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MERCYHURST COLLEGE, GLENWOOD HILLS. ERIE, PA. 16546

March 12,1998

Spring Break Trip Opens Students
By Chris W loch Editor-in-Chief During the spring break a group of 27 Mercyhurst students travelled to Myrtle Beach, SC to participate in Habitat for Humanity's Collegiate Challenge from Saturday, Feb. 28 until March 6. The students were accompanied by Campus minister Michele Garvey and Darlene Polk, mother ofjunior Jodie Folk. * J ijj The trip was a lot of fun, and it showed us how much others are in need of our help," saidjunior Katie Con ley. "It gave me a new way of looking at thngs and taught me not to take anything for granted." Junior Courtney Shores also felt that the trip was an excellent way to spend spring break. "It was one of the greatest experiences, and 11 never forget it I feel like I got *1 more out of Habitat for Humanity than 1 put into it." This year, the participants were unable to begin work on a new house for Habitat because heavy rains resulted in extensive flooding. Instead they worked on projects with two other charities, Social Services and Caring for Kids. I . .'. J.. ; . For four days, the particpants worked on a house belonging to Lula Hemingway opLoris, SC a small town about an hour from the Atlantic coast. During the week, they removed garbage -from the back yard, cleaned and painted the interior of the house, moved in a new freezer, installed a new chimney pipe for the wood burning stove, built and painted a shelf and erected walls for an indoor bathroom. A group of six students also painted theexteriorofLula'scousin Ruby's house nearby. "The group went down to South Carolina not knowing what to expect We pulled together to help Lula clean, build and repair her house and yard. Qi ving her and her granddaughter a nicer place to live, a bathroom and many other wonderful things was very rewarding," said senior Kevin Segedi. Junior Mike Gratzmi 1 ler said that he thought the hard work was well worth it. "When we started I thought*whathave 1 gotten myself into?' But by the end of the week I was really glad I had given my time to help someone less fortunate." In order to raise money for the trip, many of the students sold candy bars and solicited donations tocover theexpe nses. The college's Board of Trustees matched the amount raised with a $2,000 gift For many of the students, the trip demonstrated theilharsh realities faced by poor people in our country every day. The area m which they,worked was one in which there was no regular garbage pickup and no indoor toilets for some of the people. "I have never seen the things that I saw down there, but knowing that I really made a difference in someone's life made it easier to deal ;wi th. This was a rewarding experience that everyone should have an opportunity to participate in," said junior Kel ly Magi nn. I experienced so much on the trip that I cannot adequately put i ntowords, "saidjuniprErin Lynch. "The group got along so well and I'm grateful that I got to know them all a little better. Most of all, though, my eyes were opened to the circumstances of poverty." Garvey said that the number of particpants this year was more than double the size of last year's group. "This group of incredible individuals has shown so much love to one another and to the community
*i

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Eyes to

Poverty

Front Row: Tony DeFinto, Laura Smith, Sarah Lamont, Megan Hale Row 2 Darlene Folk, MarisaOrtman, Nat Majoris, Jodie Folk, Mike Gratzmiller, and Kevin Segedi. Row 3: Lou D'Ambrosi, Katie Conley, Erin Lynch, Courtney Shores, Kelly Magihn, Paula Donnelly, Jen Manieri, Michele Garvey. Row 4: Amy Kovach, Leah Corrigan, Tracy Bacik, Sarah Reynolds, Joe Sawyko, Janel Beaver, Debbie Black. Photo: Chris Wloch "Our site coordinator, Judy, told of Habitat for Humanity," Garvey said. "When they came,back after us that * we are the hands and feet of working in dirt and paint, they Christ here on earth.' This is so smiled and wondered what the true because each student lives the projects would be for the next day. witness.To everyone who particiWe spent long days working on pated in the Habitat project I want site and talked late into the night to say thank you for showing me about the experience we were all Christ in you. I love you. Let's do tt sharing. it again next year.

Women's History Month Events Begin Thursday
By James Gorman News Editor The month of March is known as Women's^ History Month and Mercyhurst will be honoring this celebration by coordinating numerous events. On Thursday, March 12, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., there will be an AIDS awareness red carnation and red ribbon sale in the Hermann Union lobby, sponsored by the Minority Student Union. Information will also be distributed by the Family Health Council. On Friday March 13 and 20, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. there will be a Special Woman Awards Postcard Project. Each student is encouraged to stop by and send a post card to a special woman in her/his life. Mercyhurst College will pay for the postage of one card per student. This event will also be held in the Hermann Student Union. On Monday, March 16 from noon to 1 p.m., Women's History Month B rown Bag Luncheon will be held in the Mercy Heritage Room. Bring a sandwich and a beverage*? Cookies will be provided. On Wednesday March 18, there will be a poetiy reading where anyone can read a poem written by or about a woman. This activity will be held in the Government Chambers. Coffee house begins at 8:30 p.m. in the Union where Sister Sky will be performing. On Thursday March 19, from 11 a.m. to lp.m. Cancer Awareness will be addressed, a pink carnation and ribbon sale by the MSU and information from the American Cancer Society will be available. On Monday March 23, Woman's History Month Speaker Maxine Maxwel I will give a speech called "Echoes of the Past." ? On Wednesday, March 25, there will be Eating Disorders Awareness Screenings and Educational Success from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.. At

5 p.m. there will be the Woman's History Month Dinner in the Grotto at a cost of $5 per person. Mary Baird, {acting President of the Ophelia Project in Erie will be the guest speaker. For more information contact Alice Edwards at ext. 2548 or Cass Shimek at ext. 2433 for reservations. On Thursday March 26, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Peace Awareness will be observed in the lobby of the Union. Also, white carnations and white ribbons will be sold by the MSU. They will also have information on domestic violence and area shelters. At 6 p.m. there will be a women's roundtable discussion. It will be attended by women from a wide variety of occupations who will discuss the opportunities! and challenges that they have faced] in their career paths. This event] will be sponsored by MSU and will be held in the Government Chambers.

D o r o t h y K i r k in

R e c o v e r

Dorothy Kirk, administrative assistant to President William P. Garvey, suffered an aneurysm at home Wednesday night, March 4, shortly after calling 911 for her 89year-old mother who had fallen. Dorothy underwent a seven-hour surgical procedure the following day to clamp the blood clot surrounding the parent arteries. She will remain in Intensive Care at Hamot Medical until the weekend. She was able to speak in short For almost 3 decades, Dorothy sentences and remember events has managed the President's Of- from before the aneurysm. fice at Mercyhurst for Dr. Garvey Dorothy's mother suffered a broand two of his predecessors Dr. ken arm and hip. She underwent Marion Shane and Sr. Carolyn surgery on Wednesday to have her Herrmann. Beginning in 1973 hip pinned. Dorothy attended Mercyhurst as a Garvey said that Dorothy has student while working as a secre- been sorely missed in his office for tary. In 1986 she graduated with an the past week. "We're all deeply associate's degree in the 1 i bcral arts concerned and hope that she'll soon and in 1989 she received her be back at her desk. She's served thecollegefor30ycarsand its hard bachelor's in American Studies. On Wednesday, March 11 Dor- to imagine Mercyhurst without othy had the respirator removed. Dorothy."

PAGE 2

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March 12,1998

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Belovarac Serves Country in Japan
By James Gorman News Editor
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During the past trimester break, Dr. Allan Belovarac, History professor at Mercyhurst College went to Japan with the Navy Reserves as an Intelligence Officer. While stahue's Pinochet Bids Farewell as Army Head;: tioned at Yokota Air Base in Japan, the American unit worked closely with U.S Forces Japan, a By Gerret reserve uni t for the Japanese Army. CorifrMti As a result of a bilateral agreeOn Tuesdav S$&'!lO&&enerajt Augusio t^nocnei: reiu-ea:.«is CORH- ment devised by the U.S. after mander-in-chiefof the Chi lean: Army m a festive ceremony marking the World War 11, Japan i s not allowed end of his 2A vears at'the post;:The ceremdriy aJsb marked the end of k. to have a military for offensive purposes, and the size of the army 65 year:imlttery cattierlorrthe 82^yeaT^ e n i s very small. Therefore, the United guests and 3,000isoldiers;attenMed the:pea>ii|y guarde4.c$^nfedj? h ^ 1 States has a large military presence in Japan in order to assist in its v'Thanks, thanks to this: homeland of mine; Ihave^ been a soldier and defense. The U.S unit supports an r exercise component in Fussa, Jathat mhkm m6feappy? fttf^fe|$|a(ii(liiiitWmMxnm^^^p^nm^Wiamg: pan at Yokota Air Base. his ofTiceibver -to; his sueeesstit^B^ Belovarac, as a member of the : : : : : .v PiijcHmet «ame(o : ^wi'-^ '.l^^^ Navy reserve, must participate in a Salvador Allende in abloodycoup.lHeitnstalled himself as a dictator;: command post exercise. These „d issol vingcongressand outlawing political parties, InadditioniBnochet;: missions are simulations or dry set out on a witch-hunt 1 n an efTort to round-up all left wi ngers in Chi \e>: The gf^ieral remaSlecJin poW.et-ftjji: J7 ycaj^ijtjejpfJjng d®TOSS:JS88 after runs, which do not involve the participation of active fleets or forces. This particular exercise lasted : : Now that Pinochet has retired from the military he is freetoassume^a eight days and Belovarac served >• :Bfj>4on$,^i^iBC^:$^ (^:^W^sfor>p^$| : . presidents servirig at least six^ears^jte:pfnise>.• :g^^^::^;S5L^S^SS^*5t^^S?:: |:-x; Many Chileans are happy to seePinbehetgcsand are opposed to his taking a seat in the senate;: There: is a large anti^Pinochet movement m By James Gorman : : : Cttle because :<3; .sey^ral jnjustice$i thai occurred durfti^:jhis:irei^:a$i: News Editor Jdictator. Itis befc&ed th^s6ii^;3,00O;»^l& k|lle<i^:|the; 17 J f 0 ^ ; t j ^ This year the Mercyhurst senior opposition!:Senate Chairman Sergio Romero announced lastweek that class gift will consist of a coffee bar* which will be located in the speculation aiidutiwncn he:would itffi^lyitakfejrais^ library in the former Montgomery Room. Many changes will be made to the former Montgomery Room, including new seating, lighting, By Randy Hilliard $ vending machines for beverages Staff Writer and snacks. A snack bar will also
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be open in order to sell an even wider*variety of beverages and snacks.;The snack bar will sell coffee, juices, bagels, muffins and a host of other items. The snack bar will be open for three hours anight so students can use this facility during the hours at which they study. The purpose of the coffee bar is to create a facility where students can relax and take a break from studying. Senior R/IAP major Emilio Colaiacovo said, *This is a very unique and practical idea, and will provide a long-lasting tribute to thisfineinstitution." Ruairi Gleeson is the administrator who is in charge of this project, and the student coordinators are Kevin Segedi, Tom Bender, Karen Milinovich, Sarah Allen and Jennye Vetter.

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lMarine Colonel Richard Mik^e, c«mi^nip^;^ sponsible for tailing20 peopteiinacabfe ^ By Jamz Porzio : Staff Writer beaten with a hammer by an unMbhtifled man;i'ast:pri'da^: i* Trombino, 43> was taken to a hospital near the northern Italian resort; town, Pordenone, after receiving countless blows to the head and body,- This month SAC is addressing Officf&ls have not ruled oiifthe attorney's connection to tne;^ S. Manirie f the celebration of Women's His4^ *W^ i 4» *ftLP P p 4 P | i •* * * * * * • * . aft4 * ' a * * • ft a 4W '# a • i.* * * i ' **•***V *%•%***•* ' • • * fc*4 -^ • * • • 4 P 4 4f 4 P P • - * ' • • » 4 4 P » 4ftt 4 * aft*ftPft^pP 4 - 4 f P i • P P 4 4 4 4 * » • *» • • * • •_*_•„' • t . I 4 4 I

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charged Italian citizens are outraged by for incident; a ting negligence with manslaughter as a motive the I r o W i ^ Many and irresponsibility for the tragic accident. Conspiracy thc^p#$ts cjai;ii^ that the U.S. military is attempting to hide lnfoiroatwni.fo^^ the: plane's flight recorder, whiie Italian officials arc asking Washittgtbn to j forfeit therightto lead any criminal proceedings from (he. investigation, U.S>Italian relations have been strained by the incident. Accorcfiijig to U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albrighl, the United States and Italy are allies and have responsibilities to each other. Albright commended thei collaboration between the U.S, and. Italian governments -in' this investigation, while assuring the angered Italian r^ople that the United!; States will do everything in its power to find but the whole truth;and ensure that something like this will never happen auain^
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Banic hek, theThough t Reader, wi 1 day. 1 be appearing in the Taylor Little On Tuesday, SAC will present Theater at 7 p.m. the movie, GJ. Jane, at 9 p.m. in On Saturday March 14, MSG is the Union Great Room. holding Monte Carlo Night in the On Wednesday, the 18th, a twotory Month. On Thursday March Great Room. MSO is fund raising day Scavenger Hunt will begin. 12, there will be Red Carnation fort the A.L.S. Foundation for For details, meet in the Union at and Ribbon Sales at the Informa- people with Lou Gehrig's disease. 8:30 p.m.. tion Tablefor Family Health Coun- There are seven packages to be At 2 p.m., the annual Women's cil. The table is set up in the Stu- won such as dinner and movies, a History Month Poetry Reading dent Union from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.. breakfast pack, and many others. will be presented in the GovernHowever, the-Worn en's History It will be held at 8 p.m. ment Chambers. Finally from 9:30 Month Film for Discussion as There will be a Women's His- to 11 p.m. at Coffeehouse, Sister stated on the March Activities Flier tory Month Brown Bag Luncheon Sky, a women's band, will be perhas been canceled. from Noon to 1 p.m. in the forming. On Friday, March 13, Steve Mercyhurst Heritage Hall/Mon-

March 12,1998

THEMERCIAD

PAGE 3

African American ChoralfEnsemble to Perform Saturday
By Carrie Tappe A&E Editor Uplift and sensitize. Help people remember history and reconsider the future as the Indiana University African American Choral Ensemble embarks on a musical journey of formally composed works by African American artists at the Mary D'Angelo Performing Arts Center of Mercyhurst College on Sat, March 14 at 8 p.m. Hear a selection of spirituals, various genres of folk music, trad itional and contemporary' gospel music and popular songs, performed by this group of more than 50 singers. Since its founding in 1975, the Choral '.Ensemble has been devoted to presenting and promoting the rich and varied traditions of African American choral music. Sojourner, Soul-ACE, and God's Progress—three contemporary gospel groups drawn from the Ensemble'membership—provide a special feature on Choral En-

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semble programs. The group has been engaged in venues ranging from schools to large concert i halls throughout the Midwest and Eastern United States. | O n Monday, March 16,| Under the direction of Dr. James Ithejfamed Dartmouthl E. Mum ford, the Choral Ensemble I Glee Club and D'Angelol is an academically-based group whose creative efforts are focused • School of Music Concert" exclusively on presenting the fin- Choir will present a con-J est in contemporary and traditional I cert irfthe Performing| works by and about African | Arts Center at 7:30 p.m.j Americans. A successful performer, comI The 128-year-old touringi poser, educator, and musical and I choir is a mixed chorus' vocal director, Mum ford has been J of 40 voices with a re per-J a member of the Institute staff since 1976 and'.Director of the • toire ranging from largei Choral Ensemble since 1983. The 11 choral masterworks,aj ensemble has premiered several of African American Choral Ensemble to perform in PAC I capella works, choruses! his original compositions while others, including Black Nativity I from operas and musi-l and Ebon-One, have gained recogTickets are currently on sale for TheSpriiig3FilinSeriesbe.;ilcais spirituals and folk! nition through television presenta- the show and cost $7 adults, $5 for gu«^:n^i|:MeddMb!^ 9 J songstothespirited songs. tions. In 1993, Mumford was in- President's Card Holders, seniors ducted into the Faculty Collo- and s tude n is, and $3 for Me rcy h u rs tMarch 18 mth^Brbtlier's • of Dartmouth Collegej quium on Excellence in Teaching students with ID. For more infor- K « per" in the PAC a t 8 FreeforPresident's Card| program,fa prestigious honor at mation call 824-3000. ptiiiioiFree !to Jvlepcyfturst Holders and Mercyhurstl Indiana University. students with IBmimi»$M
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ishment for mistreating Simon's By James Hain dog, Melvin finds himself forced Merciad Writer into caring for the canine. Melvin develops a fondness for the dog. The basic premise of As Good As Simon slowly-recovers from As It Gets is that everyone has the physical and emotional damsome good in them, but sometimes age of the attack, hefindshimself, you have to look very deeply in for better or worse, bound to the order to find it That's certainly outrageously homophobic, racist, true of Melvin Udall (Jack sexist Melvin. Nicholson), an obsessive-compulAlso drawn in is Carol (Helen sive novelist working on his 62nd Hunt), a waitress in Melvin's fabook. ff vorite restaurant, who finds herWhen we first meet Melvin, he self repulsed and at the same time is chucking his neighbor's tiny dog ^ intrigued by Melvin's obnoxious down the garbage chute. It's a j behavior.* When Melvin performs brave way to introduce your main an unexpected act of kindness tocharacter, and writer-director ward her, Carolfindsherself beset James L. Brooks doesn't pull any by mixed feelings. On one hand, punches. In the opening scenes— she is overwhelmed with gratitude. indeed, for the first hour—Melvin On the other, she is suspicious of is almost irredeemably unlikeMelvin's motives. able. It's made clear that some of At the 'heart of the film is this stems from his psychological disorder, but also that most of it is Nicholson's bravura performance probably just dyed-in-the-wool as Melvin. Even at his worst, it's hard to hate Melvin. Melvin seems nastiness. more like a hopeless screw-up than Melvinfivesby routines, and he a' monster-*-an Archie Bunkerfinds them upset by unforeseen type capable oi both vile prejudice circumstances. His gay neighbor, and incredible kindness. A lesser Simon (Greg Kinncar), is brutally actor could easily have blown the assaulted in a robbery and. as puncharacter by making him either too mean or too nice, but Nicholson is just right Helen Hunt shines in a difficult role as the waitress torn between her commitment to her son and her need for companionship. Greg Kinnear shows impressive acting chops as Simon, the introverted artist who finds himself trusting Melvin more than, perhaps, he should.
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ivi'th'" Goldie's tro with Gold.e s trademark bass i ^ ^ g g j ^ ^ g . ^ veriMSfcbut lacks locus ana airecj «r««-ftiap $$} especially on the first disc. Even though this release has some good tracks. I suggest people save timeand money by avoiding this alburtL t
possesses disesses

electronic artists, his album rei crttrcai .aceiI at m but <:^ not -.> _ u.,# did . ceived WW ^M:m^-^MmSm become very popular amongmanv Stream American listeners, No longer the king of the jungle scene, Ooldie continued to work with iother musicians and his label but

PAGE 4

THE MERCIAD

March 12,1998

By Mareia Farrell Merciad Columnist

Caffeinated Parasolsii The End of. Well... the End
office sales. Every day that I go anywhere I hear about how soand-so hooked up with so-and-so, or how this person wishes that they could have a significant other because these people do. What is up with that? Either the world is inundated with hormones, orsomething else is going on. * Talking to my best friend the other day, I was reminded of a line in the movie "Sabrina" (the Julia Ormond/Harrison Ford version). One of Sabrina's friends in Paris told her, 'You are embarrassed by being alone. It's only a place to start" When I look at most of the people around me, this quotation seems not only appropriate, but an exact description. Wherever I go it seems the main topic of conversation is usually about so-and-so's latest desire or about someone crying that they are unable to meet anyone. Day after* day it is the same thing — people wanting to be with someone, or people trying to hook someone up with someone else. The unattached are continually scouting for opportunities and then weeping over flaws in the plan while the attached meddle so that they aren't the only one's attached. Now, I ask a favorite question of mine, why? Why are we so humiliated to say that we are not "seeing" anyone? Why are our models people who will break their necks tofind"true love?" And why, for goodness sake, can we not enjoy the precious gift of being alone, rather than over wasting our time mooning people of the opposite gender 24 hours a day? In three months the seniors will be saying good-bye to their college years and moving on to new phases of their lives. I wonder, how many of us have wasted away our years here doing nothing
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I have a confession to make to those of you w ho actual I y read my column. I am a hopeless romantic. I am a sucker Iorhappy-ev er-afters. I melt at the sight of chivalry. I really do believe in things like fate and make-believe and meant-tobe's. I even cry at Hallmark commercials. I think that people have the right to be individuals — that is, without upsetting the overall harmony of existence. And, I do not think that I am the only one out there. If I were the only one, then there would not be such a grand following of Fox's "Ally McBeal," who has become the spokeswoman for romantics around the world. Why is that? Why are we so drawn to the pursuit of "love" and dreams? According to James Cameron his 'Titanic" is basically a love story amidst the setting of the terrible disaster — and that - a so-called "chick's movie" — is 7 topped only by "Star Wars' in box

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I wonder, how many couples out that maybe we need to start lookthere are truly happy. I don't mean ing at life a little differently. The that cutesy "Oh, look, there's my point of NOW is not to "hopefully whatever." I mean really happy. meet my future soul mate." There How many people are suckered is no reason why anyone should into relationships because they feel embarrassed by being alone, cannot stand being alone, but in the and it is utterly disgraceful that process haveclost who they are there are people out there who feel because they were never really the need to question others' states comfortable with being them- of being alone. Just as it is wrong selves to begin with? If you cannot for people to smirk or give that define yourself without your knowing smile when people profess their comfort with being partner, then who are you? , I am not suggesting that every- alone. To each his own SELF. As one should suddenly throw off all the quote from Sabrina conpartners, all interests—I just think cludes, 'It's only a place to start." # • • • .fjf.f. •«•.?. •• . J* .•. t • • • .?. •.• .•. •. .•)• . • • .•. .• •. .•. •. .•. • • 9t • J G ^ S ^ ^
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THE MERCIAD
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Losing my religion
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By Randy Hilliard Campus Life Editor As my third year of college d raw s to an end I am forced to remember one of the first things I was told here at Mercyhurst*T"can remember it very clearly because I have often reflected on it as I studied various cultures, histories and philosophies. Father Steve Andersen was teaching a section of English Composition in which I was enrolled and as a class we read an opinion column about the place of religion in higher learning. The essence of die article was'"hang your religion at the door and pick it up in four years.'' I couldn't believe the audacity of this and swore that I would always subordinate what) read to that which I knew was fact, that which I had learned in church and Sunday school for the first 22 years of my life. Well, I guess that I wasn 't true to

my words, as sincere as they were at the time. I have consistently subordinated my religion to other spiritual notions and philosophies and often found it within reason to believe that Christianity has been the catalyst of countless massacres throughout the history of the medieval "'and modern world\ And what's more, I have come to believe that com m unism and the millions of murders attributed to the vanguard of that system would not have been possible without using Christianity as its model.' And to top all of that off,.I had to stop attending church regularly so that I could work on Sunday mornings to be able ta afford this opportunity to deny my maker and search for other acceptable solutions to what I already know to be true. What really brought this to my attention as a problem was a recent conversation I had with my fiancee. We were talking about how we thought the best way to start a family was and where religion fit into that picture. (For those of you who know me I 'm sure that you'll agree that I always have something to say about something or at least some pseudo-intellectual explanation for any dilemma at hand,

and for the fortunate few who don' t know me on a personal level; I really do think I know it all) Anyhow, I was speechless. For once I didn't have a clue about what to say. I realized that I really had "left my religion at the door." I tried to explain my stance on organized religion, especially that of the Judeo-Christian tradition to no avail. I was a mumbling mound of disjoined vowels and consonants, all of which made no sense. And now, more than a week later, I still don't know exactly what I think about religion or what I really believe in terms of spirituality. A dream that I had a few nights ago pretty much sums it all up though. I was walking across the stage to get my diploma on graduation day and embossed in gold on a sheet of parchment paper was a huge question mark. Then Dr. Garvey shook my hand and smiled as he said "Congratulations, now you know the point of life." Maybe life is all about questioning reality, or maybe we should all be mindless slaves to a system that keeps us occupied with thoughtless tasks, I don't know. What I do know is that it all seemed so obvious three years ago.

tragedy that should have been prevented
that barring the dri nking of alcohol from those who exercise-caution will somehow alter the lifestyles Rarely does anyone ever influ- of those who present a danger to ence the subject matter of my col- themselves and others. I merely umn.?'However, I was.asked by suggest that we reflect as a peer someone very special to comment community to re-examine our ona very serious problem. On Sun- value system and rate the imporday mornings, my parents and I tance of the events in our lives.. (when I am home) wake up early to Unfortunately, Scott Krueger read the paper and watch the politi- never had the ability to do so. In the cal shows on T V. If anything, our end, he will never experience the family embodies Aristotle's belief wonders of life. He shall never see that humans are pol itical creatures. the sun rise again, he will never This Sunday, the Buffalo News hold a child in his arms, and he will did a story on Scott Krueger, a never express his love to those he native of Orchard Park, NY, who cherished. In* retrospect, this died earlier this year after consum- simple vice took everything from ing a lethal amount of alcohol at a him and his family. This is a lesMassachusetts Institute of Tech- son that we all must reflect upon nology frat mixer. After reading because it could have so easily this article, my mother asked me to been one of us. write briefly about this potential Later in this poignant article, danger which could inevitably af- Dr. Schwartzstein stated, "Virtufect us all. After being so moved ally every weekend during the year, by; this article, I felt obliged to when colleges are in session, teencarry out her simple request. agers are brought into our emerAccording to Dr. Richard M. gency department a with alcohol Schwartzstein, chief of the Divi- poisoning. Most survive. But the sion of Emergency Medicine at the difference between those who surBeth Israel Deaconess Medical* vive and those who do not is priCenter in Boston, Scott was found marily luck: Someone brought 1n the basement of an fraternity them to the hospital in time. They House in a deep coma. Evidently, were placed on their stomach inthe amount of alcohol in his body stead of their back. They didn't prevented the blood supply to his vomit and block the i r airways with muscles which inevitably led to the contents of their stomachs. Do his vomiting. Yet, when his over- we want to leave the survival of filled stomach released its con- our children to luck?" tents, his esophagus and his wind- While many of us gamble with pipe became blocked. As a result, our lives each weekend, I offer a the liquor penetrated hist lungs challenge to those who believe which prevented theflowof oxy- that they are immortal. Are you gen to the brain, ft was this oxygen willing to trade your life, and all deprivation that killed Scott. While that is entailed with living, for a many believe that this tragedy simple,weekend? J would hope could never happen to them, it hap- you would answer NO! While we pened to Scott Krueger who felt must continue to make careful and prudent decisions, I still believe just as impervious and naive. While I refrain from casting the mat as young Americans we can first stone, I must admit that I too experience fun and excitement have sometimes drunk excess- with casual drinking. However, I?j ively. Looking back on this juve- ask all of you to remain cognizant nile frivolity, in many respects I of the potential consequences that was playing with my own life. Yet, are related to alcohol abuse. I enlife is too precious to be abused in courage all of you to think of these such fashion. While moderation is consequences as well *as Scott I acceptable,'- it is the heightened Krueger the next time you venture^ abuse of alcohol which led to this out for a weekend whether it be on tragedy. We must not foolishly this campus or others across this impugn our intellect by believing land. Though Scott no longer has that the total abstinence of alcohol this opportunity, you all do and I pray you use it wisely. will remedy our difficulties. I do not comprehend the notion By Emilio Colaiacovo Senior Writer

The Merciad
VOL. 71 NO. 14
Chris Wloch , Jim Gorman Scott Vance Carrie Tappe Bill Melville \ Randy Hilliard

March 12,1998 Merciad Editors
Jim Hain Copy Editor Photogtaphy Jessica Russell Advertising Stephen Nolan Emilio Colaiacovo 1 Senior Writer ^^^^^ ShawntaeHoward Cartoons Advisors »Jerry Trambley

Editor-in-Chief News Editor Sports Editor A&E Editor Features Editor Campus Life Editor

Merciad Staff
John Dedad Todd Zielinski Jamz Porzio Heather Cvitkovic Joe Gallagher Angela Harris^ Brian Eichstadt Perry Wood Marcia Farrell
Rich Costelloe Neil Norberg Genet Baur

The Merciad is the student -produced newspaper of Mercyhurst College. Box 161, 501 East 38th St. 16546. Phone:824-2376.

welcomes letters to the editor. | ^^ ^^ signed, but your name can be withheld on request under certain conditions. Letters are due on the Tuesday before publication.

PAGE 6
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M e r c y h u r s t Loses O n e of Its Strongest Voices
long. Law will be a good profession for him, since he's an excellentconniver. Plus, his Republican When it comes to being visible rhetoric infuriates you and makes on campus at Mercyhurst, few you tired of arguing with him," 'i ' • people are seen more than senior Gorman said. "Once I drove through the gates, R/IAP major Emilio Colaiacovo. For the past four years, Colaiacovo I knew Mercyhtirt was the only has managed many extracurricular place I wanted to go," Colaiacovo activities, maintained a 3.7 GPA,| said. "I've really enjoyed the R/ and has also gotten the entire cam- IAP program, and all the opportupus to talk about some of his more nities which Mr. Heibel (Robert controversial editorials in The Heibel, director of R/IAP) told us 1 about have come true. ' MerciadL About Colaiacovo, Heibel said, "In Emilio, I see the kind of student I love working with. He's "With Emilio, whatyousee is what interested in a wide range of things. you get, because of how focused He also holds some very strong he is. You have to respect Emilio, opinions, and even though I don't even though you might not always always agree with them, he de- agree with him. College has helped fends them well," Dr. Michael to season and temper his view of Mc Q ui 1 e n, profes sorofh i s tory and life. He's still a conservative, but 1 director of the history department, college has shown him the other side of the coin." said. Through the R/IAP program, . After attending St Joseph's Col legiate Institute in Buffalo, NY, Colaiacovo was able to complete Colaiacovo originally wanted to two i n terns hi ps. For the first one, attend Niagara University for a during the summer of 1996, criminal justice degree. However, Colaiacovo worked with iU.S. Colaiacovo's friend Jim Gorman, Customs in B uffalo, NY, where he a senior R/IAP major, told him helped in searching vehicles for about the R/IAP program at contraband at border crossings. Mercyhurst, which was closer to The highlight of the internship, Colaiacovo said, was being part of what Colaiacovo wanted to do. "Emilio and I have been friends a Secret Service detail for former for eight years, attending both high . Senators B ob Dole and Jack Kemp school and college together. 11 will during their visit to Buffalo while be i n teres u n g for us to go our sepa- campaigning for the presidency. For the ; second internship, rate ways, since we've been fixtures in each other's lives for so . Colaiacovo went to Washington, By Bill Melville Features Editor D.C., where he worked for the National Security Agency (NSA). Heibel said that Colaiacovo was the first analyst intern at the NSA. Colaiacovo said the highlight of this internship was shadowing Barbara MacNamara, the deputy director of the NSA, for a day. "They were both wonderful places where I got to put my classroom knowledge to good use,'* Colaiacovo said. £•" sDuringhis four years, Colaiacovo has been involved in several disparate areas. He helped to set up the Mercyhurst Intelligence Research Student Association (MIRSA), of which he is currently the president Colaiacovo has also been involved with Campus Ministry, serves as a eucharistic minister, and is a seni or representative i n the college senate. He is currently a Resident i Assistant on South Briggs, and has written editorials for the Merciad for three years. Last year, Colaiacovo was elected to the position of MSG secretary, which he said he believes to be one of his greatest accomplishments at Mercyhurst During the campaign, Colaiacovo said he went to every apartment building and introduced himself to everyone he could. '1 was very proud that my heavy campaigning helped me to win the position," Colaiacovo said. "Emilio went door to door and introduced himself, and a lot more people voted because of his cam-

Emilio Colaiacovo Photo: Jessica Russel 1
paigoing. He's ak phenomenal speaker, and the political foundation he has created here will help him in the future," Cass Shimek, MSG advisor, said. '< "Cass has been wonderful in helping me to see the things on this campus that need to be changed," Colaiacovo said. During his term as MSG secretary, Colaiacovo said he was most proud of the Student Forum held earlier this year, an event, which, as Colaiacovo said, "a lot of peopl e thought would never come together." Colaiacovo served as the Student -Forum's moderator as well. For Colaiacovo, leaving will be sad, but also fulfilling. "While I was here, I really found my niche and found who I am. Mercyhurst has been a great place to live, learn, and play," he said.*

Psychology Department Represented at Boston
By Richard Cost el loe Staff Writer ?) > '
*

Conference

Spring break provided several members of the Mercyhurst community the opportunity to present at the annual Eastern Psychological Association Conference.] This year the convention was held] in Boston, from February 27 to March,!*\I" Attending from Mercyhurst were three psychology majors, sophomore Sue Toner, seniors Aaron Stankiewiz and Beth Shultz, and Dr. Marilyn Li vosky, assistant professor of psychology. Stankiewiz and Shultz used this opportunity to

• present research they had conducted i n association with Livosky on gender bias and prejudice in children. >. , Although many studies on gender bias have been conducted in i the past, a very insignificant number have focused upon the attitudes expressed by children. Following a study designed by Etaugh and-Rose, Stankiewiz and Shultz had 81 children read six stories and ' then provide reactions. These redactions were then evaluated in rcJo biases toward subject matter and authors of a masculine, 1 feminine or neutral orientation. "| I Livosky explained that the pre- • *
*

diction going into this study was of the author. pressed how well the entire trip that gender biases would be exBoth Stankiewiz and Shultz said had gone, especially in regard to pressed stronger in a younger the amount of interest shown for population, however their re- that they were very pleased with their research. the conference. Livosky also exsearch suggested quite the opposite. The study conducted by Stankiewiz and Shultz concluded that gender prejudice seemed to be expressed stronger by preadolescent girls than boys of similar age. This result was derived from the evaluations of the girls, which significantly favored the texts ori ented towards one gender which had also been written by authors of that sex. Boys within the same age group seemed to favor masculineoriented texts regardless of.the sex Left toright:Aaron Stankiewiz, Beth Shultz, Dr, Marilyn Livosky Photo: Sue Toner tt
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March 12,1998

THE MERCI AD

PAGE 7

ill

M e n ' s L a c r o s se O p e n S p r i n g S e a s o n with 1-2
By Todd Zielinski Sports Writer well. Kravitz will take over most of the starts in goal this year and has proven he can hold his own Fresh off a week spent in Vir- between the posts. This year the ginia the men's lacrosse team is lacrosse team will feature their looking forward to starting the sea- "Canadian crash" line made up of son. The team played several na- Zac Aitkin, Paul Sallie, and Steve tionally ranked opponents includ- Voituk who have been playing toing the University of J Virginia, gether for nine years, but now play Drexel University, and Roanoke on the second line adding a much College. The team's first home needed offensive punch. game will be March 24, at3 p.m. in The team's first test against the Erie Stadium. Roanoke ended up to be the easiest According to assistant coach of the three. Plagued by penalty Lang, the team should experience minutes, the Lakers found themsuccess through a balance of lead- selves down 5-3 at half time. That ership and youth. Freshman Gavin would be as close as they would Prout and Derek Kravitz are two come as Roanoke pulled away in players to keep an eye on. Prout is the third and fourth quarter. The one of the teams most talented final score ended up a distant athletes in the midfield but can 11-6. | ] play both offense and defense as The Lakers' next oDDonent number-three ranked in the nation, University of Virginia proved to be an even tougher game. According to assistant coach Lang, the team played well defensively, but Virgina simply had a more talented team. The rakers lost 11-2 with goals scored by, junior Jon Savage and fab fresher Gavin Prout. Fresher goalie, Derek Kravitz was outstanding, stopping 20 shots in the loss. Mercyhurst's last game against Drexel University was their last game down south before they headed back up to sunny Erie. The Lakers fell victim to an early offensive attack by Drexel and stayed i n that defensive mode the whole game. Team captain Senior B ruce Alexander led the way for the Lakers

record

The Lakers practice for their upcoming spring season

By Carrie Tappe A & E Editor

C r e w T e a m R e a d y for Season after T o u g h Spring? Training

Along the shores of Summerton, S.C. The Mercyhurst College crew team spent 10 days of intense traimng over spring break. More than 70 athletes from the men's and women's Varsity, JV, and Freshmen team spent their break rowing through the.waters of Lake Marion. The teams have been active during their off seasons since the beginning of the fall. The fall season boosted the teams' incentive and brightened the future and spring season. Spring break served as a time to determine the lineups for the spring season. . 2 The teams will kick off the season with their first dual race with long time rival, Marietta College in Marietta, Ohio, on Saturday, March 21. Both the men's and women's teams will race a Varsity, JV, and Freshman boat. The season will continue most every weekend through the end of May. Home races are held at Findley Lake in Findley,N.Y. The first home race is scheduled for April 11'.

Words of wisdom from Coach SpracUen as the women's crew team gets under way during their recent trip to South Carolina Photo: Jessica Russell .

Disappointing Season for Women's B-Ball
By Perry Wood Sports Writer The Mercvhurst Women's basketball team finished its season at 11-15. ' After a controversial loss to Gannon, the Lady Lakers were left with no option but to win their next three games in order to win a playoff spot. Unfortunately, the cards did not fall their way. The fi rst loss seemed to set the pace for the next two games. A crushing defeat at Wayne State ended all hopes for a playoff berth, and seemed to damage team confidence. Losses to Findlay, and Hillsdale followed in the following week. The Lakers were down, but not out. Senior Guard Sarah Marindo said, "We never gave up and we had close losses at the end." The glaring difference between GLIAC and non-conference matches was overwhelming. The Lady Lakers went 8-1 in non-confere nee play. Senior forward Kristin Molli said, "we saw a large difference in the level of competition between the GLIAC and nonconference games." The unique chemistry of the 1998 Lady Lakers seems to distinguish them on the court. Molli said, "This year was the closest team we ever had. The freshmen bonded well with the team, but it didn't really fall in place."
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This Saturday, March 14th at ?»4 8 p m ? i
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individual check presenters a $3 check cash*
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A DJ will spin m * tunes downstair* nacks and Drinks will also be available

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PAGE 8

THEMEKCIAD

1998

again in a very tight game which went5into extra innings and finished 16-15 in favor of The Mercy hurst Baseball the opposition. Missouri St. Team returned to Erie after Louis were next on the schedspring training in Fort Myers, ule and the Lakers«received a FL. The Lakers played nine 20-7 beating. games in a week. They now A double-header against have a 4-5 record. This is Head New Hampshire was next. The Coach Dan <DeCaprio*s first Lakers (lost the first game 8-6 season with the Lakers. after extra innings, the second The?Lakers' first opponent was a 12-0 victory. Senior Jawas St. Rose. Mercyhurst got son Smith pitched the shutoff: to a great start with a 10-5 out. win. Winona was next and the >For the last two games of Lakers came away with a 9-8 spring training the Lakers win after extra innings. Next, faced Dominican and Kenthe Lakers played Salem tucky) Wesleyan. The Lakers Teikyo. The result was disap- had a 4-3 victory against;Dopointing with a 17-12 loss. minican and a 20-8 > loss Mercvhurst faced St Rose against Kentucky Wesleyan.
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By Stephen Nolan Sports Writer

Baseball Starts!Off Season With
•< Spring training went very very well against Winona. Offensively, the Lakers had well. We were especially pleased with the performance a few impressive individual 0 performances. Junior shortstop of' our freshmen who played Justin Santonocito had five very well. The games weVplay home runs, is batting over .500, in Florida are either \league or and had 15 RBI's. Junior Mark conference games but they do George had three home runs, is count on our record. They are batting over .400, and had 10 still very important," said AsRBI's. Freshman first baseman sistant Coach Joe Spano. Mark Mattson had two home The pitching for the Lakers runs. Senior Mike Snusz has a was very successful. Smith's .370 batting average.. Outshutout <against New Hampfielder t Brian DePalma had a shire was just one highlight. home run. Senior Tom Clear pitched a The Baseball team has;an three-hitter against Dominican. extremely busy schedule for Relief-pitching was also J imspring season. The Lakers play pressive for "the Lakers. Junior 49 more games, many of .them Paul Welker relief-pitched exdouble-headers, and this does tremely well, and Freshman not include playoffs. TwentyMike Palano relief-pitched

Record
seven of the games are on the road. Thef GLIAC Conference.is very important for the Lakers. < Opponents include Gannon, Hillsdale College, j Ashland University, Northwood, Grand Valley State, and Saginaw Valley. The I Lakers face most;'*of the;GLIAC teams towards the end of the season. *t 1 The Lakers are on the road for the next several games at Salem Teikyo on March 14 for a double-header and again^ on March 15 for one more game^ Then it is on to El kins, WV, to face Davis & Elkins on March
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M e n ' s i H o o p s i L o s e l i n F i r s t R o u n d of G L I A C
By Perry Wood Sports Writer The Mercyhurst Lakers basketball team ended the season with an overall record of 16-11, after losing to Michigan Tech in the first round of the GLIAC League Championship. : Michigan Tech took the court ready to avenge its 6971 loss against the Hurst in January, Michigan's Mike Kissman led his team 5with 26 points. Joel Burgei said "Everyone had high confidence that we would win, but we only played thirty five ^ minutes." The Lakers seemed to fold in the last five minutes jot the game, ending their playoff run with A. 6777 loss. In his 26 years of coaching basketball, Head Coach Karl Fogel thinks of this year's team as his favorite. Fogel said, "I've never coached a team that was this fun and hard working before. The team was together and they seemed to fight adversity well. Adversity is a kind word to describe Captain Maurice Profit's severe shin splints, Jody Crimes' knee problems, and Jason Ioppolo's broken hand." The Lakers ended the season in a three-way tie for GJJAC's South -Division Championship* with both -Ashland and Gannon. Forward Kris Lynn said, "We have a lot of potential for next? year," Freshman center Brent Swain said. "We knew we could go farther, but it was a great season. We,have a lot to look forward to next year." It will be difficult to replace senior Maurice Profit who averaged just under 20 points a game.

Playoffs

Matt Thielker driving to the hoop for the Lakers

Laker Hockey Goes Down in a Blaze of Glory
By Stephen Nolan Sports Writer The Men's Hockey Team ended its season with a defeat by RIT in the EC AC playoffs in a 30 game. The Lakers last regular season game was agai nst £1 m i ra. It was an exciting game but the dominating Lakers were defeated 4-3. This left the Lakers witha 17-9-1 record forthe 1998 season. Goals from Freshman Jody Robinson. Junior Oto Hlincik, and Sophomore Colin Kirkey were not enough to beat Elmira. "We outshot Elmira and we dominated them pretty good. For whatever reason we just hit a drought and we just couldn't put the puck in the back of the net," said Head Coach Rick Gotkin. The Lakers then traveled to Niagara for the ECAC playoffs for an unprecedented ninth year in a row. The Lakers were ranked third in the conference and they played the secondseeded RIT. Niagara was seeded first, while Canisius was fourth. Neither Elmira nor Hobart made the playoffs. The Lakers lost to RITt3-0. However, RIT did score an open net goal with 22 seconds left in the game when the Lakers pulled their goal tender to give them an extra man advantage. "We played very good against RIT, We certainly played good enough in our last two games, against Elmira and RIT, to win But sometimes you can dominate and do good things and still not win. We are disappointed, obviously, but all in all it has been a good year. We wanted a great year but you don'tal ways get what you want," said Gotkin " We showed up but we just could not put the puck in the net 11 was disappointing to lose. It was especially tough for seniors. It is our final year and we came so close," said senior Chris Morgan. . *i was very happy with the way we played against RIT. We came out flying. We were not intimidated? in any way by RIT. We showed a lot of heart but we just could not getthescoreson the board. There can be only one winner in games like that and it just ended up we were the losers. It would have been great to go all the way in my last year. I know the other seniors feel the same way,** said Senior John Evangelista. The Lakers' top scorer this year was Senior Joh n Evangelista with 17 and 30 assists. Junior Scott Ludcviks had 16 goals and 20 assists while Junior Bobby Atkin ended up with 12 goals and 27 assists.

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