Vol 72 No.

8

Mercyhurst College • 501 E 38th St • Erie, Pa. 16546

Golf and hockev teams for Ladyj Lakers
By Carrie Tappe and Mike Tanner Merciad writers An outline to take Mercyhurst into the 21st century includes plans to put Lady Lakers on the ice and on the links. Plans for the women's golf team are already under way with the hiring of head coach Tom Simmons, who will also head the men's golf team. * "The news that Mercyhurst is starting a women' s golf team is the best thing I 've heard in a long time," said prospective golf player Julie Woodruff. Woodruff has been playing golf for six years and had to play on the men's team in high school. '* "If enough students show interest, the team could start as a club sport as early as this spring," Simmons said. With help from Woodruff, L Alexis Toi and Anne Hardes, Simmons hopes to roster a team of six girls for a spring season. "In the spring, the team will *2 play as a club sport in order to not lose anyone's eligibi 1 ity," Simmons said. "In the fall we will be officially recognized as a Division II women's golf program." | Simmons is originally from Erie. He attended college at Xavier University in Cincinnati, and transferred to Gannon University to be closer to home. Simmons played golf for both schools. "I hope to return to Xavier to play in a Division I tournament. I would like to be the best in the GLIAC. With therightgirls, if they play wel 1 and establish themselves among Division II schools, hopefully we can be invited to other Division I tournaments," Simmons said Scholarshi ps will be offered to;J qualified members of the team. Simmons is looking for experienced players who can break a score of 100. "Depending on ability, the girls can receive scholarships. We will have try-outs, probably in April. I've already offered a scholarship to a potential student at Mercyhurst Prep," Simmons said. The women's team will play ^ and practice at Lawrence Park Golf Club. The season will consist of 5 to 7 tournaments in both the fall and spring with teams from the GLIA C and western Pennsylvania schools such as Edinboro University, Gannon University, Thiel College, Grove City College and Slippery Rock University. ]: Members of the team will be given golf bags and uniforms to use during their time with Mercyhurst They must provide their own clubs. " Anyone interested in the women's golf team can contact Simmons in the MAC or call Ext. 2224. There will be an informational meeting Feb. 15 at 3:30 p.m. More details will follow. m "I hope to get the word out jg through the newspaper, radio and TV stations. I'd like as many girls as possible to come out for the team," Simmons said. Women's ice hockey is also currently in the research and , developmen t stage. T he ath 1 eti c staff is searching for a possible league in which to play. Athletic Director Pete Russo said, "My first priority is to find a coach. Then we can begin to recruit new student athletes, schedule teams to compete against, and create a budget [in which] to operate. If everything would fall together perfectly, then there is an outside chance we could start next season" The new squad would play in * the ice center, but locker room arrangements would have to be made. Both men's varsity and club teams would not be affected in any way. * According to Russo, the price tag attached to the development of new athletic teams are offset by new students each fall. Women's field hockey and both lacrosse teams were made possible this way.

January 28,1999

An all-too-familiar scene at Mercyhurst — snow. The gates, perhaps the most well-known symbol of the college, have been embraced with snow during the winter for over four decades. Winter '98-99 has been no exception. I*

A remedy for the long lines and sometimes chaotic registration process is on its way. Two satellite registration locations have been established for juniors and seniors in the business and education departments to help decentralize f the mass population of students registering at one location. "We're moving toward a time when all students may register via their major departments,' said

Changes designed to relieve registration
Bonnie Hall, college registrar. ?. "We chose two of the biggest majors, education and business, to start with to see if this is a better alternative for registration.'' A n y junior or senior majoring in education will register with Rhonda Marion in Main 301. Junior and senior business majors will register with Carolyn Brumbaugh in
(90+ cr) | (90+ cr) (90+ cr)

Preston 308. f i Hall said, "We're keeping open-minded to change with the (registration) process. We are exploring any options relative to technical progress. Perhaps in the future, all students will register at the department level." Registration Dates: Do not count winter term credits i n the numbers below.

SENIORS:
Business Majors Education Majors Other Seniors
ELED.ECED.SPED

Mon, Feb l 3:00- 4:30pm Mon, Feb 1 3:00- 4:30pm Mon, Feb 1 3:00- 4:30pm Tues, Feb 2 Tues, Feb 2 Tues, Feb 2 Toes, Feb 2 Tues, Feb 2 Tues, Feb 2 2:452:452:453:003:003:003:00pm 3:00pm 3:00pm 4:30pm 4:30pm 4:30pm

Preston, 3 08
Main 301

Mercy Heritage Hall Preston 308 Main 301 f Mercy Heritage Hall Preston 308 M«ln 301 | Mercy Heritage Hall Mercy., Heritage Hall Mercy* Heritage Hall Mercy. Heritage Hall

JUNIORS;
Business Majors Education Majors Other Juniors Business Majors Education Majors Other Juniors
ELED.ECED.SPED

..
ELED,ECED.SPED
M

(81+ cr) (81+ cr) (81+ cr) (60-80 cr) (60-80 cr) (60-80 cr)

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\nai Wp>athpr Sp.rviira Wftftkenn rnfificaste:*:

SOPHOMORESi (S1+ cr) ^

(30-50 cr)....last names A-L (30-50 cr)....last names M-Z

« « * * • • • • • • • • • • * • * *

**<••«••«•#•••»••*

...... Wed, Feb 3 2:45- 3:00pm ...... Wed, Feb 3 3:00- 4:30pm ...... Thu, Feb 4 3:00- 4:30pm

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FRESHMEN; .*NO CLASSES HELD FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5th* .. JFri, Feb 5 8:30- 9:00am Mercy Heritage Hall (21+ cr) ... (0-20 cr).. ..last names A-L...w... .... Fri, Feb 5 9:00-12:00noon Mercy Heritage Hall 1:00- 4:00pm Mercy Heritage Hall (0-20 cr).. ..last names M-Z .. Fri, Feb 5
• • • • • • • ^ • • • • • • • • • • • • ' •••••••»< • • • • • • • • • • • * * • • • * • • • •

PAGE 2

THE MEROA D

JANUARY28.1999

CAMPU S NEWS

Stricter requirements for honors^^ program
By David Hermenau Merciad writer an extensive portfolio, the contents of which will help a selection committee decide whether the student has met the requirements for acceptance into the honors program. 'This meant a real substantial change in the program," said Brown "It meant a lot more requirements and we also thought it should equal a lot more benefits."*. ; |. Among the benefits, students in the new program can receive up to $50 in book expenses for each honors course in which they earn a C+ or better. Students in the new honors program will also be given the opportunity to register early in certain cases and may be eligible for housing in an honors apartment complex. Since this is thefirstyear that the new honors program requirements have been implemented, and they still may be subject to some further change depending upon how successful it proves to be. 'This year and next year will tell the tale," said Brown.

intellectual life," said Brown. ?For participation in the previous honors program, the student must Last year, the Honors Program hold a 3.2 QPA, complete two % Advisory Committee proposed honors courses per year and various changes in structure of the complete 15 service hours per year. honors program Admission to the In order to graduate with honors Mercy hurst College Honors Program under the new requirements, the I student must have a 3.35 QPA, for the current freshman class is completed nine honors courses and vastly different than the one yvho did pot receive a graduation:::^:" must have completed a senior or an encountered by previous honors honors thesis, students. According to Dr. Ludlow Brown, E Rather than subject first-year director of the honors program, as a :* students to such a large commitment, the Honors Program Advisory result of a very lenient and open On Wednesday;: Fetka- Micre «ffi beiaspedai Mass aria blesahgoP::honors program, few students were Committee proposed, along with the new Honors Program, the Honors iiltlttpate ; a ^ taking more then a couple honors ; Preparation Year. During the courses and only a handful of preparation year, the incoming students were even graduating from students can ease into both the Mercyhurst with honors distinction 'The perception was that it would college community and the. honors program. be a better program if we had more ^Th&OfFi&bER&iiid^^ The student outlines a list of students committed to completing ::::toapplyforcampus^wldepc«itioixsas expectations, less rigorous than those the program, and taking the nine &:£:I999^200G:acad^ of the honors program itself. Among courses. But more then that, if .we :::!:|:gbffic»^ R e s i d e ^ these expectations are that the had a core of students who were really committed to the program they student must attend 10 intellectual or artistic events on campus. would be committed to something beyond just taking the courses. They The preparation year will ::!the Caftiii^: A ^ a r w ^ a 3 ^ would lie committed to leading an culminate in the student submitting kj
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"Poftceand Safety Incident Log
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Jan. 11 Verbal Abuse of a College Employee Duval Apartments A student disgruntled over his girlfriend's vehicle being towed ^i>:.Jhe HealUi^wfe^ became abusive over the phone to i. MercyhurstiiOannon University^ Penn Stated eh rend and Edinbar6;:; members of the Police and Safety Department. Jan. 11 Drug Violation McAuley Hall 1 ^ \ * Three students were found to be in violation of the campus drug policy. : They were referred to the dean of $:?Ai«^:TltoblW ^W need up-tovthe miriuterwia^ students for disposition. Jan. 11 Drug Violation McAuley Hall I Three students were found in their residence smoking marijuana. They were referred to the dean of students for disposition Jan. 15 Harassment Briggs Avenue Apartments A total of 14 prank phone calls were made to two apartments in the same building in a 30-minute time period. Jan. 17 Harassment # 1 Spring Break Special s j Egan Hall Cancun & Jamaica $399, Bahamas $459, Florida $99. A student received a phone call in which the caller claimed that a Free "Spring Break Uncensored" video included. family member was involved in a 1 -800-234-7007 www.endl esssummertours.com serious accident, which proved to be false. ^ Jan. 16 Lewd, Indecent, Obscene #1 Panama City Vacations! Behavior Briggs Avenue Apartments Free Parties - No Cover. A male student was accused of Best Beach Fronfchotels from $99. mooning of another student He was Free "Spring Break Uncensored" video! referred to the dean of students for disposition endlesssummertours 1-800-234-7007 wwu
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science and communications major, was recently awarded the Pennsylvania Campus Compact's annual Student Service Award. The state Campus Compact is part of a national organization by the same name that encourages ' community service among college students. tt, Koskoski shies from listing the volunteer projects he has undertaken, but Sr. Carol Ann Volte, director of Mercyhurst's service learning program, compiled a list of 15" *

Studenta junior political servicesheaward receives projects when nominated Scott Koskoski,

koskoski for the award. •'*%£*• Volte said, "Scott is a definite leader and a compassionate person/' He doesn't mention all that he does in the community or on campus because he loves his work and thoroughly enjoys it" When asked why he adds/ £ volunteer work to his busy schedule, Koskoski said, "We need to help people out I wonder why people mate a big deal about volunteer^ work. Its what we*re here for*

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THE ME ROAD

PAGE 3

ENTERTAINMENT
S c o f i e l d ' s i n s p i r a t i o n Iw o r k s h o p a s u c c e s s
exercise, open up to projection, open up to new ways of moving.!! He guided us through improvisaIt was once said it is not new lands tion that led to internally devised we should pray for but new eyes in choreography," said dance major Julia nna Pieknick. * which to view our world.!. Alan Scofield, guest artist in Scofield's multidisciplinary residency with the Mercy hurst workshops brought dancers dance, music and education "e together with music students and departments, brought precisely that education majors. Thus, both the to the students, faculty and S movements of the body and the community members who attended music as well, supported the his workshops in danceSpace inspired senseof movement which January 5 to 9. Scofield brought to each of his '• £ * "His residence here was terrific. classes. He opened our minds and hearts to His workshops, funded in part by an Academic Enrichment Grant, a new way of approaching drew an impressive audience, movement creatively and brought according to Hunter. Over 90 a greater understanding of its 44 intimate relationship with music," people attended his seminar, The Challenge of Staying Inspired," the said dance department director $ climax of Scofield's residency at Tauna Hunter. 44 Mr. Scofield got people to open up through his spontaneous v
t h e c o l l e g e . • H '•

ARTS&

By Alison Gics Merciad writer

New Works Showcase Stepping out I f n style

File Photo

Alan Scofield, guest artist in residency with the dance department, at one of his inspirational seminars.

Performances in the Performing Arts Center on Feb. 13, at 8 p.m. and Feb. 14, at 2:30 p.m. ft The show highlights new works by six students and two faculty members and features music that ranges from classical to jazz to pop rock to contemporary J instrumental.!, Tickets are $5 for adults and $3] for students, children and senior citizens. I The event is free to Mercyhurst students with college I.D. and to faculty and staff with President's Cards.

Winds on the Hill at the PAC
Concert at Forward Hall
Donna the Buffalo keeps the audience dancing
By Bill Melville Merciad editor When going to a concert, fans expect a band to play between 90 minutes and two hours, including an encore. Concerts running over that length tend to lose their intensity and bore the audience. Far Donna the Buffalo, playing a three-hour show is not unusual. On Fri., Jan. 15, they played for over three and a half hours, managing to keep the audience at Erie's Forward Hall dancing duri ng the enti re show. 1* Donna the Buffalo is touring in support of their 1998 album, -Rockin' in the Weary Land," so their set focused on songs from that release. Many songs from past albums^such as "The Ones You Love," appeared throughout their set as well. the Donna Buffalo's chief strength throughout the show was their ability to switch between different musical styles while maintaining their own personality within songs. The z balance and unity they achieved helped them to move between genres without missing a step., At the end of each song, the audience never knew whether they would hear a bluegrass, country, or 60s-style rock song next Whatever type of song eventually came next, the audience showed no si gns of slowing down, even during some of the band's extended jams. The band revealed its versatility by playing instruments that suited the musical genre of each song. Tara Nevins, the lead singer for Donna the Buffalo, switched effortlessly between acoustic guitar, fiddle and accordion, among others. At one point, she even played the rubboard, a washboard-type [ instrument she wore while playing. Three hours into the show, Donna the Buffalo appeared to befinishedfor the evening, but soonreturnedtofinishthe show with a three-song, half hour long encore. All in all, Donna the Buffalo's fluid music and style insured that people attending were unaffected by the length of the show. of wind ensemble music," noted of Hartford), arid Niagara (N. Y.) Frank Collura, assistant professor University. Most recently at at the D* Angelo School of Music., Mercyhurst, he was the composer The winds will blow "on the hill" The program is a cross-section of of the sell-out conceit, "Vienna in Erie,*" onfrfewYear's Day. when Mercyhurst College presents popular composers, featuring pieces that are both brilliant in a concert celebrating composers The conceit features students from around the world Sunday, and faculty of the college commusound and challenging for the Jan. 31, at 2:30 p.m. in the Mary nity and some professionals from players ultimately designed to y D'Angelo Performing Arts Center. show-off the virtuosity of the the tri-state area providing topThe D'Angelo Wind Ensemble, class entertainment in a worldensemble." under the direction of Frank k. Maestro Collura brings a host of class facility," said Michael Fuhrman, director of the Mary Col 1 ura, will perform this free experience to the college having D'Angelo Performing Arts Center. event as a community service of conducted with such prominent This performance reinforces the the college. orchestras as the Mexico City college's dedication to the arts and The first half of the performance Philharmonic, the London to providing superior quality will feature a march by Delle Cese Philharmonic, and with various student and professional perfororchestras throughout the United and a selection of pieces tranmances to the community." scribed by Gordon Jacob. Senior States. * This event is part of the 1998-99 music major James Foley will be a f In addition, Collura has held Cultural Series. To order tickets, featured soloist in thefirsthalf of academic positions at Buffalo the performance. I State University; the University of call the Performing Arts Center Box Office at 824-3000. 'These composers and composi- California, Santa Barbara; the Hartt School of Music (University tions touch on the different styles By Heather C vitkovfc Merciad editor

Spotlight on fashion: Tommy Jeans in the music industiy
wardrobing agreement with all-girl group Wild Orchid. And this year is no different. Levi's sponsored Lauryn Hill's To win consumers and pump up first solo tour and Tommy Jeans' their brands, high fashion designers have often attached themselves print campaign features a cast of up-and-coming hip-hop, rap, R&B to Hollywood stars as key marketing and image vehicles. But and pop artists. Tommy Jeans is really pulling to for jeanswear firms, the medium of the forefront in the music industry. choice is fast becoming music. Last year, many major jeans \ fj Artists such as Aaliyah, Gwen Stefani of No Doubt, and all brands looked to bands to drum up members of N?Sync have been some business. Gitano sponsored spotted sporting Tommy gear. pop and country diva Shania u, According to the Hilfiger Twain's concert tour. Levi's linked Company, 70 percent of their up with the giant Lilith Fair. ] DKNY Jeans hosted free concerts marketing efforts this year will have some connection to music. featuring British pop band All Company-wide, Tommy Hilfiger Saints. And Guess announced a By Heather C vitkovie Merciad editor has dubbed 1999 a "year of music' that includes sponsorship of The Rolling Stones upcoming tour. ' According to a spokesman for Hilfiger, if someone looks at their target market there are a couple of things that are important to them and one of them is music. But does tuning into music translate into more jeans sales? Hilfiger stressed that putting up i banner behind a stage is not enough. To maximize the impact of music-related marketing, it requires in-store events and multiple cross promotions. So expect to see a lot more Tommy Jeans on the covers of albums and on MTV.

PAGE 4

THE MEROAD

DECEMBER 28.1998

Editorial

OPINION
CAMPUS
it recruits.... As we enter the millennium, awareness - ' whether it be — cultural, political or technological — will be our most treasured asset 1 • ™ BOY) I UNNA BE A Y*BJys
ft THAT*

centers of enlightenment — institutions of higher learning. But just how enlightening is Mercyhurst? ; While the college does a fine job of attracting speakers, promoting art exhibits, sponsoring films and providing the t i student body with a wide range of extracurricular clubs and organizations, those should not be the only means by which students may increase their knowledge and understanding of certain issues and events, c Interaction with people is sometimes the most enlightening venture one can undertake* In fact, to truly understand different cultures, regions and backgrounds, it is almost • necessary to have complete & exposure to them. .* & As an institution of higher learning, Mercyhurst should strive to appeal to all types of' students regardless of face, religion or neritage.

Cultureareshock? College campuses supposed

Considering that the overwhelming majority of students at this campus are white, a greater effort should be made to appeal to minorities. Diversity, or rather lack of, has been an issue here for some time. Mercyhurst only hurts itself by perpetuating the circumstances which discourage minority students from applying. Think of the wealth of knowledge a truly diversified student body would possess. ^ Efforts have been made to recruit outside of the tri-state area, and for that the administration should be commended. The Strategic Vision, a document which outlines the college's progress for the next four years, describes more aggressive recruiting that will eventually spread to the West coast However, we must go beyond location. .ST Simply considering where to recruit from is not enough. The college should also look at who

READIAM3 i t fWl THE ffl\CJ£% HUH #06?

should remain in office because "I am undecided. I really do not his impeachment may lead to the even have time to worry about development of a chaotic state. it" ^r £ However, his actions are less Andrea Ellison, Junior than honorable and should not go Political Science/ Social Work unpunished." Mike Tanner, Sophomore "No, I do not think that Bill Communications Clinton should be impeached. While I find his behavior "Yes, Bill Clinton should be deplorable, his offenses are not impeached. Pure and simple,' he 1 impeachable. Furthermore, they committed perjury. If we let the i do not meet the constitutional leader of our country, the single requirements of 'high crimes and representative of an entire free 1 misdemeanors. 1 think that body, lie under oath, how can we certain members of Congress have faith in our own court have been searching for a reason system? Our judicial system is to remove the president from based on one thing, truth under 1 office since the beginning of his oath. Without it, our freedoms term. The media has perpetuated are placed in jeopardy." the situation at the expense of the David Reiser, Graduate Student American public." Special Education Karen Petho, Senior. Environmental Politics "Yes, I think he should be gone. I don't like him anyway.* "I believe that President Clinton Bob Rees, Freshman ... Undecided

QUESTION

The inquiring campus reporter asked students what they thought of the President Clinton im peachment hearings.

Naming the nineties —*what's^the stereotype?
aver
Kari Wells Labels of almost all types annoy me, especially when there is little need to categorize the subject? being given a name — i.e. Generation X. . I have come to terms with the fact, however, that sometimes it is necessary to label for descriptive purposes. For this reason, I have been wondering what they are going to call the decade 3 coming to a close. ** My initial thought was something like the ^Technology Decade" or the "InformaUon Decade" — something related to the rapid speed with which people are becoming computer (iterate. f. Almost everyone in the United States has some form of access to computers, even if it is just at their public libraries. Today, a majority of high school graduates have a working knowledge of computer programs and the Internet Recently, I changed my mind that the possible labeling of the 90s will be related to technology. Instead, that should be the label of the entire century. In the last 100 years we have walked on the moon, examined the farthest reaches of the galaxy, developed automobiles, flown ^ millions of people around the world and developed the
* -

capability to destroy the world as WcTkflOWlt wtthlthe push of a button and nuclear technology. Then, one recent afternoon I was watching one of my favorite movies, "All the President's Men." The movie made me think, where have all the responsible journalists and reporte rs gone? If The movie focuses on the two reporters for The Washington Post who broke open the story of the Watergate scandal. Even though they were positive of the truth they could not run any stories on their findings until they confirmed the facts that supported their claims. .. , Sometimes they did have to be

innovative to accomplish this goal, but they did it to protect the reputation and dignity of those*' involved and especially that oft their newspaper. You just do not see that type of integrity in* journalism in contemporary society. * Therefore, I believe the 90s will be known as the 'Tabloid Decade" or the '*Media Decade." We have been inundated by scandal after scandal for the past nine years. Some, I admit, were greatly entertaining, but most were more tragic and sad than anything else. Scandals include: the Tonya I Harding debacle, the O.J. Simpson trial, the mutilation of

John Wayne Bobbin, the Jon . Benet Ramsey murder, the arrest of Paul Reubens (a.k.a. Pee Wee Herman) in a porn theatre. Paula Jones, Sexgate '99 (the Clinton/g Lewinsky/Starr/Republicans showdown), Tyson s earbiting and the list goes on and on. I hate clumping all media together because I know there are hardworking, committed journalists who are reporting on issues that are worthy of attention but are either ignored by the public or by mainstream press. Many journalists try to make us aware and care about the ^ dealings with Iraq, the atrocities in Kosovo, and the real injustices committed in our country (and

around the world) every day. t They are.ignored though so that 'smut can control and Smother the American public. There is no surprise why Americans are ignorant of world events and politics. We are not informed of any news or information of substance and impor: tance. ~ To have an informed and caring populace, reporters must try and remember why'they chose the line of work they did. Was it to give brain candy and exploit the plight and grief of others or to truly inform? It is too late to redefine this decade, but the next decade is a blank slate and a chance to re-examine priorities and responsibilities. Byr Jbfiawntae. j0. cH d owax

Have Mercy!
I did fr7 I managed +o ftnlSh my IS page Wi'dtef/n paper u/ith A O problems. 1+ e\/rY\ saved?

wwwwwwwww

The mail bag
Questionable campus conditions
, On Monday, Jan. 18,1 was givine a tour for the Ambassador s Club. It was a 9 a.m.t tour, so I realize that it was early in the day. But I was extremely dismayed by the condition of our campus. I passed countless beer bottles and discarded packs of cigarettes as well as several piles ofvomit J around the campus. ^ Imagine how embarrassed I was when I saw the look on the face of the mother of my perspective student I am trying to convince a parent to send his or her child to our school, ensuring them that the school will be a good environment for him or her. r How can I do that when our campus looks lite trash? I realize that students have parties; I go to them. This is not a letter asking people not to party. I am simply imploring people to have a little pnde and respect for the place that has and will take good care of them for the four years that they are here. If possible, maintenance could even do a Monday morning clean-up, to ensure that our campus looks good for the visitors during the week. I spoke with one of our 1 administrators regarding this > situation, and he agreed: But he also posed a poignant question, Should maintenance really be responsible for the clean-up of I students' vomit V I say no. I think students should be responsible for their own actions. After all, we are here to become adults. We need to prove that we are not a bunch of unruly pigs. We need to take action and try to keep our campus looking its best — even on Monday morning. ^
&

JANUARY 28,1999

THE MERCIAD

PAGE

A need for semesters
The chimera
Bill Melville and have to assign work over jr break. For the last three years, I have spent the majority of each Christmas break writing papers and reading assigned texts, and have had to cut three vacations short because work got in the way. Among the dozen friends I have at different colleges and universities, none of them has a term split by Christmas break. I have to wonder how much information people actually absorb from classes in the trimester system. Essentially, once one term ends, we return only a week later, and the process begins anew. ? Whatever information a student learned must be immediately placed on the back burner, because new information is already on (he way. I don't think the trimester v system is beneficial for professors, either. Grading papers and midterms eats up most of their free time. The 10-week cycle only allows them so much time. If they get behind on the information to be covered in a course, they usually cannot catch up because the end of the term approaches too
quickly.

Parking problems

As most Mercyhurst students know, taking classes in a trimester or quarter system requires an immense amount of work in a short period of time. Even in a term with relatively "easy" classes, a few days of procrastinating can lead to a student falling behind. Unless a student chooses not? to enroll in difficult classes, | extracurricular activities must be kept to a minimum. Finding the hours to work an extra job is tough, too. Even though I need a job to help my work-study income, an extra class and a senior project due at the end of Brooke the term necessitate an inordinate amount of my day. * The breaks we receive at Mercyhurst don't help much Parking or lack of, has always Why was I in a "reserved" lot? either, unfortunately. While the been a persistent problem for In case security did not notice, three-day weekend during students living on Briggs approximately 18 parking spaces registration is convenient the Avenue — add to that problem were not available to students other breaks tend to cause stress a ton of snow and a powerbecause of the piles of snow. instead of provide relaxation. tripped security department As £ Now tell me, how does that • i break if students don * t pay enough * make any sense. I paid 475 for a t«? example. Since it begins after already to park on campus, parking permit yet my tickets security seems to take pride in three weeks of winter term, are more expensive than a giving parking tickets to student without a permit teachers are generally forced to students who have permits, but .Maybe next time the snow is hold exams before break begins can't find parking spots piled and parking is chaotic, remotely near their residence. perhaps security should focus on I received two $15 parking students parking without permits tickets during the past couple instead of those of us who weeks, despite the permit in my already paid to park on campus. window, for being parked in a Did they forget, we pay reserved lot $20,000 or so For college. Poor college students can't afford an My roommate, who does not have a permit, received two $10 parking permits for not having a ignorant parking attendant. permit * IH :£ Barb Tompko Name withheld upon request

While I .think a switch to semesters would be the best : course for Mercyhurst and would benefit nearly everyone, I also realize such a system cannot be

It's all aboutpriorities
Skedaddle

implemented overnight. While professors usually teach three to four classes a term, the semester system would call on them to instruct more classes. Since professors would have more courses to teach, more ! < classroom space would be ^necessary. At present this space does not exist on the Mercyhurst campus. That nonexistent space, however, might become available soon enough. The Strategic Flan, a document which outlines the col lege's progress for the next four years, includes information about a proposed academic building to be constructed in that period. Once this building is constructed, Mercyhurst would have the classroom space necessary for such an endeavor. While this has no bearing on me (semesters are the standard at all the graduate schools I've applied to), I think it is something to be seriously considered by the administration and faculty,? The length and timing of breaks have been a problem for students for some time, and the semester system would remedy this. Fall semester would end before Christmas break, and spring semester would begin immediately after the break. While it is merely an idea, such a system has potential benefits for nearly everyone at the college.

yiEROAD
Editor-in-Chief Jessi Gentile News Editor Carrie Tappe Sports Editor Stephen Nolan Features Editor Bill Melville A& EEditor Heather C vitkovic Senior Writer Kari Wells Photography Jessica Russell Cartoons Shawntae Howad The Merciad is the student-produced paper of * Mercyhurst College. •; East The Merciad welcomes letters to the editor. Ail letters i be signed, but your name can be withheld on request und certain conditions. Letters are due on the Tuesday before
ET.i.1* ~AZ
.

~A cUm\A iv» n n Ion per than 5 0 0 words.

Mercyhurst is a beautiful place to be. Scenically, the grass is always trimmed, the buildings are well kept and the environment is soothing and comfortable. Rom a social angle, diligent office workers politely answer questions pertaining to registra tion or locating the nearest restroom. Disciplined professors share their knowledge, time and experience with students. At Mercyhurst College the priority is the student Well, this being the case, wh> are so many freshmen leaving? Freshmen, in particular, are o concern. According to Catherine Anderson, dean of

student development, 75 freshmen held to discern problem areas are on academic probation and 29 and brainstorm possible solustudents have transferred from the tions. Furthermore, the campus* college. Student Activities Committee | A nderson also noted that, as a encourages students to submit result of these statistics, a manda- their ideas and become involved tory meeting (or freshmen was in the numerous activities the proposed by the elected leadership b col lege has to offer. Many clubs of the class and will be held on T kand sports teams would welcome Thursday evening at 8:15 p.m. to ; the extra participation and address these issues. *.. support "This is not trouble. It is a College becomes a home away from home — a relaxed, fun normal transition. The meeting will al low students to sit down and atmosphere that inspires creative learning. Students get to live in a talk among themselves," said^ building with their friends, come A nderson. •* Many colleges and uni versi ties' home any time they want, and if'] they are fortunate, they might I stress the importance of postlearn something in the process. graduate students. They cater to their needs with the hope of Mercyhurst is committed to building and asserting a strong #' I your comfort and your success.' influence. The undergraduates The college has built itself around YOU. ™ often become overlooked, and All students, not only freshmerely aspire to the revolutionary men, should take advantage of voice of graduate students. However, at Mercyhurst, this is this, possibly once in a lifetime, opportunity/ not the case. Student forums are

PAGE 6

THE MEROAD

JANUARY 28.1999

FEATURES
Vatican pushes for college control Poetry readings return
, •-

College administrators fear proposal could be damaging to students and faculty
By BUI Melville Merciad editor Most people at Mercyhurst recognize the college's tradition of strong Catholic ties and inclusiveness of non-Catholics; A new Vatican proposal, however, could force that tradition to undergo a sharp change. In an effort to Improve ties to Catholic universities, the Vatican wants to place control of those institutions with local bishops, j This would eliminate the board of trustees and make the schools answerable to the bishop. The U.S. Counci) of Bishops will vote on this proposal later in 1999. ' ; According to Dr. William P.* Garvey, president ofMercyhurst, this proposal would be damaging to Mercyhurst at almost every level. •[ \ "I would be very concerned if this all came to pass because it

would threaten the basic nature of a Mercy school which is to be inclusive, to include all faiths and to respect all faiths," he said.

[TheVatican is] trying to preserve the Catholic nature.... They are showing they don't understand the American climate of higher education.
-Dr. William P. Garvey
The proposal's adoption would also force these schools to hire a predominantly Catholic faculty. According to a recent Boston ! Globe article, theology courses! would require approval from the bishop, and any nonCatholic faculty would have to . attend classes on Catholicism and its teachings. y? . For students, attending Catholic schools would become more difficult because they would be ineligible for any J * federal loan and grant money. Likewise, the schools would also be unable to receive grants from the government While

some private colleges, such as Grove City, already accept no grant money from the government, Mercyhurst does, and the effects would be noticeable. " (The Vatican is] trying to preserve the Catholic nature. However, they are showing they^ don't understand the American climate of higher education, which supports diversity," '• Garvey said. Recently, in *The Chronicle of Higher Education," the Rev.' Edward A. Malloy, president of Notre Dame, and the Rev. J. Donald Monan, chancellor of Boston College, came out against the proposal, viewing it as a danger to Catholic higher education in America and the standards such schools have set According to Garvey, Mercyhurst would be faced with a dilemma if the proposal were adopted/ " "Mercyhurst could remain a Catholic college or become a college in the Catholic tradition and retain its inclusiveness^ How Mercyhurst will remain Catholic in the future depends on this Issue. But if it comes down to either/or, if s a matter for the board of trustees and the Sisters of Mercy," he said.

By Bill Melville Merciad editor In the past, Mercyhurst has 'j sponsored poetry reading by such famous American poets as * Gwendolyn Brooks, but for unknown reasons, it has been several years since the college has hosted a reading. This recently changed with a reading by Lynn Emmanuel to a . packed crowd in the Mercy Heritage Hall on Tuesday, Jan 19. Emmanuel is an awardwinning poet who has published several volumes of poetry. She currently serves as director of the University of Pittsburgh's graduate program in creative writing. Rather than read from older collections and rely on poems people might already know, Emmanuel said she decided to read mainly from her newest book. Much of Emmanuel's poetry involved tributes to certain people who influenced her. These include a tribute to Gertrude Stein, who Emmanuel said had a large influence on Ernest Hemingway; a tribute to Walt Whitman in which Emmanuel writes in the free verse form which Whitman made famous; and a tribute to her father. v < Other poems dealt with simple events that are interrupted by famous people, such as actress Sharon Stone filming a movie in Emmanuel's neighborhood. The most striking poem which Emmanuel read was "The Dig," which comes from a book of the same name. In it, she describes a Middle Eastern archaeological dig she accompa-

Jessica Russell/ Merciad photographer

Etiquette dinner offers students business edge
By Stephen Nolan Merciad editor... As students prepare for the real world there is always an emphasis placed on developing a professional image. A large part of business in today's society is conducted in restaurants and a professional image can be very important in these situations. On Jan. 20, the Hotel Restaurant Institutional Management Department, the Walker School of Business and the Office of • Career Services hosted a business etiquette dinner to educate students on the correct behavior in a business dinner setting. Students were given an hourlong presentation in the Mercy Heritage Room. The presentation consisted of overhead projections and slides. Valerie Weaver, certified image consultant, spoke on many topics concerning proper table manners. She discussed a wide range of topics from the proper way to introduce yourself to "braving the baffling buffet" Some of the basic dining etiquette points were always using utensils from the outside in, passing the salt and pepper shakers together and placing napkins on chairs when leaving the table. Weaver advised against eating difficult foods in a formal business dinner. Pasta and other such foods should be avoided because they have a tendency to end up on clothing. *• *Fol 1 owing Weaver*s presenta^ tion, students moved to the Grotto Dining Room for dinner and an opportunity to put their new-found knowledge into

practice. Weaver moved from table to table, and pointed out ;} examples of bad dining etiquette. "It is very important to conduct yourself in a professional manner. More and more compa- There will be a meeting for anyone interested in studying nies bring you out to dinner as abroad in Ireland during the 1999-2000 school year part of an interview and how you Tuesday, Feb. 2, at 8:30 p.m. in Sullivan 2. conduct yourself may determine whether you get the job or not The presentation brought up a lot f* of interesting points, it was very informative," said senior s business major Stuart Hogg.

Lynn Emmanuel nied her husband on. Rather than describe events from her own perspective, Emmanuel wrote the poem from the point of view of a female skeleton they discovered during the dig. A^ Dr. Beth Gylys, assistant | professor of English, described Emmanuel's poetry as being rooted in post-modernism, because it contains strong metapoetic themes. Meta-poetry occurs when the characters or narrator in a poem draw attention to the fact that they exist in a poem. The poem most infl uenced by these themes is "Dressing the Parts," in which Emmanuel * examines ways that people ' invent themselves. & "I think she does some really interesting things with the language in her poetry," Gylys said / Emmanuel's reading marks . the return of renowned poets, reading their works at Mercyhurst Gylys said she hopes that readings such as this will be possible in coming years.

* BREAK.

\ 3BSI2S

e

V

Anyone interested in the Mercy Corps should plan to attend a meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 2, at 7:30 p.m. in Sullivan 2.

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ATHLETE
OF THE WEEK MattTamborino

JANUARY 28,1999

THE MERCIAD

PAGE 7

voiieybans

Hurst grad is ?Flutie Flakes star
gear. 'They said they appreciated the advertising, but they weren't sure it was the image they wanted their product to project,'* Fraser said, ^hey showed me a gigantic replica of a Flutie Flakes box, a four and a half feet high, three feet wide box of cereal, and asked if I would wear it. I said, 4 Why not? Look what I had worn before. " Wearing tile red, white and blue cardboard box, Fraiser entertained fans at tailgate parties and Ralph Wilson Fieldhouse at four Buffalo home games. Then he headed for his 50-yard line seats without the box since it would block other fans' view of the game. 1 Fraser receives a paycheck for his work as the Flutie Flakes mascot That money, he said, will be donated to the Doug Flutie Jr. Foundation for Autism when he meets quarterback Doug Flutie. A portion of the proceeds from, the cereal sales go to the foundaChris Fraser, a Mercyhurst alum, tion named for Doug Flutie's was hired by a marketing firm to young son. * " % ' **• promote Flutie Flakes t "Doug Flutie's a pretty good guy — from the stories and interviews I've read. I'm looking forward to meeting him. I talked i f I could go to the Superbowl to the president of the company and watch the Bills play, but it and after the Superbowl I should^ did not work out this year,"" said be able to meet nim," said Fraser. Fraser, who was an admissions counselor at the Hurst until 1992 'The way I fell into this iff the funniest thing. I went there acting when he was hired by Erie's 4 ^ like a crazed fan and it got me Edmund L. Thomas Detention i the job. It would have been great Center as a juvenile counselor.

Many people support "their r team * with all the love and admiration of a mother's love for her son. From Seattle to Miami, crazed fans brave the elements week in and out to support their favorite football team. For one long-time Buffalo J Bi 1 Is fan, support resul ted i n something quite unexpected. But according to Chris Fraser, it was almost a dream come true. Fraser graduated from Mercyhurst in 1987 with a degree in criminal justice. He also was a pitcher for the baseball team for four years. [£ "It was something fun, but a dream come true would be to play.for the Bills. I guess this would be the next best thing," said Fraser, who was hired by a Pittsburgh marketing Arm to romote Bills quarterback Doug lutie's Flutie Flakes cereal at Bills home games duri ng the recent season. * Fraser was offered the job, which included a pair of frontrow tickets on the 50-yard line, after several national television programs, including George . Michael's Sportsmachine and NFL PnmeUme, aired footage of Junior middle'hitter Matt Tamborino was named MVP of the third : him sporting shorts, a Bills annual Mercyhurst Invitational Men's Volleybal I Tournament at the tattoo, a Halloween mask and an "I love my Flutie Flakes" sign at Mercyhurst Athletic Center. ? 'i^m mr.fr^Mr -Atr,' ^hefBtthr* Nov. 1 home game * On Jan. 22 the Lakers defeated Juniata College in five games and against the Miami Dolphins. on Jan. 23 defeated St. Francis College in three games and Tri-State A few days later, Fraser was University in four. b f contacted by the marketing firm In the three matches Tomborino had 47 kills and 24 blocks of who asked him to meet with \ which 10 were solo. them in Pittsburgh with his game

P

1

BRIEFLY...
The men's volleyball team hosted the third annual Mercyhurstlnvitational Men's Volleyball Tournament in the Mercyhurst Athletic Center this past weekend. s The Lakers started by playing Juniata College on Jan. 22. After losing thefirsttwo games, tfiefLakers came from behind and won the next three games to winthe match 11-15,16-17,15-5,15^13,15-13. Senior Adam Tokash and juniors Jim Zorn and Matt Tamborino provided the team with excellent all around play that led Mercyhurst to the victory.*W Jr_ J* The men started Saturday playing against the Red Flash of St Francis University. The Lakers three straight games 15-1,16-14,15-' ZZ _ _ ja^m^ They finished the weekend with a third win against Tri-State University. The Lakers were declared champions of the tournament after finishing 3-0. Tokash was named to the All-Touriiament team and Tamborino was named MVP of the weekend. | i fc

Men's volleyball winsjin home tournament

Air For ce
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Intramural basketball league underway!
As the college basketball season is well underway and the NBA players prepare for their short season, other fine basketball players are preparing to battle itout. But these athletes do not play in Madison Square Garden or even the Mercyhurst Athletic Center. These players grace the court of the Rec center in the 1999 Intramural Basketball Leag^ * for the tweve teams, with such names as "Ruff Riders" and "Brothers of.No Mercy, ultimate goal of intramural champion over the next month. &^ ~~ . Each team will play 11 regular season games with playoffs beginning Feb. 20. The top four teams will compete in the second round of the playoffs. . .. . . J The champion will play the intramural champion from cross-town rival Gannon University for bragging rights in the Erie area. / i-

(If you qualify) P i A i r Force training, education and experience can help you reach your goals. Ex-Laker catches TD pass for Vikings * Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Matthew Hatchette, who caught a touchdown pass in Minnesota's 30-21 For a free information packet, overtime loss to Atlanta on Jan. 17, once played for Mercyhurst S e t o p M for Jim Chapman and the Lakers during the 1992 season. He caught seven passes |*1| call 1-800-423-USAF during the season for 148 yards and two touchdowns. He also ran the ball four times for a net of one yard. Th#» inkers finished the 1992 season at 5-4-1. . I £ i o r visit www.airforce.com
T1I1

Following the academic year, Hatchette transferred to Langston University in Oklahoma, an NAIA Division I school.

PAGE 8

THE MERCIAD

JANUARY 28,1999

SPORTS—
By David Leisering Merciad writer

LAKER


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win, avenging the loss just a year. Other Laker goals were week prior. A ubry gave up two scored by Tom McMonagle, Paul first-period goals, but then Caluori, and Fedor Zakusilo. It's revenge month for the slammed the door on Findlay the The overtime win was Mercyhurst College hockey rest of the way. Ludeviks, Goulet Mercyhurst's first since a 7-6 team, and so far, the Lakers are and Mark Stamp each lit the verdict over Elmira at the MIC, passing with flying colors. lamp twice for the Lakers. February 25,1995. The Lakers Since bowing to Findlay 6-5 in & Mercyhurst put the game away had gone 0-5-2 (including three with three goals in a 63-second the championship game of the overtime losses this season) in span late in the third period. The extra sessions since then. Junior Hamot Hockey Classic, the Mercyhurst win snapped the Lakers have rattled off three goal tender Ashley Stevens straight victories to improve their Oilers' eight-game winning stopped 28 Brockport shots for record to 13-6. streak. % his tenth win of the season. The first game after the loss, For their efforts against Stevens was named this week's Mercy hurst had to travel 45 Fredonia and Findlay, Aubry was ECAC West Division Goaltender minutes up Interstate 90 to take chosen Eastern College Athletic of the Week. T on State University of New York Conference (ECAC) West However, Mercyhurst still has at Fredonia on Jan. 13. UnfortuDivision Goal tender of the plenty of room for improvement nately for the Blue Devils, they Week, while Goulet picked up "It was great to get the win, but Rookie of the Week honors. found themselves in the wrong we can get better, explained Game two of revenge month place at the wrong time. Laker head coach Rick Gotkinl took place last Saturday i n the Mercyhurst used three short"We need to start finishing more friendly confines of the Mercyhanded goals and four third chances and blow games open. hurst Ice Center, as die period goals to skate away with We also need to work on our Brockport State Golden Eagles an 8-3 win. The Lakers got two defensive zone coverage. It came to town. ; goals each from Scott Ludeviks, hasn't been as good lately." Mercyhurst, again, was trying Bob A tkin and Louis Goulet. In fact, Mercyhurst had a 3-0 3 to avenge a loss occurring late Freshman goal tender Peter t lead midway through the second! last year in which Brockport Aubry picked up his second win period of the Brockport game, skated away with a 5-2 victory, of the season by stopping 33 .of and then allowed Brockport to and took away Mercyhurst's 36 Blue Devil shots. j score two goals in a 33-second Three nights later, it was game NCAA Division II playoff hopes. span to end the second period 4 Aaron Morrison's fourth goal one of revenge month. Mercyand a shorthanded goal early in of the season three minutes into hurst helped Findlay University the third period to tie the game. on Jan. 16 open its brand new ice overtime gave the Lakers a ; Games three and four of thrilling 4-3 win over Brockport, j revenge month take place this arena but spoiled the Oilers * celebration with a convincing 7-2 and avenged the loss from last Friday and Saturday, Jan. 29 and

Hockey team wins three straight games, improves to

m

Junior Fedor Zakusilo faces off against a Brockport Stale University <• player Jan. 23. The Lakers won the game 4-3 in overtime. 30, when the Bentley College Falcons come to the Mercyhurst Ice Center. Face-off is scheduled for 7:30 both nights, f \ Earlier this season, Mercyhurst went to suburban Boston, and lost two heart-breaking games 65 in overtime both nights. Mercyhurst hopes to avenge those losses against its future Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference rival. This is an important weekend for us,** Gotkin said. "It should get us ready for the ECAC ^ ~ portion of our schedule that starts in February.** ,;

1

Jessica Russell/Photographer

Women's b-ball trying to turn season around
bearth," Koncsol said, the Lady Lakers visited Westminster College where they looked to upset the home team After dropping six consecutive and take one more step toward games, the women's basketball the playoffs. team visited Wayne State University and Westminster Behind a hard-played first half, College with the hopes of the Lady Lakers jumped out to a keeping their playoff birth alive. insurmountable 27-13 lead. The* women cruised to a 56-51 Presently, the women sit in victory after this impressive start. third place in the South Division Sander again had a terrific of the Great Lakes Intercolligiate Athletic Conference, with the top night as she dropped 20 points three teams getting invitations to and pulled down six rebounds. Maxim scored 10 points and the post-season. Two wins over dished out six assists in the the weekend were necessary for winning effort the women to remain in the top With these two wins coming three. I i after a six-game slump, the Lady & At Wayne State, the Laker Lakers are back on track and women outclassed the Tartars as look to solidify the remainder of they rolled to a 72-49 victory. After a dominating 33-18 lead at their season. The Lady Lakers next face the half, the Lady Lakers never Findlay University at home on looked back as they further extended their lead. Thursday and Hillsdale College K Sophomore Rebecca Sandor on Saturday. Both games will be led scoring with 26 points, while played in the Mercyhurst Athletic Center at 6 p.m. and 1 sophomores Amy Galla, * p.m., respectively. Meredith Koncsol and Jodie Maxim each scored 14, 11 and 10 points, respectively. "We knew we had to start winning if we wanted to get a By Lynn Burns Merciad writer

Men's basketball back in winningtfbrm
remain at the top of the G LI AC South Division at 12-1. & Less than 48 hours later, the Hurst took to the road againsU It may only have three letters, new GLIAC member | , but the word the Mercyhurst men's basketball team has Westminster College needing a spelled with inconsistency this win. This time, it took just two season is w-i-n. Last Saturday, quick Titan baskets in the game's opening minutes to wake up the though, the Lakers passed the test with flying colors. Lakers. : ; Accurate field goal shooting Despite a 79-62 loss to * powerful Wayne State University and first-half layups by Jeff Woleben and Brent Swain in Detroit last Thursday, the propelled Mercyhurst to a 14-13 Hurst dismantled Westminster early lead, a lead the Blue and College 73-63 in New Green would not give up. Wilmington on Saturday, mo vine right back into the Great Freshman guard Richard Bradley nailed three shots from downLakes Intercollegiate Athletic town to give Mercyhurst a 43-28 Conference (GLIAC) playoff halftime advantage. hunt The Titans tried to keep it close Wayne State, ranked third in the second period, but the nationally in die most recent Lakers would not surrender their NCAA Division II poll,'showed lead. After Westminster's Jason no mercy against the Lakers in McCray converted a three-point their own gym. Tartar senior forward Tony Goins, recognized play to narrow the Titan deficit \ to 64-56, three straight Laker before the contest as Wayne layups sealed the deal and State's all-time leading scorer, Mercyhurst prevailed 73-63. The paced the victors with 13 points win moved Mercyhurst's GLIAC and seven rebounds. Reserve forward Alex Ward came off the mark to 3-7 (9-8 overall) and just three games out of the final bench for 12 points and five playoff spot in the South | boards in the win. L, ~ Division. ; V ^ v Mercyhurst, down by as many The Lakers must make quick as 14 points in the first half, work of their upcoming oppo- < rallied behind five 3-pointers to nents in order to qualify for the cut the halftime deficit to 31-26. playoffs, though. All of ' Wayne State zoomed to a quick Mercyhurst's remaining games second half start, however, and are against South Division cruised to the 79-62 victory to By Scott Koskoski Merciad wri ter * opponents. The Hurst returns to action Thursday night at the < . Athletic Center against the-" University of Findlay at 8 p.m. :' and Saturday against Hillsdale at 3 p.m. at the MAC. Both games can be heard live on 88.5 WMCE Mercyhurst College Radio.

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