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MERCYHURST COLLEGE, GLENWOOPHILLS, ERIEjPA. 16546

November 6^1997

Alcohol Abuse Outrages Students, Administration
By Carrie Tappe A &E Editor February. i Another fight broke out on campus during the weekend of Oct. Lately the re. has been much 24-26. A young male, not a student controversy around campus about at Mercyhurst, began acting out in security, rules and regulations re- a Baldwin ^Townhouse. The resigarding the consumption of alco- dents ejected all visitors from the hol, disorderly conduct, property town house to the parking lot. The damage and an increase in vio- individual continued to act out and lence. Many students are con- was harshly attacked. When secucerned about a number of issues rity arrived at the scene the victim which I feel need to be addressed. was found partially conscious. The In the past three weeks, vio- investigation has been made diffilence, vandalism and alcohol abuse cult because of the uncooperative have stretched beyond reasonable attitude of the victim. !f limits. At 2 a.m. on Wednesday, Oct 22, an incident occurred on Lewis Avenue involving the brutal beating of two Mercyhurst-Northeast students by' a group of These incidents are only two Mercyhurst lacrosse players. Acof four serious "incidents of excording to one lacrosse player, the treme violence, mainly on a maletwo males were throwing rocks at to-male basis, which occurred reapartment windows which angered cently. In all of the incidents, alcothe lacrosse players who proceeded hol has been a major"key to the to batter the males severely. Curoffenders' actions. rently five lacrosse players are beRodger Gregorich, Dean of ing sanctioned and are in the apPublic.Safety, said, "Alcohol is peal s process. In addition, the encausing some very serious probtire team has been suspended until lems on this campus... violent assaults, increases in vandalism, underage drinking -and disorderly conduct." Another area of concern is the uncivilized behavior at hockey games. Apparently this past weekend many students were loud and rowdy, which is not a problem, but many were out of?control. The cussing,pushing,andpublicdrunkenness was past what Dr. Garvey feels is appropriate for Mercyhurst students. Students have been increasingly concerned about two alleged rapes on campus. Administration at the college claims that no rapes have been reported to security, and no students have been arrested on campus for rape charges. As for the college's counseling services, all matters are confidential and misinformation can be released. Bill.Kennedy, Dean ofjStudent Services, said, "In*terms of the rape, that is possible, but I' m not aware of i t " Gregorich added, "If it happened* it wasn't reported to security.
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ANALYSIS

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from a washing machine and water was turned on. The newly installed security gates on either end of the Baldwin loop were also broken. Also, a student's bike, chained in the basement laundry room of an apartment building on Briggs Ave, was vandalized. It is believed that a person not affi 1 iated wi th the college destroyed and vandalized the bike. A growing number of cars have also been vandalized. Tires have been slashed, windows broken and stereos stolen. Kennedy said," We consulted with the Erie Police and we think that there is an organized group from the outside not just hitting Mercyhurst, but hitting areas throughout the city where there is a cluster of vehicles ... they are NAHIT after tape players, stereo speakers ... it's very hit and miss. *t Outsiders on campus have been There has also been an expensive increase in damage as a result the cause of a lot of concern. The of vandalism. This past weekend administrators who were circulatalone, a window was broken in ing on the campus this past weekpMercy 100, washers and * dryers end claim to have escorted 25 or so were badly damaged in McAuley Goto "Alcohol," p.3 i Hall when a hose was unscrewed

Mercyhurst only had one reported rape on campus last year. Many students say that number is not representative of the actual number of sexual assaults and rapes that occur on a college campus in a year. If these malicious acts are happening, the victim(s) need to come forward to report the rape, which will launch an investigation by the college. In addition to the physical violence, recently a female freshman was hospitalized for alcohol poisoning. This past Halloween weekend alone, 15 students were written up foralcohol violations, a mere fraction of the number of underage drinkers on campus.|'

New Banner Marks Millennium Celebration
By Chris Wloch Editor-in-Chief On Sunday, Oct 26, a new banner which marks the upcoming celebration of the millennium was blessed during a Mass held in Old Main's Christ the King Chapel. According to Father Stephen Anderson, campus chaplain, the banner was created in preparation for the third millennium. "We are taking part in a worldwide celebration,** he said. "Every parish is doing something to get ready for the millennium." Fr. Anderson urged all students to take the time to stop in the chapel and see the banner which is displayed on the right side of the sanctuary. "It will be used during campus liturgies in the chapel for the next three years," he said. The white banner was sewn by the chapel's sacristan, Sister Catherine Anne Mcsanko, with the help of students Shaun Gayer and Joe I Crotty. It includes the Mercyhurst school colors, blue and green, and is accented by shiny gold material as well, Fr. Anderson said. The last three years before the new millennium are each dedicated to a different person of the Trinity according to Fr. Anderson. "We focus on faith in Jesus Christ in 1997; on hope in the Holy Spirit in 1998, and on an increased loving relationship with the Creator to finish the preparation in 1999. As the year 2000 dawns, we will have focused our attention on the totality of the Trinity of our God, and a new century can thus bring a deeper faith for all,** he said. The banner was specifically designed to focus on each of the three divine persons, he added. "The triangle has always been a symbol of the Trinity - three corners, one structure; three persons, one God. The cross of Jesus is at the top of the triangle - the symbol ofj victory over death. The dove represents the Spirit - a dove of peace and love that unites and empowers a Spirit-filled people, and the Creator is shown by the loving, embracing, affirming hands that continue to; hold us in a loving relationship with our God. * * According to Fr. Anderson, as we approach the end of the second millennium, the sudden rise of apocalyptic fervor around the world needs to be tempered by recognizing this fresh start as a season of hope .and promise. •There will be so many who will begin to announce, 'Repent! The end is near!' As believers, we should rather say, * Repent! A new beginning is here!' Not only will the turn of this century be marked with great celebration*and observances, but we should also go beyond that and make it known that the turn of this century should be a holy time at well." At right, the Millennium Banner which will be on display in Christ^ the King Chapel for it he next three years. Photo: Jessica Russell

PAGE 2

THE MERCI AD
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MSG News: Reps Discuss Queen's Chapel
puter use and campus Internet difficulties. MSO President Kevin Segedi On Monday, Nov. 3, Mercyhurst led a discussion on two important Student Government held its concerns. The first issue to be weekly meeting in the Student raised involves the recent Board of Trustees proposal to allow past Government Chambers. Treasurer Ryan Kennis an- presidents of the college to be nounced that a $13,000 deposit buried in the Queens Chapel in was made i n to MSG accounts and Old Mai n In regards to the Queens that the Budget and Finance Com- Chapel question, some students mittee was meeting to review the protested that this idea would take expenditures made by ?MSG away from the history that is asso*«W ciated with the space. Yet, other throughout this term. Vice President Tom Bender re- students believed that many of the r^AtiUmted Nato^ minded everyone present of the presidents of this college have upcoming lecture' featuring done so very much for the instituProgressi wis stalled by: thitailurt of th9:lhiti^:S^^:^idBti^^:^i::: Mohammed Bailal from MTV's tion and if their only wish is to be break their stalemate on the issue^Theten^day conference wasaimed: "Real World." Bailal will speak at buried in the Queen* s Chapel than 8 p. m., Wednesday, Nov. 12 in the they should be allowed to do so. restrictions or greenhouse £ases^ MSG representatives were asked Taylor Little Theater. W i ^ ^ v ; : : ; :•:•:•:•:•:•;•:•:•:•:•:•:•:::;:::^>:-:::.:::-:::<-::<-:-:-::-:::::::>:-:::-:>::v:::::::-::;>: Also at the meeting, several com- to talk with their constituency to .•: Thedispute betweenthe United States and The; European: Union is;:; mittees reported the progress they get more input on the issue. The second significant issue that had made with key administrators. alized nations to agree in K^tq-to cot output^ Jodie Pol k, chairperson of the Resi- was addressed was the drinking :: : dence Life committee, informed enforcement incidents that ocJe^t we^ - lne:1^iSL tf ^ curred on campus over the weekstudents of the topics discussed end. Several non-MSG members upheai arx>ut a eomrjromisftwith :ffie:.EU&:x#::& duri ng herlast meeting withTyrone attended the meeti ng to voice their x Coalitions of underdeveloped countnes along^ with: environmental:. Moore, Director of Residence concern over last weekends groups^^whoareseeldhgemissidnfestrictions that go far beyond those:; Life. Moore said that all dryers on "events." Students adamantly campus have been fixed so that if disagreed with the college's poli: as yieldtng to the iiaietestsi of bigbosihessL;:^iionia:Nemni Slide,:. a student desired additional drycy of taking cups away from stuing time, they could simply dedents. Though some agreed that ance of Small Island States, stated, *The short-term economic inters: posit an additional quarter instead underage drinking is a serious of starting another drying cycle ests seen to be drlymg.^brhe pt^i^sal^^^:(?le^^:^ problem, many believed that stuAtthe Rio Earth Suinmitiii 1992;allo£ the countries represented:in>:| which costs 75 cents. dents who are of legal age to drink Bonn agreed to stabilize ehiissionSat 1990 levwfty 2000. Hbw^Ver^ Members of the Facility Use Germany and Bn tain are carrentlythe only nations on track to achieve •:• Committee reported that they met should not be penalized for the VV.VftMi-, crimes of others. Furthermore, this goal, | with dean of administration, Tom some students noted that some of Billingsley in an effort to extend the off campus police as well as bookstore hours on the weekends. administrators were rude and Also, the'committee stated they By Randy Milliard abrasive towards students who had not yet gained a satisfactory International .News J were not causing any disruption. response to the concerns that have been addressed in regards to comRichard Tomlinson, a former operative of the British MI6 intelligence service, has been charged under the Official Secrets Act with disclosing classified information about the agency. Tomlinson, a Cambridge University graduate who joined the group in 1992, was dismissed in 1995 after serving the British crown in Bosnia and Moscow. According to the charges, Tomlinson intended to write a book about his adventures in the intelligence community, an action which MI6 has taken legal measures to prevent. % According to prosecution lawyer, Dru Sharpling, Tomlinson has both British and New Zealand citizenship and it was feared (hat he may try to flee the United Kingdom to evade u trial that could land him in jail for two years. Tomlinson's lawyer, Owen Da vies, .said" this is a case of a man who |in the past had a disagreement with his employers purely because he lost his job. Mr. Tomlinson is not a man who is dangerous to his country." Through his actions he has clearly been in opposition to the need of security for MI6 operational procedures, that, if exposed, could place current MI6 agents in clear and present danger said Tomlinson. • > The last prosecution under the Official Secrets Act was in 1961, which led to a 42 year sentence of George Blake, who had been spying for the Soviet Union, escaped after five years in prison and now lives Wednesday By Emilio Colaiacovo MSG Secretary

SAC Report
By Chris Coan Contributing Writer On Saturday Nov. 8 the Weekend committee will be having Fantasy Fun Ricks and Videos in the Great Room of the Union from 511 p.m. Fantasy Fun Flicks and Videos is a chance to have your face placed on a famous celebrity body as well as your chance to record your own video, complete with costumes. Next Wednesday, Nov. 12 the band T h e Jel 1 y bricks" will be performing downstairs in the Union at 9 p.m.. "The Jellybricks" are an up and coming band that,open for bands like "The Goo-Goo Dolls", "7 Married 3," plus many other big name bands. Also on Nov. 12 the Tournament committee will be playing "Mancala" which \is an African stone and glass game. This is a multi-cultural passport event as well as a pretty cool game. The multi-cultural passport will be explained at the Muhammed Bilal 1 ecture on Wednesday Nov. 12 at 8 p.m. in the PAC. We at the Student Activities Committee are in need of more ideas for the winter term. With your ideas we should be able to program a fun and enjoyable winter term. You can contact SAC at 2463 with your ideas, as well as attend our meetings on Tuesdays at 8 p.m. in Government Chambers. Our hotline at 2093 is still active, with the current activities for the week.

World Climate TalksEnd in Stalemate
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outsiders off college property. Security is asking people to help them by turning away people from outside the Mercyhurst community who don't belong on campus. Be selective with whom you admit to your parties. After all, you are responsible for your guests.

pose is not to bust people for having a good time, but to look out for the safety and best interest of the students. Garvey said, 'The uncivilized, obnoxious behavior is not a part of Mercyhurst. We need to crack down to escape the danger and threat of worse behavior."

It is apparent that violence, vandalism and underage drinking is increasing and changes need to occur immediately. Students have been in an uproar over the "new alcohol policies," when in fact there have been NO NEW RULES established. According to Tyrone Moore, Director of Housing and Associate Dean of S tudent Services, "I don' t want us (Administration) to go out with a hard-line approach, but I would much prefer that you go where students are involved in inappropriate actions and activities and I prefer to talk to them and get them to see the error OF their ways.* We did that for a while... the majority of students responded ...^but unfortunately there is a fair amount of students who make it more difficult for the masses. We have to look more carefully at the manner in which we do this business. It needs to be clear that: This is not a change in policy at all, it is a change in approach to the administration of the same pol icy.| All the rules and regulations of Mercyhurst College in accordance with the Commonwealth laws are printed in the Student Handbook. In the past it seems as though many of the rules were i gnored. The administration feels that the first step in reducing or eliminating the unsafe conditions and damage produced by violence and vandalism is to crack down on the somewhat relaxed drinking policy. I n the Student Handbook, "Minimum Sanctions" are clearly stated for offenses categorized as: respect and consideration standards, general safety and security, fire safety, drug and alcohol related standards, residence living and public order standards and personal integrity standards. In addition, the legal and college requirements are printed. Students are being warned that the policies are going to be more strictly upheld.Thereforethestudenlsshouldbeaware of the rules and regulations. Regarding the upcoming weekend, Moore said, "We will more vigorously enforce the laws written in the MC handbook and commonwealth laws. We want you to enjoy yourselves, even if it involves partying for those of age, but let's be smart and let's be responsive. We want you to respect others and respect the rules, such as leaving containers in your apartment when you choose to move to a new location." Moore has made it very clear that his purft*

There are many reasons for the change in administration of the current policies including the increase in violence and vandalism, health risks, and lack respect for other students. Additionally, the fact that Freshmen girls are often being taken advantage of is especially disturbing. At almost any party on this campus, at least half if not more of the attendees are Freshman, 99% of whom are less than 19 years old. There is no personal problem with Freshmen attending parties, but underage drinking is against the law. The problem lies where Freshmen are underage, looking to fit-in, and don't know their limits. We were all impressionable Freshman at one time in our lives. At the beginning of the year, many partygivers along Briggs Avenue posted signs on their doors stating "No Freshmen A1 lowed." People are starting to let their guard down now* Freshmen are trying to mix in with the crowd. Some can, butsome can't. This makes them dangerous targets for some unscrupulous upperclassmen. The next reason for change is the increase in violence and vandalism. Perhaps a few weekends ago, aconfrontation was more like a screaming match. Now, confrontations are turning into fist fights. What's next? Every time people drink, there are health risks involved. The major risks are when people don't know their limits and can't control themselves or when drugs are mixed with alcohol. Drugs are probably the most well-hidden rule-breaker on campus. At the same time, alcohol is the drug of choice for most students. As far as respecting other people, fist fights, loud obnoxious parties and public drunkenness far exceed the boundaries of respect. Not all students choose to drink and party. Don't they have the sameright to their means of fun as you do to yours?

their privacy. What are our rights as students? As a student, I have no problem with the open container policy, when it was interpreted as dumping your cup as you leave the confines of an apartment! building or townhouse. I think that taking empty cups from students is totally uncalled for. Just as administration said that not all kids drink, why should those kids not be allowed to carry a glass of kool-aid to their friend's apartment? An empty cup in the possession of a student cannot cause harm. If students obey by dumping their cups, then it is not necessary to confiscate the empty cup. According to Moore, the idea of making Mercyhurst a "dry campus" is not an issue. "We would never make it a dry campus," Moore said. "Even though it is a pain in the butt when students are drinking and acting all crazy, I wouldn't have it any other way. I believe students should have a choice... if everyone is twenty-one, that is. We want you to enjoy yourselves, even if it involves partying, but let's be smart and responsible. We want students to respect each other and follow the rules." Many students feel that if the rules and regulations are going to be more strictly enforced, they should have been gi ven warning. One weekend it is an easy-going good time here and the next, every housing and security official was circulating through out Briggs Avenue cracking down on everything. Three points of view need to be looked at when discussing students' concerns: The partier, the studier and all the rest caught somewhere in between. All three characteristics are the individual choice of the student. Students need to respect the decision of their fellow classmates and neighbors. Many students are voicing their opinions to Dr. Garvey against the outrages. Now's the time when everyone needs to voice their opinion. -*
• j

ing to Gregorich, three to five additional security guards are being hired to help out on the weekends. These part-timers will assist when there are functions at the PA C or special events on campus. The administration is willing to test an escort service if enough students are interested and support it. If you feel suchga service would be beneficial, I need your feedback!

Now is the time where we as the students need to voice our opi nions and feeling about the rules, regulations, policies and current situations here at Mercyhurst. The faculty and administration of Mercyhurst have expressed their willingness to listen and be open to students and their opinions, if handled in a mature and respectable way. If we can prove to the adm i ni strati on that we can act like and be responsible adults, perhaps they won't crack down so harsh, and we can find a happy medium. lit doesn't take much to sit:back and criticize the system and what is happening. Students are asking administration to ensure their safety and well-being here. On the contrary, every time administration makes a move in that direction, students are outraged I and criticize again. . We need your feedback. We want to know how you feel about the issues discussed. Maybe a student has an idea that can be presented to the administration that may help them understand how we as students

feel.

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Garvey agreed, "We need to find the happy medium that permits people to enjoy themselves without abusing the rights of other people and behaving in a manner that is consistent with the standards and morals of Mercyhurst as well as their own personal standards."

Your voice can and needs to be heard Any Many students are voicing their concerns additional feedback, comments, concerns, about safety issues as wel 1 as the crackdown etc. are welcome, in the written form. The on alcohol. Many issue of safety are being comments should be place in an envelope CONCERNSdiscussed. Mercyhurst is considering in- marked jj "STUDENT stalling more call boxes or perhaps imple- MERCIAD." Your feedback is essential in menting an escort service. Currently there future situations and developments handled are six full-time and one part-time security by administration. officers employed by the college. Accord-

We are college students. The most common form of entertainment on a typical college campus anywhere is partying. Students feel as though theirrightsand, privacy are being violated. Some feel that taking empty cups from students on the weekends is unfair. Students are claiming that administrators entered their apartments or townhouses without their consent, invading

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THE MERCIAD

November 6,1997

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Robert Ward 's Roman Fever Hits the Hurst
under the direction of Stephen Colantti. Roman Fever is set in Rome on On Sunday. Nov. 9 the Taylor Capitoline Hill in 1924 and tells Little Theatre will be shaking, as the story of a surprise reunion befeet tap and fingers snap to the tween two recently widowed catchy tunes of Roman Fever, an wealthy American women Grace opera by*Pulitzer prize winning Ansley, played by Mary Beth Seder burg, a 1992 graduate of composer Robert Ward. "Audience members will need Mercyhurst and a leading mezzoto hold onto their flap dresses for soprano with the Pittsburgh Opera what proves to be a very Center, and Alida Slade, played by exciting...storyline," said Louisa Melanie Freany Eberhard, a 1997 Jonason, stage director of Roman graduate of Mercyhurst College Fever and assistant professor of with an:Advanced Certificate in Voice Performance.^ Each woman music at Mercyhurst. The opera is based on Edith has a daughter who is 20 years old, Wharton * s short story and will fea- the age that they were when they ture students and alumni of the met at the hotel 20 years prior. D'Angelo School of Music accomBabs, played by Nicole Boeke, panied by a live chamber orchestra a sophomore voice performance By Heather Cvitkovic Merciad Writer major, is Grace's daughter and Jenny, played by Karen Jones, a sophomore m usic education major in voice, is Alicia's daughter. The story, told through the memories and conversations of the bolder women, compares the differences between the generations, and shows the modern day experiences of their daughters. What unfolds is a story of confused lovers, rivalry and Roman Fever, a mysterious illness inflicted on people who stay i n the cold after dark. 'This is my first leading role at Mercyhurst and I am really excited about it," says sophomore Karen Jones. "Everyone has worked really hard to make this a memorable performance." And memorable it should be, especially since the composer Robert Ward will be in attendance. Ward will host a meet-the-artist discussion in Taylor Little Theatre the day before the performance, Saturday, Nov. 8, at 2:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Ward will then attend the performance on Sunday, which happens to be his birthday. "I am very excited that someone of Robert Ward's caliber would choose Mercyhurst and this performance to grace us with his presence," said sophomore Ray Fritz, a dancer in the performance. Following the opera all in attendance are invited to stay and share a piece of cake with Ward. "This is a prime opportunity for students and members of the Erie
•*

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community to 'hobnob' with a Pulitzerprize-w i nni ng composer," said Dr. Albert Glinsky, associate professor of music at the college and this year's director of the Visiting Artist Series. "Our students also experience a modern day opera staged and performed by members of the college community." Seating in the Taylor Little Theatre is limited, so anyone wishing to attend is encouraged to order their tickets early. Tickets for the event are free to Mercyhurst students, $5 for adults and $3 for seniors. They are available at the Performing Arts Center Box Office. For more information call 824-3000.

roque through the 20th Century including Latin and African music. The students are under the i nThe D'Angelo School of Music struction of Glen Kwok, Mark presents a concert of chamber Marchant and Steven Lyons from music in the Taylor Little Theatre the D'Angelo School of Music. of Mercyhurst College on TuesMarchant, a lecturer of music day, Novell at 8:15 p.m. The education at Mercyhurst, exevent, which is free and open to the plained that the ensembles wi 1 fea1 public, will feature the premiere ture music not usually offered in production by Mercyhurst's Drum the Erie community. One unique Circle showcasing the African aspect of the group is the variety chant "Jingo-lo-ba." that exists within the program. Made up of students and faculty 'This is only the third year that of the string, rercussion, and wood- the smaller ensembles have come wind ensembles, the concert fea- together for an evening perfortures a mixture of pieces from all mance," said Marchant. "It is a periods of music, from the Ba- great opportunity for the students

By Carrie Tappe A&E Editor

Concert Part of Cultural Series

Housing Troubles? Are the Computer Labs when needed? campus? Who Can
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and Erie community to experience a high caliber of students in performance." Each event produced by the D'Angelo School of Music is considered part of the overall 1997-98 Cultural Series. Other scheduled events will feature a combined concert by the Chamber Orchestra and Wind Ensemble. These events include a free concert with Frank Collura as conductor on Sunday, Nov. 16; St. Petersburg String Quartet Sunday,/Nov. 30; "The Glory of Christmas" on Dec. 13; and "Vienna in Erie," a symphony orchestra concert with Collura as conductor on Jan. 1.

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glish protocol, is summoned to walk the Queen's pony and becomes her most trusted friend. As rumors of an affair spread, a crisis in the monarchy seems in"Multicultural Diversity" | MercyhurstCoHegewillbeshown. evitable, A romantic drama, Mrs. The film. Mrs. Brown, is directed Brown tells of one of history's I Jeremy Brock. most unusual love- stories, the reby in the Mary D'Angelo I It is 1864 and the British govern- markable relationship between Performing Arts Center I ment is in turmoil. The Queen, Queen Victoria and John Brown. The film will begin at 8 p.m. in stricken with grief from her son's death and refusing to carry out any the Performing Arts Center. Ticki of her public duties, is losing popu- ets are free to Mercyhurst students, i larity with the people? Brown, a $3 for adults and $2 for seniors and j Scotsman with no respect for En- other students.

iMerciad Writer ' from MTV's i " The RearWorld " i i On Wednesday, Nov. 12, the last will discuss ifilm in the Fall Film Scries at

M uhammed i { Balial iBy Heather Cvitkovic

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Editor's Note: The following account watt written by a current Mercyhurst student who was sexually assaulted on campus last year. In order to protect her confidential* ity, she will remain anonymous.

Real Life Tragedy Heeds Warning to Others McElrathj Opens Speaker Series
#

Last January, I was at a party in the Baldwin town houses with two friends on a typical Friday night Neither I nor my friends were drunk, but we did have a few drinks, possibly two beers. Both of my friends met guys and were dancing and socializing. The guys had a friend who came up to me, introduced himself and asked me to fast dance. Maybe an hour later, the party was breaking up. The guys asked us if we wanted to go back to one of their apartments. I was under the impression that because there were six of us, there was no problem threat. During this whole time, the guy was consuming alcohol as if it were water. When we got to the apartment, the first five minutes werefine.After that, the nightmare began. There were two people passed out in the living room. The guy I met, whom I will call John Doe, and I were talking in his bedroom. MtHi£fL. ^SSSm^&^SB^SkW-.

p Living in a dorm last year, I was accustomed to sitting in a bedroom, so the location really didn't bother me. John Doe proceeded to kiss me, to which I had no objections. His roaming hands exceeded my intentions. I asked, then told him to stop more times than I could count. He didn't listen. I tried physically to make hi m stop and even bit him, but since he was a lot bigger and stronger than I was, I didn't succeed. I don't know how I managed to get out from underneath him. Fortunately I did, grabbed every piece of my clothing that I could find and bolted. Although I was not legally raped, I was violated and physically assaulted, not to mention humiliated. I was bruised. I bled. I was devastated. My first reaction wasn't to run to security. Instead, I ran home, sat on the floor of my dorm and cried, alone. Withinfivedays, I was attending meetings with the college's counseling service and an academic counselor. Often I regret not reporting the incident directly to security. Kwas afraid that my personal life would be spread all over cam-

pus. It takes a lot of courage to go public, and that's something that I most people don't understand. When you are a Freshman and an upperclassman shows interest in you, you are nothing but flattered. What I thought was innocent flirting turned out to be a test of strength and character on my part Kwas violated not only physically but emotionally. \ ^Wj We do go to school in a safe environment Mercy hurst does maintain a safe cam pus,-but the college is only a division of society. Assaults happen in society and they are bound to happen here. The only way to stop them from happening is for the offenders to start taking responsibility for themselves and for everyone else to eliminate the possibilities of becoming the next target. I don't consider myself to be a victim. I was just put in a really bad situation with no clue how to handle it. I thought I could handle the situation, but I couldn' t. If it ever happened to you, you would see for yourself. Don't be the next naive person to be taken advantage of These things happen. What are you going to do about it?

By Carrie Tappe
A&E Editor The first speaker in the Social and Behavioral Sciences Distinguished Speaker Series will be held on Thursday, Nov. 13, at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Karen Mc El rath will deliver her presentation, "An American Looks at the Troubles," in the Mercy Heritage Room in Sullivan Center. J McElrauYs presentation will explore the conflicts in Northern Ireland between the Catholics and Protestants. As an American living in Northern Ireland, she is an outsider looking in on the current happenings. She also will express her feeling and opinions on the future of the controversy as well as insights to the cause. The presentation is free and open to the public. It is made possible through a grant from College President^ Dr. William P. Garvey and the Academic Enrichment Fund.

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PAGE 6

THE MERCIAD

November 6,1997

Letters to the Editor: The f No Open Container Policy
ti
To the Editor.

On the evening of Friday Oct. 31, administra- A Letter to the College Community. tors and the Liquor Control Board were on camThis past weekend Mercyhurst resembled a police state rather than pus to confiscate open containers. This is a usual "Mercyhurst College has, as its purpose, the promotion an institution of higher learning as stormtroopers rolled through occurrence, and is not the reason I'm writing this of the growth and development of the individual student campus breaking up parties and dispersing students harmlessly conarticle. In the past year the definition of "open A Mercyhurst College student is expected to act in a gregating outside. One literally could not walk through the campus containers" has been broadened to include empty manner consistent with the best interest of the college without'being stopped by some authority figure who quickly imcups, or in fact cups containing non-alcoholic community. Rules are essential for the maintenance of a pounded empty cups with little or no hesitation. beverages. Although this rule has been in effect proper atmosphere for academic achievement, therefore Does this mean that a student carrying an open container of coffee to since the beginning of the 97-98 school year, and the College has rules. It is the policy of the College to their 8 a.m. class must keep a paranoid lookout for college officials is written in the student handbook (which I did make rules that are in the best interest of the college.'' bent on enforcing the "no open container" policy? Will students be not receive until Sunday, Nov. 2), protest to the Over the past several weeks, there have been many forced to conceal their empty cups in a brown paper bag like vagrants rule was minimal. There was no protest to this serious incidents resulting in students being hospitalized instead of young adults trying to unwind for a weekend? While college rule because quite simply it was not enforced. for injuries and alcohol poisoning. Also, levels of vandalofficials waste no time in collecting the empty cups on Briggs Ave., V m Now that this rule is being enforced, it is impor- ism have increased with damages to college and personal certain you will not find them confiscating the full wine glasses at any tant to examine the fairness of it. property. Should this be considered responsible behavior? of the school's VIP functions. First, by definition, a student can't carry a cup In an attempt to promote responsible behavior and mainBy Saturday afternoon word had spread of the prior night's happenof coke from their car to their apartment If this tain the safety of the college community, we are in the ings so far and wide that most students knew better than to hop from sounds a bit extreme, it is. If this sounds a bit process of more vigorously enforcing the rules and reguparty to party and at dusk a tumbleweed swept through a ghost town of exaggerated, it isn t. There been two in- lations stated in the Student Handbook. ;v a campus. Those who weren't drinking in dorms or apartments wisely stances in which students were forced to dump We must ensure that some of the tragedies which have resorted to going to the bars and escaped the harassment of the SWAT non-alcoholic beverages en route to their aparttaken place on other campuses do not occur here. Please team. While many plan in advance to have a designated driver, ments. Second, even if the cup is being used for remember that the laws set forth by the Commonwealth of realistically it doesn't always work out and many are forced to get alcohol, is it fair to take the students cup? If the Pennsylvania and Mercyhurst College need to be adhered behind the wheel when they are bordering on that. 10. cup is empty, then obviously the student is con- to by all residents. The Residence Life Staff is not at Rumor has it that the recent crackdown is blamed on a rash of assaults. suming the alcohol in a closed environment liberty to choose which laws to enforce. Moreover, the and vandalism. However even with this weekend's tactics, destruction Iirealize that in light of recent assaults on Security Department agrees wholeheartedly with this campus, it was important for the administration philosophy and has been directed to ensure that the rules of property still ran rampant Wouldn't an increase in visible security to find an immediate.solution. Although their governing the college community are enforced without presence be a more practical approach to counter this problem? I s it intentions may be for our best interest, they are qualification or exception. It is our hope that you will possible that some of the destruction caused Friday and Saturday going about this in the wrong way. The vast support us is our efforts to make Mercyhurst College a nights was fueled by the unanticipated measures adopted by authorimajority of students conduct themselves in a better place in which to live and learn. ties? * If the goal of the recent enforcement is to turn Mercyhurst into a dry manner that is mature, within reason, and are only T v Tyrone B. Moore, out to have a good time. The act of taking empty campus, I urge the college to seriously reconsider its plan of action. Director of Residence Life Would the college rather be plagued by weekly Merciad news of keg cups has only angered the students, and is likely parties or headlines of Mercyhurst college students involved in multo create more problems than it solves. This rule Rodger Gregorich, tiple alcohol related accidents in the Erie Daily News? i nfringes on our personal freedom. The results of Dean of Public Safety this act were not thought through thoroughly. Although the administration will state that this Matt Orysiek rule is written in the student handbook, the enand Fran Rodowicz forcement of it was sprung on the students withThis regards Emilio Colaiacovo. I am presenting this response in a out warning. letter to the editor as I will not stoop to Mr. Colaiacovo's level by The school has incorporated this rule, and we mudslinging and using the confines of my column to do nothing but have no choice but to follow it or face the consesubjectively criticize other Merciad writers with my reaction. Two quences. However, every student living on this weeks ago, I brought up recent instances in The Merciad for discussion campus has over 16,000 reasons why we can as examples to illustrate objective points regarding representation and change the rule. Regardless of what anyone responsibility in writing accurately. thinks, this is our school. The students pay the You, Emilio, did nothing except personally attack, take information out bills, maintain the'campus, and pay the faculty of context, and misrepresent my position(s) along with other inaccurate and staff salaries. Whether any of us realize it or and incoherent information in order to support your own.stance in your not we have a say in what goes on at this school. opinion column. Your dependency on such inaccuracies and others' The student body was not fairly represented when thought is uncreativc and a waste of over a half-page of print space last the "open container'* policy was changed, and week alone. I could bring up here the misleading information you that is wrong. presented regardi ng my writing, tax revenue, etc. but I refuse to rebut you I hope that after reading this letter to the editor point-for-point, as it would only be a further waste of space. I hope that you will not simply set the paper down and say "1 readers of both our columns can critically view content and thus deci- agree." I want every individual that agrees with pher it with veracity. this article to do something about it Where Last year I wrote an informative article regarding issues on abortion in should you begin? Talk to the administration, talk The Merciad. The very next issue, a person wrote in a reaction. While to MSG, write your opinion on the matter, and if attempting tocri ticize, they did nothing but offer support for what I' d said you are one of the lucky ones who was forced to and proved my entire point. Once again, this has taken place. So I will dump a non-alcoholic beverage, have your parend this by extending a thank you Emilio, for proving further what I ents call the school. Although we must approach BOOO! The Merciad Editor-in-Chief poses with the i n tended. this in a mature and responsible manner, it is women of Student Accounts on Halloween. Row 1: In cognizance, important that we act quickly and assertively. Debbie Wurst, Jeanette Britt, Michelle Sanford. Practice what you preach, Sincerely, Row 2: Corrine Ertl, Alice Flanagan, Chris Wloch. Joe Gallagher Brian Ash Ghostin Back: ValerieSisson. Photo: Jessica Russell

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November 6,1997

THE MERCIAD
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By R i c h a r d Costelloe Art Propagandist Examining the consciences of school administrators for i loopholes is like flossing with teenyboppying valley girls headbanging to miscellaneous christian rock while at the same time choking o n fruit-flavored sparkplugs. Obviously, the most advisable course of action is to strangle without mercy or afterthought' B u r s t There are t w o main purposes o r objectives defined for W M C E , 88.5, Mercy hurst College's F M radio .stations T h e primary purpose is to allow the opportunity for communications majors to gain some practical experience in their major. The secondary purpose concerns the college's image in the community, in ?that the station functions as a medium for representing Mercyhurst and its ideals to prospective students and to the general public. The current condition of the station, in regard to these t w o objectives, must b e reconsidered however, following a series of recent developments which have occurred at the station. After a change of staff including the posi -

tions of general manager and all the student administrators, the new and improved W M C E has defined a very questionable interpretation of the two purposes outlined for the station. *One of the policies which has been adopted this year include a restriction for D.J.s in regard to what they choose to broadcast. W M C E .is now a Classic Rock station, as far as student format is concerned. I find this conservative shift from the previous format which had defined the station, quite disturbing. Although the communications?majors are not consequentially restricted from learning the technical aspects of this broadcasting medium., the importance of ingenuity, creativity and expression in this medium have been marginalized. "College Radio" is the only opportunity for both communications majors and other interested students to enjoy this medium, without the restrictions usually associated with "comnjercial" sta; tions of the real world. T h e opportunity for all students to develop, create and express their love of different kinds of music and radio through W M C E has been robbed.

This strikes me as a complete regression back to the average, banal and repulsively complacent mass of radio j u n k in this community. The secondary function of the station is to represent the college with a positive, progressive look, coherent with the image presented through other promotional means. This purpose, I believe, has been severely damaged by the recent changes. Instead of the "Carpe Diem" attitude and image which we value in this college (and which I would defend as having beencommunicated through the station in the past), Mercy hurst's honor is now represented b y "Guns n ' Roses," four times in one'hour. (Forgive me for counting). T h e contemporary W M C E , encompassed by the new staff and format definition, proclaims mediocrity, timidity and unquestionedcomplacency.Thisideological image is a completely absurd representative for the college. I hastily disassociate myself from whatever aspect of Mercy hurst this station* expresses. I recommend, in positive faith, that every show on W M C E , from this moment o n be pre-recorded and broadcast at an exceedingly high rate of speed.

Stasis: Fit
By J o e G a l l a g h er Merciad Columnist On Tuesday, Nov. 4 , the United Nations supposedly sent a representative to attempt to resolve the situation between the USA and Iraq. It makes sense to want a peaceful resolution to come from this. If Iraq should have to open the security of its state borders to allow thorough weapons inspections, then should other political states have to d o this as well? Of course they should. There are other military threats to world order in addition to Iraq. The list includes almost any country having chemical, biological, or nuclear weapons arsenals. It could be called survival of the fittest to have the biggest powers enforce regulations on the rest of the world. But what about these political states attempting to organize a world order? Should they not be subjected to full inspection as well? It can be argued that doing so would pose too great a threat to the security of both that state and the world order. However, not doing s o most definitely will force the submissive state to feel as though its people are being scrutinized by higher powers. Feelings of injustice due to inconsonant practices of major political powers are in no way beneficial to achieving any state of world peace. <> Put yourself in the situation of a citizen who has grown up in a lesser political state of this world and walk a mile before criticizing their hesitancy towards foreign policies of the U N ^ and its influencing powers. You would d o the same. It is human behavior and the desire for autonomy. Remember also, that domestic difficulties and inequalities exist at different levels in all political states of this world. Perhaps w e should strive for unity in order to get to some sort of peace. Understand that political boundaries change throughout history, while peoples' behaviors, emotions and desires remain the same.

M

1999 MISS PENNSYLVANIA USA" MfiEANI

The Merciad
VOL.171 NO. 6
Chris Wloch Jim Gorman Scott Vance Carrie Tappe Bill Melville Randy Hilliard

November 6^1997 Merciad Editors
Copy Editor JimHain Photography Jessica Russell Advertising Stephen Nolan Emilio Colaiacovo Senior Writer Shawntae Howard Cartoons Jerry Trambley Advisor

m * US/l* P*te*"*
I t P O F f t W M G T M O T K 9 U I I E I •

Editor-in-Chief News Editor Sports Editor A & E Editor Features Editor Campus Life Editor

Merciad Staff
John Dedad Todd Zielinski Jamz Porzio Heather Cvitcovic Thfr M
grriad

Joe Gallgher Angela Harris Brian Eichstadt Garret Baur

Marcia Farrell

KIMBERLY JAYCOX Miss Pennsylvania USA

If you are an applicant who qualifies and are between the ages of 18 and 27 by February 1, 1999. never married and at least a six month resident of Pennsylvania, thus college students are eligible, you could be Pennsylvania's represenative at the CBS nationally televised MISS USA PAGEANT In March. 1999. Last year, MISS USA competed for over $100,000 in cash and prizes. The 1999 Miss Pennsylvania USA pageant will be presented at the Palace Inn in Monroeville, Pennsylvania on March 21 and 22,1998. The new Miss Penn]

Rich Costelloe Neil Norberg Jen Harwell

sylvania USA, along with her expense paid trip to compete in the CBS-nationally televised MISS USA PAGEANT will receive over $2,000 in cash among her many prizes All tadies interested in competing for the title must respond by mall.

MltRS W S T I N a N D t l R l C E N I B N ^ ^ inilBF&S AND A PHONE NUMBU. WBITITO: 1999 MISS PINNSYIWANIA | T P A B 0 K T " P A G S X HEADQBABHBS- DIPT W - 34U0MSTBVIMUI WASHINGTON.It 15301- OFFICE P O E N N M i l « - 2 2 5 - 5 3 4 3 1 HN

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Celebrating over 20 years of 'Pageantry with a Purpose'™ 1

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The Merciad welcomes letters to the editor. signed but your name can be withheld on request under certain ^Aiti™* Letters are due on the Tuesday before publication.

Application Deadline Is December 20, 1997 Miss Pennsylvania USA pageant is a Carvern Production

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November 6,1997

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THE MERCIAD

PAGE 9

Shannon Becomes W M C E jManager, Changes
By Nell Norfoerg Contributing Writer The 1997-98 school year has brought many changes to Mercy hurst, and the campus radio station, WMCE, is not exempt The station is run by a new general manager and has switched to a classic rock format at night with traditional classical music during the day. This is a drastic change from previous years when the station played traditional, cutting -edge college radio. The new general manager is Bill Shannon, bringing with him 32 years of experience in the radio business. When asked the reason for the switch he said, "It was a simple decision, WMCE had zero listeners in the evening hours, according to Arbitron ratings." As to why classic rock was chosen. Shannon said, "It seemed like the best option because there was a space in the Erie area market that needed to be filled. I brought the whole staff together and we decided this as a group." In order to institute such a major change the station bought a new library of 4,000 titles. According to Shannon, the biggest beneficiaries of the change are the students-who work at the station. "It brings professionalism to the station. WMCE is run the same way as any commercial radio station. This entails a music format," Shannon said. This year's student manager, Jamie Smith, shares Shannon's enthusiasm regarding the changes. Obviously the station was not popular," she said. "I t's difficult to hear on campus and there was no consistent format of music play. People would come to work and play music according to their tastes, and that is just not how a professional station is run. We would like more 1 isteners, but more importantly we wanted to create a professional environment gfor communications majors that had the feel of a real station.^^^ Smith also commented on why WMCE is so difficult to pick up directly on campus. "Our broadcast antenna is in a bad position (on top of Baldwin Hall). Being up on«?the hill, the signal sometimes passes over parts of campus. "Management is working on moving the antenna, but that is going to mean a frequency change "Smith said. T Eventually, when the move is in place, WMCE will no longer be 88.5 on your dial. However, if a student cannot get a good signal i t is .possible to listen in via your cable television. WMCE broadcasts, along with a community bulletin board, on channel 66 or 14B if you do not have a cable box. Another change this year is a magazine show entitled "Hurst
44 M

Format

Rock Cafe," which airs every weekday at 6 p.m. According to Shannon, this is a show, "by and for the students of Mercyhurst." The "Cafe" consists of segments dealing with sports, entertainment, local and regional news, etc. It also marks the first time that two DJs are allowed to be on the air at the same time. In addition Smith is workingonimplementinga video camera into the DJ booth during the show. This would make it possible to watch the show live via simulcast on channel 66 (14B). The cameras could be in place as early as next week, Smith said. Mike Gratzmiller, one of the two DJs who works on "Cafej said, 'I'm glad about the change. Classic rock is my favorite type of music. If it gets rolling and people outside listen to the station because of it, I think it will prove to WMCE General Manager Bill Shannon be a good change." Photo: Jessica Russell As would be expected with such It is still uncertain whether ratdrastic change, not everyone*in- as broadcasters and makes the stavolved with WMCE was thrilled tion sound better to the commu- ings have increased as a result of about the idea of a format change. nity? However; I have always be- the change. However, Smith said, This led to the resignation of last lieved the status of college radio as "I've heard a lot of positive comare year's student manager, Brian a non-profit platform gave it a ments from other students. We Eichstadt, and Rich Costelloe, the commitment to play new, innova- always open for suggestions." If a tive, and other types of music not student does not like what is being previous music director. Eichstadt, who won the 1997 provided to the community played, they are encouraged let the WMCE Service Award, provided through any other venue. While I station know. The same can be said the following statement regarding do not advocate total chaos; by for someone who likes the new his resignation, "I think WMCE allowing students to run rampant format and wants to be a part of the moved in the right direction by on the air waves, I do believe that action, she said. becoming formatted because it a compromise could have been gives students a better experience met in the musical format."
it

Archaeology Uses O p e n
By Allison Byrnes Contributing Writer On Wednesday, Oct 29, the Mercyhurst Archaeological Institute held its open house in the basement of Zurn Hall. This oneday event was designed to help people see the necessity ol preserving cultural resources as well as shed the romantic and unscientific image that many have about archaeology. Unlike some of the departments previous Open Houses, this one was rather informal. Structured tours were not given, but rather students, faculty, and local folk were permitted to walk around the department at their leisure. Archaeology and Anthropology students were stationed in each of the labs, where they explained to visitors how the different facilities functioned and informed them of the numerous projects with which the department has been involved in the past f Archaeology and Geology students demonstrated some of the various steps in artifact and sample processing, such as artifact labeling and analysis and the extraction of geological core samples. Physical Anthropology and Forensic Anthropology majors described how the detailed examination of human bones can be used to identify the sex, age, and cause of death of deceased individuals at a number of settings including prehistoric sites, crime scenes, and loca-

House to Dispel
Qui nn, lecturer and project archaeologist,. His presentation, "Late Prehistoric Archaeology on the Lake Erie Plain,"summarized what archaeological sites on the Lake Erie Plain have told us about the somewhat enigmatic Erie and Proto-Eric Indians. pThe second lecture. "Exca vations at Erie Land Lighthouse," was given by historical archaeologist Judith Thomas. It recounted this summer'sfieldschool excavations at the Erie lighthouse, which resulted in the discovery of the remains of two much older lighthouses that once stood on the property. Dr. Dennis Dirkmaat, forensic anthropologist, was the final presenter, with his lecture and slide-

Myths

tions of mass disaster. Faculty member David Pedler explained how computers are then used to generate precise maps and reports to organize and present the data recovered from si te excavation and artifact analysis. Junior Forensic Anthropology major Gail Oolec expressed her enthusiasm over the ability of the public to view the goings-on of the Anthropology, Archaeology, and Geology departments* "A lot of people never really get a chance to sec what we do. They see archaeologists as just a bunch ol eccentric weirdoes with shovels but are never exposed to the real scientific and analytical procedures we use." At 6 p.m., a series of three lectures was kicked off by Allen

show titled "Forensic Anthropology: Issues of Context and Association." Dirkmaat explained the wealth of information that forensic anthropology can provide at disaster areas and crime scenes, incl uding body identification and cause of death. "It is the only way for everyone to become aware of the cultural resources that need to be protected and studied with proper methods. This Open House gave us the opportunity to reach out to others besides students so that others can benefit' from our concepts and ideas " Thomas said.

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PAGE 10

Honors Department Sends Delegation to Atlanta
By BUI Melville Features Editor From Wednesday, Oct 22 to Sunday, Oct 26, Dr. Ludlow Brown, professor of philosophy and director of the Mercy hurst College HonorsProgram(MCHP), and six other members of the Mercy hurst com muni ty traveled to Atlanta to attend the annual conference of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC). Brown and the other six, senior Archeology major Bill Meyer, senior finance major Nikki Dobay, junior special education/elementary education major Lesa Bednarski, junior* education major Michelle Borsos, junior education* major Kerri'Mull ins, and Dr. Candee Chambers, assistant professor of physics and chemistry, all presented papers at the conference. Chambers gave a presentation on "Chaos As An Interdisciplinary Honors Course," which offered an overview of chaos and a review of reasons for choosing chaos as a topic. According to Brown, the presentation was well appreciated by the audience. Meyer was involved in three presentations. These includedhisown, a paper entitled "The Shaman's Song: The Mythical Roots of Identity ," a discussion he led with professor John Brennan on the role of science in jt undergraduate education. Meyer also helped with Chambers' one hour presentation. *The conference gave us the chance to; meet interesting and strange people," Meyer said. Dobay led an hour long discussion on the philosophical view of Ayn Rand titled "Ayn Rand: The Glory and the Misery of Objectivism." According to Brown, Dobay's presentation gathered both friends and enemies of Rand's work. Bednarski, Borsos, and Mull ins combined their efforts into a panel discussion called "The Effects of Mental Retardation on the-Fam•»

"Although we were disappointed that our time was cut shorter than we expected, we were happy at how well the audience received our presentation," Mull ins said. £ At the meeting of honors program directors, Brcwn presented his findings on the creation oft a directory of undergraduate journals, their functions and their supporters. Of Mercyhurst's representation at the conference, Brown said, "I think it went well for us, despite the fact that the NCHC is going through some serious growing pains." Additionally, Brown said that the size of the conference has hinleft to right: Lesa Bednarski, Bill Meyer, Michelle dered some presentations for other Borsos, Nikki Dobay, Kerri Muffins schools, because each student might only receive a five minute Meyer, who has attended three ing our work in a broad forum. I'd block of time in which to present a NCHC conferences, expressed like to see more interest on the part paper. This year, nearly seventeen optimism about future con- of students rn coming years. We hundred students from schools all ferences. also need to work out the money over America were present at the "I think the convention gives us situation so that more people can conference, he added. the unique experience of present- attend," Meyer said.*

Bender A d d s Edge to Foreign Language! Department
By Bill Melville Features Editor Last year, both the Mercy hurst Foreign Language and Education departments received a grant which allowed for graduate studies in special and bilingual education. Now those two departments have a professor to i nstruct i n both ofthose subjects: Karen Bender, assistant professor of Spanish. Bender originally hails from Iowa, and attended Iowa State University as a music major, with a concentration in voice and instrumentation. During her fourth year, the ISU band traveled to Mexico, and Bender said that while she was there she fell in love with the language. After finishing a bachelor's degree in music, Bcndei went to the University of Georgia to get a master's degree in Spanish linguistics. "After the trip, I decided I would rather conjugate verbs than teach scales. In fact, Spanish was similar to music for me,*' Bender said. Currently, Bender is working on her doctoral dissertation in linguistics and bilingual education. She has previously taught at Southern Oregon University, attended a teachers' workshop in Spain, and studied for a summer in Mexico. However, Bender does enjoy the change of scenery which her new job offers her. "I like Erie. There's a lot of cultural activity going on here. I like living on the lake, and, after spendingfiveyears withou t cold weather, I miss the snow," she said. About Mercy hurst, Bender said, "Nowhere else have I seen the kind of support and friendly behavior I saw in the faculty here. I've also been impressed by the students. After teaching at two public institutions, I've found that students here are more willing to work." This fall, Bender has taught Basic Spanish and a course in methodology for Spanish majors getting ready to teach. Bender will also teach a course in sociolinguistics for education majors and help to set up the masters program in special/bilingual education, for which she has been given a one class release this term. I n the near future, Bender said she hopes "to offer a di fferent angle on teaching linguistics, and to broaden the range of courses taught" Bender said she also wishes to research her students' behavior in classroom settings by observing how they work together, how they respond to her teaching style, and how male and female students relate in the classroom. Bender al so said she i s anxious to observe student teachers in the classroom. "By researching students in the classroom, I can learn how they work together best and how I can teach them best," Bender said. Outside the classroom, Bender said she wishes to be involved in faculty advising of student organizations, especially the foreign language honors society. Alice Edwards, associate professor of Spanish, said, "We are very glad to have Karen. This gives us another full-time person in the department A lso, she brings specific skills to the department which it didn't already possess. Her focus is in linguistics, while most of the other professors in the department are focused on literature."

Karen Bender, Assistant Professor of Spanish Photo: Jessica Russell

November 6,1997

THEMERCIAD

PAGE 11

L a k e r leers F o u r G a m e W i n n i n g Streak* Comes! to an
By Scott Vance i Merciad Sports Editor
«

End

The Mercy hurst Hockey team's four-game unbeaten streak has come to an end. The Lakers were defeated in the opening round of theR.LT. tournament, despite having a four goal lead. The Lakers did bounce back in the consolation game and they defeated Seneca. Braves 7-1. The Lakers have ah overall record of 5-1, The Lakers got off to a perfect start in their game against Oswego State as Junior forward Scott Ludeviks scored the first two Laker goals. The Hurst furthered its lead by^ another two goals and seemed to be coasting with a 4-0 lead.

The Hurst had a 4-1 lead halfway through the game and it seemed like they* were going to extend their unbeaten record to 5-0. * 'However, the whole tempo of the game changed in the space of 43 seconds when Laker goal tender Ashley Stevens allowed three goals past him to level the scoring at4-4. Senior Captain Mike Massis scored to regain the lead for the Lakers within six seconds of Oswego, drawing level with an accurate wrist shot as he drove to the net Oswego State leveled the scoring for the second time in the game with under a minute left in the second period. The Lakers were to regain the lead midway through the final period courtesy of a John Evangel is ta

goal, but that was not enough as Oswego scored two goals in the final three minutes to,steal the game from the Hurst Oswego State had split games with one of the Lakers' biggest rivals in Division II, Alabama College. Therefore it would have been an important victory for the Hurst M I don't think that it was a matter of choking. 11 was a matter of some guys losing focus on the game. They started to relax and in the league that we're in you can't do that, or something disastrous will happen and it did," said assistant captain Trevor "Stinky" Brandt. The following evening the Lakers played the Seneca Braves and they were not about to throw this game away as they motored to a 71 victory.

lit took the Lakers quite a while to find their rhythm as they were held scoreless for the first two periods. In the third period the Lakers scored; seven unanswered j;goals and they ended the game with a 71 victory.

The Lakers play Canisius in their next game. "I think that after the disappointing loss against Oswego, the team is ready to play our first EC AC game. Our first goal of the year is to win the ECAC and a win against Canisius would be a perfect start," said Brandt

Freshmen hockey players parade through Garvey Park in drag last Thursday much to the chagrin of an onlooker. Photo: Ron Rambally

Men 5 Soccer Uncertain Hockey! Boosters Kick Off First Year About Playoff Spot
By Bill Melville and Chris Wloch, Merciad Editors Z By Stephen Nolan Merciad Sports Writer Over the past several years, Mercyhurst hockey has attempted to start a booster club. Now, the Hockey Booster Organization (HBO) has finally gotten off the ground, and has thrived since its inception a week and a half before this year's hockey season began. * The men's soccer team played its last game on the 1997/98 regular Founding members of the club include grad assistant Misty Smith; assistant director of food services Cheryl season at Ashland University. The Lakers had a lot to prove and came Lenhart, treasurer; varsity hockey coach Rick Gotkin and associate coach Michael Sisti. away with a 4-0 victory and the GLI AC conference title. The Lakers now "Before the first game we decided that we would have this organization even if only five members are involved. Right now we have more than 30 people involved. Everyone's welcome to join," Smith said. have an 11-6-1 record. The team had a relatively easy win over Ashland. They went up 2-0 in Sisti attributes the organization's success thus far to the high visibility which Smith, Lenhart, and food the first half, thanks to two fine goals from freshman forward Allen services director John Washington have given it. I •_. O'Brien. In the second half the Lakers continued this trend and scored "One of our main goals is to get more publicity for the varsity and JV teams. We are the only college in this two more goals. Substitute, Eric Clark, set up the two goals which were area with a hockey team, let alone its own facility," Lenhart said, As a result, the group is looking for more local media coverage of the hockey games. The organization is also hoping to get the teams involved with Erie scored by freshman Lynn Burns and senior Shawn Kroener. i * Goalkeeper Darian Tuitt posted his ninth shutout of the season thanks Youth Hockey. to some great defending by Glenn Francis and team captain Stuart Hogg. "By getting involved in the community, we're hoping to educate others about hockey, have fun and seek out potential players among kids involved in the youth hockey program," Lenhart said. O'Brien now has 13 goals in hisfirstseason. , The Hockey Booster Organization also sponsors catered parties for members after every home game, The Lakers now wait to see if the win against Ashland can squeeze Lenhart said. For the first two games, Nunzi's Restaurant provided the food. After future games, the them into a playoff spot The team is currentlyfifthin the region after Mercyhurst Cafeteria, Pizza Hut and the Buckhorn Restaurant in Harborcrcek will provide food, she said. their defeat to Edwardsville which is ranked first "We'd like to thank food services director John Washington for all the time he has put into the organization," "After working so hard during the season, it's disappointing to have to Smith said. "Coach Gotkin has also been very supportive. He's furnished us with a room up in the ice rink. wait We knew going into the last game of the season that whatever we It's the old lacrosse office. He also loaned us tickets for the 50/50 raffle during the game against Windsor a did was not going to guarantee a place. So we went out there wanting to prove a point We got the scorel ine we deserved, we won 4-0. It s out of few weeks back! Lenhart said that the Hockey Booster room is a good space because it is located in the ice rink where home our hands now. We just have to rely on other teams' results to get us games are played. "This year we would like to transform the office by decorating it with team pictures and through. Whatever happens from now on we know we have undermemorabilia. If anyone has something that they want to contribute, we can use it up there," she said. achieved this season. We just have to hope for the best, said Hogg. On Thursday, Oct 9, Gotkin, Sisti and nine players hosted a seminar sponsored by the booster organization. «We had two or three chances during the season to secure a playoff spot The players illustrated the basics of the sport while the coaches explained various calls. Smith said. The and we didn't There was a lack of commitment from the playersand now organization is planning for more seminars in the future, in addition to skating times with the players and it has come back to haunt us. We are a good enough team to make it if reserved seating at games for HBO members. -" . we do wecan definitely go to thefinalfour. We should • « te» fc. "What's really good about this organization is that we have students, faculty, staff and members of the situation, now we just play the waiting game and hope for the= be*. but community involved," Lenhart said. "It brings a lot of different people together. It's also a really good way Z M very lucky to make it," said Head Coach John Melody. for freshers and commuters to get to know people," she said. * V ^ ! ^ 5 r teams in the region the U k e r s have defeated only one Membership fees for the Hockey Booster Organization are $10 for students, $25 Jor non-students and $40 W - ^ ^ W c * ^ The others Edwardsville. Uck Haven, and for a family membership. Checks and money orders (no cash) can be sent to Box FC 427. For a membership Truman State have all beaten the Lakers. , annii/Hitinn CXT furthor details contact Smith at 2 6 0 9 and Lenhart at 2187,
*

f

November 6,1997

PAGE 12

No "Profit" For Men's B-Ball
getti ng better every day." The Lakers will open the season without captain Maurice Profit, On Friday, Nov. 14 the Laker who is suffering from a leg injury mens basketball season gets un- that will require surgery. Profit will derway with a homecourt battle miss at least the first month of the against Lock Haven in the first 97/98 season and this will be a big round of the.Knobloch Classic loss for the program as Profit was the leading scorer for the Lakers here at Mercyhurst The team, which consists of three last season, with almost a 19-point seniors, five juniors, one sopho- average. The team will miss Maurice's more, and four freshmen has been practicing intensely since Oct. 15. scoring ability and leadership. Head Coach Karl Fogel said that Despite this setback, the coach said he lost a lot of talent when last the team possesses great depth and year's seniors graduated, but he is ability w hie h allow them to remain hopeful that the incoming fresh- competitive in the GLIAC Conference. He said that the team plays men will make up for it Fogel seems happy with the new a hard schedule with /rivals like freshmen that he has introduced Gannon, but is confident that this into the squad saying, "They are years will be a successful one. By Perry Wood \j Merciad Sports Writer

The men's basketball team during one of its practice sessions for the new season

Football Improve Record jTo 5
Swanson Collects Honors as Hurst beats Robert Morris By Todd Zielinski Staff Writer On Saturday, Nov. 8 at 1:30 p.m. the Laker football team will play Ohio WesleyanatTullioField. This will put an end to a very successful season for the Lakers who 1 ook to end it with a bang. For the 17 seniors on the team, Saturday's game will be their last For the rest of the team and the coaches it will mark the end of a season filled with its share of ups and downs. Last week Coach Kimball led the team into Moon Township to play a team which has looked almost invincible in the past, a team which was currently ranked second in the nation at the division IA non-scholarship level, which had only lost two home games in the history of their program, but a team which had already been beaten by the Lakers several years back. For the Lakers that bit of background was encouraging as the sun was nowhere to be found and the rainj droplets fell at an increasing rate. The Lakers* second drive of the game saw junior quarterback Matt Kissel I throw a perfect strike to senior Tim Brediger, who found the end zone 20 yards after the fact On the ensuing drive, -Robert Morris had trouble holding on to the ball, as senior linebacker Keith Swanson made sure the Hurst would capitalize on their mistakes. Later in that very same quarter the Colonials' punt returner fumbled again to give the Lakers another wide-open door, a door which they gladly took, as senior kicker Eric Wicks put the heavily-favored Colonials down 10-0 at the end of the first quarter. The second quarter was a different story as the Lakers struggled to gain yards, while Robert Morris inched its way back into the game. The Laker defense held tough, only giving * up a field goal as the Col on ial s ran nine plays within the Laker 10-yard line. From there, Swanson was on the rampage recovering his second fumble of the game just before the half-time break. Robert Moms came out ready to retain its high rank, tying the game on its second possession from the one-yard line. From there Mercyhurst sustained a five-and-a halfmi nute drive ending up with a louchdow n pass completed to Junior Joe Liotia. At this point the Lakers were in the driver's seat with a seven-point lead and a little undei 10 minutes left in the game. From there the defense turned it up, stopping the Colonial offense on five different drives including Juniorstrong safety Tim Bednarski. intercepting his record breaking eighth pass of the year. Head Coach Joe Kimball said, 'They played constant football alia day long." Kimball pointed out that his team made the "big plays" when they had to and that might have made the difference in beating Robert Morris at home. The Colonials gave * up six turnovers helping the 15-point underdog Lakers hand them only their third loss at home ever. ) For Keith Swan son's performance in the game he was awarded the distinction of EC AC Division II Defensive Player-of-the-Week. His nine tackles, two fumble recoveries, and sack were some of the reasons the potent offense of Robert Morris was held to just 10 points, 20 below their average of 30 per game. For the Laker team a big game is still at hand as they host Ohio Wesleyan. A win this week would give the team a record that would reflect the hard work and execution the team has displayed all year. Coach Kimball said, "We need to end up on a positive note, we want to be 6-3."

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-spot in the^layoffis,"said Head Coach John Melodyiii:.M Mi ••:• •y As a team the Lakers conceded only 13 goals m 17 game^i ivhile scoring 59 goals. M : i i l p S i i WMM M p S l Individually the women s team had its s^tar^,5ophomoTe forward! Theresa Roach broke the nine-year school record for most points scored in a season with 695She ended the season with 29 goals and 11 assists. fif Freshman forwardOliyia Mendicinofiriished second in scoring for the Lakers withl ll The Lakers lose only three seniors this year but they leave behind very large boots to fill. Captain Nicole Esppsitoin defence, Stacie] Bortz leaving behind an empty net, and AllisorijMarsden in midfie^d:.;] "Wc had a great season this year,rightup to the last game, vVe had a very young team with 15 freshmen and sophomores. This will prove essential to us next season because they got a lot of experience this year. Stacie. Nicky and Allison will be a great loss to the team,, jthcywi 1 be tough to replace. We are already looking forward to next 1 season. Hopefally with some good recruiting, and the strong base we will have another good season," Melody said.
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