PERIODICAL.

LIBRARY USE ONLY

MERCYHURST COLLEGE HAMMERMILL LIBRARY^ 46-0001

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Vol 72 No. 10

Mercyhurst College

16546

February 11,1999

Ambassadors lead phonathon

Late night activities planned
Unionjopen til 2 a.m. in spring
open later and sponsoring "We will take the same events, we think more people precautions as we do at any will feel comfortable about campus event to make sure For those who have been desper- participating.** ? things are not disrupted. On the| ately searching for things to do According to Melissa Lang, same note, we are also expecting on campus during the late night chairperson of the Student a certain level of respect from the weekend hours, search no further. Activities Committee, the students,** Shimek added. Starting spring term, the Carolyn union will host several events Students can expect events to Herrmann Student Union will be ranging from movies and be scheduled through the entire open Friday and Saturday coffeehouse to karoke and spring term, with the exception nights until 2 a.m. . comedians.-The events are free of the night of the spring formal Cass Shimek, associate dean to students. t Easter weekend. t of student development and Ryan Kennis, president of ^ 8 T h e spring term will serve as director of the student union said, the Mercyhurst Student f ^ a trial period. So if it doesn' I ^ "Several students in their Government, said, "We had work out, we do not have an freshman interviews with extra funds available in our obligation to it for next year,** Campus Ministry and just in budget and decided that this said Kennis. ? conversation, have indicated that would be a good way to use According to Shimek, snack J they feel there is nothing to do on them. Dr. William Garvey has food and soda will be provided weekends but party. We want to agreed to supplement the rest since the Laker Inn will not be offer an alternative to those of the costs that we cannot open. cover." students who choose not to bi "We hope to see these lateIn order to ensure the safety night activities into next year and participate in the weekend social of the students, Shimek said a fife that already exists on this the years to come, but it will all security person will be hired. campus. By keeping the union depend on thefarnbuTbf students* she added.*T By Jessi Gentile Merciad editor

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Jessica Russell/Merciad photographer

The phonathon runs through Thursday. Already $51,282 of the $75,000 goal has been raised. The Ambassadors are leading the way with $30,234, football is in second place with $9,692 and Circle K is third with $2,200. : ' g

North East topioldi graduation ceremony
By Carrie Tappe Merciad editor For the first time in its eight-year history, Mercyhurst-North East will hold its own graduation ceremony. According to Patricia Gates, chair of the graduation committee for the campus, approximately 60 to 70 students will receive their associate degrees at a ceremony to be held Saturday, May 22, on the campus. According to Mary Daly, coordinator for graduation on the main campus, with North East's growing enrollment, Mercyhurst hopes to establish North East as a branch campus, and its own graduation ceremony is another step in that process. McA uleyWayne students will still graduate with the main campus students. "Holding our own graduation is another milestone in the development of the Mercyhurst-North East campus,** said Dr. Gary Brown, executive .dean of the school. *• North East offers associate degrees in liberal arts, culinary arts, physical therapist assistant, criminal justice and law enforcement, business administration management and computer support systems. One main difference for students of these studies is that they can walk in graduation if they are within six credits of completing their degree. The six credits must be finished during the fall term, with the exception of culinary arts. Those students must finish the six credits during the summer. For an associate degree from the main campus, students must complete all of the required course work to participate in graduation, according to Bonnie Hall, registrar. In addition to a separate graduation ceremony, an awards dinner and other activities will be held on the North East campus Friday, May 21, for graduating students. According to Daly, having a separate graduation ceremony for North East willfreeup a few extra tickets for students on the main campus*Graduation for main campus students will be held at the Warner Theatre, Sunday, May 23. Seniors and their parents should receive the first graduation packet next week containing information on hotel and motel accommodations and ordering announcements. The Warner Theatre will not be the site for graduation for the class of 2000. Due to renovations at the Erie landmark, alternative graduation sites are being explored. The Civic Center, Family First and an outdoor graduation ceremony are 'being considered. "We did an outdoor graduation in 1973 and H poured," Daly said. "If we attempt it again, it* will be with a year of planning and a fool-proof contingency plan."

Study in Ireland next winter
concl ude the program in midMcrciad editor May. 3 Gower said that he hopes In January 2000, Mercyhurst will Mercyhurst will be able to send 20-25 qualified students to launch its Study in Ireland Ireland for the first year. program, which will allow A minimum QPA of 3.0 is Mercyhurst students to study at a university in Gal way, Ireland, for necessary to register for the program. Tuition and housing a semester. costs will be financed through According to Dr. Joseph Mercyhurst $ Gower, vice-president of acaAccording to Gower, registrademic affairs, beginning in the tion for the program must be winter term, students will take done in April, because the two classes at Mercyhurst In program requires a great deal of early January when the students planning. embark for Ireland, they will \ "Students have to begin the complete those courses. When the planning now so they have two classes are completed, academic and personal arrangestudents will take four classes ments taken care of before school from the Irish university and starts in the fall.** he said.
•-•••'

By Bill Melville

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THE MEROAD

FEBRUARYlt 1999

CAMPUS NEWS
Mercyhurst will also be * featured in the March/April issue The teleconference was of Earth Comfort Update, the*.j broadcast locally at Blasco GHPC newsletter, she said. The Memorial Library. One of four newsletter can be viewed on-line schools featured in the teleconference, Mercyhurst was the oiily at <www/geoexchange.orgpft. "Mercyhurst has a really Mercy hurst College's unique use college. The other schools were an elementary school jn Keninteresting story to tell," Quinn of geothermal heating and tucky, and high schools in said. "Its performing arts center cooling earned the college a spot is one of very few performing in a satellite teleconference that; Tennessee and Idaho.-arts centers worldwide to use Mercyhurst has used a, was broadcast to over 500 sites geothermal heating and cooling,^ GeoExchange system, also in the United States, Canada and Mexico on Tuesday. The 1 known as geothermal heating and and the library was a retrofit project" | cooling, since 1996 when the teleconference, "Energy Smart » The approximately fourSolutions, for America's Schools/ college built the Mary D' Angelo GeoExchange Heating and Performing Arts Center. In 1997, minute video package on Mercyhurst was filmed at the \\ the college retrofitted p Cooling - An Educational college in December, Quinn said. Experience," was broadcast via Hammermill Library with a Interviewed for the story were satellite from Washington, D.C. geothermal system while Thomas Billingley,-executive Hosted by Richard Trethewey renovating the then 44-year-old vice president of administration; building. The unique projects of PBS's 'This Old House," the teleconference focued on energy attracted teleconference organiz- Dr. Roy Strausbaugh, dean oft | libraries; Michael Fuhrman, ers, according to Sara Quinn, efficiency in schools. Participerforming arts center director; communications director for the pants at each site were able to Geothermal Heat Pump Consor- and Bill Kerbusch, physical plant call in questions to a panel of director, j* % tium, a program sponsor. experts and take part in discusSchools can typically save from 30 to 60 percent in heating and cooling bills by using GeoExchange, she added.b Those savings opportunities, among other benefits, prompted 4801 Peach Street Mercyhurst's initial' use of the*' GeoExchange sys tern f according | to Billingsley.'The college will consider using the system in future construction. ^ Aft Delivery • Open 7 Days a Week

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THE MEROAD

PAGE 3

ENTERTAINMENT Oscar nominations announced
Terrence Malick, "A Thin Red Line" is the first film he has made in the past two decades (the last being "Days of Heaven" in 1978). The Best Actor nods went to Roberto Benigni ("Life is Beautiful"), Tom Hanks ("Saving Private Ryan"), Ian McKellen ("Gods and Monsters"), Nick Nolte ("Afflic1 tion* ) and Edward Norton By Kari Wells ("American History X"). Merciad writer Norton was the big surprise in " this category as Was the shutout of On Feb.9at5:38am. PST, Jim Carrey (who won the Golden Globe in the same category) and Academy Award-winning actor Joseph Fiennes for "Shakespeare Kevin Spacey and Academy in Love." T President Robert Rehme anBest Supporting Actor nominanounced this year's nominations tions went to James Coburn (the F for the 71st Annual Academy first in his long acting career), Awards. | Robert Duvall, Ed Harris, There were few surprises this Geoffrey Rush and Billy Bob year, which lacked the presence of Thornton. a sure bet movie like 'Titanic." There were also no surprises in "Shakespeare in Love" led the the Best Actress in a Leading Role nominations with 13 followed by "Saving Private Ryan" with 10 and category: Cate Blanchett ("Elizabeth"), Fernanda Montenegro seven each for "Elizabeth," "A ("Central Station"). Gwyneth Thin Red Line"and "Life is Pal trow ("Shakespeare in Love"), • Beautiful." $ 1 Meryl Streep ("One True Thing") Best Picture nominees are H and Emily Watson ("Hilary and "Elizabeth,? "Life is Beautiful," Jackie"). H $ >-•'-'" f.OW * "Saving Private Ryan," is&$ Nominees for Best Supporting i .. "Shakespeare in Love", and "A cJB Actress went to Kathy Bates, Thin Red Line." This will be a >. Brenda Blethyn, Judi Dench, showdown between three movies Rachel Griffiths and Lynn that take place during World War Redgrave. \ 1 and two during Elizabethan 1 Interestingly, Blanchett and England. * The only slight surprise was the ! Dench are both nominated for the role of Queen Elizabeth, but for absence of 'The Truman Show," which was expected to be included different movies and at much different ages. on the list. j ^ i For Redgrave, her nomination The directors for each of these for "Gods and Monsters" is the movies were also nominated for first in over 20 years. Oscars with the exception of The number of nominations that Shekhar Kapur for "Elizabeth." went to "Life is Beautiful" was a Peter Weir took the fifth spot for surprise, but one that was well 'The Truman Show." For director

ARTS&

'Shakespeare in LoveMeads nominations

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deserved. It was nominated for both Best Picture and for Best Foreign Language Film, being the second film to ever accomplish this feat — the first was the political film "Z." * Many worthy films and performances were ignored this year, but this was not a shock considering the overall conservatism of the Academy. > Todd Solondz and his highly critically acclaimed film "Happiness** was ignored even in the category in which it should have been a shoe-in — Best Original Screenplay. The sensitive nature of > the film, which included i pedophilia, is most definitely the reason for its snuff by the Academy. - v iv v£ » "Waking Ned Devine** was ^ another exemplary picture that was I \ overlooked this year to my dismay since I view it to be one of the best ^of the year. An explanation for 'The Truman Show** not being nominated for Best Picture was probably due to Ahe fact that the Academy does not Husually choose comedies in this ^category. •*£ * *?*£; .* • j %. This year the nomi nations wenS Fgiven in front of a large sign stating "Sunday at the Oscars*' to ^promote the change of night for .the awards show. The usual Monday night has been changed to r-an airing Sunday, March 21, at 8 * p.m.' Another new feature for this year is an Oscar preview show, which will be hosted by actress Geena f Davis. Whoopi Goldberg will hos$ the 71st Academy Awards. Get your score card ready — this is bigger than the Super Bowl!

A little bitjof south up north
By Heather Cvitkovie Merciad editor The Roadhouse Theatre has welcomed to the stage what it calls "one of the greatest American plays of all time.** The Pulitzer-Prize winning drama, "A Streetcar Named -• Desire,** began last Friday and will run through March 13. The play reveals the depths of the character Blanche DuBois, a woman whose life has been undermined by her romantic illusions. These illusions lead her to reject the realities of the life with which she is faced and which she consistenty ignores. She is pressured by her sister and her sister's husband to move to New Orleans. Finally, the pressure gets to her and her self-delusion is revealed leading her to madness. "A Streetcar Named Desire** features the Roadhouse * s artistic director, Kim McClelland. She is reprising her role from the Roadhouse's 1991 production. Following "A Streetcar Named Desire,** the Roadhouse Theatre will open *The Glass Menagerie" on March 26. Believed to be autobiographical of Tennessee Williams' youth, the play focuses on Amanda Wingfield. Wingfield is a faded, tragic remnant of Southern gentility who lives in poverty with her son and crippled daughter. The world of i 1 usion which she has striven to 1 create in order to make life bearable for her family ultimately collapses. * * V Performances for both productions are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults and $8 for students and seniors. The Roadhouse is offering a* special ticket package called a ^Tennessee Two-fer. * By ordering * tickets in advance, admission for both plays is just $15 for adults and $12 for students and seniors.' To order tickets, call the Roadhouse Box Office at 456-5656, or stop by the Box Office at 145 W. v

UthSt.

'

TT

ClaudialSchiffer in new movie
Spotlight on fashion
Heather Cvitkovic The runway meets the Hollywood Boulevard when Claudia Schiffer stars in her third movie from the past year. In this role, she plays a European anthropologist who comes to New York to study hip-hop culture and winds up going native in James Toback's new low-budget movie, "Black and White.'* The rest of the cast should be no less recognizable. Claudia's boyfriend is played by the New York Knick's Allan Houston, while her ex-boyfriend, played by Ben Stiller, is investigating the f\ current beau for murder. Power, the managing force behind the Wu Tang Clan, plays the central protagonist, a gangster who wants to go legit by opening a nightclub. The movie also stars Brooke Shields, Gabby Hoffman, Robert Downey Jr., Jared Leto, former child actor and now teen heartthrob Elijah Wood, and wildchild model-turned-actress Bijoux Phillips, who sports a discountstore version of Versace's candypink metal mesh halter top throughout the movie. In a press release on the movie, Wood said. The underlying idea is that there isn't a distinctive black culture versus white culture. As far as hip-hop goes, it's so ingrained that it's part of youth culture whether you want it to be or not." Most of the scenes were improvised by the actors. Toback 's plot outline provides a basic ^£ structure, but he asked the actors to find their own words. Although films dealing with racial issues can be tough to sell at the box office — "Bulworth" and "Beloved" were duds — Toback and his cast have high hopes for the movie, which is expected to premiere at the Cannes Film Festival later this year. Keep your eyes open for Leto and Downey's flashy Versace pleather suits and Schiffer's leopard-print dress.

The Merciad is looking for an

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PAGE 4

THE MERCIAD

FEBRUARY111999

Editorial

OPINION]
No more fourth -on Friday ni ghts
beings hold* in high regard.* As of late, McAuley Hall has 4 issued a set of new rules to which resident assistants and desk workers must comply, Qne^' of those requires that all backpacks and/or laundry baskets must be searched before individuals attempt to enter the dormitory on Friday and Saturday nights. j? 'What is this besides a blatant disregard of the residents* (and those who choose to visit) rights? Must Residence Li fe officials and desk workers really search through the bags and baskets of students? What will be next —| metal detectors and dogs trained to sniff out drugs and alcohol? £ What happened to our rights? Are they signed away each term wi th our loan checks and scholarships? Or do they simply not apply to us because we attend a private institution? This js truly a sticky situation. No one wants their personal effects, whether it be homework, tests or dirty laundry, sifted through by strangers. On the other hand, those who must conduct the searches probably do not want to be looking through those personal effects either. Perhaps we should al 1 try harder to respect one another — students and administration.

/

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CAMPUS
QUESTION
"I would go to see the bands. I; think that it is great that student activities is doing this." Martin Heitzmann Freshmen, Undeclared "I would go to check out the first couple — just to see what the events are like, and then I would decide." *•* Nate Scholl Sophomore, Archaeology "Is anybody really going to go?" Michelle Sprague Sophomore, Business

The Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution states that it is "the hght of the people to be .* secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, (and that) shall not be violated." In layman's terms, that simply means wrongful searches and* seizures are illegal. The Fourth Amendment, one of 26, ensures our basic right to live and as American citizens. * Indeed, not only does it protect us from unreasonable searches and seizures, it also safeguards our dignity and self-respect — both of which almost all human

The inquiring campus reporter asked students what they thought of the late-night activities in the union scheduledfor spring term. "I do not usually go to see the bands, but I might go to see a comedian." Elizabeth Nlci J Sophomore, Graphic Design " I really do not think that people will go." \ Allison Oberle Sophomore, H RIM *
*

"I would definitely go, provided that there are no excellent * parties, of course/ Joe Walko Junior, R/IAP

King Hussein — voice bf peace
Haver
Kari Wells

On Feb. 6, King Hussein, ruler of the Hashemite Kingdom of f Jordan died at the age of 63. He died of heart failure in an Amman hospital as a result of the non-Hodgki ns lymphoma he has been battling for over a year. He had undergone four rounds of chemotherapy and was receiving his treatment at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. He surprised the world Jan. 25 of this year when he designated his eldest son, 37-year-old Abdullah, heir to the throne; he bypassed his brother Prince Hassan over differences, though he had been crown prince for 34 years. On Abdullah's succession to the throne aftei his father's death, he named his half-brother, Hamzeb, son of Queen Noor, as crown prince to help bond the royal family. (It is suspected that this may have been the wish of Hussein of whom Hamzeb was a favon te.) The two princes had been born to different mothers. King Hussein had been an important player in the Middle East for his entire rei gn which was nearly half a century. His grandfather, King Abdullah, was the first ruler of Jordan when it was founded 76 years ago. He was assassinated in front of the then 15-year-old 1 lussein at the Al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem.

His father, King Talal, then took the throne but ceded it to his teenage son because of his difficult battle with schizophrenia. Hussein had seen 12 assassination attempts and seven plots to overthrow him. Most of the difficulty of his reign was caused by the ongoing struggle and i conflict between Jews and Arabs in the region. A long history of fighting and war due to land and to exert power in the region had left it unstable and tumultuous at best. Hussein admitted that he often made poor decisions in the area of foreign policy, and lost a large area of land in 1967 — the West Bank and parts of Jerusalem to Israel to show for it (land his grandfather had gained

through conflict). & However, throughout his life, King Hussein had been a pragmatist and avoided radicalTr ism. He knew that stability would only come through diplomatic activity with Israel. Many Arabs were angered by his secret talks with Israeli leaders,? but he felt they were necessary if peace was ever to exist in the Middle East This, of course, £ caused many problems i n a j country of 4.5 million in which two-thirds are Palestinian and in a land area the size of South Carolina. He also was surrounded by Arabic countries of much greater size and wealth who at times had made decision-making difficult 1 King Hussein established ties

with the United States (more specifically the Central Intelligence Agency) in the 1950s when they warned him of a coup plot against him. The CIA even gave him checks to establish good relations and helped him when his country was boycotted by surrounding Arab countries. Relations were strained during the Gulf War when Hussein did* not support the air strikes against Iraq because he felt peace could be reached by other means. Relations were re-established during the Clinton administration during the attempts to reach a peace agreement between P.L.O. leader Yasir Arafat and Israeli President Yithak Rabin, whom King Hussein greatly respected. Jordan and Israel also signed a

historic peace agreement i n July of 1994, ending the state of war between the countries that had existed for nearly 50 years. After Rabin's assassination and . . Benjamin Netanyahu becoming \> president of Israel, King Hussein felt the chance for peace in the region was becoming less likely (especially due to the expansion of Jewish settlements in the West Bank). •; | King Hussein, however, never lost hope or stopped attempting to establish peace in the Middle East and was active until weeks before his death. He will be sorely missed in the international community and his contributions to the peace effort^ will never be forgotten.

Have Mercy

i

Shawntae Howard

FEBRUARY U 1999

THE MERCIAD

PAGE 5

Where has media responsibility gone? of network programming, or is it least watched shows of the day. Thanks from Pi Sigma Alpha genuinely attempting to inform the CNN may provide 24-hour The The Pi Sigma Alpha organization like to thank Sister Damien who public about what is going on in coverage, but that network offers (political science national honor Chimera the world?certainly been the case the evening news. one gets on the same news that was the lucky winner of the society) would like to thank all This has raffle. She generously contrib- .
those who participated in our 50/50 raffle. We would especially uted half of her winnings back to the organization. Andrea Ellison, treasurer Bill Melville While at the grocery store the* other day, I noticed that the front page of one of the H newspapers said something similar to "Hussein lies gravely ill." I knew very welf that the ' headline was referring to King Hussein of Jordan, who died of cancer one day later. However, as I left, I could not help but wonder how many people bought that newspaper and thought to themselves, "I didn't even know Saddam Hussein was sick." While it seems ridiculous, everyone knows the name Hussein was placed in the headline because it would sell more papers than if it were to say Jordan's king was dying. Someone passing the newspaper racks might glance over at it and think the headline referred to the Iraqi dictator whom we all know and love. Within that little anecdote lies one of the serious problems with the media today. Is the media si mpi y trying to sel I newspapers and fill a half-hour

The mail bag

Questioning faith
How do you know God exists? What are the differences between Protestant and Catho-* lie faiths? What does feminist theology mean to Christians? I'm not Catholic, what can Campus Ministry do for me? I believe in God, but I have doubts about my religion How can I strengthen my faith? If you would like answers to questions similar to these, or if you have your own concerns; why not ask Campus Minisry? Submit questions to The Merciad at Box 161* !% S8& In a column published every other week in The Merciad, a member of the Campus Ministry team will review, discuss and attempt to answer your concerns. Look for this provocative column in upcoming issues of The Merciad. j All submissions must include a name and contact number, i However, names may be withheld upon request.

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in the last year, when we've seen nothing but the Monica Lewinsky scandal plastered on the front page of every major metropolitan paper. If it hasn't been that, it has been other scandals, lawsuits and any other number of media-inflated issues, ranging from Mike Tyson's continual troubles with the law to Jesse Ventura's election as* governor of Minnesota (just because he was a professional wrestler does not mean he will be a bad leader). '• Other events have gone on in the world, but to look at a newspaper, one would never know it Around a month ago, for example, Bill Clinton met with Cuban president Fidel Castro but that meeting received only a minimal amount ol attention and news coverage. This was probably due to the way the CubanAmerican lobbyists pump large sums of money to ensure that no progress will occur between the United States and Cuba as long as Castro is alive. Money is the real issue here., after al 1. The world news programs on the major networks are generally the

Maybe the media is not to blame. Perhaps the media believes the public wants sensationalized news. Consequently, they have chosen to exploit that belief as a way to sell newspapers and gain viewers^ Whether or not the media is giving the public what they want is irrelevant, because they are not being impartial in what they jj reveal. *] 111 incidents such as the OJ. Simpson case, the media definitely played a hand in turning the trial into a race issue. His guilt or innocence was not the issue — as it should have' been. The media did not portray the facts in a fair manner. Essentially, I believe that people are not being allowed to make their own decisions on issues which affect them. The media is portraying certain events in the hope of changing public opinion. Personally, I don't think freedom of the press should be made into a big issue, because the press is so limited in what it already shows.

Putting things in perspective
Shawntae Howard

Skedaddle
Barb Tompko The first thing I do when I get up in the morning is tell myself, "Barb, you have got A LOT of work to do today; but you have all of thetimein the world to do it." After reciting this mantra, I feel relatively capable of con tri bu ti n g to a productive workday. [| The first thing I say before I go to bed each night is "What the hell have 1 done with my day?" I was pondering this enigma the other day; curiously enough, when I was supposed to be typing an eight-page paper. I used to be so driven to succeed. I vividly recalled my earliest memory (my high school years), maneuvering my way through SATs, perspiring as I opened the scores, hoping that my exhausted effort would pay

f

MEPOAD

Editor-in-Chief Jessi Gentile News Editor Carrie Tappe^ ^ Sports Editor Stephen Nolan Features Editor Bill Melville A&E Editor Heather C vitkovic Senior Writer Karl Wells Photography Jessica Russell Copy Editor Mandy Pies Cartoons Shawntae Howad The Merciad is the student produced paper of Mercyhurst College. It is published throughout the year with the exception of mid-term and finals weeks, The Merciad welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be signed, but your name can be withheld on request under certain conditions. Letters are due on the Tuesday before publication and should be no longer than 500 words. All letters should he submitted to Box 161.
• i

off. I shared my time between the library and the soccer field. I was devoted, ambitious and charisi: matic. When I got to college that all changed^ I think, in one way or another, we all can relate to this. I have gotten so overwhelmed with work that I just do not have time to think, much less apply myself to do something extracurricular. I recently came to the brutal realization that I am cheating myself. Maybe, we are all cheating ourselves. i Personally, I cannot give a good excuse as to what I've done with my time. When we came to college we hoped that it would help us achieve our future goals. But you must be committed and industrious before you can even begin to achieve. The only benefits we truly appreciate are the ones we must sacrifice for. However, we all have the tendency to get a little sidetracked. It happens to the best of us. I think now (just before finals week), is a

good to time to focus ourselves. I think that success exists wherever you go. You can do well if, j| you real 1 y want to. Being a • knowledgeable, well-rounded citizen requires a little discipline on our part I started out okay at Mercyhurst; but I have gotten a little frustrated and disappointed. The best way to remedy that, I believe, is to get involved in something that really challenges us. For two excruciating, but rewarding, months I was a rower. I played soccer and Softball in high school, so by no means was I a novice to the demands of athletics. But to be perfectly honest, rowing really slapped me across the face. Challenges will always surround us. Opportunity is everywhere. It stares at us each morning, and we keep avoiding its eye contact. Today, I decided to enter the staring contest. I am determined to apply perspective in my life. Hopefully, you and I can both get something out of it.

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PAGE 6

THE MEROAD

FEBRUARY!! 1999

FEATURES
By Bill Melville Merciad editor In the college's Strategic Plan, there is a move to improve the quality and quantity of coed intellectual activities offered at MercyhursL What most people don't know, however, is that a/ successful activity fitting that description is already present at Mercy hurst the Model United v Nations. Eleven members of the Model U.N. team participated in the Montreal Model U.N. Conference from Jan. 28-31. The conference was attended by approximately 1,000 students from 56 schools, including many Ivy League universities and military academies. 5 The students who traveled to Montreal were Danielle Bums, Jill Bucceri, Ann Bui a, Donna D'Aleo, Elizabeth Kolojek, Beth Stoessel, Paul McCloskey, Todd Conklin, Josh Heimburg, Steve Salas and Adam Wells Davis. During the conference, Mercy hurst students represented Latvia, and each team member was assigned different committees for that country. The % committees, which covered such areas as human rights and , . * women*s rights, then discussed the issues pertaining to their^ committee and then tried to come to resolutions on those issues. Dr. Rhonda Clark, assistant professor of history, who serves as adviser to the group along with Dr. Brian Ripley, traveled with the team to Montreal. According to Clark, the simulation kept students working from Thursday through Sunday, usually from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Any spare time was spent exploring Montreal. "It is an exhausting experience for the students, but they get to experience both the academic and cultural side," Clark said. This was the second conference Model U.N. attended this year. The first one was held at Kent State University's campus * in Ashtabula, Ohio. While individuals were eligible for awards at the Ashtabula conference, only one team award was ; available at the Montreal I conference. "This conference is more for experience,'* Clark said. t McCloskey, who served as the

*

Model U.N. travels to Montreal College?and grief: the difficult balance
group's head delegate, said, "I think our group was incredibly professional. It was amazing to see our ability compared to some of the bigger schools, such as Harvard and West Point" Clark said she felt pleased with the group's performance at the conference. | % "I am always impressed about how much students want to learn about international issues. The students were well spoken and well prepared. It's a valuable t experience to be in that sort of atmosphere. Our students were justified in feeling that they could interact well in this type of environment,*' she said. * y According to Clark, Model U.N. has attended their two yearly conferences, so spring term will be spent trying to raise campus awareness of the group. . Course credit is available for those involved in Model U.N. "Model U.N. presents an outstanding opportunity for all 1 students at Mercyhurst,, not just gg those who are interested inf ^| politics,''McCloskey said. By Bill Melville Merciad editor4 responsibilities of being a college senior, it is enough to initiate a nervous breakdown. Taking time off from school to truly heal is For most students, adjusting to college life takes several months. impossible. I missed a week of class and was completely If a student has trouble finding overwhelmed with work when I.: friends and dealing with the workload of college courses, the got back," Gentile said. Tobin notes that most college change can take even longer. students imagine a death when But if a student is faced with grief, such as the death of a loved they leave home, because of the fear that someone might die one or other tragedy, them T students can become completely while they are away. "[Imagining death] makes a lot lost. They may even stop trying of sense developmentally to adjust, j ••!. because it is such a strong Dr. Gerry Tobin, director of moment of separation. Humans counseling services, said tragic events can undermine the beliefs can and need to understand their college promotes. Part of Tobin's experiences. Part of grief is that|j at face value, it has no meaning. doctoral dissertation dealt with the positive aspects of suffering, It can, however, give birth to J meaning we would have never so it is an area of familiarity for imagined without it," Tobin said. him. According to Tobin, there is "With college students, who •always support available in times see the future as boundless, finality is a shock to their • J of grief, but that support can only perceptions of-thfe worlti aitf! . °?n go so taf'He believes that in the themselves. For some, it is the ? process of grief? we don't imagine ourselves as being able* first time they ever bump into finitude and it's an unpleasant . to deal with that grief, but eventually one must transcend introduction," he said. the pain. When that happens, our Senior Jessi Gentile lost her< lives become enriched in spite of grandfather shortly after Christtragedy. & * ' mas break. She had to go to "Ultimately, this is really about Florida for the funeral and our own deaths. At one level, no missed a week of class during a term in which she must complete one will ever know your pai n. two senior projects and serve as It's part of the life process and causes us to ask the big questions editor-in-chief of The Merciad. "Having to deal with a death is because they are so rarely accompanied by easy answers," always difficult, but when you he said?" I combine it with all of the

Body building defines; Kolivoski
By Mike Tanner Merciad writer Sophomore Jill Kolivoski weighs in at 123 pounds and has a body fat percentage of three. As if this were not impressive enough, she is also training for the National Collegiate Body Building Championships, which will take place this summer. In her body building career, Kolivoski has taken first place and best poser awards at the 1998 Ohio Natural Body Building Championships in the women over 118 pounds division. Kolivoski also holds a second place finish at the 1998 central states National Physique Championships, women's middlewei ght division. j Kolivoski, who double majors i n pre-physical therapy and wellness, has been sculpting her body for the last two and a half years. A typical day includes a f 30- to 40- minute cardiovascular workout twice a day and at least two hours of solid weight trainings hours before a competition, she dehydrates herself in order to look as chiseled as possible. Juggling school and training is also a large part of Kolivoski's life. ,H ;. "If I'm not in class, I'm home eating. If I'm not studying, I'm in the gym lifting," she said. Food preparation is done all at once. Kolivoski cooks 10 chicken breasts at a time. "That should last me about three days," Kolivoski said. Kolivoski said depending upon how well she places, she may decide to take up body building professionally. She already has a sponsor, USA Health and Fitness, a national chain specializing in supplements and nutrition. • ' But despite all the hard work, Kolivoski sees the potential gains as worthwhile. J "It's all worth it in the end," said Kolivoski, "It's very rewarding to see how your body transforms."

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Jill Kolivoski
"It takes a lot of dedication," Kolivoski said. As a show approaches, Kolivoski modifies her diet. She must eat six meals a day, mostly chicken, broccoli andrice.Each meal must be consumed at the same time every day for optimum performance. She avoids sodium to prevent weight gain caused by water retention and 48

S PO RTS
A T H L E T E Basketball OF THE W E JodieiMaxim EK
By Colleen Pazderski Merciad writer 1
4 *

FEBRUARY 111999

THE ME ROAD

PAGE 7

Men's v-ball can't find winning form
The men's volleyball team struggled again this past week-5* end after taking on two .nationally-ranked teams. ^J On Feb. 6, the Lakers played Indiana University-Purdue University at Fort Wayne (IPFW), a team ranked eight in the nation. After a close first game 13-15, the Lakers came back and won the second 15-11. The last two games were lost to IPFW 7-15 and 12-15. Junior outside hitter Jim Zorn put down 31 kills, setting a new school !^ record for most kills in a match. Senior outside hitter Adam Tokash registered 21 kills and seven digs. Also with seven kills during the match was sophomore setter Greg Beato. 5 On Feb. 7, Mercyhurst played Loyola University of Chicago, presently ranked 10th in the national polls. The Lakers lost the match in three quick games, 7-15,9-15 and 5-15.1* Both Tokash and junior Matt Tarn boh no served two aces each, 'while Zorn and Todd Ledoux each had one. Zorn led the team again in kills with 14, and Tokash followed with seven.
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Jessica Russell/Merciad photographei

Senior Adam Tokash rises to the occasion for the Lakers against Loyola University on Feb. 7.
Tokash now leads the team in kills with 104, digs with 54 and service aces with 12. Beato has accumulated 373 assists so far this season. 1 The Lakers will be on the road this weekend to Quincy Univer si ty and Clarke College. They then return home to play Ohio State University on Feb. 18*

Losses spell trouble for men's b-jball Rowing teams place second
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Sophomore guard Jodie Maxim has been named to the Eastern College Athletic Conference Division II honor roll for her performance last week. : ; : -.<<;.><•-: 18 * ,.«••.;..- .; ,* c#^(fen { Maxim registered her first carrer double-double with 20 points and 10 assists in the 88-86 win over Ashland University on Feb. 2, then scored a carrer-high 25 points in a 79-77 overtime loss to Ashland on Feb. 6. VA « ^ ''* *

By Mike Tanner Merciad writer The Pittsburgh Indoor Ergometer Championships were held Saturday Feb. 6. The Laker rowing teams had a strong show, placing second in the overall team rankings. Sophomore Laura Rush placed second in the women's open division, put I ing the standard 2,000 meters in seven minutes, 27 seconds. Freshman Amanda Cullen puffed a 7:53 giving her fourth place in the lightweight

women s division. . , Freshman Bob Furgal also earned a fourth place finish pulling a 6:34 in the open men's division. In the lightweight men's division, sophomore Mike Tanner and junior Curtis Walsh pulled 6:42.6 and 6:42.7 to finish third and fourth, respectively. Freshman Tim Lohse won the coxswain's race with a comcfrom-behind victory over defending champion and teammate, junior Eric Carlson, with a time of 7:38.

By Scott Koskoski Merciad writer %/.

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The Mercyhurst men's basketball team might want to consider '•• buying stock in Kleenex. Lots of it. ; * Three straight heart-pounding losses by the Lakers in must-win games, two defeats by four points or less, is enough to break any Mercyhurst fan's heart i When each setback drives the Lakers further out of the Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference playoff hunt, facial tissues should probably be handy. After a pulsating 90-86 loss to Ashland University on Feb. 1 on the road, the Hurst welcomed the Ohio school to the Mercyhurst Athletic Center to finish the home-and-home series last Saturday. Needing a victory to even the season series and climb back into the South Division playoff picture, the Lakers $ cruised to an early 9-0 edge. An 8-2 Eagle run narrowed the score before Laker rookie Jamal 3 Hoi ley's three-point bomb gave the Lakers a 19-8 lead. Ashland rallied back, though, and went into halftime up 31 -28. Feeling the pressure to win, the Hurst took charge early in the second period and stormed back . in front 47-41 behind solid floor shooting from senior Jeff

Woleben and sophomore Brent Swain. The Lakers led 72-71 . with 1; 13 to play before the « Eagles' Nate Vaughn canned a lay-up to give the visitors the lead for, good. Mercyhurst was forced to foul in the closing". seconds and despite making > _ ' things interesting, lost the battle 76-74, the second narrow defeat to Ashland in five days. bv As if that weren't enough, the Lakers had just one day to [repare against their next GLIAC jouth Division foe, cross-town arch-rival Gannon University. Trying desperately to avenge an earlier loss to the Golden Knights at the Athletic Center, Mercyhurst entered downtown Erie's Hammermill Auditorium with much-needed confidence. A win kept things interesting in the playoff picture; a loss most likely sent the Lakers home to play > spoiler to their remaining opponents. 1 he game s opening moments displayed the Mercyhurst toughness and never-give-up style that has sometimes been missing from the huddle this . season. The Lakers opened up early runs on the Knights after ^ Gannon was whistled for an if early technical. Several fans threw toilet paper on the floor after the Knights' first basket, earning Brent Swain a spot at the foul line and the possession

arrow. Gannon also came to play, however, and rallied to -~t \ even the score just before v* hatftime 28-28. * A fter the Lakers again opened up on their rivals to start the second half, Gannon responded. With the Lakers up 46-39, the Knights went on a 6-0 run to tighten the deficit The Knight's faithful fans roared to life inside the Hammermill and Mercyhurst became noticeablyflustered.A 9-0 Gannon run capped off by three-point wonder Steve Mover's 418th career collegiate three gave the Knights a 65-56 edge, a lead they would not \ surrender. Again forced to foul, the Lakers mustered just four more points the rest of the way and fell apart, losing 69-59. The loss dropped Mercyhurst to 4-11 in the South Division, wiping away most playoff visions dancing in Laker fans' heads. The Blue and Green can still play for the conference's atlarge spot, though, and is two 1 games behind Michigan Tech for the spot. Mercyhurst returns to action Thursday night against Wayne State University (an earlier 79-62 victor over the . Lakers) and Westminster College Saturday afternoon (Mercyhurst won the earlier meeting) in games that can be heard on 88.5 WMCE Mercyhurst College
R a d i o . •

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PAGE 8

THE MERC2AD

FEBRUARY 111999

SPORTS—
Lakers now a£l57-1, still hope to host ECAC playoffs.
By David Leiseiing Merciad writer The Mercy hurst hockey team returned to Eastern College Athletic Conference West action last weekend, splitting a pair of road games at Elmira College and Hobart College. ? At Elmira on Friday, 3,500 fans watched the Soaring Eagles knock Mercy hurst out of first place in the West with a 7-4 decision. Elmira led from wire-to-wire but nearly squandered a big lead in the third period. With the £ Soaring Eagles up 5-2 and on a power play, Mercyhurst got back into the game on shorthanded goals 59 seconds apart, by senior forward Bob Atkin and sopho-

LAKER

Laker icers w i n d d o w n season- and look to playoffs
more defenseman Jody Robinson..' * With 11 minutes still to play, the game was up for grabs. Still down a goal with two minutes left, head coach Rick Gotkin pulled junior goaltender Ashley j Stevens in an effort to get the equalizer. It wasn't to be, however, as Elmira scored two empty-netters to put the game out of reach. > * "Elmira is a tough place to play,° noted Gotkin. Our guys never quit, and although we had some chances to tie the game in the third period, we just couldn't put the puck in the net" Defensemen Mike Masse and Colin Kirkey had the other Laker goals. Less than 24 hours later, t Mercyhurst and Hobart met for probably thefinaltime in Geneva, N.Y., and the Lakers 4 escaped with a 3-2 win. Freshman Peter Aubry picked up the win in goal stopping a career high 32 Statesmen shots, including all 17 in the firsts period. Atkin, Eric Ellis (pp), and Tony Borgford (pp) had Mercyhurst's goals as the Lakers opened a 3-0 lead in the second period. Hobart wouldn't fold, however, as the Statesmen scored a power play goal of their own and an even-strength tally fj before the middle period had ended. But the Laker defense stiffened and limited the Statesmen to just six shots in the final stanza and Mercyhurst had another victory. Borgford'& goal in the second would prove to be the gamewinner. The weekend split moved Mercyhurst to 1>7-1 on the ? season and to 2-1-0 in the ECAC West The injury/illness bug continued to hinder Mercyhurst Freshman forward Brad McDonaldre-injuredhis leg over the weekend while junior center Paul Caluori did not make the ? trip because of the flu. On thef positive side, freshman center Louis Goulet had four assists in the two games and was named ECAC West Rookie-of-theWeek while Aubry made the ECAC West Honor Roll. I Goulet now has 14 goals and 16 assists on the season. His 30 points lead all freshmen and places him second overall on the team, behind Atkin, who has 23 goals and 17 assists for 40 • points. The freshman center is also tied for second in the ECAC West in scoring with one goal *ij and six assists in three league games. He is tied with Elmira's-J Mark Biesenthal. Aubry has been on a tear as of late. The freshman goaltender now sports a 2.13 goals-againstaverage and a .922 save percentage to go along with his 5-2 record. But, in his last six games, the rookie netminder has allowed just eight goals in 147 shots (.946 save percentage), while going 5-1. Duri ng that time, Aubry has a 1.44 goals-against- J average. His overall 2.13 GAA gives him a chance to break the Laker record for best goals-* against-average in one season. Avi Karunakar, who graduated last May, set the standard last season with a 2.51 G A A J ^ ^ ^ Only three games remain in the regular season, all conference tilts. The Lakers will travel to Rochester Institute of Technology on Friday for an important game against the Tigers. The game will be broadcast on J WMCE 88.5 FM JHT will enter the affair with a record of 19-1-1 overall and a 0-0-1 mark in the ECAC West J5 Gotkin knows what his team is up against, "RIT has major league firepower. We can't let them get going in their building. We'll do everything we can to limit their chances but we must capitalize on ours.'* Mercyhurst will entertain RIT on Wednesday, Feb.fl7, before closing out the regular season at home against Elmira on Feb. 27. "Right now, we're the third seed in the ECAC West | * postseason tournament,** said Gotkin. "We still have an outside chance of hosting. The team knows what it needs to do to accomplish that * *
L

L a d y Lakers face m o r e defeats
By Lynn Burns Merciad writer

By Stephen Nohm Merciad editor

Students kick their w a y to fitness

Ashland only 24. In overtime, Ashland pulled off the upset as they nudged out a 79-77 victory. Jodie Maxim continued her One of the toughest conferences potent offensive threat as she^' in the nation, the Great Lakes scored 25 points, with 19 coming Intercollegiate Athletic Conferin the second half to fuel to the ence has proved a tough test for the women's basketball team this Laker comeback. Amy Gal la, f Meredith Koncsol and Rebecca It is a good workout season. Sandor scored in double digits in and it,is a little more With no easy games in their the losing effort. schedule, they are tested each constructive than Jane Next, the Lady Lakers traveled 1 night as they face tough oppo- { Fonda-type aerobics. to city-rival Gannon on Feb. 8 nents that are nationally ranked where they looked to avenge a —Jose Otero and respected. With games previous loss. The Lakers again against Ashland University and workout and learn self-defense. fell behind early as Gannon Jessica Russell/Merciad photographer Gannon University, the Lady Jose Otero, a resident of Erie, jumped out to a 43-27 halftime Lakers looked to battle their way Senior Sarah Reynolds works out during kickboxing class in the recently began offering lead. This lead proved too much i nto the postseason GLIAC Classes are held on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at kickboxing classes to students at REC. for the Lady Lakers to overcome tournament. ? 3:30 p.nv the REC. Classes are held as the game ended 78-58. Hosted by Mercyhurst on Feb. Monday, Wednesday and Friday Koncsol led scoring with 19 good workout and it is a little; the college. We got it all ar6, the Eagles jumped to a 51-35 at 3:30 p.m. points, and Rebecca Sandor more constructive than Jane ranged, got the time slot and put halftime lead shooting 60 percent a Otero, who has been studying Fonda-type aerobics,** he said. chipped in 13 in the loss. „ up a couple offlyers.I did not from the field. However, tough martial arts for 15 years, had Senior Jennifer Hamilton, an realize that there would be such a The Lady Lakers record now Laker defense and higher been an amateur boxer. He active member of the class, said, large outing for it," Otero said. stands at 8-14 (4-1 1) with offensive output enabled the explained that amateur boxing "It is a very tough workout It is The majority of the class is upcoming home games on Feb. was a lot more popular than Lakers to takeover the lead and a lot better than aerobics or going women. Otero believes this is 11 against Wayne State Univer- kickboxing so it was a lot easier force Ashland to convert two to the gym because you use so because the workout is very to get involved. Then, kickfree throws in the final seconds of sity and Feb. 13 against many muscles and it is a total similar to aerobics, but they get Westminister College. boxing grew in popularity and he to throw a lot of punches and regulation to send the game into cardio- workout. We learn a lot of began instructing. skills and self-defense is tied into kicks. overtime. " At my karate school, I began "It is not self-defense per se, This lead was overcome by the the work.** t£teaching kickboxing classes, then vou learn to throw a punch. It is a Lakers as they scored 40 secondwe decided to do something up at half points, while allowing
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Healthy mind, healthy body. Hopefully, we are keeping a healthy mind, but having a healthy body may require a little more motivation. ^ Instead of the usual walk to the REC for a jog on the treadmill, students now have the opportunity to try kickboxing to get a

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