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INTRODUCTION
4 Who We Are 5 Executive Summary

TALK STRAIGHT
8 Campaign Scope 8 Campaign Objectives 14 Target Market 16 Geographic Strategy

9 Industry Analysis

10 SWOT Analysis

11 Competitors

DO RIGHT BY OUR CUSTOMERS BE OBVIOUSLY BETTER
20 Media Vision 22 Media Strategy 26 Flow Chart 27 Budget 28 Future Recommendations

who

we are
4

}

We are InterMix Media. Our philosophy is to “mix” traditional and newer media together to build stronger campaigns that can reach consumers consistently and repeatedly for a memorable message. After reading about Ally’s three philosophies, IM consciously took these ideas to heart while constructing a media strategy that is appropriate for Ally at this point and time. Seeing that Ally will only offer savings products to their consumers, IM realized that Ally could still leverage the limited product offerings to convert new consumers to help fund any plans of future product line expansions. IM is committed to talking straight by providing accountability for all suggestions after analyzing the banking industry, do right by our customers by finding the consumer most susceptible for conversion, and strive to be obviously better by providing tools to enhance the consumer experience to make Ally a leading example of online banking.

{ executive summary }
Launched in 2009, Ally has already garnered a large customer base that gives some of the largest banks a run for their money. Ally is exclusively an online bank that is extending its services to include not only consumer products, but small business products as well. It has built a foundation on the belief that customers matter. Additionally, with the three core values that Ally has provided and has built its company upon, IM has produced a fully-integrated media strategy that will allow Ally to see its potential in “banking without boundaries.” The purpose of this book is to create a national media strategy for Ally to meet the objectives of increasing awareness of small business products to 10%, increase engagement with a captivating, ubiquitous campaign, and convert small business customers to invest $1.0 billion in net new deposits. Keeping Ally’s product offerings in mind, IM plans to pursue a target market that consists of men ages 35 to 59 that have already successfully established a stable small business. At this point, these small business customers are interested and ready to invest time and effort in Ally’s small business products. The media strategy encompasses the whole nation with 8 heavy-up areas that include Austin, Texas; Cinncinati, Ohio; Indianiapolis, Indiana; Kansas City, Missouri; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Nashville, Tennessee; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. To determine which heavy-up locations to choose, IM meticulously calculated a formula that determined the success rates of small businesses within that state. Additionally, IM chose cities with the highest population because of a correlation between the size of the city and the success rates of small businesses. The heavyups included work well in terms of small business success rates, number of small businesses existing, and the area’s population size. These heavy-up cities will receive additional advertising to promote the Ally brand including guerrilla marketing and out-ofhome (OOH) efforts. A projection system will constitute our guerrilla marketing efforts and will give customers a brand experience to enhance our overarching theme of banking without boundaries. OOH efforts include advertising in airports, taxi signs, and a nontraditional push for Ally sponsored Wi-Fi hotspots at targeted airports. For national efforts, IM has implemented a mix of various traditional advertising that includes radio, television, and Internet to give small business customers a seamless experience across the media. Television will include four channels: CNBC, CNN, FOX News, and FOX Business. Local radio stations were selected based on demographics that matched our chosen target market and AQH. Additionally, Fast Company and BusinessWeek, our print selections, were chosen based on their content and audience psychographics. In order to give small business owners a connected advertising campaign, we also chose to advertise heavily on both of their online counterparts, BusinessWeek. com and FastCompany.com, with the addition of Forbes.com. Lastly, we chose to delve deeper into the social media mix that specifically includes Facebook and Twitter. Both social media networks will continue to be used in order to enhance customer experience.

WE TALK

STRAIGHT

campaign

scope
Drive awareness of Ally Bank Small Business products to 10% at the end of the first 12 months following launch.

In order to create a successful campaign for Ally, IM is creating a media strategy to create awareness and brand recognition among small business owners. In doing so, IM strives to generate a plan that will advertise the services, products, and rates that Ally provides. Larger and more established banks already have an advantage in that they are able to provide all of the services a small business owner would need at one stop. Ally is not as large as some of the established banks and does not provide scores of services and products, however, what they lack in products and services, they make up in rates and customer service. As a winner of the “Best Savings Account” by Time Magazine, Ally is ready to stand up alongside the traditional banks. Furthermore, Ally prides itself on its customer service, and many of its customers express much of their appreciation of the brand through outlets such as Ally’s Facebook and Twitter, which can serve as a draw for potential new customers. Through this campaign, IM wants to create a large consumer base of small business owners so that not only will Ally be an online bank, but the online bank for these owners to turn to for their savings needs.

campaign objectives
Awareness
Leverage the most effective media channels to drive strong engagement of small business audience.

Engagement

Conversion
Deliver $1.0B in net new deposit growth in small business deposit products by the end of the first 12 months following launch.

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47% of the total U.S. population claimed to have participated in online banking in just 2002 alone. Also, it is important to focus on some major trends in online banking. To begin, males are more likely to use online banking than women. 49% of men have tried online banking as opposed to 39% of women. Those with higher socioeconomic statuses are more likely to go online for these services. A strong correlation begins with usage among households making more than $75,000 annually with a college education. However, in general there has been an increase across all social spectrums as the popularity of this medium continues to increase. Thanks to the convenience and security of being able to monitor their money whenever and wherever they want, online banking has become a new norm. As banks begin to realize these benefits of online banking, they have also noticed that online customers are more likely to interact with the bank through service calls and have a lower switching rate. With this added value of customer service comes the responsibility and advantage of reinforcing a good user experience. Through convenience and price cuts, many of the once charged products such as bill paying is now offered for free at many different banks across the United States. The customers’ experience with their current institution will create new expectations from online banks to provide the best experience possible.

conclusion

Even though trends point to increasing online usage in the future, physical banks still have the greatest impact on customers. Young and high-income customers have a strong preference for online banking, with ATMs and branch locations being the most important factors in selecting their financial provider. There is a correlation with online banking and usage of automated teller machines and telephone services. However, there is still a strong dependence in branches where consumers typically desire human contact especially when it comes to product concerns. Thus for purely online banks, it is even more crucial to transform the user experience to compensate for a lack of human contact.
Sources: LexisNexis.com; Fox, Susannah. Online Banking 2005. Pew Internet & American Life Project, Feb 9, 2005.; “Forbes.com Best of the Web - Banking.” Forbes.com.

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industry analysis
online banking
9

strengths

• Interest rates are comparatively higher than competitors • Notable features (free checks, no ATM fees, refunded ATM charges, free checks, and unlimited check writing) • Provides easily accessible personal customer service with several options (24/7 phone service, e-mail, and online chat) • Users are loyal to the brand and show it through posting @replies on Twitter and Facebook comments • Simple language is easy to understand and no fine print talks directly to the consumer • Prestigious (#1 Savings Account and Best CD Accounts ranking) • One of the best capitalized banks in the nation (FDIC insured for up to $250,000)

weaknesses

• No brick and mortar sites for people to do their banking • Limited small business product offerings • Disgruntled fans leave bad reviews on various websites because of bad customer service experiences • May only be a secondary bank for most small businesses

opportunities
• Expand services to the small business community • Small businesses are already seeking out Ally’s services • Successful small businesses with the desire to profit from higher interest rates • Distrust of “big banks” creates leverage for Ally

threats
• Economy (during poor economic times, consumers will use their current bank for their small business accounts due to familiarity and security reasons) • Small business owners using larger, more well known banks as their primary bank • The rate at which small businesses fail Additionally, we were able to derive problems affecting online financial affiliations - Brick and Mortar Banks: • Despite heavy online use, branches remain the most utilized channel with 75% of consumers visiting at least once a month. • 82% of consumers still prefer the branch for opening a new account and 60-70% of bank sales come from their physical location. • Branches are still the most popular form of banking (36% branches, 23% online, 21% ATM, 8% mail, telephone 5%).

conclusion

From the analysis of Ally’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, we were able to derive traits that affect online financial affiliations: • 24-hour services: 92% of consumers list all-access services as the main reason for using online services. • Faster response time: 77% cited faster response time as a main reason for using online. • Toll-free numbers: 41% preferred using toll-free numbers when having a product or service problem.

The bottom line is that customers want their money easily accessible, which is why all channels are important to contributing to the customer experience. The biggest crutch for Ally is that there are no physical locations. In order to address this, Ally must actively educate consumers to take advantage of the ever expanding access of Wi-Fi to associate the brand with accessibility.

10

Sources: LexisNexis.com

competitors
bank of america
+ Good customer service (when you get to an actual person) + Chat system has quick response time - Have to go through several phone numbers and transfers in order to get through to a real person - Hit hard by the financial crisis

capital one
+ Easy to navigate website + Simple and customer-friendly interface - Customer service issues - Call centers are based overseas - Frustrated consumers are outspoken - Non-competitive rates for consumers

chase bank
+ Technologically ahead of the time, already has mobile banking + Easily accessible with many physical banks and ATMs + Well established, older bank - Poor website accessibility, constantly under construction, website server problems all the time - Overwhelming offers to people about new credit cards and card mail-outs

 

citibank
+ Competitive interest rates for CDs - No online chat system for quick customer service - Customer service delays on the phone

ing
+ Online-only bank with a high APY + No minimum balances or service fees + Can link current checking account from another bank with an ING Direct account - Urges customers to “do-it-yourself” - Customer service not up-to-par - Poor website design

wells fargo
+ Amicable and great customer service + Wachovia takeover has allowed them to amp up their physical presence + Highly personable brand that resonates well with consumers + Customer service representatives are based in the United States - Too many small fees such as bill pay fees, overdraft fees, and returned item fees

conclusion

Customer service is a work in progress for all banks. This market is highly saturated which further points to the importance of products that provide the best rates for customers. With Ally’s rates already beating the competition, Ally must emphasize this competitive advantage to its target market. Sources: Bank of America, Capital One, Chase, Citibank, ING, Wells Fargo, - customer service representatives

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WE DO RIGHT BY

OUR CUSTOMERS

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target
market
4%   10%   14%   18%  

The target for this campaign is a small business owner (company size is under 500 people) between the ages of 35 - 59. According to the household income of these small business owners, they tend to be financially well off due to the fact that they perceive themselves as hard working business men striving for success. This gives them the confidence needed to venture into the risks of beginning their own small business. To dig deeper, start up small businesses are not the ideal market because Ally’s best products are associated with savings. Since small businesses are mostly interested in banks offering loans, Ally will not be considered. Thus the best market to reach would be wellestablished, successful businesses that are seriously ready to start investing in savings products.
2%  
Age      %  Coverage  
Under   25   25-­‐29   30-­‐34   35-­‐39  

1%   3%   1%  4%   6%   9%  

1%   9%   3%  

2%  

2%   1%   2%  

Household  Income      %  Coverage   2%  
Less  than  $20,000   $20,000-­‐$24,000   $25,000-­‐$29,999  

15%  

8%  

$30,000-­‐$34,999   $35,000-­‐$39,999   $40,000-­‐44,999   $45,000-­‐$49,999  

14%  

40-­‐44   45-­‐49   50-­‐54   55-­‐59  

17%   22%   16%  

$50,000-­‐$59,999   $60,000-­‐$74,999   $75,000-­‐$99,999   $100,000-­‐$149,999   $150,000-­‐$249,999   $250,000-­‐$499,999   $500,000+    

16%  

60-­‐64  

target psycographics

The small business owner is a self proclaimed workaholic who is constantly striving for success. They work more than 51 hours per week and have many tasks on their plate because they are very involved and passionate about their business. It is important for them to be involved in their company’s decision making process, and they want to work hard so they can set an example for their kids. They want to do well and make money to reach the peak of their careers while providing a comfortable life for their family.

14

Sources: Simmons Research; LexisNexis.com

psycographic snapshot} {
Self  Proclaimed   Workaholic    
HOURS  WORK   WEEKLY:  51  OR   MORE  (33%,  560)  

Strives  for   Success    
ANY  AGREE:  MONEY   IS  THE  BEST   MEASURE  OF   SUCCESS  (26%,  123)   ANY  AGREE:  I  WANT   TO  GET  TO  VERY   TOP  IN  MY  CAREER   (48%,  151)  

Family  Man  

Business  Man    
ANY  AGREE:  I  WANT   TO  GET  TO  VERY   TOP  IN  MY  CAREER   (48%,  151)   BUS  PURCH  DEC-­‐ INVOLVED  ($5,000+) LST  12  M:  YES  (62%,   431)  

NUMBER  OF   CHILDREN:  THREE   (8.18%,  137)  

EMPLOYED  FULL   TIME  (30+  HOURS)   (84%,  172)  

ANY  AGREE:   IMPORTANT  FAMILY   THINKS  I  AM  DOING   WELL  (54%,  111)   ANY  AGREE:   PROVIDE  MY  KIDS   W/THINGS  I  DIDN'T   HAVE  (59%,  116)   ANY  AGREE:   INDULGE  MY  KIDS   WITH  THE  LITTLE   EXTRAS  (57%,  125)  

ANY  AGREE:  IT  IS   IMPORTANT  TO   JUGGLE  VARIOUS   TASKS  (72%,  116)  

OWN:  OWN  ANY   INVESTMENTS  (50%,   118)  

ANY  AGREE:  I  AM  A   WORKAHOLIC  (51%,   209)  
Sources: Simmons Research

ANY  AGREE:  LOOK   AT  WORK  I  DO  AS   CAREER  NOT  JUST   JOB  (71%,  174)  
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Seattle, WA

Population grew by +1.85% to 3,407,848 from ‘08-’09

Kansas City, MO

Milwaukee, WI

Population grew by +7.26% to 482,299 from ‘06 to ‘09

Population of 1,549,308 grew by +0.59% from ‘08-’09 •

Indianapolis, IN

Wichita, KA

Population grew by +2.69% to 807,584 from ‘06 to ‘09 • •

Population grew by +1.65% to 372,186 from ‘08-’09

Oklahoma City, OK
• •

Cincinnati, OH

Pittsburgh, PA

Population grew by +6.2% to 537,734 and 97th fastest growing city (April ‘00-July ‘06 Population grew by +4.93% to 560,332 from ‘06 to ‘09

Nashville, TN
• •

Austin, TX
• •

Population grew by +7.6% to 709,893 and 84th fastest growing city (April ‘00-July ‘06) Population grew by +9.73% to 786,386 from ‘06 to ‘09

Population grew by +1.2% to 552,120 and 167th fastest growing city (April ‘00-July ‘06) Population grew by +8.81% to 605,473 from ‘06 to ‘09

Population grew by +0.3% to 332,252 and 184th fastest growing city (April ‘00-July ‘06) Population grew by +0.28% to 333,200 from ‘06 to ‘09

Population of 311,647 grew by +.89% from ‘08 to ‘09

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geographic strategy } {
Putting aside certain biases about states and the potential for small businesses to succeed there, the statistics and research are the guiding force in determining the heavy ups with the best potential for Ally to grow. Ally’s Banking Without Boundaries will truly resonate by going to areas that might not seem ideal at first glance. Eight heavy up DMAs were chosen because of budget constraints and the desire to advertise in these locations to effectively create the largest brand awareness. The top tier DMAs such as New York, California, and Illinois were excluded because of expense and the fact that these areas were already highly saturated with most of Ally’s competitors. They were also excluded due to large failure rates experienced by their small businesses. In order to select the best locations that would have the highest return on investment, these steps were followed: 1. A statistic was created to critique all 50 states’ small business success rate • Success is the most important factor because Ally’s best attributes are the saving products • Small businesses that are relatively new rely heavily on loans which Ally does not yet offer, so it is essential that these businesses s ceed to the point where they can shift their concerns to savings • Formula: [[(Small Employers + Openings) – (closings+bankruptcies)] 100] / (small employers+openings) 2. Consider states with a large number of small businesses • This makes sure that the more successful areas were not due to an already enormous small business base. 3. The last criteria is the growth rate of the cities within the states to select an appropriate DMA that is growing, not shrinking • Small businesses are more likely to succeed in highly populated locations.

Sources: City-data.com; Census.gov; SBA.gov; CityMayors.com; Klein, Roger. Marketing. 9th edition.

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WE STRIVE TO BE

OBVIOUSLY BETTER

media vision
20

}

To compensate for the concerns that more traditional business owners may have with Ally’s online only presence, there needs to be emphasis on the flexibility of their products and the access to customer support. With the majority of small business owners claiming the title of a ‘workaholic,’ Ally’s versatile options and plethora of access platforms offer the target market of small business owners an easy way to fit their banking needs into an already hectic schedule. Ally offers banking without boundaries. Banking without boundaries represents two things: the full accessibility of Ally as a savings and financial institution--regardless of physical location or the time of day; and Ally’s promise to their customers to provide great customer support and competitive rates. In order to meet all of Ally’s objectives and in order to express the core message of banking without boundaries we have chosen to utilize the following media placements: out-of-home installations, national radio, national television, online ad placements, and print selections.

{small business owner connection points}
Radio    
ANY  AGREE:  RELY  ON   RADIO  TO  KEEP  ME   INFORMED  (35%,  133)   ANY  AGREE:  LISTEN  TO   RADIO  FOR  QUICK  NEWS   UPDATE  (39%,  121)  

Television  
ANY  AGREE:  RELY  ON  TV   TO  KEEP  ME  INFORMED   (58%,  116)  

OOH  
ANY  AGREE:  I   OFTEN  NOTICE  THE   ADS  IN  BILLBOARDS   (58%,  118)  

Digital    
INTERNET  ACTIVE   QUINTILE  1  (HIGHEST)   (9.05%,  135)  

Print  
MAGAZINES  -­‐   READ/LOOK  INTO   LAST  6  MOS:       BUSINESS  WEEK   (5.17%,  141)     CONSUMER   REPORTS     (13%,  129)     CONTINENTAL   (5.38%,  255)     FORBES     (6.28%,  171)     SKY  (DELTA   AIRLINES)     (7.65%,  156)  

ANY  AGREE:  WHEN  IN   CAR,  ALWAYS  LISTEN  TO   THE  RADIO  (72%,  117)  

ANY  AGREE:  TV  MAIN   SOURCE  OF   ENTERTAINMENT  (53%,   110)  

INTERNET  AT  WORK:  INTERNET   (INTERNET  ACTIVE):   ACTIVE  QUINTILE   I  (2ND   INTERNET  AT  WORK:  2NTERNET   INTERNET  ACTIVE   ACTIVE  QUINTILE  3  (MIDDLE)   HIGHEST)  (8.91%,  133)     (9.61%,  145)  

INTERNET  HOME/WORK   QUINTILE  1  (HIGHEST)   (18%,  121)     QUINTILE  2  (2ND   HIGHEST)  (18%,  121)   QUINTILE  3  (MIDDLE)   (16%,  113)  

ANY  AGREE:  I  LISTEN  TO   THE  RADIO  EVERY  DAY   (62%,  127)  

ANY  AGREE:  LIKE  TV   COMMERCIALS  THAT   MAKE  ME  LAUGH  (72%,   111)  

RADIO  ALL  DAY:   QUINTILE  1  (HIGHEST)   (22%,  112)   QUINTILE  2  (2ND   HIGHEST)  (28%,  139)  

TV  PRIME  TIME:   QUINTILE  1  (HIGHEST)   (25%,  124)  

OUTDOOR:   QUINTILE  1   (HIGHEST)  (26%,   130)   QUINTILE  2  (2ND   HIGHEST)  (29%,   148)  

SPONSORED  WEBSITES  FRM   SRCH  RSLTS-­‐CLICK?:  OFTEN   (5.86%,  114)  

WEBPAGE  LINKS-­‐DO  YOU   CLICK?:  OFTEN  (7.27%,  120)  

Sources: Simmons Research

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television
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continuous prescence wit

A coast-to-coast full national television push was chosen as a way to obtain optimal reach in this campaign. Several prestigious national news channels, which also host multiple segments on financial decision-making, were selected based on research revealing dense small business owner viewership. All of the full national stations have a household size of 98 million. Ads for Ally’s small business savings products will run on CNBC, Fox News, CNN, and an affiliate channel—Fox Business. Additionally, behavioral research has shown that key day-parts for small business owners include primetime and early morning. Since this research has revealed that most small business owners self identify as ‘workaholics’ and often work upwards of 51 hours a week, a later day-part (primetime) was chosen for when they are most likely to return home and begin consuming television.

h

22

our

c

Television will run continuously throughout the campaign with channels switching off to maintain cost efficiency. Although 1,032 spots were purchased, additional added value or gratis spots are expected for the budgeted spending and a 30-minute spacer is requested to make certain Ally spots do not run back to back.

 

In addition to the other national media that will be utilized, a national radio campaign will run and will target all 8 of the heavy up DMAs plus two more DMAs: Wichita, Kansas and Seattle-Tacoma, Washington. Additional DMAs were selected beyond the core heavy ups to meet the minimum 10 markets required to create a national radio campaign. Station selections were made based on news/ talk stations already reaching our target market that also have high average quarter hours (AQHs). Three of the selected national cities (Austin, Texas; Indianapolis, Indiana; and Wichita, Kansas) had low AQHs associated with their news/talk station, so alternate stations were selected with higher AQHs that had audience demographics which matched well with the target market. Key day-parts selected are night drive and morning drive based on behavioral research, with a total of 8,800 spots running in the campaign.

print} strategy

maintaining an effective reach with our target audience by leveraging readership demographics, and choosing publications whose editorial content specializes in topics of interest to small business owners

}

radio strategy

Ally’s target market skews toward older males which matches up well with the current target demographics of print media in the United States. Two major players in the world of print media were chosen as conduits for Ally’s message to small business owners: Fast Company and Bloomberg Businessweek. Both mediums have a rate base upwards of 700,000. A total of 200 insertions will be placed to optimize both reach and prime frequency with the target audience. The creative concept will be integrated in print ads, which are full bleed and will extend beyond the “boundaries” of the pages. Print will be pulsed throughout the campaign. Both periodicals will be utilized simultaneously only in the months of August, September, January, February, May and June. The estimated reach is 1.62 million.

Sources: SRDS

23

 

Three websites were selected based on their demographics and content regarding small business and savvy savings articles: Forbes.com, businessweek.com, and fastcompany.com. Multiple ad sizes were selected across the mediums to avoid viewer confusion. BusinessWeek and Fast Company were chosen for longer promotional periods and will see ads continue onto their website to ease reader’s brand recognition as they move across media. An additional site—Forbes—was added because its demographics suit the target market and has a lower CPM. Overall, 945,000 impressions were purchased at an average cost of $139 CPM.

}strategy

online

Ally currently employs three types of social media - Twitter, Facebook, and the Ally Community blog. • Twitter: Twitter is a very popular medium for Ally to interact with its customer base. In order to promote its Twitter and the ease of getting in contact with Ally, we want to build a feed into the home page of Ally’s website. This feed will allow customers an easily glance at the questions that are being asked and how Ally is responding. • Blog: Low customer involvement is a main concern at this point in time. Promotion of the blog is currently poor on Ally’s main page so in order to increase traffic to the blog, Ally needs to increase blog entries and interaction with its customers. In order to gain a following among small business owners, Ally should now focus their content on small business products. As example of this would be a low-risk investment option article for small businesses and feature guest bloggers. • Facebook: Facebook is a strong avenue for customers to express their love for everything Ally. It is a powerful tool for Ally and by creating a presence on Facebook, they are creating an even better personal experience for the customer. Ally is already doing a good job by posting content regularly on their page, however, they need to work to receive more comments and likes to show new users that Ally is not your run-of-the-mill bank. In order to enhance the experience for small business owners, IM suggests that Ally create a separate section that addresses these kinds of questions. By compartmentalizing customers, Ally will be able to respond to questions about these new services in a timely manner.

social media

24

OOH} strategy
airports

A multitude of out-of-home advertising will take place during the campaign, which is aimed at garnering attention from small business owners and travelers.

taxis

Taxi signs will be purchased in every location that airport placements have been inserted. These cab signs will emphasize the mobility of Ally’s banking without boundaries and the easy accessibility of the new mobile app. The taxi signs will build on the frequency rate of small business travelers traveling to and from airports as well as to their meeting destinations. A total of 1,950 signs were purchased.

Out of the 8 pre-selected heavy-up DMAs, 5 major airports were selected based on air traffic levels. These 5 airports include: • Cincinnati/orthern Kentucky Int. Airport- 7,984,074 boardings in 2008 • Kansas City Int. Airport- 5,386,242 boardings in 2008 • Pittsburgh Int. Airport- 4,292,546 boardings in 2008 • Indianapolis Int. Airport- 4,061,450 boardings in 2008 • General Mitchell Int. Airport- 3,861,333 boardings in 2008 These five airports were selected because they had the greatest number of consumers. Nashville and Oklahoma ranked only around 1 to 2.6 million passengers respectively. Austin-Bergstrom International Airport was not selected, despite the large number of annual passengers, because of the smaller airport facility that was not optimal for this advertising strategy. In all of these airports Ally will have window clings and wall-wraps describing banking without boundaries. The placements will only run during months of the highest anticipated traveling periods including: October, November, December, May, and June. Furthermore, hot spots around the Ally advertising installations and placements in these airports will have free Wi-Fi courtesy of Ally with a default homepage leading to Ally’s small business website.
Sources: Simmons Research; Federal Aviation Administration

projections

In all 8 heavy-up DMAs, projection artists will take to the streets and create virtual ‘branches’ of Ally. There are projections that will be located on the sides of buildings throughout the city. The emphasis will be on how easily accessible all of one’s banking needs are met anywhere and anytime—as long as you have an Internet connection. This plays upon the idea that these projections are fake, physical Ally banks that do not need to be real due to its omnipresence through Wi-Fi. The projections will be pulse flighted in the first week of every month, for everyday of that week, with the addition of the final week of March in preparation of tax season.

billbaords

In all of the 8 core heavy up multiple billboards, ranging from 3-5 panels in each market, will be selected to advertise Ally’s small business savings products. The creative concepts utilized will emphasize the core message of banking without boundaries while reaching small business owners as they commute from meeting to meeting or home to work. Additionally, small business owners who are traveling will have multiple exposures to Ally from the airport to the highways of their destination. A total of 29 panels will be purchased.

25

YEAR OF 2011 LAUNCH
MEDIA VEHICLE 27 TELEVISION :30 NATIONAL Networks Full Coverage CNBC 8 HHS 98million/ M-F Prime 6p-8p/ RATE;$3800 CNN HHS 98million/ M-Su Primetime 7p-12m/ RATE;$6125 FOX NEWS 8 HHS 98million/ M-Su Primetime 8p-11p/ RATE;$10325 National Network Affiliate Break Rate Card FOX Business HHS 25million/ M-Su Primetime 8p-11p/ RATE;$550 RADIO :60 Austin, TX KBPA-FM Classic Hits 5:30a-7p M-Su 28500AQH $88 40 Kansas City, MO-KS KMBZ-AM News/Talk 5:30a-7p M-F 4900AQH $41 40 Nashville, TN WWTN-FM News/Talk 5:30a-7p M-F 5100AQH $41 40 Milwaukee-Racine, WI WISN-AM News Talk Information 5:30a-7p M-F 16800AQH $41 40 Cincinnati, OH WLW-AM News Talk Information 5:30a-7p M-F 25000AQH $135 40 Indianapolis, IN WFBQ-FM Album Oriented Rock 5:30a-7p M-F 21500AQH $41 40 Pittsburg, PA KDKA-AM News/Talk 5:30a-7p M-F 6300 $41 40 Oklahoma City, OK KTOK-AM News Talk Information 5:30a-7p M-F 6400 $41 40 Seattle-Tacoma, WA KIRON News/Talk- AM 5:30a-7p M-SU 11300 $90 40 Wichita, KS KRBB-FM Adult Contemporary 5:30a-7p M-F 5200 $41 40 PRINT: MAGAZINES 1/3 pg 4 Color+Bleed BUSINESSWEEK $29,000 FASTCOMPANY $22,000 OOH BILLBOARDS Austin CPB $6,000/ 48260AVG DEC/Panel Cincinnati CPB $8,500/ 104000AVG DEC/Panel Indianapolis CPB $3,400/ 37500 AVG DEC/Panel Kansas City CPB $4,500/ 61138AVG DEC/Panel Milwaukee CPB $7,000/ 98000AVG DEC/Panel Nashville CPB $2950/ 42815AVG DEC/Panel Oklahoma City CPB $4815/ 57000AVG DEC/Panel TAXI Pittsburgh CPB $8,400/ 24000AVG DEC/Panel Kansas City, Missouri $50/sign Milwaukee, Wisconsin $45/sign Cincinnati, Ohio $55/sign Indianapolis, Indiana $60/sign Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania $50/sign AIRPORT Wallwrap/ Window Cling Kansas City, Missouri MCI Kansas City International $5,100 Milwaukee, Wisconsin MKE General Mitchell International $4,800 Cincinnati, Ohio CVG Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International $6600 Indianapolis, Indiana IND Indianapolis International $5,800 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania PIT Pittsburgh International $5,400 INTERNET DISPLAY: BANNER ADS FORBES [970x418][970x66] IMPRESSIONS 35,000 CPM $132 Businessweek [300x250] IMPRESSIONS 35,000 CPM $144 FASTCOMPANY [728x90] IMPRESSIONS 35,000 CPM $140 SOCIAL MEDIA TWITTER FACEBOOK NON-TRADITIONAL Guerilla Video Projection Kansas City, M / Milwaukee/Cincinnati/ Indianapolis/ Pittsburgh/Oklahoma City/ Nashville/Austin $2300 AIRPORT Free Wi-Fi Pods 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 1 1 1 15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5 15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5 1 1 1 JULY 4 11 18 25 $152,000 8 8 8 AUGUST 8 15 22 SEPTEMBER 29 5 12 19

ALLY 2011 Media Mix Flowchart
AWARENESS
OCTOBER 3 10 17 NOVEMBER 31 7 14 21 DECEMBER 28 5 12 19 JANUARY 2 9 16

YEAR OF 2012 PINNACLE
FEBRUARY 6 13 MARCH 5 12 APRIL 2 9 16

FINALE
MAY 7 14 JUNE 4 11 18

Individual Expenses/ Totals

Total Spending by Medium

1

26

24

26

23

30

20

27

19

26

23 30

21

28

144 Spots 8 $196,000 8 8 8 8 $196,000 8 8 8 8 6 6 6 6 6 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 559 Spots 25 25 25 25 25 20 20 20 20 16 16 16 $96,000 $14,080 40 40 40 $6,560 40 40 40 $6,560 40 40 40 $6,560 40 40 40 $21,600 40 40 40 $6,560 40 40 40 $6,560 40 40 40 $6,560 40 40 40 $14,400 40 40 40 $6,560 40 40 40 16 10 10 10 10 10 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 $120,000 $17,600 40 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 40 $27,000 40 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 40 $18,000 40 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 40 20 20 20 20 $307,450 1,032 Spots $3,478,775 880 Spots $77,440 880 Spots $36,080 880 Spots $36,080 880 Spots $36,080 880 Spots $118,800 880 Spots $36,080 880 Spots $36,080 880 Spots $36,080 880 Spots $79,200 880 Spots $36,080 100 Insertions 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 100 Insertions 4 $440,000 $580,000 200 Insertions $1,020,000 8,800 Spots $528,000 8 8 8 8 145 Spots 8 $1,497,125 8 8 8 8 184 Spots $1,127,000 $547,200

$413,000 8 8 8

$120,000 $17,600 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 $27,000 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40 $18,000 40 40 40 $8,200 40 40 40

40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40

40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40

$96,000 $14,080 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $21,600 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $14,400 40 40 $6,560 40 40

40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40

40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40

40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40

$96,000 $14,080 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $21,600 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $6,560 40 40 $14,400 40 40 $6,560 40 40

40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40

40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40

1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1

$18,000 $25,500 $17,000 $22,500 $21,000 $8,850

1 1 1 15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5 15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5 15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5 15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5 15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5 15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5 15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5 15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5 21 weeks/ 390 signs

$14,445 29 Billboards $33,600 $160,895

15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5

15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5

15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5

15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5

15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5

15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5

15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5

15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5

15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5

15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5

15 15 15 15 15 5 5 5 5 5

$19,500 $17,550 $21,450 $23,400 1,950 total signs $19,500 $101,400 $127,500 $120,000 $165,000 $145,000 $135,000

$692,500

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5

195 Banners @ $924/banner $180,180 195 Banners @$1008/banner 5 $196,560 195 Banners @$980/banner 585 Banners 5 $191,100 $567,840

9 weeks/ 63 days/ 378 hrs $144,900

$1,159,200 $183,485 $107,905 $8,000,000

Contingency TOTAL

26

}}
budget
breakdown

Media TV Radio Print Billboards Taxi Signs Airport OOH Online Placements

Allocated Budget $3,478,775 $528,000 $1,020,000 $160,895 $101,400 $692,500 $567,840 $1,159,200 $183,485 $107,905 $8,000,000

Percent of Budget 43.5% 6.6% 12.8% 2.0% 1.3% 8.7% 7.1% 14.5% 2.3% 1.3% 100.0%

Guerilla Video Projections Airport Free Wi-Fi Contingency Total

 

27

“Branches are essential - not just because small businesses work around cash. Setting up on one’s own is such a hazardous enterprise, so face-to-face relationships with the staff at a local bank are vital for instilling the confidence needed to take the risks involved in growing a small firm.” - Chris Hughes

future }

recommendations

website

Interactive Website --- Web 3.0 • Create the option of face time with Ally representatives • As mentioned previously, small business consumers desire face time because it increases their confidence by building a connection with the bank representative and the consumer thus enhancing the brands perception within the consumers consideration sets to eventually convert to Ally fully when they increase their product offerings.

• Create a sort of “interactive shop” where customers can scroll through products that have video tutorials about the product and its features/ or have an actual representative go through the products on video chat. • Creates a one-on-one experience without being at a physical bank • Make people more comfortable with using an online bank • Someone talking to customers on the website creates a consistency with talking straight instead of pushing fine print of product offerings onto customers

mobile app

Integrate the concept of video chat into the app to compensate for the desire of actual human contact at a physical bank.

28

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inter

mix
adam africawala
manuel hernandez

laura maschinski

cl a r a l a u
kathryn poh

marika whitehurst

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