xiv) (xv) (xvi) 53 .20 mm round hole screen and express it as a percentage.50 mm 6. the mass of the blemished and soiled kernels above the 6. the mass sundry edible groundnuts on the 6.00 mm slotted screen and express as a percentage.00 mm slotted screen and express it as a percentage.00 mm slotted screen. broken.20 mm round hole screen and express it as a percentage.20 mm becomes (i) (ii) Class D 7.75 mm slotted screen.75 mm slotted screen.00 mm slotted screen.00 mm slotted screen. sun cured and shrivelled kernels above the 6. the mass of the kernels on the 7. the mass of the unsound and soiled kernels on the 7. the mass of edible kernels above the 6. the mass of the unsound kernels on the 7. C and E 6. the mass of the kernels above the 6.75 mm slotted screen and express as a percentage of the kernels above the 6. blemished and soiled kernels on the 6.00 mm becomes 7. blemished and soiled kernels above the 6.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS B.

(a) In the case of Choice/Standard grade the mass of all the unsound kernels above the 6. the 6.20 mm round-hole screen and express as a percentage of the working sample. the mass of the total clean splits on the 7.20 mm round-hole screen and express as a percentage of the working sample. soiled. and 54 . (xxi) (a) In the case of Choice/Standard grade the mass of the total defects above the 6.00 mm slotted screen and unsound. damaged and shrivelled kernels above the 6. blemished and soiled kernels above the 6. the mass of the total sundry kernels by adding together the blemished.00 mm slotted screen.75 mm slotted screen and 6.00 mm slotted screen.20 mm round-hole screen as well as the total Choice or Standard grade above the 6.20 mm round hole screen.20 mm round-hole screen and express as a percentage of the working sample.00 mm slotted screen and unsound.00 mm slotted screen.00 slotted screen the 7. soiled kernels on the 7. the mass of the unsound kernels in the whole sample and express it as a percentage of the working sample. soiled. (xxiii) the mass of the kernels in the pan and express as a percentage.75 mm slotted screen. (xxii) (a) In the case of Choice/Standard grade the mass of the total sundry kernels by adding together the blemished.75 mm slotted screen. damaged and shrivelled kernels above the 6. (b) In the case of Sundry grade the mass of all the unsound kernels above the 6. the total clean splits above the 7. (b) In the case of Sundry grade the mass of the total defects above the 6. (xxiv) (xxv) the mass of the unsound kernels in the pan.GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE (xvii) (xviii) (xix) the mass of the whole kernels on the 7. (b) In the case of Sundry Grade the mass of unsound. the 6.00 mm slotted screen the 7. (xx) (a) In the case of Choice/Standard grade the mass of all the unsound. and the total clean splits above the 7. the 7.75 mm slotted screen.20 mm round-hole screen and express as a percentage of the working sample.20 mm round-hole screen and express as a percentage of the working sample. the total edible kernels above the 6.75 mm slotted screen and expressing them as a percentage of the working sample.20 mm round-hole screen and expressing them as a percentage of the working sample.00 mm slotted screen and unsound. total edible kernels above the 6.20 mm round-hole screen and express as a percentage of the working sample.75 mm slotted screen. soiled kernels above 7.20 mm round hole screen. blemished and soiled kernels above the 6. (b) In the case of Sundry grade. soiled kernels above the 7.

Grading on kernels obtained in (i) should be done as set out in clause 26. Mix thoroughly and divide the kernels with a multiple slot divider. (a) Measure out about 10 kg material and determine the percentage foreign matter and sticks by selecting them by hand or by screening. The grade of a consignment pods should be graded as follows in association with Table 1. Shell sufficient pods and determine the percentage moisture as set out in clause 25. Deductions (a) (b) Shell loss adjustment: A deduction of 1. Smell for objectionable odour and look for live insects and chemical substances that are discernible on the pods. Determine the kernel content on at least a working sample of 200 g pods which is free form sticks/foreign matter and shelled kernels each by shelling them by hand. 6% points should be added to the sundry grade and 2% points added to the crushing grade. Determine the percentage shelled kernels from the balance of the 10 kg material.5 percentage points should be deducted to account for physical loss adjustment.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS (xxvi) the total crushing groundnuts in the sample and express it as a percentage of the working sample. If soil clings to any pods. (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h) (i) (j) (k) (l) 55 . One kernelled pod (nubbins) in the sample should be shelled with a hand to crushing grade kernels. Mix thoroughly and divide the pods with a multiple slot divider. (i) Allocate the grade comparing the result with the requirements of the different grades. Of this 8%. All pods not shelled with the shelling machine must be shelled by hand and split kernels made. Shell the balance of the 10 kg material by means of the shelling machine. (h) Balance the receipt. A standard deduction of 8% will be applicable from Choice or Standard Grade. Steps for grading pods 27. Determine the class as set out in clauses 18 and 19. The percentage soil thus determined is added to the percentage of foreign matter and sticks to determine the total percentage foreign matter and sticks. The split kernels thus obtained are then added to the total kernel sample before dividing and grading. 200 g pure pods must be measured out and the soil removed by rubbing with a hand.

GROUNDNUTS REPORT EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE 56 .

25 (Only at a Sea Port) Cargo Handling (Manuseamento) 9.36 1.25 Price CIF/CIP Durban USD 436.50 (At the Exit Port) Seafreight to Durban USD 21.00 (Average LARGE price to the SA wholesaler.00 DELIVERED RETAIL PRICE IN S.00 S.50 (From Container Depot to C. USD 1.040. South Africa (December 2003) CONSOLIDATION POINT: Chimoio MANICA Forward .91 (@ 24 050) Delivery of empty container to the C.00 (Clearing Agents.44 997.P.93 909.75 23.50/kg) Note: Costing is per Metric Tonne but based on Full Container Loads of 20 Metric Tonnes (or 26 Cubic metres) 57 .50 2.Beira USD 22.00 Start End 21.300.00 9.00 S.41 EXW Full container to point of exit .62 MZM/kg Price delivered to the C.A.A.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT GROUNDNUTS Appendix G Table G.46 29.25 21.50 18.Moz to SA Backwards .43 897.594.20 (Charge from Mozambique Customs) Customs Service Tax @ 3% of Invoice(FOB) USD 12.P.00 MZM/kg Target 21. 11.75 (Unloaded on the quay) Clearing Formalities 18.00 Per Metric Tonne (SA average = say ZAR12. USD 897. Price to Retailer 598.00 PER Metric Tonne Comparative Retail Price in S. Retailer's Margin @ 50% 299.67 260.500.SA to MOZ Start @ 8.615.A.A.950.50 11.1: Cost calculations for Large Groundnut exports from Manica to DDP Johannesburg.85 22.25 MZM per Metric Tonne Price delivered to the C.000.75 (Railage costs) USD Price DDP Johannesburg USD 478.19 976.85 (Transport from Chimoio to Beira) Terminal Handling Charges USD 3.594.950.18 650. MZM 8.P.) USD 364.P.50 (Charge from Mozambique Customs) USD Movement Guide USD 0.00 0.A.50 South African Port Charges USD Customs Duties in South Africa USD 0.500.00 No duties for SADC Carriage to Johannesburg 23. (USD) USD 353.) S.54 End Start 1. Handlers etc) USD Container Movement Tax 2.25 3.69 1.30 (Charge from Mozambique Customs) Price FOB/FCA Beira USD 415.P.20 0.) USD Price EXW Chimoio (C. Wholesaler's Margin @ 25% USD 119.

19 0.11 970.SA to MOZ Start @ 6.) Full container to point of exit .19 0.274.00 249.00 3.A.00 1.2: Cost calculations for Large Groundnut exports from Quelimane to DDP Johannesburg.00 3.950.48 0.63 MZM per Metric Tonne Price delivered to the C. MZM 6.00 1. Retailer's Margin @ 50% DELIVERED RETAIL PRICE IN S.P.95 213.59 427.P.Quelimane Terminal Handling Charges Cargo Handling (Manuseamento) Container Movement Tax Movement Guide Customs Service Tax @ 3% of Invoice(FOB) Price FOB/FCA Quelimane Seafreight to Durban Price CIF/CIP Durban Clearing Formalities Customs Duties in South Africa Carriage to Johannesburg Price DDP Johannesburg S.950.) USD End Start PER Metric Tonne Comparative Retail Price in S.00 926.75 18.P.00 2.50 300.50 997.300.50 0.GROUNDNUTS REPORT FORCE EXTERNAL MARKET TASK Table G.75 342. Wholesaler's Margin @ 25% S.00 260.36 85.25 9.00 2.00 23.A.A.11 18.97 641.040.48 0.P.50 0.50 0.00 650. (USD) Delivery of empty container to the C.A.) EXW (Only at a Sea Port) (Clearing Agents.P.25 27. Handlers etc) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (At the Exit Port) (Unloaded on the quay) South African Port Charges No duties for SADC (Railage costs) (Average LARGE price to the SA wholesaler.Moz to SA Backwards .000.00 Start 22.000.929.00 MZM/kg Target 22.A.75 1.00 (@ 24 050) (From Container Depot to C. South Africa (December 2003) CONSOLIDATION POINT: Quelimane ZAMBEZIA Forward .50 0.61 27.000. Price to Retailer S.00 23.93 MZM/kg End Price delivered to the C. Price EXW Quelimane (C. USD 1.50/kg) Note: Costing is per Metric Tonne but based on Full Container Loads of 20 Metric Tonnes (or 26 Cubic metres) 58 .20 29.92 926.25 9. USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD 249.20 8.18 272.274.00 Per Metric Tonne (SA average = say ZAR12.

48 0.P.50 0.P.000.P.80 3.950.93 84.75 1.20 29.A. Price to Retailer S.90 MZM/kg End Price delivered to the C.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT Table G.75 15. MZM 6. Wholesaler's Margin @ 25% S.45 281.950.3: Cost calculations for Large Groundnut exports from Nampula to DDP Johannesburg.354.68 15.00 997.4: Cost calculations for Large Groundnut exports from Montepuez to DDP Johannesburg.66 211.Nacala Terminal Handling Charges Cargo Handling (Manuseamento) Container Movement Tax Movement Guide Customs Service Tax @ 3% of Invoice(FOB) Price FOB/FCA Nacala Seafreight to Durban Price CIF/CIP Durban Clearing Formalities Customs Duties in South Africa Carriage to Johannesburg Price DDP Johannesburg S.00 929.A. Price EXW Nampula Full container to point of exit .50/kg) Note: Costing is per Metric Tonne but based on Full Container Loads of 20 Metric Tonnes (or 26 Cubic metres) Table G.) EXW (Only at a Sea Port) (Clearing Agents.00 Per Metric Tonne (SA average = say ZAR12. (USD) Delivery of empty container to the C. South Africa (December 2003) CONSOLIDATION POINT: NAMPULA Forward .00 260.48 982.) USD End Start PER Metric Tonne Comparative Retail Price in S. South Africa (December 2003) 59 .00 2.00 296.00 GROUNDNUTS (@ 24 050) (From Container Depot to C.80 3.00 2.25 9.68 18.300.895.00 1.SA to MOZ Start @ 6.00 1.25 9.52 8. Retailer's Margin @ 50% DELIVERED RETAIL PRICE IN S.040.50 929.50 0.354.88 MZM per Metric Tonne Price delivered to the C.20 8.00 249. Handlers etc) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (At the Exit Port [or Maputo for overland]) (Unloaded on the quay) South African Port Charges No duties for SADC (Railage costs) (Average LARGE price to the SA wholesaler.A.00 23.000.00 Start 22.P.000.50 0.83 635.50 0.75 18. USD 1.A.48 8.00 23.52 0.A.73 423. USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD 249.00 650.75 338.Moz to SA Backwards .00 MZM/kg Target 22.

00 23.25 9.SA to MOZ 21.500.00 260. South Africa (December 2003) 60 .50 880.27 16. Wholesaler's Margin @ 25% S.20 10.50 0.180.50 0.69 16. Retailer's Margin @ 50% DELIVERED RETAIL PRICE IN S.06 End CABO DELGADO EXTERNAL MARKET TASK Backwards .P.P.68 513.45 18.00 23.00 1.70 25.50 0.300.A.000.040.GROUNDNUTS REPORT FORCE CONSOLIDATION POINT: Montepuez Forward .20 3.70 102. USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD 270.00 MZM/kg Target Start End Price delivered to the C.P.00 MZM per Metric Tonne (@ 24 050) (From Container Depot to C.20 29.Moz to SA Start @ 6.Pemba Terminal Handling Charges Cargo Handling (Manuseamento) Container Movement Tax Movement Guide Customs Service Tax @ 3% of Invoice(FOB) Price FOB/FCA Pemba Seafreight to Durban Price CIF/CIP Durban Clearing Formalities Customs Duties in South Africa Carriage to Johannesburg Price DDP Johannesburg S.00 Price delivered to the C.00 1.A. Price to Retailer S.A.P.20 3.P.180.) Full container to point of exit .59 MZM/kg 21.00 25.950.75 410.00Per Metric Tonne (SA average = say ZAR12.5: Cost calculations for Small Groundnut exports from Chimoio to DDP Johannesburg.00 286.00 896. MZM 6.) EXW (Only at a Sea Port) (Clearing Agents.38 256. Handlers etc) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (At the Exit Port [or Maputo for overland]) (Unloaded on the quay) South African Port Charges No duties for SADC (Railage costs) (Average LARGE price to the SA wholesaler.500.27 32.69 32.A.00 1.75 997.28 342.50 0.950. Price EXW Montepuez (C.75 1. (USD) Delivery of empty container to the C.16 972.50/kg) Note: Costing is per Metric Tonne but based on Full Container Loads of 20 Metric Tonnes (or 26 Cubic metres) Table G. USD 1.00 1.75 368.A.) USD Start PER Metric Tonne Comparative Retail Price in S.69 770.75 18.25 9.00 650.594.

93 Full container to point of exit .50 0.033. South Africa (December 2003) 61 .Moz to SA Start @ 8. USD 11.00 PER Metric Tonne Comparative Retail Price in S.75 Price DDP Johannesburg USD S.25 USD Cargo Handling (Manuseamento) 9.617.18 897.46 Price FOB/FCA Beira USD 415.00 Start End Price delivered to the C.00 USD Carriage to Johannesburg USD 23.50 0.) 206.P.617.) EXW (Transport from Chimoio to Beira) (Only at a Sea Port) (Clearing Agents.500.50 702.A.54 End MANICA 16.33 516.550. Price to Retailer S.00 Per Metric Tonne (SA average = say ZAR10/kg) Note: Costing is per Metric Tonne but based on Full Container Loads of 20 Metric Tonnes (or 26 Cubic metres) Table G.69 119. Handlers etc) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (At the Exit Port) Start (Unloaded on the quay) South African Port Charges No duties for SADC (Railage costs) (Average SMALL price to the SA 826.550.19 Seafreight to Durban USD 21.87 16.P.67 1.00 USD Container Movement Tax 2. USD 1.47 22.P.A.500.20 Customs Service Tax @ 3% of Invoice(FOB) USD 12.50 Price EXW Chimoio (C.00 2.Beira 22.85 USD Terminal Handling Charges 3.20 22.A.25 784.00 23. MZM 8.P.90 763.868. Wholesaler's Margin @ 25% USD S.00 MZM/kg Target Price delivered to the C.6: Cost calculations for Small Groundnut exports from Quelimane to DDP Johannesburg.85 3. (USD) USD 353.SA to MOZ MZM/kg MZM per Metric Tonne (@ 24 050) (From Container Depot to C.75 GROUNDNUTS Backwards .42 18.A.50 USD Customs Duties in South Africa 0.36 299.58 690.EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT CONSOLIDATION POINT: Chimoio Forward .P.) USD 364.17 21.A.50 USD Movement Guide USD 0.43 Delivery of empty container to the C.25 Price CIF/CIP Durban USD 436. USD 478.67 598.44 Clearing Formalities 18.97 11.25 9.67 1. Retailer's Margin @ 50% DELIVERED RETAIL PRICE IN S.000.67 wholesaler.

71 756.00 270.82 294. Handlers etc) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (At the Exit Port) (Unloaded on the quay) South African Port Charges No duties for SADC (Railage costs) (Average SMALL price to the SA wholesaler.92 27.18 MZM/kg 17.A.11 ZAMBEZIA EXTERNAL MARKET TASK Backwards .00 2. MZM 6.A.26 0.27 0.A.96 719.A.25 9.67 1.75 363.67 1.20 8. South Africa (December 2003) 62 .26 0.Moz to SA Start @ 6.33 516.00 Price delivered to the C.00 3.00 MZM per Metric Tonne (@ 24 050) (From Container Depot to C.50 0.P.50 0.00 3.P.298. Price to Retailer S.P.00 23.00 719. Retailer's Margin @ 50% DELIVERED RETAIL PRICE IN S.95 454.298. USD 1.67 206.27 0.SA to MOZ 17.50 321.500.A.74 227.42 18.50 784.P.182. Price EXW Quelimane (C.550.20 22.P.00 Per Metric Tonne (SA average = say ZAR10/kg) Note: Costing is per Metric Tonne but based on Full Container Loads of 20 Metric Tonnes (or 26 Cubic metres) Table G.00 MZM/kg Target Start End Price delivered to the C.GROUNDNUTS REPORT FORCE CONSOLIDATION POINT: Quelimane Forward . Wholesaler's Margin @ 25% S.000.54 18.37 682.00 2. USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD 270.50 0.7: Cost calculations for Small Groundnut exports from NAMPULA to DDP Johannesburg.04 27.50 0.00 23.25 9.550.75 826.) EXW (Only at a Sea Port) (Clearing Agents.) USD End Start PER Metric Tonne Comparative Retail Price in S.Quelimane Terminal Handling Charges Cargo Handling (Manuseamento) Container Movement Tax Movement Guide Customs Service Tax @ 3% of Invoice(FOB) Price FOB/FCA Quelimane Seafreight to Durban Price CIF/CIP Durban Clearing Formalities Customs Duties in South Africa Carriage to Johannesburg Price DDP Johannesburg S.79 90.033. (USD) Delivery of empty container to the C.) Full container to point of exit .500.

P.42 18.67 206.00 23.58 8.033.67 1.00 MZM per Metric Tonne (@ 24 050) (From Container Depot to C.67 1.A. Handlers etc) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (At the Exit Port [or Maputo for overland]) (Unloaded on the quay) South African Port Charges No duties for SADC (Railage costs) (Average SMALL price to the SA wholesaler.27 8.149.A.000.00 MZM/kg Target Start End Price delivered to the C.378.) EXW (Only at a Sea Port) (Clearing Agents.P.500.25 9.80 3.42 15.50 0.00 Per Metric Tonne (SA average = say ZAR10/kg) Note: Costing is per Metric Tonne but based on Full Container Loads of 20 Metric Tonnes (or 26 Cubic metres) Table G. Price to Retailer S.75 826.25 9.P.11 15.27 0.00 270.A.550.15 MZM/kg 17. South Africa (December 2003) 63 .) USD Start PER Metric Tonne Comparative Retail Price in S.33 516. Price EXW Nampula Full container to point of exit .36 90.00 Price delivered to the C.20 9.A. MZM 6.45 225.00 784.75 360.A.378.00 722.00 318.SA to MOZ 17.P.00 2.00 2.09 303.58 0.50 0.80 3. USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD 270.08 769.500.50 0.Moz to SA Start @ 6. (USD) Delivery of empty container to the C.23 675. Retailer's Margin @ 50% DELIVERED RETAIL PRICE IN S.Nacala Terminal Handling Charges Cargo Handling (Manuseamento) Container Movement Tax Movement Guide Customs Service Tax @ 3% of Invoice(FOB) Price FOB/FCA Nacala Seafreight to Durban Price CIF/CIP Durban Clearing Formalities Customs Duties in South Africa Carriage to Johannesburg Price DDP Johannesburg S.00 23.68 End GROUNDNUTS Backwards .EXTERNAL MARKET TASK FORCE REPORT CONSOLIDATION POINT: NAMPULA Forward . USD 1.8: Cost calculations for Small Groundnut exports from Montepuez to DDP Johannesburg.550.50 0.20 23.11 18.21 722. Wholesaler's Margin @ 25% S.09 450.

550.00 1.50 0.P.) 206.50 0.00 23.75 389.50 0.A.P.67 25.00 Price delivered to the C. Price EXW Montepuez (C.000.P.25 9. (USD) Delivery of empty container to the C. Price to Retailer S.A.67 1.000.P.20 22.000.00 307.P.76 16.) Full container to point of exit .50 0.75 MZM per Metric Tonne (@ 24 050) (From Container Depot to C.SA to MOZ 16.Moz to SA Start @ 7.) EXW (Only at a Sea Port) (Clearing Agents.85 MZM/kg 16.00 Per Metric Tonne (SA average = say ZAR10/kg) Note: Costing is per Metric Tonne but based on Full Container Loads of 20 Metric Tonnes (or 26 Cubic metres) 64 .25 CABO DELGADO EXTERNAL MARKET TASK Backwards .203.42 18.83 673. Handlers etc) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (Charge from Mozambique Customs) (At the Exit Port [or Maputo for overland]) Price DDP Johannesburg USD S.76 758.033.75 784.203.00 23. MZM 7.20 3. USD 1.75 432.00 1. USD End Start (Unloaded on the quay) South African Port Charges No duties for SADC (Railage costs) (Average SMALL price to the SA 826.550.03 540.00 PER Metric Tonne Comparative Retail Price in S.00 MZM/kg Target Start End Price delivered to the C.20 10.A.06 16.20 3.GROUNDNUTS REPORT FORCE CONSOLIDATION POINT: Montepuez Forward .17 270.Pemba Terminal Handling Charges Cargo Handling (Manuseamento) Container Movement Tax Movement Guide Customs Service Tax @ 3% of Invoice(FOB) Price FOB/FCA Pemba Seafreight to Durban Price CIF/CIP Durban Clearing Formalities Customs Duties in South Africa Carriage to Johannesburg USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD USD 291.33 516.13 25.25 9.13 108.06 32.08 810.847.00 689.67 1.A.88 18.92 364.76 32.A.67 wholesaler. Wholesaler's Margin @ 25% USD S. Retailer's Margin @ 50% DELIVERED RETAIL PRICE IN S.

2.2 3. are obtained from varieties of the species Arachis hypogaea L.1 ESSENTIAL COMPOSITION AND QUALITY FACTORS Quality Factors .0% Lower moisture limits should be required for certain destinations in relation to the climate.2 3.1 DESCRIPTION Definition of the Product Peanuts.1 3. living insects and mites. 3. Peanuts shall be free from abnormal flavours. .1. either in the pod or in the form of kernels. duration of transport and storage. 3.A (I)(b) of the General Principles of the Codex Alimentarius. SCOPE This standard applies to peanuts as defined in Section 2 intended for processing for direct human consumption.2.2 Mouldy.1.General Peanuts shall be safe and suitable for processing for human consumption. 1. Quality Factors .2. 3.1 3.2% m/m max Mouldy kernels are defined as kernels with mould filaments visible to the naked eye. odours. Governments accepting the Standard are requested to indicate and justify the requirements in force in their country.CODEX STAN 200 Page 1 of 5 CODEX STANDARD FOR PEANUTS CODEX STAN 200-1995 The Annex to this standard contains provisions which are not intended to be applied within the meaning of the acceptance provisions of Section 4.Specific Moisture Content Maximum Level Peanuts in-pod Peanut kernels 10% 9. rancid or decayed kernels 0. 2.

2.3.1 Filth Impurities of animal origin (including dead insects) 3. 3. 3.0%) resulting in the production of disagreeable flavours.2 To the extent possible in good manufacturing practice.5% m/m max 0.5% m/m max 0.2. and other Codes of Practice recommended by the Codex Alimentarius Commission which are relevant to this product. 2-1985). 5.1% m/m max The products covered by the provisions of this standard shall be free from heavy metals in amounts which may represent a hazard to human health. dust.CODEX STAN 200 Page 2 of 5 Decayed kernels are defined as those showing visibly significant decomposition. HYGIENE 5. seeds.3. Rev.General Principles of Food Hygiene" (CAC/RCP 1-1969.3 Organic and inorganic extraneous matter: is defined as organic or inorganic components other than peanuts and includes stones. etc. 4. stems. .2. 5.1 CONTAMINANTS1 Heavy Metals 0.2 Pesticide Residues Peanuts shall comply with those maximum residue limits established by the Codex Alimentarius Commission for this commodity.1 It is recommended that the product covered by the provisions of this standard should be prepared in accordance with the appropriate sections of the Recommended International Code of Practice .2 Other organic and inorganic extraneous matter Peanuts in-pod Peanut kernels 4. Rancid kernels are defined as those which have undergone oxidation of lipids (should not exceed 5 meq active oxygen/kg) or the production of free fatty acids (should not exceed 1. 1 A Proposed Draft Guideline Level for Total Aflatoxin in Peanuts intended for further processing is under elaboration. the product shall be free from objectionable matter. 4.

When the product is packaged in sacks.shall be free from microorganisms in amounts which may represent a hazard to health. and . tinplate containers. They should not impart any toxic substance or undesirable odour or flavour to the product. dry. Codex Alimentarius Volume 1A). including new clean jute bags.2 Packing material shall be made of substances which are safe and suitable for their intended use. these must be clean. 1-1991.3 When tested by appropriate methods of sampling and examination. Packaging will be sound. the product: . 6.shall not contain any substance originating from microorganisms. Rev. LABELLING In addition to the requirements of the Codex General Standard for the Labelling of Prepackaged Foods (CODEX STAN 1-1985. and free from insect infestation or fungal contamination.1 The Name of the Product The name of the product to be shown on the label shall be "peanuts" or "peanuts in-pod" and type of peanuts. . except that the name of the product. clean. lot identification and the name and address of the manufacturer or packer may be replaced by an identification mark. and strongly sewn or sealed. plastic or paper boxes or bags.shall be free from parasites which may represent a hazard to health.3 7. lot identification and the name and address of the manufacturer or packer shall appear on the container. 6. provided that such a mark is clearly identifiable with the accompanying documents. METHODS OF ANALYSIS AND SAMPLING See Codex Alimentarius Volume 13. 8. However. technological. . nutritional.1 Peanuts shall be packaged in such manner which will safeguard the hygienic.CODEX STAN 200 Page 3 of 5 5. the following specific provisions apply: 7.2 Labelling of Non-Retail Containers Information for non-retail containers shall either be given either on the container or in accompanying documents. and organoleptic qualities of the product. including fungi. 6. 7. PACKAGING 6. in amounts which may represent a hazard to health. sturdy.

and/or those damaged by insects. In-Pod Defects 3% m/m 10% m/m To be determined To be determined LIMIT METHOD OF ANALYSIS 1.CODEX STAN 200 Page 4 of 5 ANNEX In those instances where more than one factor limit and/or method of analysis is given it is strongly recommended that users specify the appropriate limit and method of analysis. 2. staining. 1% m/m 5% m/m 2% m/m 2% m/m 2% m/m 3% m/m To be determined 2.2 Discoloured Kernels: kernels are not damaged but are affected by one or more of the following: To be determined . worm cuts.1 Empty pods: pods containing no kernels.2 Damaged Pods: include: a) shrivelled pods (pods which are imperfectly developed and shrunken). or other means affecting 50% or more of the pod surface. Kernel Defects 2% m/m To be determined 2. especially if the kernel inside the pod is easily visible without any pressure forced upon the edges of the crack. shrivelled kernels which are imperfectly developed and shrunken.1 Damaged Kernels include: a) b) c) d) e) those affected by freezing injury causing hard. germinated kernels. FACTOR/DESCRIPTION 1.3 Discoloured Pods: pods having dark discolouration caused by mildew. translucent or discoloured flesh. 1. mechanical damage. or b) pods having cracks or broken areas which cause conspicuous openings or which seriously weaken a large portion of the pod. 1.

CODEX STAN 200

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FACTOR/DESCRIPTION a) flesh (cotyledon) discolouration which is darker than a light yellow colour or consists of more than a slight yellow pitting of the flesh; and/or b) skin discolouration which is dark brown, dark grey, dark blue, or black, and covers more than 25% of the kernel. 2.3 Broken and Split Kernels: broken kernels are those from which more than a quarter has been broken off. Split kernels have been split into halves. 3. Peanuts other than the designated type.

LIMIT

METHOD OF ANALYSIS

3% m/m 5% m/m

To be determined To be determined

CODEX STAN 209-Rev.1

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MAXIMUM LEVEL AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR TOTAL AFLATOXINS IN PEANUTS INTENDED FOR FURTHER PROCESSING CODEX STAN 209-1999, Rev. 1-2001 INTRODUCTION 1. The sampling plan calls for a single 20 kg laboratory sample of shelled peanuts (27 kg of unshelled peanuts) to be taken from a peanut lot (sub-lot) and tested against a maximum level of 15 micrograms per kilogram (µg/kg) total aflatoxins. 2. This sampling plan has been designed for enforcement and controls concerning total aflatoxins in bulk consignments of peanuts traded in the export market. To assist member countries in implementing the Codex sampling plan, sample selection methods, sample preparation methods and analytical methods required to quantify aflatoxin in bulk peanut lots are described in this document. A. Definitions Lot: an identifiable quantity of a food commodity delivered at one time and determined by the official to have common characteristics, such as origin, variety, type of packing, packer, consignor or markings. designated part of a large lot in order to apply the sampling method on that designated part. Each sublot must be physically separate and identifiable. is defined by an aflatoxin test procedure and an accept/reject limit. An aflatoxin test procedure consists of three steps: sample selection, sample preparation and aflatoxin quantification. The accept/reject limit is a tolerance usually equal to the Codex maximum limit. a quantity of material taken from a single random place in the lot or sublot. the combined total of all the incremental samples taken from the lot or sublot. The aggregate sample has to be at least as large as the 20 kg laboratory sample. smallest quantity of peanuts comminuted in a mill. The laboratory sample may be a portion of or the entire aggregate sample. If the aggregate sample is larger than 20 kg, a 20 kg laboratory sample should be removed in a random manner from the aggregate sample. The sample should be finely ground and mixed thoroughly using a process that approaches as complete a homogenisation as possible . portion of the comminuted laboratory sample. The entire 20 kg laboratory sample should be comminuted in a mill. A portion of the comminuted 20 kg sample is randomly removed for the extraction of the aflatoxin for chemical analysis. Based upon grinder capacity, the 20 kg aggregate sample can be divided into several equal sized samples, if all results are averaged.

Sublot: Sampling plan:

Incremental sample: Aggregate sample: Laboratory sample:

Test portion:

B. Sampling Material to be Sampled 3. Each lot which is to be examined must be sampled separately. Large lots should be subdivided into sublots to be sampled separately. The subdivision can be done following provisions laid down in Table 1 below. 4. Taking into account that the weight of the lot is not always an exact multiple of the weight of the sublots, the weight of the sublot may exceed the mentioned weight by a maximum of 20 %.

CODEX STAN 209-Rev.1

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Table 1: Subdivision of Large Lots into Sublots for Sampling Commodity Lot weight – tonne (T) ≥ 500 >100 and <500 ≥ 25 and ≤ 100 >15 and <= 25 Weight or number of sublots 100 tonnes 5 sublots 25 tonnes --1 sublot Number of incremental samples 100 100 100 100 Laboratory Sample Weight (kg) 20 20 20 20

Peanuts

Number of Incremental Samples for Lots of Less than 15 Tonnes 5. The number of incremental samples to be taken depends on the weight of the lot, with a minimum of 10 and a maximum of 100. The figures in the following Table 2 may be used to determine the number of incremental samples to be taken. It is necessary that the total sample weight of 20 kg is achieved. Table 2: Number of Incremental Samples to be Taken Depending on the Weight of the Lot Lot weight tonnes – (T) T≤ 1 1 <T ≤ 5 5< T ≤ 10 10<T < 15 Incremental Sample Selection 6. Procedures used to take incremental samples from a peanut lot are extremely important. Every individual peanut in the lot should have an equal chance of being chosen. Biases will be introduced by the sample selection methods if equipment and procedures used to select the incremental samples prohibit or reduce the chances of any item in the lot from being chosen. 7. Since there is no way to know if the contaminated peanut kernels are uniformly dispersed through out the lot, it is essential that the aggregate sample be the accumulation of many small portions or increments of the product selected from different locations throughout the lot. If the aggregate sample is larger than desired, it should be blended and subdivided until the desired laboratory sample size is achieved. Static Lots 8. A static lot can be defined as a large mass of peanuts contained either in a single large container such as a wagon, truck, or railcar or in many small containers such as sacks or boxes and the peanuts are stationary at the time a sample is selected. Selecting a truly random sample from a static lot can be difficult because the container may not allow access to all peanuts. 9. Taking a aggregate sample from a static lot usually requires the use of probing devices to select product from the lot. The probing devices used should be specially designed for the type of container. The probe should (1) be long enough to reach all product, (2) not restrict any item in the lot from being selected, and (3) not alter the items in the lot. As mentioned above, the aggregate sample should be a composite from many small increments of product taken from many different locations throughout the lot. 10. For lots traded in individual packages, the sampling frequency (SF), or number of packages that incremental samples are taken from, is a function of the lot weight (LT), incremental sample weight (IS), aggregate sample weight (AS) and the individual packing weight (IP), as follows : Equation 1 : SF = (LT x IS)/(AS x IP). The sampling frequency (SF) is the number of packages sampled. All weights should be in the same mass units such as kg. N° of incremental samples 10 40 60 80

08 cm x 30. As a general rule. . if the aggregate sample is larger than the required laboratory sample.1 Page 3 of 5 Dynamic Lots 11. Cross-cut samplers should be installed in the following manner: (1) the plane of the opening of the diverter cup should be perpendicular to the direction of flow. Equation 2 can also be used to compute other terms of interest such as the time between cuts (T). then blend and subdivide the aggregate sample to obtain the desired size laboratory sample. 15. taken from a lot by a cross cut sampler is : Equation 2 : S = (D x LT) / (T x V). T = (5. composite the peanuts to obtain an aggregate sample. take small increments of product from the entire length of the moving stream. This may be considered too infrequent. the entire lot will pass through the sampler in 60 minutes and only 14 cuts (14 incremental samples) will be made by the cup through the lot. True random sampling can be more nearly achieved when selecting an aggregate sample f rom a moving stream of peanuts as the lot is transferred. a person can be assigned to manually pass a cup though the stream at periodic intervals to collect incremental samples.000 kg)/(20 kg x 30 cm/sec) = 254 sec 17. D is the width of the diverter cup opening (in cm). Weight of the Incremental Sample 18. The size of the aggregate sample (S) in kg. (2) the diverter cup should pass through the entire cross sectional area of the stream. small increments of peanuts should be collected and composited at frequent and uniform intervals throughout the entire time peanuts flow past the sampling point. and V is cup velocity (in cm/sec). MR (kg/sec). to obtain an aggregate sample of 20kg. T is interval or time between cup movement through the stream (in seconds). When automatic equipment is not available. If the mass flow rate of the moving stream. If the lot is moving at 500 kg per minute. For example. the width of the diverter cup opening should be about three times the largest dimensions of the items in the lot. or number of cuts made by the automatic sampler cup is : Equation 3 : SF = (S x V) / (D x MR).08 cm (2 inches). and the cup velocity through the stream 30 cm/sec. 13. Automatic sampling equipment such as cross-cut samplers are commercially available with timers that automatically pass a diverter cup through the moving stream at predetermined and uniform intervals. When sampling from a moving stream. by a conveyor belt from one location to another. and (3) the opening of the diverter cup should be wide enough to accept all items of interest in the lot. the required time (T) between cuts of the diverter cup to obtain a 20 kg aggregate sample from a 30. Solving for T in Equation 2. 16. LT is the lot size (in kg).000 kg lot where the diverter cup width is 5. then the sampling frequency (SF). Whether using automatic or manual methods.CODEX STAN 209-Rev. in that too much product passes through the sampler between the time the cup cuts through the stream. for example. 12. The weight of the incremental sample should be approximately 200 grams or greater. is known. 14. depending on the total number of increments.

is appropriate. Sealing and labelling of samples 20. Homogenisation – Grinding 22. Sample Preparation Precautions 21. The criteria-based approach has the advantage that.1 mm diameter hole in the screen) has been proven to represent a compromise in terms of cost and precision. since aflatoxin gradually breaks down under the influence of ultra-violet light. samples should be prepared . C. developments in methodology can be exploited without having to reconsider or modify the specified method. Analytical Methods Background 26. Each laboratory sample taken for official use shall be sealed at the place of sampling and identified. 24. The use of a hammer mill with a #14 screen (3. repeatability coefficient of variation. These methods are regulary monitored and improved depending upon technology. As the distribution of aflatoxin is extremely non-homogeneous. All necessary precautions shall be taken to avoid any change in composition of the laboratory sample which might arise during transportation or storage. All laboratory sample obtained from aggregate sample is to be used for the homogenisation/grinding of the sample. Analytical methods that are accepted by chemists internationally (such as AOAC) may be used. permitting each lot to be identified unambiguously and giving the date and place of sampling together with any additional information likely to be of assistance to the analyst. resulting in a lower sample preparation variance. 23. A record must be kept of each sampling. A minimum test portion size of 100 g taken from the laboratory sample. inert container offering adequate protection from contamination and against damage in transit. Each laboratory sample shall be placed in a clean. The performance criteria established for methods should include all the parameters that need to be addressed by each laboratory such as the detection limit. laboratories would be free to use the analytical method most appropriate for their facilities. Daylight should be excluded as much as possible during the procedure. and the percent recovery necessary for various statutory limits. .with extreme care.CODEX STAN 209-Rev. D. Utilising this approach.1 Page 4 of 5 Packaging and transmission of samples 19.and especially homogenised . The sample should be finely ground and mixed thoroughly using a process that approaches as complete a homogenisation as possible. A better homogenisation (finer grind – slurry) can be obtained by more sophisticated equipment. Test portion 25. by avoiding setting down specific details of the method used. A criteria-based approach. reproducibility coefficient of variation. whereby a set of performance criteria is established with which the analytical method used should comply.

1 Page 5 of 5 Performance Criteria for Methods of Analysis Table 3: Specific Requirements with which Methods of Analysis Should Comply Criterion Concentration Range Recommended Value Negligible 70 to 110 % 80 to 110 % Maximum Permitted Value Blanks All Recovery-Aflatoxins Total 1 .15 µg/kg > 15 µg/kg All Precision RSD R As derived from 2 x value derived from Horwitz Equation Horwitz Equation Precision RSD r may be calculated as 0.: (1-0.000 mg/kg) 27.CODEX STAN 209-Rev. 1 = 100g/100g. .e.5logC) RSD = 2 R where: ∗ RSD R is the relative standard deviation calculated from results generated under reproducibility conditions [(sR / x ) x 100] ∗ C is the concentration ratio (i.66 times Precision RSD R at the concentration of interest • The detection limits of the methods used are not stated as the precision values are given at the concentrations of interest • The precision values are calculated from the Horwitz equation. 0. This i a generalised precision equation which has been found to be independent of analyte and s matrix but solely dependent on concentration for most routine methods of analysis.e. i.001 = 1.

ca u li fl ow e r . sorghum. R . D is i n fe c t an t s A c t. I n t h es e r eg u la t i on s “t he Act” means the Foodstuffs. 2 46 o f 1 1 F e br u a ry 1 99 4 A s a me n d e d b y : G ov e rn m en t No t ic e No . barley. oats and rye af threshing. un l e ss in c on s i st e nt w it h th e co n t ex t — “An n ex ” m e a ns t he A nn e x t o t h e se r eg u la t i on s . the bean plus the pod and. “ce r e al g ra i n s ” m e a ns w he a t. “cu c u r b i ts ” m e a ns m el o ns . i n t h e c a se of g r ee n beans. S CHEDULE D ef i n i t i on s 1. .REG ULATIO NS GO VERNING THE MAXIMUM LIMITS FO R P ESTIC IDE RES IDUES THAT MAY B E P RES ENT IN FO O DS TUFFS P ub l i sh e d u nd e r G o ve r n m e nt N ot i c e N o. c uc u m b e rs a nd pu m pk i ns . “b e a n s ” m e a ns . 49 4 o f 8 J un e 2 0 01 G ov e rn m en t No t ic e No . ter “ch e mi c al s u b s t an c e” m e a ns a ny a gr i c ul t ur a l re m edy or stock rem edy contemplated in the F er t i li z e rs . “co f f ee ” m e a ns t he c offe e b e r ry be fo re p ro c e ss i ng . grapes intended for the table. sq u as h e s. m aize. made the regulations contained in the S chedule hereto. m il let. “gr a p e s ” m e a ns . 52 5 o f 3 M ay 2 00 2 T he M i n is t e r o f Na t io nal Health and Welfare has. for m aking wine or for s ul t a na s . rice. F a r m F e ed s . c u r ra n t s o r r a i si n s . R . R . R . C osm etics and Dis-inf ectants Act. in term s of section 15(1) ofthe Foodstuff C osm etics and s. “cr u c if e ra e ” m e a ns c ab b a ge . 5 4 o f 1 9 72 ) . A g ri c ul t u ra l R em edies and Stock R emedies Act. in the case dry beans. 1947 (Act No. un l e ss o th e rwise indicated. 36 of 1 94 7 ). “co n t ai n ” m e a ns t he p re s e nc e of a p e s ti c i de i n o r o n a fo od s tu ff. a n d. 14 4 8 o f 2 6 Au g us t 19 9 4 G ov e rn m en t No t ic e No . a n d a n y e x pr e ssion to which a m eaning has been assigned in the Act shall have t ha t m e a ni n g . 1972 (Act N o. 1 97 2 ( A c t N o. 5 4 o f 1 9 72 ) . b r oc c ol i an d B r u ss e l s s p ro u ts . the b ea n wi t ho u t t h e p o d.

t ha t c on t ai n s a c he m ic a l s u bs t a nc e th a t i s not listed in the publications referred to in p ar a g ra p h ( d ) o r in t he An n ex s ha l l b e imported if such foodstuff exceeds a m aximum r e si d ue l im i t o f 0.01 m g/kg. t ha t i s i m p o r te d an d t h a t is not listed in publications referred to in paragraph (d) or in the A nn e x a n d t ha t c on t ai n s a c he m ic a l s u bs t a nc e li s t ed i n c olum n I shall be sold or m an u fa c t ur e d fo r s a l e i f su c h foodstuffexceeds a m axim um residue limit of0. p ec a n n u t s . i n t h e c a se o f a n y o t he r foo d st u ff. “p e a s” m e a ns p ea s wi t ho u t t h e s h e ll .2 “gr o u n d n u t s. in so far as its applies and is applied to foodstuffs. 01 m g / k g. 0 1 m g/ k g . m a ca d amia n u ts an d waln u ts” means the nuts without the shell. u nl e s s o t he r wi s e i n d ic a t ed — (i ) ( i i) i n t h e c a se o f m e at . F or t he p ur p os e s o f se c tion 2(1)(a)(ii) of the Act. t ha t is no t im po r t ed a nd t ha t is n ot l is t e d in the Annex and that contains a chem ical s ub s t an c e l i s te d in c ol u m n I s h al l be s ol d or m a n ufactured for sale if such f oodstuff e xc e e ds a m a xi m um re s i du e l i m i t o f 0 . an d “p l u ms ” i nc l u de s pr u ne s be fo re p ro c es s i ng . s h al l be s ol d or manuf actured for sale if such foodstuff exceeds a m ax i m u m r e si d u e l i m i t of 0 . . t ha t a pp e ar s in the latest list of the “C odex M axim um Limits for Pesticide Residues”of the C od e x A lim entarius C om m ission (Joint Food and Agricultural Organization/World Health O rg a ni z a ti o n F o od S t a n da r ds P ro g ra m m e ) or i n t h e “ Di r e ct ives of the European C om m u n it y ” s h a ll b e i m p o rted ifsuch foodstuf exceeds the maximum residue lim its for f a ny c he m ic a l s u bs t a nc e f such foodstuff. t ha t i s n ot i m p o rt e d a n d t h a t c o nt a ins a chemical substance that is not listed opposite t he r e to i n t h e A nn e x . is such lim it in such a product w he n fr e s hl y p r o du c ed . ( b) (c) ( d) (e) ( f) 3. a pe s ti c i de r es i d ue l im i t. or the or ied h ig h e st o f t h e m ax i m u m r e s id u e l i m i t s s p e ci fi ed i n b ot h pu b l ic a t io n s. i s s u ch limit in such a foodstuff at harvest ( dr e s se d fo r m a r ke t i ng ) . an d ot h er anim al products. “p e a ch e s ” i nc l ud e s n e c ta r i ne s . specif in any of the said publications. F or t he p ur p os e s o f th e s e r e gu l at i o ns — (a) ( b) t he m et a bo l i te o f t h e chemical substance m entioned in colum n I ofthe Annex is included i n t h e m a xi m u m r e s id u e l i m i t . 2. n o foo ds t u ff— (a) t ha t i s n ot i m p o rt e d a n d t h a t i s l i s t ed i n c ol u mn II of the Annex and that contains a c he m ic a l s u b st a nc e li s t ed o pposite thereto in column I shall be sold or m anufactured for s al e i f s u ch foo dstuff exceeds the m axim um residue limit listed opposite thereto in colum n I I I. “me a li e s ( g r ee n )” m e a ns t he c ob s at d ou g h s t ag e wi t h l e af sheaths and stamens removed.0 1 m g/ k g.

. . T he r eg u la t i on s pu b li s h ed by Government Notice No. . . . Alachlor. . . . Bro c c oli. cabbage. . . . . Beans. . . . .. e Cotton seed. . . . . .. . Groundnuts. . .. . Apples. . . . . .. Acibenzolar-S-methyl…… ……… ……… . . . . .. Ametry n. ... 05 0.. . . . .. . . .. . .. . . . . . . cruciferae and peas. . . . . . . . ... . . 4-D-salts and esters (2. . . . .. . . .. .2 0. . . . . . . .2 0. .3 4. . . . . 05 0 . . . . . . . . . . ANNEX I C he mica l subs ta nc e 1-naphthy lacetic acid . . . . . 02 0 . . R . ry e. . DPXL 5300. . . . . .1 0 . . . . ..... . . .1 0. . grapes. .. .. . . . . . Abamectin. R . . . .. . R. . .. . .0 1. . . . . . . . . . its sulphoxide and sulphone.. maize. .. .. Grapes . 05 0. ..0 0 . . . .. ... sorghum. .. MCPA. . .. . . . Potatoes. . .. .. .. . .. A ld r in ( HHDN) (sum of HHDN and HEOD). . . . . soyabeans and sunflower seed.. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 2 . . . . . . . .. pineapples and sugar cane . . . . sorghum.. pears and strawberries . .0 0.. . . . . . .. .. 0 0. . . . . . .. . . . . .. ... . . .. . . . . .. . ... . Citr u s a n d p o tato e s ……… ……… …… …… III M aximum residue limit ( mg /kg ) 1. . . . . . .. . .. .. ... . . . . . . Alphacypermethrin . . . CGA 184927. . . . . . . m A ce ta mip rid…… ……… ……… …. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . Citrus. . . . potatoes and to mato . . . . . . . . . . 0. . .5 1.. . . . . .. . . e ac h ac c o rding to its own maximu residue limit requirement) .. . . . . ... . . .. . .. . . .. . . . MSMA (arsenic content. .. . . . . . .. . . . .. . .. . . . . . . .. . . . grapes and to matoes. . .. . 05 6-benzy l adenine.. sugar cane and wheat. . .. . . pecan nuts and pineapples . . 2116 of 3 0 A ug u st 1 99 1 . . . .. . . . . .. . . .4-dichlorophenox -acetic acid). . . . . Mealies (green peachesand tomatoes. . . Peaches. . . . . . . . 01 A ce p h ate an d methamidophos. . . . .. . 1932 o f 1 7 A ug u st 1 99 0 . . Barley . ... . .. . .. . y II F oo ds tuf f Apples and pears. . . .. . . . . . a r e h e r eb y w i t hd r aw n . .. . .5 2. . . . . . 1 04 1 of 17 M ay 1991 and R .2 0 . expressed as aldicarb). . . . . . . . maize and so rghum. .. . . . . EPTC. . . . . .. . . . . . .. ... . . . . . R. . .. . . . Citr u s ………………………………………. . .1 0 . . . . pears and sorghum. . H op s (d r y )……………………………… …. . .. . 05 0. . . . . . . ...... . .. . . .. . . . T om a toe s …………………………………… A pp le s. . . . .. ..1 1 0. . . . . . . . .. . . .5 0.. .. . ... . . . sugar cane and wheat. . . . . . 05 0 . .. plums. .. .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . 05 1. 3. . Cotton seed. . .. . . . . . Sugar cane. . . . . . . . . .. . .0 A cr in ath r in……… ……… …… …. . . . . .. ... . . . . . . . . pineapples and sugar can……… …. . es. .. 1939 of23 S eptember 1988. . M acadamia nuts. . . . .. ). . . potatoes. .. p e ar s and tomatoes……… …… …… H op s (d r y )……………………………… …. calculated as MSMA) . . . . . . . kidney beans. . ... . Groundnuts and sugar can . .. . . cru ciferae and pears . .. . . . Wheat.. p ota to es .0 0. . . . .. 05 Aluminium phosphide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bar ley . . . . Bananas and coffee. .0 0. . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . Acetochlor .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . (a cibenzolar-S-methyl determines as its metabolite CGA210007 and expre as ssed acibenzolar-S-methyl…… ……… ……… … Apples.. . . .. . . . Cotto n . . . ... . . . . . . . Potatoes. . . . . .. . . ry e. . . ... . . . . . ... .. . . . . . See d ield r in Apples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Barley and wh . . . .. . . . . . .. .. Maize . . . ... .51 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. 2 38 1 of 1 2 O ct o be r 1 99 0 . . . . as amended by G ov e rn m en t No t ic e s N os. . . . . . . . . . . . . sugar cane and sweet p ota to es ……………………………………. .. .. sweet corn and sweet potatoes . . . . . . maize. R . . maize. . . ..2 0 . . .. . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. groundnuts and potatoes. eat. . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. . . .. .. . .. . .. . . . .5 0. .1 2. . . See h y d r o ge n ph o s ph id e Ban a n as. . . . . . . 2160 of2 October 1987. mealies (green). . . M an g oe s ……………………………………. .. R . . . . . . . .. . . . sunflower seed.5 0. .. . . 05 0. Citrus. . g r ou n d nu ts. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .1 0 . . . sugar cane. Apples. . . . . 05 0 . . . . . . . . . potatoes. . ... . . . Brussels sprouts.. Cotton seed and tomatoes. . . .. . .. . . . See in or g a nic br o mid e Dry beans. .. . . . . . . . . . . 0 . . . . . . . . 2893 of31 Decem ber 1987. . . . . green beans.. . . . EDB. .. 01 0 . . . . . ... . . .2 0. . . . . . 1 A ld ic ar b ( su m of aldicarb. .. . . .. . . . maize. . . . . . . . .. . .

... . ed .. . 05 Benzoximate (sum of benzoximate and its metabolite. calculated as N-(2. . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. .. . mealies ( g re e n) a n d p lum s …………………. . .. peaches. . . . .0 0... . . . . Cruciferae. .0 0. . . . . . . Cotton seed.. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . A pp le s. . . .. . . . . Azinphos-methy l. . . . . . . 05 0. . . . . . . .. .. . mealies (green). . . . . . .. . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . Cruciferae. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . ... . . . . . pears. . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . .. Maize. . . ... . ... . . .. . . . . . Onions . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . .0 A zo c y clotin (sum of azocy clotin. . . Groundnuts. Benalaxyl. .0 . . . peas and wheat. .. .1 0. . . . .. Cotton seed and pot toes. . Bitertanol. . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . .0 0 . . . .. .. . c otton seed and tomatoes……… …. . . . . . . ... . .. .. . . . . . citrus and peach . .1 0 . . . . . . A pp les. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . .4 A mitr az [ sum of amitraz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . c r u cif e rae. Apricots. . . . . . . . . . . . Anilazine. . . . . Maize and mealies (green)... . . . . . . Tomatoes . .5 0 . Onions . .. . . . .. . . .. . 0.. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 0 ... . . . . ..5 5. .. . . 05 Bro m ch lo r ph o s (sum of bromc hlo r p ho s and 2. .. . Groundnuts . . .. Ben f u ra carb (sum of carbofuran and 3-hy droxy -carbofuran. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . Mushrooms. .. Beta -c y p e r me thr in (s u m o f is om e rs ) .. . .. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . .2 0. . Apples and pears. . ... 0. . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . A zin p ho s -ethy l (sum of azinphos e th y l a n d its oxy gen analogue. .. . Citrus and mangoes.. . . . . .. . . . . Citr u s . . . .. avocados.. . . . . .. .. . . . . 02 0. . . .5 0. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . Biphenthrin. ... . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..1 0 . . . . . .. 2. . . grapes and tomatoes. . ..4dimethylpheny l)-N1 -methy lformamidine].. Cotton seed. ... . .... .. . . . . ) Sorghum. . . . .. . Plums. . . .1 0. . . . .. . . . ..2 0. . . .. . . . . .. P ota to es ……………………………………. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . peaches. . .. . . . . ... grapes... .. . . . . . A pp le s. . .. H op s (d r y )………………………… …. . G ra p e s……………………………………… P ota to es ………………………………… …. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . sorghum andwheat. . . . . . . . . . . . 05 0 . . . . . .. . . . . . 05 0. . .. .. . . . . . ... pears. . Grapes. . . . .. 02 2. . . . . .. . . . peppers and plums. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ran) Ben o my l ( su m of benomyl and carbendazim. . .. . . . . . . . Bromophos. . . . . 05 0. . . ... . ..5 0. .. .5 1. . . . sorghum and tomatoes.4 2. . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . 05 0 .. .. Tomatoes . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . .. . . Bifenox . . . .. .. .. . .. . . . . . . . . . Cotton seed. .. . . .. ... . .. . . . . Bananas.. ... . .. .. sorghum and wheat …… …… Sunflower seed .. . . .. . . .. . . .0 0 . .1 3.. . express as cy hexatin) . . . . . . . . . . . Atrazine. .. .. .. . .. .05 0. .. . . .. .. . .. . . . . . .. .. . . .. . pears and potatoes .. . . apricots. . . .. …….. . . . . ... 0 0. . . .. . . P ota to es ………………………………… …. . . . . . . . . . . expressed as bromchlorphos) . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . groundnuts. . . pears. . . . c ruciferae and peas ……… ……… …. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Citrus . . .. 05 1. . . . . . 6-dimethox -benzohy d y roxamate). . . .. . . . . . . ... . . .5 0. . . . . . es. . .0 1 75 ... . .1 0. Mealies (green . . . . .. . . . .. . . .. . .4-dimethylpheny l)-N m eth y lformamidine. Apples. ... .. . . ..2-dichloroviny l d ime thy l phosphate. Apples. . pears and plums. . . .. . ..2 1. . sugar cane and wheat.. . . . . . .. ... . .. . ..1 0 . .. .. ..1 3. peaches and plums. . . ..... . peas. . . . Brussels sprouts and cucurbits . . Bromophenoxim . . . a Appels and pears... . . . .. Bea n s . . . . . .. . Beans . . . tomatoes . . . . . . .. . .. Apricots.. . . . ethyl 3-chloro-2.. p eaches and tomatoes …… ……… …. .. Cereal grains.. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . sorghum and sugar cane. Azaconazole. . . . . .. Beta-cy fluthrin. . .5 0. . . . . . expressed as carbendazim)....0 1. . .2 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bromopropy late. . . Maize.. . . 05 0 ..1 0 . .. expres sed as carbofu . . .. . . . . 05 0 . . Apples and pears. . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .1 8. . . macadamia nuts.. . …… Citr u s ………………………………………. . . . 05 0 . 05 0. . . . . . A pp le s. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .0 0.. . . . . . . A zo x y str o bin…… ……… …… …. .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . G ra p e s………………………………………. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 0 . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . M ea lies ( g re e n) …… ……… ……… …… …. . . Bananas and citrus (whole fruit).. .. . . expressed as azinphos-ethyl). . . .. . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . c y h e x atin an d dicy clohexy ltin oxide. . . . . . . . 0. . olives and potatoes. . peaches. . . ... . . . . . . . and N-(2. 05 0 . . . . .. . . .0 0.. . . . . ... . . . . Bea n s .. . . . .

. . .. . . . . sunflower seed and wheat. . . sugar cane and wheat. .. . . . . mangoes. . . .0 0 . .. Car b o sulfan (sum of carbosulfan. . . . . . . .. . .. . Citrus (pulp) andcotton seed. . . . . .. . . . . . . . .1 0 . . eat. . .. . quinces. . .. . . . . Citrus . . . Mealies (green . . . . . . . . . (nectarines). . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . .1 0. . .. . . . to m ato e s a nd y oungberries. .. . .. . .. . . . . . . ... . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P ea r s ………………………………………… Wheat. . . . . Potatoes. . .. . . . . . . a Cruciferae. . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Carbary l.. . .. . . . . .. . . . .. Barley .. .0 0. . . 05 0. . . . . . Mealies and sugar cane. . .. Pe a r s and tomtoes…… ……… …… ….. . . ... .. .. .. . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . ... M aize. . . . . . . . . . plums. . . . . . groundnuts and wheat.. . . . .. . . . . . Bananas and citrus. Cucurbits. . .. .. Sugar cane . . 05 0. . . . olives. . . . . . . . 05 0 . ... . . Citr u s . . . . . Barley . . . . . . See ima za lil Potatoes. . . . . . . . . . . . Poultry. . 0 1 0... . . …… Car ta p hy drochloride … ……. .. . .5 0. .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . .... .. . .. .0 0. 0 . . apricots. . . . . . . Apples. . Bro m uc o n azole… ……… …… …… Bupirimate (sum of bupirimate and ethirimol. . . 05 0 . oats and wh . .. . . . . ... . . . .. s p in a c h. . . . . expressedas bupirimate) Buprofezin . cucurbits and peaches . . . cruciferae. . . . Soya beans. . 0 5. . . .. . . . .. . . . . . ) Cab b a ge ……………………………………... . . . . . . . . . . .. .2 1. .. . Calc iu m a rsenate (calculated as arsenic trioxide). . . . .. ...5 0 . guavas. . ... .. . . Car ta p……………………… . . . . . . .. ... cotton seed. . .0 0. . . . mealies (green) and prick pears. . . . ... . .0 5. . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . Mangoes.. . . A pp le s. . . Chlormequat (cation) . . Eggs. c r u ciferae. . . . .. . .. . . 01 0 .. . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . grapes. . . . . . .. .. . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . .. .. .. . . .5 0... .. . . .5 2. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . .. dry beans. . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . Captab (captan) . . . . . .1 0 . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .. . . . . . .. Apples and pears.. . . . . . Grapes. . ... . .1 Chlorsulfuron. . . . . . . . . Beans. . . . .. . . . . . .. .. Grapes. .. . . .2 0. . . .1 0 .5 0.. . peaches. .2 1 50 . . . . . . . .0 1. . Cotton seed. . . . . . . . . 01 0. . . . . . . .. .. . . . ly Carcass meat. . . . . . . . . . . .1 0. . . . . . 05 3. . . s tra w be r r ie s . . . . .. .. . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P ota to es ………………………………… …. . . . . . . . A pp le s………………………………………. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ). . Milk. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . Mealies (green . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .... .. . . . . . .. . . . . .. . ..5 0. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .2 0 . . . . . . .. . .5 Bromoxynil.. . . . Bar le y a n d w h ea t…… ……… …… …… …… Apples. . . . . ... . sorghum. . . . pears. . …… Chinomethionat. . . . . Chlorfenvinphos (sum of E. sugar cane.. . . . . Apples .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . .. . . . .. . .. . . . . Citrus .5 0.. . .. Cadusafos .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .2 1 54 . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 05 0. grapes (table). .1 0. . . . . . .. . .. . . . . .. M ea lies ( g re e n) …… ……… ……… …… ….. . . . . .. . .. . . .. .. .. . . . . Citrus and advocados. b ea n s .. .. . . . . . sorghum. . cucurbits and tomatoes . . ... .. . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . Buty late. . . . ) 0.. .. . . . . .5 0. . . . . . . .. . 05 0 . . . . gooseberries. . T om a toe s ………………………… …… …… Cotton seed and pot toes. Carbendazim. . . . . 02 0. .. ... . . . . . . . . . . . Chic o ry …………………………………….. . . . . . .. .. .. . . .. .. . . . . .. . . . . .. Chlorimuron-ethyl. . . . Barley . ... 05 0 . .. . . . ... .. . Apples. . Carbofuran (sum of carbofuran and 3-hy droxycarbofuran. . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. peaches and to matoes. . . . . . . . .. . . . Cas tor-oil seed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . a p ric o ts . . . . . . . Citr u s ……………………………………….. .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . P ea s …………………………………………. . . . . . . . . 0 0. . . oats. . . . . . .. . . 3-hy droxycarbofuran and 3-ketocarbofuran . . . .. c arbofuran. . . . . . . . . . . . sorghum and wheat.. . . .. . ... . . .. .5 3. . . . expressedas carbofuran). . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..0 0. . . .. . . ... . . 05 0 . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . peaches. ... . . . .. .... . .. . . . . . . .. . ... . . . . .. . . .5 0. . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . 05 5. .5 0. . . .. . . .. . .... . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . .. . 02 2.. . . ... .. .. . . …… Grapes. Chlorothalonil. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 02 0. .2 0 .. . . ... . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . Groundnuts and potatoes. . . boy senberries. ... . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . Mangoes.. . . . . . . .1 0 .. . . . . . . . Chloramizol. . pears. ... Potatoes. . . . .and Zisomers). .. . . . . .... . .. g rapes. .. . .. . . .. 02 0. .. . . ... Chlo r ph e napy r… ……… ……. . . . . . . . . T om a toe s …………………………………… O nio n s ……………………………………. celery . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . .2 0. . . . . . . . . G ra p e s ……………………………………… P lum s ………………………………………. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 0. . . . . . .0 0 . . ... . . . . . . . . maize. . . . . .. . . .

. . . . Peas. . . . . .0 0 . . . . . Cy p r o din il……… ……… …… …… Cy r o mazine (sum of cyromazine and melamine) . .1 0 .. . . grapes. H op s ( dr y ) ………………………… …… …… Grapes. . . . . . .. . . .... coffee. Apples.. . . . . .. . . . ... . .. . .. . groundnuts. . .. . . Apples.... . . .. . . .. .. . .. . .. .. . . . . ... . . . . pearsand plums. .1 0. . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .1 0 . . . ..... ... . . . . . . . . ..0 0. .. . . . ... plums. . . . .. . . grap and pears . . .. .. . . . . . 05 0. . Cotto n s e e d. carrots. . . cruciferae. . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . .1 5. ... . .. . . . .5 5. . . . . . . . peaches. .. . . .2 0. pears and plums . .. .. . . .. . . . cruciferae.5 0. .. . . . . . .. . . . .0 0. . . . . . . m ea lies ( g re e n). . .. . . . . . . . . rooibos ( g re e n) . . Cotto n s e e d ……………………… ……… …. . dry beans and wh . . . . . . . . . .. . . M us h r oo m ……………………………… …. . . . . . .. . . .. . .. . . A pp le s. . . . . . . . . . . .. .5 0. . . .0 2. .. . . . grapes. Peas. . . . . . . . . . . . grapes. .2 0 . . . . Cymoxanil . . . .2 Cyproconazole. . . Chlorpy rifos-methy l. . . . . . . . . . A pp le s. . .. . . . .. . . . pears. . . . . . .5 Cyhalothrin (sum of isomers). Cereal grains. . .. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . .… ……… …. . 05 0. ..0 0 . potatoes and wheat.. beans.. . . . . . . . . Apples. . .. . . . . .. . 05 0 . . . . . . . . 05 0. . .. . . …… Stor e d g r a in ……………………… …… …… 0. . . . Wheat. . . . .. Maize and potatoes. .. .. . . Cruciferae. . . .. . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . .. Cypermethrin (sum of isomers) . . . . . . . . . Potatoes. . . . . . . . . .. . .0 1 05 . . . . . . . P ota to es ……………………………… . ... . . . . . . g ua v a s. . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . citrus. . . . ... . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . g rapes. . . . . . . . . 05 0. . . c itr u s . granadillas. .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 05 1. 02 0. . . . . Chlorpy rifos .2 Cyanamide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cotton seed. . . . 05 1. .. avocados. maize.. . Ban a n as ……………………………………. beans. . . . a pricots. G ra p e s ( w in e) and tomatoes….. . . plums. . .. . . . . dry beans. .. . . . . . .. . ... . .. . .. .. . .. pears. .0 0. .. . . . . Potatoes. .. . . . . .5 0.. grapes and kiwifruit. . .. . . . . .. . . Bea n s ( g r ee n ) ……………… ……… …… ….. . . . . . . . . . .1 8. . . . . .. . . Oats . . mealies ( g re en). peppers. . . ... . .. . Cop p e r o x y c h lor id e and other copper salts (elemental copper). . . . . a p ric o ts. . . Apples and pears. . . . . . pears. . . .. . . .. . . . . . . .. .. cruciferae and peas. . peaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. ... . . . . . . . .. . .5 0. . ... . . . . . . . grapes. . . . . . . mealies (green).. .. . . eat. . . Cotton seed. . Tomatoes . .. . .. . . …… L ettu c e a n d sorghum ……… ……… …… …. . .1 1. . sugar cane and sweet corn Peas.. . . . . . . .. .. A pp le s. . . .... . peaches. . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . pears. . . . . .. grapes.. . . A pp le s……………………………………….2 1. . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . P ap r ika ( d ry ) ……………… ……… …. . . .0 0 . . . coffee.. . .. . .. .0 0. .. . .. so rghum and tomatoes. . . onions. . . . . . . . toma-toes and y oungberries. ... . . .. . . . . . .. macadamia nuts and plums. . . . . .. . . . . .3 5 0. 0 1. . . .6 Chlorpropham. . . . .3 0.1 0. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . G ra p e s……………………………………….1 0 . . .. .. . . T om a toe s …………………………………… A pp le s. .. . expressed as cy h exatin). . .. . . . . . . . 0 0. . .0 0.2 0. . .. . .... . .. . 0 0 .. boy senb er r ie s. . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . Citrus. . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . olives. Deltamethrin. . . Apricots and peaches . . .. .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . 05 Cy c la nilid e …… ……… …… …… Cycloate. . . . . .. c ucurbits... . .. . . . . . . . . . Cotton seed. .. . . . .. .. . . lettuce. . . . .. . Cy h e x atin (sum of cy hexatin and dicy clohexy ltin oxide. . . . . . . . …… Beans. .. . .. . . . . . . . ... . . Cy c loxidim (includes T-DME and 5-OH-T-DME metabolites). . . . Cyanazine . .. . es Barley . . . . . g r ee n beans. . . . 0. peaches and tomatoes. A pp le s. c u curbits. . . .. .. . . . cotton seed.. . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . le ttuce. Roo ib os ( d ry ) …………………… ……… …. . .. c r uc if er a e . .. . . . Rooibos tea. . . . . .. . H op s (d r y )………………………… ….0 0. .. .2 0 . . . . .1 0. . . peaches.. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . c h er ries.5 0. . Cucurbits. . . . . .. . . 2 0. . . groundnuts. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . .. .2 0 .. Apples. . . .. . . . .. . 05 2. . ... . 2. . Clofentezine. . . . . mealies (green). . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . mangoes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cyfluthrin (sum of isomers) . . . . . . plums and tomatoes. . . .. .. Beans. …… Tomatoes .. Citrus . . . .. . . pears and peas . . . . . . soy a beans and tomatoes... .. . . . potatoes and walnuts . . . . .. ... .. . . . ... 01 0. . . .. .. . . . .. . Bar le y ………………………………………. . . Pacan nuts. c ele r y ... . .. . . . .. . sorghum and wheat……… …. strawberries. . . . . .. . . .

. . .. c r u cif e ra e . Bar le y . . . . . .. . . . . pineapples. . . ... . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . Milk.. . . .. Wheat. pears. . . . . .1 0. . . . . . .. . . .. . 05 1. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . .1 1. . . . . . .. Grapes. . . . . . . .... . .. . .. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. .. . . . cruciferae. .5 0. Barley . .0 0. . . .. . . . . 05 0. . .. . .. .. . .. . . .. . . expressed as demeton-Smethy l). . grapes and pears… ……… ….. . .1 0. . .. . . .. . . . Coffee and potatoes . . ... . .. . . . .2 0 .. . . . . . . . Dichlorvos . . . . . . sorghum and sugar cane. . . . Dichlofluanid . . . . . . . . potatoes and tomatoes. cucurbits. .. . . . . . . . Cucumbers and tomatoes. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . pears. Cotton seed... . . . . . Peaches. ... . . 02 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . …… D im e thy l did e cy l ammonium c hlo r ide ………………… …… …… . . . . p eas. . . Eggs. . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . .. Macadamia nuts .. groundnuts and potatoes. . . Demeton-S-methy l (sum of demeto n-S-methy l. . . peas. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 0. .. . . 05 0. . . . . rye andwheat. . . . . . . . . . .. . .. .. . . . . .. . . plums. . .. . . . . . . . . .. .5 1. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . 02 0 . . . . .. . .. . . brinjals. . . . . . . . . .5 0. . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . .. . Dicloran.. . .. . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . Cereal grains. . . . . .... . cucurbits. . . . . . . .5 0.. .. .. ... . . . . c itr u s .5 Apples. . . . . . . . . .. . potatoes. . . . . cruciferae. . apricots. Raspberries and strawberries.. . . . .. . Diclofop-methy l. . . . .. . Dimethipin . . . . . . . Diflubenzuron. .. .. . . .. . . . . . . . ... G ra p e s……………………………………… .. ...0 0. . . .. . ... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ..0 G ro u n dn u ts. .0 1. . peaches. . .. . . . oats.. . . cherries.. D im e tho morph… ……… ……. . . . . . . . 05 0.. .. .. . . . .. . Cruciferae and lettuce . . . . . ... . . . . .. onions. . . . . . . . .. . mangoes.. . . . . . . . . . Citrus .. . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . cruciferae. . . . . . . . ... . beans. . . . .. .. . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . cherries.. . . .. . . ... . . . . . . . Milk. . .. peaches. ... . . . .and Z-isomers) .. groundnuts. . 05 0 . .5 1. 03 0. Cotton seed. . Mushrooms. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . potatoes. . .. lettuce.1 2. . . . Groundnuts .7 1. . . . . . Citr u s a n d g r o undnuts. .0 0. . . . . . A pp le s.. . . . Cotton seed . .. . Diazinon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . olives.. . . . .. . 00 6 0. . . . . . . . . . A pp le s. . . Wheat. ... . . . . . . Milk. . . . .. . . . .. .. . . . Dieldrin (HEOD). . . . . . . . . . . . Mushrooms. . . . . . . . . peppers. .. peaches. . .. . . . . Carcass meat. . . . . ..1 0 . . . . . . . . .. peaches and plums. . . . . . pears. . . .5 0 . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . plums and quinces. . . .. . . . . . . 05 1. . . . . . .0 0. . Tomatoes ... A pp les. . . . .. .. . . . .. ... citrus. . . . .. . grapes. . . . . 0 D icrotophos (sum of E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mushrooms. . . . . . . . . . apricots. . . . . . . . . .. cruciferae. . .. . . . .andZis om e rs o f dichloropropene and dichloropropane). . . .5 0 . . . . . . . .. Pineapples. . . ... . Carcass meat. . .. . . .. . .. . ...1 5. .. .. Dimethoate. . . . . . . . . . .. sorghum. . . . .1 0. .. . .1 0 . . Cotton seed and peas . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . .2 0. .. 02 0. . . . . .. . . . . . .. . Diclobutrazol. .. . . . . . . .. .2 0. . . . . .1 0 . . .…… ……… …… …… Potatoes. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . .. Cotto n s e e d. .. .. . Difenoconazole .. . . . . . . . . . eat. . .. . . .. . . . . . . sorghum and wheat.. . . Apples and pears.. . . sorghum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . onions and rooibos tea . . . . . . Sunflower seed . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . tomatoesand wheat.. . . .. . . . . . . . . Apricots.. . . . .0 5. .. prickly p ea rs. plums and tomatoes . . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . .1 2 0.. . . . . .. . 0 .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .4 0. . . Dicofol.. . .. .. . . bananas. . . . . . . . .. 05 D ia f enthiuron (sum of diafenthiur o n a n d its m e ta b o lite s CGA 140408 and CGA 177960).. . . . . . Cotton seed. .. . . . . . . . its sulphone and sulp ox id e. . . . . . . . . . . .. 2 Dichloropropene (sum of E. mealies ( g re e n) . . . .. . . . . .... . . . . .. . . . .. granadillas.. . . T om a toe s ………………………… …… …… A pp le s a n d p e ar s…… ……… …… ……… …. beans. . a p ricots. .. ... . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . beans. . . . .. . . .. . . . sweet potatoes and to ma toe s ………………………………… …. . Maize. . . . . . . beans. . . .. . . .5 0. beans. . . . g r ap e s. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .. . . Tomatoes and peppers. .. . ... .0 5. . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . peaches. . . . A pp le s. . .. . .. . . . . .. oats and wh . pineapples and strawberries. .. . . . . . . Dichlorophen . . .. . . ....1 0. .. . . tomatoes and wheat. Bananas. . . .0 0.. . . . .. . . . . .. . beans.. Maize. .2 0. . . . . . .. . .. . . . ... . . . . . . . . .1 0 . .. . . ... . . . . ... 05 0..0 0.. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . pears and plums. . . .. . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . Barley . .7 0 . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . D ic amba (sum of dicamba and 5hy droxy-dicamba) . .. .

.. . . . . .. . . . . . . . d em e ton -S and their sulphoxides a nd sulphones.. A pp le s. expressed as dinocap) Dinoseb .. Apples and pears. cucurbits. . . . pineapples and potatoes. . . . .. . . . . . coffee. . . .0 0 . . . . . . .... . . . . E nd o s ulf a n ( s u m of alpha. . . .. . . . . .. . .. cherries. E tox a zo le ………… ……… …… …. . ..... Cruciferae. .. . . . . . . .. P ea r s ………………………………………. Ethiofencarb (sum of ethiofencarb. 0. . . .2 0 . . 05 0. . . …… H op s (d r y )……………………………… …. . .. g r ou n dnuts. .. . . . .2 1. . . pears and plums . . guavas. tomatoes and y oungberries. . . boysenb er r ies. . . . . . mealies (green) and p ea r s ………………………………………… Beans . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . .0 0 . .. Dinocap (dinocap and related nitro octy lphenols. . A pp le s.. . . .. .. . . . . . . . .0 0. . . . . . .. . . potatoes and tomatoes. . . 00 8 1 0. .... 05 2. . .. . .. . . . . . peas and potatoes. Groundnuts... . .. . . peaches. Apples and pears. . . . . . . . . .. . .. G ra n a dillas. . . . . . peaches. pineapples and to matoes. . . .5 0 . .. . . A pp le s………………………………………. . . . . ) Wheat and citrus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . papay as. . peaches. . . . peppers. . Grapes..0 1. . . 2 D is u lf oto n ( s u m of disulfoton.. . . . . expressed as ethiofencarb) . . All foodstuffs. . .. grapes. .. Cotton seed. . .. .. Peas. . . its s u lpo x ide . .. . . . . . . .5 1. . . . ...5 0 . .. .. . . . . . .. onions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . ... . . . . .. . . . . cruciferae. . . . . . . . .. .. quinces.1 0. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . mealies (green). . .. . .. . c o tto n s e e d. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . Onions.. D io f e no la n……… ……… …… …. . . pears and peas. cucurbits. . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . .. . . . 0 . . ) Citr u s ………………………………………. . . . . . . . .. . . Sorghum and sunflower seed. . . . . . . .. . peaches. . . . ... ... .. . . . . citrus. . .. .. . .2 3. . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . .. . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . G ra p e s.1 0. . . . . . . .. . . . .. . .5 0. . .. . . . . . quinces. . . . . peaches.. Asparagus. . . . Sugar cane .. .. Sunflower seed . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . 05 0.. . . . . A pp le s. ... . . .0 3. .. . . . . . . .. .0 3. . . . . . Diphenylamin . . . . . . .2 0 .... Apples.0 5. . . .2 0. . . . .5 0. . . .. 05 2.. . . . . . .. . . . 1.0 Esfenvalerate (sum of isomers). . .. . . . . 0 0. bananas.. Cotton seed and groundnuts . .. . . . pears. . . 0 0. . . . . .. . . . 02 0. . . peaches. . . . . onions. . . . . ... . .0 0 . .. . . . . .. ... . . . . . . papay as. .. . . . D io xathion (sum of cis.. . . . . . . .. . . . .. .. . . . . P ota to es ……………………………………. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . pears and quinces... . .. . . .and transdioxathion) . . .. . . . .1 0.. . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . cucurbits. . .. . . 01 Ethy lene thiourea (ETU) . . . . . .. . . .. . . . ..0 0. . .. . 01 0. .. . . .. citrus. . . . . . plums. . . . . . T om a toe s ………………………… …… …… G ra p e s………………………………………. . . . . . . . .. . its s u lph o x ide and sulphone. . . . . . . . . . .. . . Cotton seed and pin eapples. P ota to es ……………………………………. . . .. Ethoxy quin. ... cruciferae. . .. cruciferae. . . . 1 Diquat (cation) .. . . .. . . . .8 Dinobuton . . Ethephon. .. . . . . . . . . peas.0 1... . . .. . Wheat. . . . .. . . . Apples. Diuron.. . . . . olives. . Cruciferae. .. mangoes. .. tomatoes and wheat Bea n s .. . . . . . . . . . ... sorghum. . . . . . . .. . .. . E thy lene bisdithiocarbamates (mg CS2 /kg). potatoes and tomatoes. . . . . . . . . Milk. . .and b eta e nd o s ulf a n and endosulfan sulphate) . . . Dodine . . . . p ap r ika ( d ry ) and y oungberries… ……… ….. . .. . . Carcass meat. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . .0 0 ... . . . . . Apples and pears. . . . . . . . . .1 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Dithianon.. . . . . . . . . .0 0 . . . . . . . . . . 0 0. .. . . . .. . .. . . .. . ... . . .. . .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . citr u s. . . . . . plums. . . . . . . .3 0 . . apricots. . . . . ... . e. . Ginger. . . . . . 05 1. . . . . . . . . . . litchis. . . . Fam o xa d o ne…… ……… …. . grapes. . . . .. . . ... .and sulphone... . . . . . p ears. . .. m angoes and wheat……… …. . . . . . . . . . . . 2. .. ... H op s (d r y )……………………………… ….. . . apricots. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ch erries and plums..0 1. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . c o tto n s eed. .1 0. . . . Ban a n as . . peas and pecan nuts. . ...0 1. . . g ua v a s.. . . 05 1 5. onions. . . . . .. . . . . a p ric ots. . . . . . T om a toe s ………………………………… …. . . . . . . . . . . expressed as disulfoton). . . . b o y s e n be r r ies. .. . . ... . .. .. . . . . . . . Potatoes. . Mealies (green and sugar cane.. . Apples. .. g r apes.. . . . .. . beans. .. . . . 05 2 0. . . .. . expressed as fenamiphos).. . . . .2 . . . . .. . . . . . grapes. . . . . . . . .. . . . Apples. . . . Mealies (green . . . .. .1 0. .. . . . . . . . Citrus . ... . .. . . . . . ... . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . sugar cane and sunflower seed . macadadamia nuts. .… …… Fen a mid o ne …… ……… …… …… Fen a miphos (sum of fenamiphos. . . . . .. . .... .. . . .2 0.. Coffee. . .

... .1 0. . .... . . .2 2.. . . .. .. . . . . . . . .. . .1 4 0. . e xcluding inorganic tin and di. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ... . . . . .... . Barley and wh . . 01 0 . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . P ea c h es (n e c tarines)…… ……… ……. . . dimethoate and omethoate. Flusilazole. . . . . . . . . . . . . Wheat.. . . . . . . . . .5 0.2 5. . . g r apes. . . .. . . . . P ep p e rs a nd tomatoes…… ……… ……… …. . . . . . .1 1 5. Citrus . . . . ... 2.. . . . . . . . 02 0. . . . . . . . . . . . Peas. . . . Appels. ... . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . Flurochloridone... . . . . . . . Flucy thrinate. .. . . . . . mangoes.. . . . . . 05 0 . . . . . . . . . Sorghum. . . Fenpropathrin (sum of isomers) . A pples.. . . 05 0. . .. .. .. . .0 0. Apples and pears. . . . . . . . . . 05 1. . . . . . . .. . . . p lum s an d qu in ce s . . . . ... .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .5 Fos e ty l-Aluminium (phosphorous . ... . ... .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .2 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. .. . …… A pp le s.. .. . .. . . . . . .. . eat. . Onions and potatoes. . . . . . Flutriafol. . . . . . 0 0.. . . . . . . . 02 0 . . . . . . …… Fenbutatin oxide . . . . .5 0 .. Carrots. . Onions and potatoes. .. . . . . . . . . pears. .1 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . Cotton seed. . . . . . . . . . .. . A pp le s……………………………………… Citr u s ………………………………………. 05 1 5. . . . . G ra p e s. Fen h e xa m ide…… ……… …… …… Fen itr oth ion …… ……… ……. . .... . . . . p ea r s . . . . . Groundnuts . . .2 0 . . . . . . . .. . . . .5 1. . . Fenbuconazole (sum of fenbuconazo le a nd its lactone metabolites RH. . . . . . . . .... . macadamia n uts . . . . . . Apples and grapes.. m an goes and wheat…… ……… …. . . mealies (green) and pears Beans . . . . . . . apricots.. 05 1. . .. plums and wheat. . . .. . .. . . Fluq u inc o nazole… ……… …… …. . . .3 0 . . . . . . . . . . . ... Dry beans. guavas. . .. . . . . ...5 0. pears and plums . . Groundnuts .. . . . .. . . Apples. . . Beans.0 0. .. grapes. . . potatoes and quinces. .. . . . . . . Apples. . .. . . . . Coffee and cucurbits. . .. . .. . . . . . . .. . . . 02 Fen tin a cetate (fentin hy droxide. .0 1 0. . . . ... . .5 0 . . . . grapes. . .. . .. . ... . . . . …… Fenoxaprop-p-ethyl. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. .. .. . . .2 0 . . Cotton seed. . . .. . .1 0. Sorghum and sunflower seed. . . .. . . . ... . . .. . . . . potatoes and tomatoes. . Apples. coffee.. . .. . .. . ... . . . . Bea n s ( g r ee n ) ……………… ……… …… …. .. . . H op s (d r y )……………………………… …. . . ... . . . . . . G ra p e s……………………………………… . . . . .. . . . . . . . ... . . .. . . . . . . expressed as fenthion) .. . its oxygen a nalogue and their sulphoxides and sulphones. .. .. . . . ..1 0. . . . . . . . . peaches and pears. . . .and monopheny ltin) . . .. . Fluroglycofen... . . 05 0 . .. . dry beans. .. .. . . pe a rs .. . . . . . . . . . . . Onions and potatoes. . . . . Apples.. . .. . . . .. .9 Fenarimol. . .. . . . . . . . . pe a c he s . . . . . 05 0. M an g oe s a nd p ea s … ……… …… ……… …. . .0 0. .. . . Stor e d g r a in ( wheat)……… ……… …. . . For m o th io n (sum of formothion. . Carrots. . .. . . expressed as formothion). . . . . . .2 0 . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . …… Bar le y a n d w h ea t…… ……… …… …… …… P lum s ………………………………………. Dry beans and cotton seed. 05 0. . . 0. . . . . 05 0. . . .1 0. . . . . .. . H op s (d r y )……………………………… …. . ...0 0. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . peaches. .. . .. . . . . . . Wheat. .. . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . Apples and pears. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . . . . . . ... . .. . . 02 0 .. 05 0. . soya beans and sugar cane. Fen o x y c a r b……… ……… …… …. .5 0 . . . . . . . .. G ra p e s ( w in e ) …………… ……… ……… …. . . . . . . . . . apricots. .. . . . . . 05 0. . . . . . . Grapes. . . . . Fentin hydroxide (fentin hy droxide.. . .. grapes. soya beans and wh eat A pp le as a nd p ea r s… ……… ……… …… …. . . . . . . . . .. Flud io xo n il……… ……… …… …. . . . ... . .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 0 .. . . . . .. .. G ra p e s………………………………………. .. . . . . . . . . Fo lpet. . . . . . . e xcluding inorganic tin and di. .. . . . . ...2 0. . . groundnuts. ..and monopheny ltin) . . . . . . . . Flamprop-methy l. . . .. 05 0. groundnuts and soya beans. 05 0. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. Fenpy roximate. . . .. pears and wheat. . . . .. . . . 05 0 . Formetanate. . barley. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. . ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . kiwi fruit. . pecan nuts. . . .5 0. . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. Fluazifop-P-buty l. T om a toe s …………………………………… A pples. A pr ic ots a nd peaches…… ……… …….. . . . . . . potatoes and sunflower seed . . . G ra p e s………………………………………. . . . .9 129 and RH-9130)…… .. . . .. . . A pp le s. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . nectarines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 0 ... . . Fenvalerate. ... . .. . . ... Fen a zaq u in……… ……… …… …. . . . .. . .2 0 . .. . . . . ..... . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . 0 0. . . .. ground-nuts. .. .1 0 . . .. .0 0.. . . . . …… Dry beans. ... . . cotton seed. peaches and pears. . . 05 0 . A pp le s a n d p e ar s…… ……… …… ……… …. . . . . . . .. . . .. . .. . plums. Citrus . . .. .. . . . . . p ea c h es . . Flufenoxuron . . . Grapes. . . ..1 0. .. . . . c itrus and tomatoes……… …… …… P ea r s ………………………………………. . . . . . Fomesaf . en.. .. . .. 0 0 . . . . . . . . .. Fenthion (sum fenthion.. . .. 0 0 .... . .. . . . . . . . . .. ..

. . . . .0 0 . . . Apples and pears. . . . . .. . . ) m.. . . . . . . .. . . Wheat.05 0. . . . Citrus . . Avocados . H y d r o gen phosphide (phosphine) ( a ll p hosphides.. . sunflower and wheat .. Mealies (green and sorghu . . . . .. . . ... .. . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . A pp le s……………………………………… Citrus . Imazamethabenzmethy l. . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . .5 Inorganic bromide (determined and expressed as total bromide ion from all sources). . . . . . . .. .5 0. . . . .. .... . . . . . . .0 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cucurbits and mangoes. . Hexazinone. . .1 0 . ... . . ... . . .1 0 . . potatoes and sweet potatoes. . . . . . . . . Grapes. .. 1‡ 0. .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . ... . . . 5 0.. . . .. . . . . ..2 0 . . . . . . . . Onions. . . . . L uc e r ne ………………………………… …. . ... . . . . .. . . . . . Apples. .. . . . All other foodstuffs. . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hexy thiazox.5 0... . . 05 0 . . .. . . . . .0 0. .. . . . .5 0 . pears. . . . ..... . . . . .. . . . peaches and plums. . . .. ... . . ... T om a toe s ………………………… …… …… Cab b a ge ………………………………… ….. . 0. . . p ine a pp le s a n d p lu ms ……………….. .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 0 0 . G ly p h os a te ( including its metab olite am ino methy l phosphonic acid). . . . .. . .. .. . .. . .. . . . .. .. . . .. .. . . . . .. . . Pineapples . .. . 05 1. . . . Ioxy nil . . peaches and pears. . .1 0. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . ... . I p ro v alicarb (sum of iprovalicarb a nd its d ia s ter e o me r s a s ip ro v a lic a rb ) …... . .. . A pr ic ots a nd peaches …… ……… ……… …. . . . potatoes. 05 0. . . . . .5 0 . 0 1. . . . . . .. .2 0. . . . .. . grapes. . .. . . 02 0 . .2 0. . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Hexaconazole. . .. . . . P ota to es …………………………………….. Milk. . . . ... . Onions . .. . . .. ... . beans. . . .. . . . . .. . . . T om a toe s ………………………… …… …… All crops. . . .5 2. . . . . . . . .. . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . Cotto n s e e d……………………………… ….. . . . pears. . . . .. expressed as hydrogen phosphide).. 0 1 0. . peas and plums. Citrus . . . 01 5. ... . . .. . . .. . . . . .0 0 . . apricots. soy a beans and sugar cane… …… G ro u n dn u ts……………………………… …. . . 05 2 5. . . . . 05 0. .. . .. . Citrus and musk melon. . . . .5 0 ... . .. K re s o xim-methy l… ……… ….. . . . . . . . . . Apples. . . Cuc u r bits . . . . . . . . . . grapes. . . . Bea n s ( g r ee n ) and peas… ……… ……… …. .. .. . .. . . . ... .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . ... Imazethapy r. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pineapples . . . . .. .1 2.. .. . . . .. . peaches. . Cuc u mb e r s a n d potatoes… ……… ……… …. . . .. .0 0. Gibberellic acid . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . .. . .. . . .. . . . . . .1 0 .. . . . . .... .. . . . . . . . . . kiwifruit. . . . . . . Pineapples . . . . .. . Cucurbits. . .. .10 acid). 0 0 .. . .. Apples ... .. . . .0 0 . . . .. . . A pp les. .2 Heptenophos. .. .0 0.. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . cruciferae. . . . . . . . .. . . Dry beans. . Citrus and grapes. . . . . peaches. . Ginger and peaches (cann . Sugar cane . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . 05 0. . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 0.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 5. . A pp le s a n d p e ar s…… ……… …… ……… ….. . . Cotton seed. . .. . . . . . . . . pears and plums… …. strawberries and tomatoes G ra p e s a n d to matoes …… ……… ……… …. . . . . . . . .. . . .. .. 02 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .0 1 5. . . . . . . . .. . ... . . .. . . . . . .. ... Sugar cane .. .. . Citr u s ……………………………………… P ota to es ……………………………………. .. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . ed). . . .. . .. . . .... .. . . . Citrus . .. . . . cotton seed and maize……… …. . . . .. . . h alo x y f o p a n d its conjugates. . . . . . ... . . . grapes (table). Iprodione. . .5 1. Guazatine. . . . . . . Ban a n as ……………………………………. ... Sorghum. . . . Pears.2 0. . .. . . ... . . . . .. . .. . . . Bee tr oo t ………………………………… …. . . . . . . . . . 05 0. .1 0 . . . . . .. .. .. I sofenphos (sum of isofenphos and its oxy gen analogue). . Boysenberriesand youngberries. apricots. citrus. 05 2. . . . . . . In doxacarb …… ……… ……… ……… …… Cereal grains. . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . Dry beans. 01 0 . Isoxaben . Imidacloprid .. . . . . . . .. . . . .. .5 5. . . .. . .... . . . . . e xp ressed as haloxy fop)……… …. . . . .. . . . . .. .2 0. . . .. 05 0.. 05 5. .. . . . . . ... . . . . Onions . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . 0 2 0. . . . . cruciferae. . . . . .1 0 . . Cotto n s e e d. . . Gamma-BHC (gamma HCH). . . .. 05 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . A pp le s……………………………………… Citr u s ………………………………………. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 05 0. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . …… Lambda-cy halothrin. . . .. . . . . . . . .0 0. . . . . . . . groundnuts and soya beans. . . . . . . . .. .. . 05 0. . Imazalil (chloramizol) . . . .... .. . . . .. . . . .. .. . .2 0.. .. . . . G ra p e a n d c itr us…… ……… ……… …… …. . . Citrus and pap rika.. . . . . . . . .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . H alo x y f o p ( h a lo x y fop esters. . . . . .. . D ry beans. .. . . . . .. . . . . . .. . ... .. . . . . . . .. . . . peaches.1 1. . . . .. Grapes. .. . . . . .1 7 5. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . sorghum and wheat. . .. . . . . . .. . . . .. . .. Isazofos . . . . . . . .0 0.. .. .. .. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . ... . . . . raspberries. .0 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . .. .. .1 0 . . .. .. Wheat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A pp les. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Fos th iaza ti…………… ……… …. . . . . ..

. . . Cruciferae.. . ... .0 0. . . . g r ou n dn u ts. . M ep iq ua t chloride (mepiquat cation) . . . .. Cer e a l g r a in s . . g r e en beans. . . . .. apricots. . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . tomatoes and wheat.. . . . . . . pineapples and quices. . . . . . . . . . Boysenberries. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . grapes. bananas. Potatoes. . . . .. . . peppersand tomatoes . . . ... .. . . Tomatoes . .. . . . . . . . . . . . Citrus . . . . . .2 0 . Apples. . . Cotto n s e e d. onions and peas . . . . . A pp le s. . .. . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . .1 1. . . . . . ... 05 0 . .. . . . . . . . . . . . s o rg h um . . ... . .. . . . . . . . Potatoes. . . . . .. . . .. . c ru c iferae.. .. . . .parathion……… ……. . . . Monocrotophos .. . .. .. . ..0 1. . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . .. . . 05 0 . . . ... . . . . . .. . . .. . . Methy l bromide (bromomethan . .1 0. . P ine a pp le s a n d tomatoes… ……… …… …… Cab b a ge .. . . . Methenamid. . . .2 0. . . . See h y d r o ge n ph o s ph id e See e thy le ne b is d ithio c ar b am a tes See e thy le ne b is d ithio c ar b am a tes Cotton seed.. .. . . . . . . . grapes andy oungberries. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . .1 0. .. . . .. . . clover. . . . beans. . dried v eg e tab le s .. . . . . . . mealies (green). . Pineapples and tomatoes . .. . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . s ug a r cane and sunflower seed. .. sugar cane.. . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . dried fruit. . cotton seedand potatoes. . . .. . . A pp le as a nd tomatoes …… ……… …… …… Carrots. ... . . . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . Dry beans.. d ry b ea n s . . . . .. . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . 02 0. . . . . . .. papay as. 02 0. . . pears. . .. . . . . . p ears and plums… ……… …. ... . . .. .. . . .5 1. . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 05 1. . . . . . .. Bea n s . . . . cruciferae.5 0 . . . . . . . . A vo c a do s …………………………………… Citr u s ……………………………………….. .. .. . . . .5 0 .. . . . ... . . . Processed grain products . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . sunflower seed and other oilseeds . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Sorghum and wheat . .. . . . . . plums. . .. . . . .. . . Mercaptothion (mel thion). .. maize. . . .. . . ... . .. . . . . .. . . . ... grapes. . . ... . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . .... . . 02 0 . . . . . . .. .. . . M eth y l. . . . .0 0. . . . .. . . .. . .. . Barley and wh . .. . . . . . . cherries.. . . . . .. . . .. . c itrus. . . . .and Z-isomers) ... Beans. . . . . . . . . ... . . . . .. . . . . . . . . mealies (green). . . . . . . .0 8.. . . . . . .. . . . . . 0 1. Potatoes. .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . ... . .... ... .. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . 0 . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . cucurbits.. . . . ... . . . . . . . g r ou n dnuts. . Metolachlor. . ... g ua v a s. . . . . . peaches. . ... peas.. . . . . . . . . .. . . . Citr u s ………………………………………. . potatoes. sorghum and sugar cane. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . peas. . Mancozeb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 05 0 . . spinach. . . . . ..0 0 . . . . . e). cruciferae. . .. Grapes. Metsulfuronmethy . . .. . . Dried legumesand cereal grains. . 0 ...2 2. . . . . . pearsand plums . . . . 02 2 0. . . . . . . . . . mangoes.. ... ..0 4.5 0 .. . . .. M ea lies (green). 05 M ilbemectin (sum of milbemectin A 3 a n d A 4) ……… ……… …… ….. . . . .. . . . . . . Potatoes. . . . . .. grapes. . . peaches. . . . Groundnuts . .. . . . . . . . 0 .. . . . . . . . . . .. . 01 0 . . . .3 0.. .. . . . . . . . . Apricots. . . . ..0 0. a Beans . . .. ... . . . .. . . .2 0 . . . . . . . .. . . . pepp ers. .. . .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . .5 Methamidophos. . a p ric o ts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Methidathion. . . dried nuts. .. . Citrus . . . . . Methomyl. . . .. . . . . . . . 0 1 00 . .. .. . . sunflower seed and sweet corn . . . . . . . . . .2 0. . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . l M ev in phos (sum of E. . . ... . ... . . . . . . . Apples and pears.. so y a b e a ns . . . ... .. . . .. plums and prickly p ears. . A pp le s. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . Avocados andcruciferae. . .. .... . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Macadamia nuts. . 0 5 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .0 3. . . 05 0 . . . granadillas. . 05 1. . . . . Asparagus and soy a beans. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Citrus. …… Citrus and potatoes. .. . cotton seed. . . . pota toes. . peaches. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . a v ocados. . . eat. .. . . . . . . . sorghum and wheat. . plums and tomatoes. . . . . . . . . .. .0 0. . .. . . a p ric o ts .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 05 0. . . kidney beans. its sulphone and sulphoxide). .. pears. . .. . citrus. . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . .. . Apricots. . .. . . litchis and peaches . Citrus . . .. . . . . . .11 Magnesium phosphide. . .. . . . . . . . .. A pp le s. . . . . . potatoes and tomatoes. . . . . ... . . . . .. .. . . . . . .0 0. . . .. . .0 2.. . . .. . . ... . . .0 3. . . . beans. lettuce. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . groundnuts. . . . 05 0. . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . 0 1 0. 01 0. . Methiocarb (sum of methiocarb. . .. . . . . grapes. . . . . mealies (green). .. . .. .. .. . . . . m an g o es. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . groundnuts.. Maize . .2 1. . . . …… Metiram (mg CS2/kg) . . .. . .. . .. Cru c if er ae.. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . Metribuzin . . . . . . . .. . . . . p ea c h es . . . . . . . . . . onions. .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . A ll f o od c ro p s — s ee inorganic bromide Dried fruit. . . .5 Metalaxyl.. Cucurbits and mushrooms. . .. . . . .. ... . .... . . . . . Maneb. Potatoes.. .2 0.1 0. . . . . . . . sunflower seed and tomatoes.. M eta lax y l-m… ……… …… ……… Metazachlor.

. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Apricots. Citrus . . ... . . Beans . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .1 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . 05 0... . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . carrots. . . . . A pp le s. . . . . . . . .. . . . Bea n s. . . . . spinach ly and tomatoes. . .. . . Cotton seeds. .. . . . ... Peas and tomatoes. . . . .. . . peaches.. .. . . . . . . . Oxycarboxin.. .. . 02 0. p ea s . . . . . grapes and pears. . . . . . . . . . Maize . . ...... . . 05 2. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 05 0 . . . apricots. . . . .. A pp le s ……………………………………… P ea r s ……………………………………… Citr u s ………………………………………. . . . .. . . . . citrus. . ... . onions. . . . . . . . 0 0 . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . .. .. . . .. peaches. . Bea n s. . . . . . . . . Citrus . . .. . . .. . ... . . . . .. . Potatoes. . . its oxy gen a nalogue and their sulphoxides and sulphones. . . . . . . 0 2 5. . . . .. 0 . . . .. . . . P ho s me t [sum of phosmet and its o xy g e n a n a lo g u e (fat s o lu b le) ] ……. prick pears. . . ... . .0 O rth o-pheny lphenol (sodium salt) ( s um of 2. . Cotton seed and oats. .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .5 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .5 0 . . . ... . potatoes and groundnuts. . . . . . . ... . Sugur cane. . .. . .1 0 .2 0. . Barley. ..0 1. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . Potatoes. . . expressed as phorate) . . .. . .. . . Cer e a l g r a in s ……………… ……… …… … . . . .. .. . . peaches and plums. . . . . . . . ... . . . . . O xy tetracy cline (oxy tetracycline hy drochloride) . . . c o tto n s e e d. . . .. . sorghu and wheat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . peas. 05 0. . . . Apples. . . . 05 0. . g rapes.. . brinjals. pecan nuts and plums. . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . .... . mealies (green). . .1 Oxyfluorfen. . . .. . . . Tomatoes . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. .1 0. . . .. . . . . . . 1 0. p eppers. . . . . . mealies (green).2 0.... . . . . . . . .2 0. . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. litchis. . . . . . ... . . .. . Ban a n as .. . . P ho s p ho rous acid……… ……. . . . 05 2. . . .12 Barley . . . . . . . . . .mealies (green) and wheat. .. . . .. . .. . Cuc u r bits ………………………………… …. . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . 05 0... . . . . . . . Coffee. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . ..5 2. Oxy demeton-methy l (sum of oxyd em e ton-methy l and its sulphone. 05 0 . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . Dry beans.. . Onions and potatoes. cruciferae. . . . . . pe ppers.. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .2 0 . .. . . . . . .. .. pears an d plums . . . . 05 2.. . . brinjals.. . . .0 0. . .5 0. . . groundnuts. . . Beetroot. . . . . .. mealies (green). . ... . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. cucurbits. .. . .5 0. . 0. .. . ..2 0 . . . . . .. . . . .. A dv o c ad o s.2 1. .. . ... . .. . . . . . . . quinces. . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . .. . . . . . . . . grapes. .. . .. . Par aquat (paraquat cation) . . . . . . . . . Par athion.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sweet p ota to es a nd tu r n ip s ………………… Barley . . . .. . . .. . . cruciferae. ... potatoes and wheat . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . Grapes. . ... mangoes.. . . . . soy a beans and tomatoes… …… Cotton seed. . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . Oryzalin. . pears and peas. 05 0. . .. . .1 0. . . . . . . . . Grapes. .... .. . . Nitrothal-isopropyl. . . .. . .. .. . . .. . . . . . . . Maize . . .. . . . . P ac lo bu tr azol (sum of Paclobutrazol and paclobutrazol-ketone).4 0. .. . ... . . Grapes. . . . . . Grapes. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . .. . .. . . . . . . . O xa m y l (s um of oxamy l and its oxime. . .. mealies (green). . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .0 0. . A pp le s. . .. . . . . macadamia nuts. . pineapples. . . . . . .. . . . .. . P en c y cu r on……… ……… …… …. . . .. .. . .. Citrus . . .... . . . . .. . expressed as oxamy l). .. . . . . ... . . . .. . . . . .. . apricots. . . .. . . . . onions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . …… Phoxim. . . . P ota to es ……………………………………. . . . . . . Peas and wheat. .5 0 . . .2 0. .. ... .5 0 . . . . .. . ... . . . . ... .. Apples and peaches. . onions and rooibo. . . . . . . . . …. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Omethoate. . Cotto n seed. . . . . . . . .2 . ... Nicosulfuron. . .. . . potatoes and tomatoes… …… Brinjals. . . . gr oundnuts... . . . . . . Sor g h um ……………………………………. pears and sorghum. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. ... . . M y c lo butaniel (sum of my clobutanil and its alcohol metabolite) . . . Penconazole. . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . 02 0 . . . .. . . . . ... Citrus and cruciferae. . . . .2 0. . . . . . ... peas. . . . . P ota to es ……………………………………. . . ... .. . . .. . .1 0 . . .. . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . Per methrin (sum of isomers). . .. .. . . . . . . . peaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . Apples. .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. Phosalone . . pears and plums . ... . .. .0 2. .. . 01 0.. . .. . . . . .. . ... . . grapes and pears. . .. . .. . .. . cucurbits. .. .5 0. caster-oil seed. . .. . . . . . . . . Onions . citrus. . . . . .0 5 0. . . Ofurace. . . . .. . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 5. . . .. . .. . . .. .. . .. Cucurbits. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . expressed as 2pheny lph enol). . . . . . . . .. . . 05 0. . . . . Apples and pears. . .. .. . .. . . 05 0. . . . . . . . . . . . peas and peppers. sugar cane and tomatoes. . . G ra p e s ……………………………………… Cereal grains and groundnuts .. 02 0 . . .. . . . . . . . Citrus and garlic . . . . .. .. . .. . .2 0. . . . . cruciferae... .. . . . . .. .0 0 . . . . . . . .. . . .1 1. 05 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phenthoate . . .. . . expressed as oxy demeton -methy l). . . . . Oxadixyl. . . Phorate (sum of phorate. . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . .. . . . A pp le s. . potatoes. 0 0.. . . .. . .. . . . .. . . . . .. .. . . Apples. .5 0. . . . . Nuarimol. . . . .pheny l-phenol and 2p he n y l. . . . .p en a te.... . . Pendimethalin. . . . . . . .. .1 0 . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . 05 0. . . . Mangoes. .. 05 0 . .. . m Mangoes. . . . . .5 0... .. . . . . T om a toe s …………………………………… Apples. .

. . .. . . .. .0 8. .. . . plums and mangoes. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . Mangoes. .. . Cucurbits. 05 0. . . . . . . .. onions and potatoes. . .. . .. . .1 1. . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . P ro th iofos (sum of prothiofos and its oxy gen analogue. . .. . .. . . . . . . . . .. Propaquizafop . Milk. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. .2 0 . . . . . . . 0. . . . . . .5 1.. . . . . . . .. .. . . .. . . . .. . .. . . . . . .. 0 5. . . . 05 0. dried vegetables. . 02 0 . . . .0 1 0. . . . P ota to es ……………………………………. . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. citrus. . ..0 5 0. . ... . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. guavas. . . .. . . . . . .0 0. . . . . .. …… Pyraclostrobin (sum of py raclostro= b in a n d its m e tab o lite BF 5003 ) ………………………………….0 Profenofos (sum of profenofos and its conversion product 4-bromo-2c hlo r o ph e no l. Rice. . .. .. . . Maize and sorghum. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . Avocados. . . . ... . 05 3. .. 5... . .. .5 0. . . . . .. . c r uc if erae.. . . . …… Brussels sprouts. Onions . . . . . . . . . . . . 05 0. . . .. . . . . . . ... . . . . . .. . .. . . . .0 0. . . .. Cotton seed and peas . . . . . . . .... Grapes and guavas. ..1 0. . . . expressed as prothiofos) .... . .. .. . . . . .. .. plums and tomatoes. . . . . . . . P y m e tr o zine…… ……… ……. .. . .0 Pyrethrins (sum of py rethrins I and II. . Py razophos. . . expressed as prochloraz). . .. . .5 0.0 0. . peaches.. . .. . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. . .. ... . . . . Peaches. . M us h r oo m s a n d potatoes… ……… …… …… Beans and plums.. . .. .1 0. . A pp le s. . .. . . . cinerins I and II and jasmolins I . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. .. . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . peaches and tomatoes…… …. 05 5. . . .0 0. . .2 0. . .grapes (table). . . . . . 05 2. . . . . . . . .. . . . . ... . . . . .. . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 P rochloraz (sum of prochloraz and its metabolites containing the 2. . .. . ... . . . . . Groundnuts . . . . . . . c r uc iferae. . . . Groundnuts . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . .. . d r ie d n uts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .. . .. .. .. .. ...4. ban anasand citrus. . . . . .. . . . . .. ..... . . . .. . . . .. b ea n s (green). . ... plums and tomatoes . . .. . .. . cotton seed. . . . . . P y r e thr in s …………… …….. . . . . . . . . . . . Propachlor. . a p ric o ts . . . .. . . expressed as profenofos). c itr u s . . . . . . .. .. . . . Propamo carb hy drochloride . . . . . . . . Pears .. . . peaches. . .. . . Propineb (mg CS2/kg). . . . . . . . .. Grapes.0 3. . . .. .. . . . . . tomatoes and y oungberries . .. .. . . . .. .. . . .. .. . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .. . . . .. . . . . grapes.. ... .. . . . . . . .. . . . . .. citrus. b ea n s (green). . Propiconazole . .0 0. . . . cabbage and cauliflower. . . cucurbits. . 05 1. . . .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . m Pirimiphos-methy l. . . . G in g e r ……………………………………. Grapes. .. . . . . . .. .. .. . . . Tomatoes . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . grapes (tabl). . . . . . .. . .. . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 00 4 0 ... . . . . .. . .5 1 0. . . . . . .. . . . T om a toe s …………………………………… A pp le s. . . . . . .0 2 0. .. . . Citrus and potatoes .. . . . . . .. . . . .. . . 0 1 0. .. .. . . . .. pears. . . .. . . . . Clov e r………………………………………. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pears. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 0 ... sunflower seed and other oil seeds . . Barley and pecan nuts . . .. .. . . .. ... cucurbits. . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . ....6tr ichlorophenol moiety . . . . . . D rie d fr u it. ... .. . Grapes. . . . . . . . peaches. . guavas. . . . . . . . . . . .. . Cab b a ge ……………………………………. .. . .2 5. .. peaches. .. . . . Strawberries . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. potatoes. sorghum and wheat.. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A pp le s.. . . . ...2 1 0. Propargite .. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . Carrots. . deme-thylpirimicarb and demethylfor-mamido-piri icarb). . . . . . . c ruciferae. . .. . .. . . . . . citrus. . .. . . . . . . apricots. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Boy senberries. . 05 0.0 0.. . . .. . . . . . . .. . A pp le s.. ... . . ... . . . pears.1 0 . . .. . . . . . . . Pro metryn. . Groundnuts and pecan nuts. . . . . . . . . . . Cucumbers. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . Propoxur . . .. . . . .. . . . .0 0 . 2.. . . . . . . .. .. . oats. Pears . . . 05 3. . . . . Apples... . . . . .. . . . . Peas. . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . groundnuts and wheat… ……… …. . . . Cotton seed. . . . . . 05 0 . . Barley and wh . .. . . . ..0 0 . . Ban a n as . . . . . g r ou n dnuts.13 Piperonyl butoxide.1 0. . . . . .2 2.. . . . . . .. .. . eat. . . Citr u s ………………………………………. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . .5 3. . . Maize and sorghum. .. . Stor e d g r a in (wheat only )… ……… …. ... . . . . Potatoes.2 0. . .. . . le ttuce.. . .. .5 0 . Groundnuts and potatoes. .. . . . . . . . .. Citrus and tomatoes . . . .. . . 0 P irim ica r b ( s um of pirimicarb. .. Cotton seed.. . . . . . . . . . lettuce. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .2 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Propanil. . . .. . . ..0 0. . . .. . . . 0 0 . .. . . . . . .. .. . .. . . . . . . . . . Peaches.. . . …… 0. .. . . . . . . Cotton seed. Cuc u r bits ………………………………… …. . . Cotto n ( s e ed ) …………………… ……… ….. . . .. . a p ric o ts . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Procymidone. . . . . .. . Soya beans and sunflower seed .5 1. . . . Propham. . . .. .. . .. .. .5 0 .5 0 . . . .. . . . . . . .1 0.. . .. . . . . . . .. . . Cereal grains. . . citrus. . . . .

. . sunflower seed and other oil seeds . . . . . . . . . . . . Cotton seed and tomatoes . grapes. . . . . . . . . A pp le s a n d p e ar s…… ……… …… ……… …. . . . . Pineapples . . . . . .. . . . .. its o xy g e n a n alo g ue an d the ir s u lp h o xid e s a n d s u lp h o ne s . .5 . . 05 0 .. . expressed as temephos). . . Maize.. carrots. . Q uin toze n e ( sum of quintozene.. . . . . .. . . Terbutryn. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . 2. . . .. . . . .. . Litchis. cucurbits. . . .1 0. . ... . .. . . . . . . . . 02 0. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. spinosy n B a nd N-demethyl spinosy n]……… . . . . . 0 T artar emetic (determined as antim on y and expressed as antimony trioxide). . . . . . . . .. . . . .0 0.. . . . . . . .. . .. . . . Dry beans . .. .. . . . . .. .. . . . . . .. . . . b oy s e nb e r rie s . 5 0. . beans. . . . . 1. . pears. . .. . Onions . . . . . . Terbufos (sum of terbufos. . . Citrus. Py rifenox. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. cotton seed.. .. .. . . . .. . . . . . . . .. Citrus . .... .. . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . sorghum and sunflower seed. . . tomatoes and youngberries. Barley .. . . . . . . . . . . . Peaches. . . . .. . . dry beans and groundnuts. . . . .. . . . . . . . Groundnuts and peas. . . . . .2 1.. . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . .. Citrus . .1 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T au . . .. . . cotton seed. . . . . . . . . .. .5 0 . . . . mango oats and onions. 02 Citrus . . Potatoes. peppers. . Maize and sugar cane. . . . . . .. Beetroot.. . . . . ... Terbacil. . .. . . maize and pears. . . 0 1 00 0 . . . .. . . .. .. . . . .. . . Can o la ……………………………………… Fat a n d m ea t ……………… ……… …… …. . . .. . 05 0. . . . . G ra p e s………………………………………. . . . groundnuts. 3. . .2 1 0. . . .. . its oxygen analogue and their sulphoxides a nd sulphones.. . tomatoes and wh . . . .. . 0 0. . . . . ..2 0 . . W he a t ……………………………………… . . .. . peas. .. . . .. . . . Grapes. .. . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . T etr a co n azole … ……… ……… …. .. 02 0. . .. . . . .5 1. . .. . . . . 05 0 . . . . 02 0 . . . Apples and mangoes. .. green peppers. . . 05 Rolitetracycline .. . . . . . .1 0 . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 05 0. . . . . . .. . . Apples. . .. Su lphur (elemental sulphur) . 0. . . . . . .0 0 . . bananas. .. mealies (green). .f luv a lin ate … ……… …… …. . .. . . . . . . .2 0 . . .2 0. . . .. . . .0 1. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . .... . Q uin o xy f e n …… ……… …… …… .. . . .. . . Tebuconazole. . Terbuthylazine.. . . . . . . .0 0 .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Apples.. .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . ..0 0. groundnuts and sweet potatoes. . . . . D rie d fr u it. . pota-toes. d r ie d nuts.. . .. . . .. . . . . . . .. . ... ... . . . . . ... ... . . . . . . Beans.. . . . . . . . Citrus . .. . . . . . ..2 2.0 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . g r ou n dnuts. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sethoxy dim. T eb u f en o zide…… ……… …… …. . . . .. . .. . .. 0 5 5. . . …… Sulcotrione (sum of sulcotrione and its CMBA metabolite) . . . y Py rrolidinomethy l tetracycline.. .. . .. . Teflubenzuron . beans. . A pp le s. . .. .. . .. .. .. . . . .. .. . .. . . . . . . . Spir o x am ine…… ……… ……. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .5 0 . . . pentachloroaniline and methy l pen tachlorophenyl sulphide) .. . . . . . . .. L ive r ………………………………………. .. . .. c itr us. plums... .. . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . expressed as terbufos) . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .2 0 . . . . ... . . P ea s ………………………………………….1 Citrus. . .. .. Groundnuts. . . . . . . Citrus . .. . . 05 0 ... . T om a toe s ………………………… …… …… G ra p e s………………………………………. . . . . . .. . . ... . . . . . . . . .1 0 .. . . .. . . Citr u s a n d p o tato es… ……… …… ……… …. . . . . . .. . . ... . . .. . .0 0.. . . . .. broccoli. . . . Q uiza lof o p-P-tefuryl … ……… … Cereal grains. . . . . . . .. . ..1 5. . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . ...0 0.. . . .. . . . . . . .. . 05 0. P y r im eth a nil…… ……… …… …… Py riprox fen. . . . . . M ilk ………………………………………… Citrus .. . . . . . peaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . .. . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . G ra p e s …………………………………… ….. .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . peas and sorghum. . ... .2 0. . . . grapes. . . . . . . ... 02 2.. .14 and II). . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . ... P ota to es ………………………………… ….. .. G ra p e s………………………………………. dried vegetables.. apricots. . . . Grapes. . 05 1. . . . .. . pa p a y a s. . . . .0 0. . . T em e ph o s ( s u m of temphos. .. .. . . 05 1.. . . . . Simazine . . . . . . . . L itc h is ( pe e l) 2 ………… ……… ……… …… L itc h is ( p ulp ) ……………… ……… …… …. . . . es. . .. .. . . . . peaches and pears. Q uiza lofop-P-ethy l (expressed as quizalofop methy l). .. . Sod ium 2-(3-chlorophenoxy) propionate . . . .. . . . . . .. . . .. . eat. . . . . . m an g oe s . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. M an g oe s ……………………………………. .. .. . avocados.. . . . . Spin o s ad [ th e su m of spinosad ( s pin o sy n s A a nd D) a nd its metabolites spinosyn K. . . . . . . . Potatoes. . . . . . .1 0. . . .. . . 05 0. . .. peas and tomatoes . . Asparagus.0 0. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .0 0. . . . .

. . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . .1 0.1 0. . . Grapes . . . . . . .0 1 0. . . . . . . . . . Trifluralin . . . . . . .... . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . ... . . . .. . . . . . . ... . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . .. ) Cotton seed. . . .0 0 . . . . dry beans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . apricots. .. . .. . . . .0 0 .. . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . apricots. . . . . . .. .5 0. . .... . peaches. ... . . .1 0 . . . . . . .. . Apples. . . . Litchis.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . mealies (green). . . . . . .. . . Cotton seed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. peaches. . . . . Apples. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . Bananas. . . . . . 05 0.. . . 0 1.. .. . Cuc u r bits ……………………………………. 0. .. . peas. . . cucurbits and mangoes. . . .0 0 . ... .. .. . . . .. . . . . . .1 0 . .. .. . . .. . .0 0. .1 0. . . . . . . .. . . .. . . beans. .0 5. ) . . . . Apples. .. . . . T hio m eton (sum of thiometon. . .. . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . Avocado’ . . . . .. . . . . . .. coffee. .. . . .2 0. . . .. . . .. . .. . . . . . . .. g r ap e s. . . . . . Citr u s ………………………………………. . . sorghum. . Triazophos . grapes.. . . . . . . . .. .0 3. .. . . a p ricots. . . . . .. . cotton seed.. . . .2 T hip hanate-methy l (expressed as carbendazim) . . . . . . . . . .. . .. Barley .. .. . . .. . Bananas and citrus. .. .. ... . . . . . . . . ... . . . . 5. . . . . .... .5 0. co w pe as. . .. . Peas . . rph. . . . . .. . . . . .. .4 0. . . . . onions and sweet potatoes . .. Cotton seed. . . . . .. .. its sulphoxide and sulphone.. . . . Barley and wh . . . . . . ... . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ... . . . Citrus and peaches. Trichlorfon.. . . . . . . . . peaches. .. . . . ... cruciferae. A pp le s………………………………………. . . . . . . . . .. Apples and pears... ..2 1. .. . . . . . . . . . A pp le s. . G ra p e s………………………………………... . . . . Apples and pears. . . . .. . . Apples and pears. . . . . . . . ... . . .5 2. Triadimenol. . .1 0 . . . ... . . . Citrus and cucurbits. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . .. . . . . 05 0.. .. .. . . . .. . . .0 0. . . . .. . . . . . . granadilla s. . . .1 3. g u avas.0 1. . . . . . . Mealies (green . .2 2. . . . . . . .. . . expressed as thiometon) . . . . . eat. . . . . . Thidiazuron . . . Potatoes and pineapples . .. .. sorghum. sweet potatoesand tomatoes. .. ... . .. . . . beans. . . . . . Mealies (green and sorghum. .. Bar le y . . . . .. . G ra p e s………………………………………. . . . . . . . . . .. . A pp le s……………………………………….. . . . . . .. . . . . .. Chic ken f a t…………………………………. . . . .. . ..2 0 . . . pears and plums . . . . . .. Barley and wh . . . . . . cruciferae. . peaches. .. . . . ... . . . . . Apples. . . . . .. .. . .5 0 . . . . .. .15 Tetradifon. . . Citrus . G ro u n dn u ts. . Thifensulfuron-methy l. . ... . . . . .. . .. .. . M an g oe s …………………………………….. . . .2 0. . ... . . .. 05 Cotton seed. . . . . . . Thiabendazole. . . . . . . . .1 0. .. . ). . .. . . . litchis. . . .. Curcurbits . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cotton seed. . . . . .. . . . . . ch illie s . ... . . 05 0. . . . . .0 0 . . Thiamethoxam (sum of thiametho= x am a nd its m eta b olite CGA 3 22 7 0 4) ……………………… ….0 5. . . . . .. 02 0 . . . . Bananas and musk melons. .. . . . . . .. . . . . .. Triasulfuron. . . . . . .. . . expressed as thiodicarb) . . . . . . .. . . Beans and tomatoes.1 0. .. . . . . . . p eas.. pearsand plums... . .. . . . . . 05 1.. ... . . . .0 0 . .. . . .. . . .... . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . T rif lo xy strobin… ……… ……… …. . .. 05 0. . . Mushrooms. . . . .. . . A pp le s………………………………………. Cotton seed. . . . .. . . . . .. .. . . .. . .. . . .. . .0 5. . .. Thiram ( CS2 /kg) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . eat. s. . . Soy a be a n s……………………………… …. .0 0 . T ria dimefon (sum of triadimefon and triadimenol).. . . Apples. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . apricots. 05 8. 05 3. mealies (green). Apples. . . . .. . . . . . . Barley and wh . .. . . .. .. .. . .. . . . .. . .. . .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . Wheat. . . 05 1. . . . T hia c lop r id …… ……… ……… …. . ... . . . . pears and plums. . . . . Apples. m eth o my l and methy l hy droxyth io a c etimidate (methyl oxime). .. . ... .. . . . . plums and quinces . . . . . . . .5 0. . . . .. . Dry tea. . . . .. . . . . . . ... . . . . . . Grapes . .. .. .. . . 05 0. . . . .. . . . . . 05 0 . . . Cab b a ge . . . . . .. .. .. . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Tridemo . . . . . . . . . . . . oats and wh . . . ... .. .. . . citrus. . . Tralomethrin. . groundnuts and wheat. . .. . prickly pears. . . . . . . cruciferae. . . . . . . pears and plums . . . . .. . .. . mg Tralkoxydim. . . . . eat. . .. ... peaches. . .1 0. . . .0 6.. . . . . . . . . . Peas . . . .. . . . .1 2. . 05 0. . . . . . .. . . . . . Cotto n s e e d…………………………… ……. .. . . . 05 0. . .. . . . ... . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . Tributy l phosphoro-trithioate. . Mealies (green and sweet potatoes . .. . .0 0.. . groundnuts and potatoes .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. . . . .. . . . cucurbits and peas. . . . . . .. . citrus and pears . .. . . . Triflumuron. eat. . tomatoes and wheat. . . .0 0. . . . .2 0 . .. . . Barley . . . .. . . .. . . T hio d ica r b ( s u m of thiodicarb.. .

. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 1 W as 0 . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . T rif o r in e (determined as chloral hy drate and expressed as triforine) Apples and peaches. . . . . .. .0 2. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 0. . . . . . Cotto n s e e d.. kidn e y b e a ns . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . expressed as vamidothion) . Z eta -c y p e r me thr in (s u m of is om e re s ) ……………………… Grapes .. . . . .. . . ... . g ra p e s.. . . . 0 m g/kg . . sunflower seed and tomatoes. . . . . .2 0. . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . .. . . . Peas . mealies (green).. . . . . . c r u ciferae and peas……… ……. . . .. . ... Apples. . . . . . . . . .5 Zineb . sorghum and w he a t……………………………… …… See e thy le ne b is d ithio c ar b am a tes 3.. Carrots . . . .. . ... .1 0. ... . . .5 0. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . expressed as vinclo zolin) . . . . …… A pp le s. . . . . . . . .. A changed maximum residue limit is proposed as the agricultural use has been extended to be applied som ewhat l a t er i n s e a s on a nd a l so more t ha n on c e t o c on t rol c e rt a i n p e s t s i n ci t ru s 2 W as o nly litc h is w ith ma x imu m r e s id u e lim it o f 10 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Beans and plums.. pers.. . . . . . .. . 2mg /kg. .. . . . . 1 V in c lozo lin (sum of vinclozolin a nd all metabolites containing 3. Strawberries. .0 0. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .0 1. . . . .. .. ... . its s u lph o x ide and sulphone. . . . . . . . . . . . . 05 1. ... . . . . . .0 1. . .. . . . . . . .. g r ou n dn u ts a nd m ac a da m ia nuts……… ……… …… …… Bea n s .. 0 .4 Vamidothion (sum of vamidothion. .. . . . .16 g r ou n dn u ts. .. . . ..0 0 . . . . .. . ... . 05 0. . . ... .. . soy a beans. Cucurbits . . . . …… P ea c h es a nd tomatoes…… ……… …….. . . .. .5dichloranaline. . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .