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Mercyhurst’s Information Technology

’Hurst
hockey goes
4-0
Read more on Page 3
Vol.82, No.11/12.10.08/Free
in
the
‘JUNK’
Read more on Page 16 & 17
R
e
a
d

m
o
re on Pa
g
e

1
6

&

1
7
Christmas
on a budget
‘Terrorists have received
lighter sentences...’
Students react to the 9-to-18-year
sentence imposed on Teri Rhodes,
former Mercyhurst student. Rhodes
previously pleaded guilty to the vol-
untary manslaughter of her newborn
baby at her 3810 Briggs apartment in
August 2007.
Perfect presents for penny-pinching
students at findgift.com.
Read more on Page 9
‘I think she deserves
longer...’
Rhodes sentenced;
students speak
Read more on Page 2
NEWS
Page 2 December 10, 2008
On Friday, Nov. 21, former Mercyhurst College stu-
dent Teri Rhodes was sentenced to nine to 18 years in
a state prison for the suffocation death of her new-
born daughter in August 2007.
Rhodes was a sophomore volleyball play-
er at the time that she birthed a 39 and a half
week-term child, who she suffocated with a
plastic bag in her Briggs Avenue apartment.
According to the Erie Times News, Phillip Friedman,
Rhodes’ attorney, said Erie County Judge William
R. Cunningham acted unconstitutionally in giving a
“manifestly excessive” sentence to Rhodes because
she had entered guilty plea to voluntary manslaugh-
ter.
As Friedman continued his protests in the case, he
also revealed details that the defense and District At-
torney Brad Foulk previously kept to themselves.
The Erie Times-News reported that one of those
details was that in April, Friedman and Foulk reached
a deal by which Rhodes would plead guilty to involun-
tary manslaughter, a lesser crime than voluntary man-
slaughter.
Friedman said Cunningham indicated such a plea
“was acceptable to the court.”
The plea hearing took place in late May 2008 and
just before Rhodes was to enter the plea to involuntary
manslaughter, Friedman said, Cunningham called him
and Foulk into his chambers and said he would not ac-
cept the plea, providing them with no reason.
On Aug. 8, Cunningham accepted Rhodes’ volun-
tary manslaughter plea.
According to the Erie Times-News, Friedman on
Monday asked Cunningham to modify Rhodes’ sen-
tence.
Cunningham is unlikely to recuse himself or grant
any of Friedman’s other requests, according to Cun-
ningham’s previous comments.
The Erie Times-News said that Cunningham an-
ticipated many of Friedman’s arguments in a 36-page
ruling, called a “Statement of Sentencing Rationale,”
issued at the start of the Nov. 21 hearing.
The statement detailed Cunningham’s reasons for
the sentence, but not the specific penalty.
Friedman said the ruling shows Cunningham was
predisposed to a lengthy sentence.
According to the Erie Times-News, Friedman’s oth-
er main complaint is that the nine-to-18-year sentence
is excessive under the law.
Friedman, who wanted Rhodes to get less than two
years in Erie County Prison, said Cunningham’s sen-
tence was beyond the aggravated range of the state
sentencing guidelines for voluntary manslaughter, a
first-degree felony with a maximum sentence of 10 to
20 years.
The Erie Times-News has also reported that based
on Cunningham’s comments, Friedman said, he sen-
tenced Rhodes, who had no prior record, as if she had
committed a first-degree murder — or a premeditated
killing punishable by a life sentence — rather than vol-
untary manslaughter, an unlawful killing preceded by a
sudden passion or serious provocation.
Also, the Erie Times-News reported that Cunning-
ham in his ruling said Rhodes, who hid the pregnancy
from family and friends and searched the Internet for
ways to kill a fetus, committed “the premeditated and
intentional killing of a defenseless child.”
Rhodes, then 18, suffocated the newborn with a
garbage bag in an on-campus apartment on Aug. 12,
2007.
Cunningham, Friedman said, sentenced Rhodes “to
an offense to which she had not pleaded guilty.”
By Ashley Pastor
Staff writer
Former ’Hurst student to serve time in prison
Teri Rhodes faces 9 to 18 years behind bars for voluntary manslaughter
Courtesy of Erie Times News
“I think that it is an appropriate sentencing for
the crime that she committed. She deserved to
be sentenced, because she had other options to
consider at the time when she committed the crime
and did not pursue them like dropping the baby off
at a hospital, fire station etc.” Torrie Caruso, senior
“Shocking, but then again it was shocking that such
a terrible thing could happen at Mercyhurst.” Mark
Gramza, sophomore
“Terrorists have received lighter sentences than Teri
Rhodes.” Christopher Purdy, junior
“While I am greatly saddened by the situation, and
the fact that Teri at no point in her pregnancy felt
she could speak to someone, she did murder her
child and deserves her sentence.” Kari Santangelo,
senior
“Based upon the crime she committed I think the
sentence of 9 to 18 years was not only deserving but
also justified.” Michelle Coady, senior
“I think the sentence is appropriate for the crime
she committed; I would think that for anyone who
did that regardless of criminal history, age, and other
factors.” Senior Rainey Murdock
“I think what she did is unthinkable to a lot of
people in that kind of situation. I don’t know what
other kind of punishment would be more justified
for what she did.” Walt Oszanik, senior
“I think she deserves longer than that. She had so
many other options.” Pawel Bialk, junior
“I believe she should be punished for taking a
human life; however, something else must be
examined if she felt so much pressure to do that.”
Kerry Skiver, senior
“I think it’s very tragic. I feel badly for how the
situation played out. I hope she is able to get the
help she needs,” Jemma Homer, junior
“I think what she did was wrong obviously, but
other people were at fault. Obviously someone had
to know [she was pregnant]. Someone had to have
noticed. Something could have been done before
going on her own and killing it.” Amy Breininger,
senior
Former Mercyhurst College student, Teri Rhodes.
Students react to sentencing
NEWS
Page 2 December 10, 2008
On Friday, Nov. 21, former Mercyhurst College stu-
dent Teri Rhodes was sentenced to nine to 18 years in
a state prison for the suffocation death of her new-
born daughter in August 2007.
Rhodes was a sophomore volleyball play-
er at the time that she birthed a 39 and a half
week-term child, who she suffocated with a
plastic bag in her Briggs Avenue apartment.
According to the Erie Times News, Phillip Friedman,
Rhodes’ attorney, said Erie County Judge William
R. Cunningham acted unconstitutionally in giving a
“manifestly excessive” sentence to Rhodes because
she had entered guilty plea to voluntary manslaugh-
ter.
As Friedman continued his protests in the case, he
also revealed details that the defense and District At-
torney Brad Foulk previously kept to themselves.
The Erie Times-News reported that one of those
details was that in April, Friedman and Foulk reached
a deal by which Rhodes would plead guilty to involun-
tary manslaughter, a lesser crime than voluntary man-
slaughter.
Friedman said Cunningham indicated such a plea
“was acceptable to the court.”
The plea hearing took place in late May 2008 and
just before Rhodes was to enter the plea to involuntary
manslaughter, Friedman said, Cunningham called him
and Foulk into his chambers and said he would not ac-
cept the plea, providing them with no reason.
On Aug. 8, Cunningham accepted Rhodes’ volun-
tary manslaughter plea.
According to the Erie Times-News, Friedman on
Monday asked Cunningham to modify Rhodes’ sen-
tence.
Cunningham is unlikely to recuse himself or grant
any of Friedman’s other requests, according to Cun-
ningham’s previous comments.
The Erie Times-News said that Cunningham an-
ticipated many of Friedman’s arguments in a 36-page
ruling, called a “Statement of Sentencing Rationale,”
issued at the start of the Nov. 21 hearing.
The statement detailed Cunningham’s reasons for
the sentence, but not the specific penalty.
Friedman said the ruling shows Cunningham was
predisposed to a lengthy sentence.
According to the Erie Times-News, Friedman’s oth-
er main complaint is that the nine-to-18-year sentence
is excessive under the law.
Friedman, who wanted Rhodes to get less than two
years in Erie County Prison, said Cunningham’s sen-
tence was beyond the aggravated range of the state
sentencing guidelines for voluntary manslaughter, a
first-degree felony with a maximum sentence of 10 to
20 years.
The Erie Times-News has also reported that based
on Cunningham’s comments, Friedman said, he sen-
tenced Rhodes, who had no prior record, as if she had
committed a first-degree murder — or a premeditated
killing punishable by a life sentence — rather than vol-
untary manslaughter, an unlawful killing preceded by a
sudden passion or serious provocation.
Also, the Erie Times-News reported that Cunning-
ham in his ruling said Rhodes, who hid the pregnancy
from family and friends and searched the Internet for
ways to kill a fetus, committed “the premeditated and
intentional killing of a defenseless child.”
Rhodes, then 18, suffocated the newborn with a
garbage bag in an on-campus apartment on Aug. 12,
2007.
Cunningham, Friedman said, sentenced Rhodes “to
an offense to which she had not pleaded guilty.”
By Ashley Pastor
Staff writer
Former ’Hurst student to serve time in prison
Teri Rhodes faces 9 to 18 years behind bars for voluntary manslaughter
Courtesy of Erie Times News
“I think that it is an appropriate sentencing for
the crime that she committed. She deserved to
be sentenced, because she had other options to
consider at the time when she committed the crime
and did not pursue them like dropping the baby off
at a hospital, fire station etc.” Torrie Caruso, senior
“Shocking, but then again it was shocking that such
a terrible thing could happen at Mercyhurst.” Mark
Gramza, sophomore
“Terrorists have received lighter sentences than Teri
Rhodes.” Christopher Purdy, junior
“While I am greatly saddened by the situation, and
the fact that Teri at no point in her pregnancy felt
she could speak to someone, she did murder her
child and deserves her sentence.” Kari Santangelo,
senior
“Based upon the crime she committed I think the
sentence of 9 to 18 years was not only deserving but
also justified.” Michelle Coady, senior
“I think the sentence is appropriate for the crime
she committed; I would think that for anyone who
did that regardless of criminal history, age, and other
factors.” Senior Rainey Murdock
“I think what she did is unthinkable to a lot of
people in that kind of situation. I don’t know what
other kind of punishment would be more justified
for what she did.” Walt Oszanik, senior
“I think she deserves longer than that. She had so
many other options.” Pawel Bialk, junior
“I believe she should be punished for taking a
human life; however, something else must be
examined if she felt so much pressure to do that.”
Kerry Skiver, senior
“I think it’s very tragic. I feel badly for how the
situation played out. I hope she is able to get the
help she needs,” Jemma Homer, junior
“I think what she did was wrong obviously, but
other people were at fault. Obviously someone had
to know [she was pregnant]. Someone had to have
noticed. Something could have been done before
going on her own and killing it.” Amy Breininger,
senior
Former Mercyhurst College student, Teri Rhodes.
Students react to sentencing
NEWS
Page 3 December 10, 2008
On Saturday, Dec. 13, Mer-
cyhurst College students and
faculty will take part in the
annual campus-wide event
Christmas on Campus.
Christmas on Campus is
organized by a committee
of student volunteers, the
Office of the Student Union
and Student Activities.
Approximately 110 children
from nine different social ser-
vice agencies in the Erie area
will come to Mercyhurst to en-
joy Christmas early.
This event is geared towards
children four to 10 years of
age and includes activities, pic-
ture taking with Santa, pizza,
cookies and milk, arts and
crafts, sing-a-longs, a reading
of “Twas the Night Before
Christmas,” and gifts for all of
the children.
Senior Jenna Golden has
participated in Christmas on
Campus in previous years and
this year has taken on the job
of co-chair.
“Being the co-chair of
Christmas on Campus is always
a really rewarding experience,”
Golden said. “It takes a lot of
planning and dedication.”
This year, 20 different
campus groups have signed up
to participate in the festivities.
Student volunteers are
paired up with kids to be bud-
dies and escort them through
the day of activities.
Senior Christina Fernandez
has participated in Christmas
on Campus in the past and
said the activities and arts and
crafts are always fun for the
kids.
“It’s amazing the work stu-
dents put into this event and
the success in it,” Fernandez
said. “Just the four hours of
Christmas at the ’Hurst on
Saturday means a lot to the
kids and makes you feel good
for being able to help.”
In preparation for Saturday
meetings, decorating and gift
wrapping take place starting
Wednesday.
Despite all of the work,
Golden said the event is worth
it for the kids.
“It’s always nice to see the
smiles on the children’s faces
and I’m glad we can provide
such a special day for them,”
Golden said.
The one draw-back that
Golden has indicated is the
committee has really struggled
obtaining donations this year.
Mostly all of the expenses
rely on donations, because there
is no budget for the event.
By Ashley Pastor
Staff writer
‘Christmas on Campus’
’Hurst, local agencies spread holiday cheer
Army ROTC Pride of
Pennsylvania Battalion con-
ducted a training exercise at
Penn State Behrend on Sat-
urday, Dec. 6.
The purpose of the train-
ing event, “Train The Force,”
was to train freshmen on
selected Army tasks such as
first aid, how to correctly
wear camouflage, movement
formations, and hand and
arm signals.
This year, sophomores
assumed the role as primary
instructors for the classes;
a role usually performed
by seniors.
This gave seniors the
opportunity to mentor the
sophomores. Juniors received
training in preparation for
LDAC, a summer training
camp where cadets are evalu-
ated in the proper military
operation format.
An award ceremony was
conducted at which Ranger
Challenge and newly con-
tracted cadets were recog-
nized.
At the conclusion of the
training exercise, the National
Guard provided pizza and
explained the benefits in join-
ing the National Guard.
From staff reports
‘Train the force’
Weight Watchers comes to the ’Hurst
Weight Watchers is one of
the most successful weight loss
programs around the world. It
has an easygoing eat-what-you-
want program that highlights
eating anything in moderation.
The plan runs on a point
system; assigning certain foods
a certain number of points
and apportioning a specific
number of points each day.
The convenience of being able
to eat what you want and to
‘reserve’ points from one day
to save for another is part of
what makes Weight Watchers
flourish.
It has been around for
more than forty years
and appeals to all ages.
Mercyhurst College is offer-
ing a new Weight Watchers
session beginning Wednes-
day, Jan. 7, 2009, and will
continue for 12 weeks.
According to Betsy Frank in
human resources, Weight Watch-
ers has been in high demand by
students and faculty.
“In the year since Weight
Watchers came to the Hurst,
members have lost a total of
nearly 700 pounds by learning
a healthier approach to eating,
increasing their activity levels
and enjoying the support of
other members during weekly
meetings,” Frank said.
Sue Corbran, a communica-
tion manager who participated
in the first session last year, said
Weight Watchers on campus,
“is wonderful and very real-
istic, it’s not a diet. It is more
of a lifestyle change. The con-
venience of it being right here
on campus is wonderful,” she
said. “You work with the same
people week after week and
become friends with them; they
become your support system.”
Those interested should reg-
ister with Frank before Friday,
Dec. 19. The latest date to
register is Wednesday, Dec. 24.
There is an initial cost of $144
for the session.
Not only are students and
faculty welcome, but so are
friends and family members
who do not attend Mercyhurst.
Contact Betsy Frank for
more information at extension
2279 or at bfrank@mercyhurst.
edu.
By Alaina Rydzewski
Staff writer
NEWS
Page 4 December 10, 2008
As the economy takes a
turn for the worse, college
students may soon feel the
effects of state and federal
budget cuts.
In a recent e-mail to the stu-
dent body, Mercyhurst College
President Dr. Thomas Gamble
said, “During times such as
these, we need to stay focused
on our students and on our
mission requirements to them.
We must keep our academic
programs strong of course,
but we also must do whatever
we can to maintain access and
affordability.”
College tuition at private
universities rose 5.9 percent
in the 2008-09 academic year,
outpacing inflation which rose
5.6 percent.
These tuition rises could be
a mild indicator of the future,
considering most colleges set
their tuition prices for 2008-09
before the turmoil in the bank-
ing industry and other areas of
the economy had taken effect.
Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Ren-
dell has not yet stated how
much of the $464 million cut
from the statewide budget
since September will be taken
from state-funded student aid.
On the bright side, Col-
lege Board reported record
increases in financial aid in
2007-08, with student aid and
loans increasing by 5.5 percent.
Federal grants rose 5 percent
this year, while private loans
decreased by 1 percent. How-
ever, experts do not believe
the increases in aid will keep
up with rising costs.
Many private schools are
getting creative in combating
economic pressures. Bene-
dictine University, a small
Catholic college in Illinois, has
already frozen tuition prices
until 2011 in direct response
to the economic crisis. Other
colleges are cutting spending
and instituting hiring freezes
to keep from reducing finan-
cial aid.
According to Gamble’s e-
mail, Mercyhurst’s board of
trustees plans to spend more
on fundraising and admissions
marketing, as well as create a
“financial aid reserve fund”
for students with drastically
changing financial needs.
Despite these reassurances,
many Mercyhurst College stu-
dents are worried.
“It just makes it more stress-
ful. It’ll mean I’ll have to take
out more loans,” Mercyhurst
senior Patrick Silvis said.
Students who graduated
from private colleges in 2007
were $23,800 in debt on aver-
age – 18 percent higher than
six years ago.
Rising tuition could be an
even bigger problem for fresh-
men who have only begun to
pay for their college educa-
tions.
“Depending on your income
and your parents’ income, I
feel like it’s going to become
unaffordable for people and
they’re not going to see it as an
option and go straight to the
workforce,” Mercyhurst fresh-
man Bethany Thomas said.
If tuition increases, deter-
mined students like Mercy-
hurst freshman Luke Nowak
will have to work even harder
to put themselves through col-
lege.
“I’ve got scholarships and
loans, so I’ll find a way to get
through it. It’ll cause prob-
lems, but there’s no alterna-
tive... What am I going to do
with half a degree?” Nowak
said.
By JoEllen Marsh
Staff writer
Economy impacts students’ fi nances
Larceny/Theft
Friday, Dec. 5. 08
Audrey Hirt Building
Closed
Controlled Substance
Sunday, Nov. 30. 08
3809 Briggs Avenue
Pending
Sexual Assault
Monday, Dec. 1. 08
3810 Lewis Avenue
Referred to City of Erie Police
Vandalism
Monday, Nov. 10. 08
734 East 4th Street
Closed
Nov. 1 - Dec. 5, 2008
Mercyhurst
College
Vandalism
Monday, Nov. 10. 08
Parking Lot 20
Closed
3907 Lewis Avenue
Closed
Vandalism
Sunday, Nov. 9. 08
Disorderly Conduct
Friday, Nov. 7. 08
Larceny/Theft
Thursday, Nov. 6. 08
Vandalism
Wednesday, Nov. 5. 08
West Main Drive
Closed
Parking Lot 6
Closed
Baldwin Hall
College Discipline
Warde Townhouse
College Discipline
3828 Briggs Avenue
Closed
3907 Briggs Avenue
College Discipline
3909 Briggs Avenue
College Discipline
Liquor Law Violation
Tuesday, Nov. 4. 08
Larceny/Theft
Tuedsay, Nov. 4. 08
Liquor Law Violation
Saturday, Nov. 1. 08
Criminal Mischief
Saturday, Nov. 1. 08
Friday, Dec. 12
9 p.m.
Student Union
Intensity Trivia
Challenge
Saturday, Dec. 13
9 p.m.
Student Union
Santa’s Secret Shop
NEWS
Page 4 December 10, 2008
As the economy takes a
turn for the worse, college
students may soon feel the
effects of state and federal
budget cuts.
In a recent e-mail to the stu-
dent body, Mercyhurst College
President Dr. Thomas Gamble
said, “During times such as
these, we need to stay focused
on our students and on our
mission requirements to them.
We must keep our academic
programs strong of course,
but we also must do whatever
we can to maintain access and
affordability.”
College tuition at private
universities rose 5.9 percent
in the 2008-09 academic year,
outpacing inflation which rose
5.6 percent.
These tuition rises could be
a mild indicator of the future,
considering most colleges set
their tuition prices for 2008-09
before the turmoil in the bank-
ing industry and other areas of
the economy had taken effect.
Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Ren-
dell has not yet stated how
much of the $464 million cut
from the statewide budget
since September will be taken
from state-funded student aid.
On the bright side, Col-
lege Board reported record
increases in financial aid in
2007-08, with student aid and
loans increasing by 5.5 percent.
Federal grants rose 5 percent
this year, while private loans
decreased by 1 percent. How-
ever, experts do not believe
the increases in aid will keep
up with rising costs.
Many private schools are
getting creative in combating
economic pressures. Bene-
dictine University, a small
Catholic college in Illinois, has
already frozen tuition prices
until 2011 in direct response
to the economic crisis. Other
colleges are cutting spending
and instituting hiring freezes
to keep from reducing finan-
cial aid.
According to Gamble’s e-
mail, Mercyhurst’s board of
trustees plans to spend more
on fundraising and admissions
marketing, as well as create a
“financial aid reserve fund”
for students with drastically
changing financial needs.
Despite these reassurances,
many Mercyhurst College stu-
dents are worried.
“It just makes it more stress-
ful. It’ll mean I’ll have to take
out more loans,” Mercyhurst
senior Patrick Silvis said.
Students who graduated
from private colleges in 2007
were $23,800 in debt on aver-
age – 18 percent higher than
six years ago.
Rising tuition could be an
even bigger problem for fresh-
men who have only begun to
pay for their college educa-
tions.
“Depending on your income
and your parents’ income, I
feel like it’s going to become
unaffordable for people and
they’re not going to see it as an
option and go straight to the
workforce,” Mercyhurst fresh-
man Bethany Thomas said.
If tuition increases, deter-
mined students like Mercy-
hurst freshman Luke Nowak
will have to work even harder
to put themselves through col-
lege.
“I’ve got scholarships and
loans, so I’ll find a way to get
through it. It’ll cause prob-
lems, but there’s no alterna-
tive... What am I going to do
with half a degree?” Nowak
said.
By JoEllen Marsh
Staff writer
Economy impacts students’ fi nances
Larceny/Theft
Friday, Dec. 5. 08
Audrey Hirt Building
Closed
Controlled Substance
Sunday, Nov. 30. 08
3809 Briggs Avenue
Pending
Sexual Assault
Monday, Dec. 1. 08
3810 Lewis Avenue
Referred to City of Erie Police
Vandalism
Monday, Nov. 10. 08
734 East 4th Street
Closed
Nov. 1 - Dec. 5, 2008
Mercyhurst
College
Vandalism
Monday, Nov. 10. 08
Parking Lot 20
Closed
3907 Lewis Avenue
Closed
Vandalism
Sunday, Nov. 9. 08
Disorderly Conduct
Friday, Nov. 7. 08
Larceny/Theft
Thursday, Nov. 6. 08
Vandalism
Wednesday, Nov. 5. 08
West Main Drive
Closed
Parking Lot 6
Closed
Baldwin Hall
College Discipline
Warde Townhouse
College Discipline
3828 Briggs Avenue
Closed
3907 Briggs Avenue
College Discipline
3909 Briggs Avenue
College Discipline
Liquor Law Violation
Tuesday, Nov. 4. 08
Larceny/Theft
Tuedsay, Nov. 4. 08
Liquor Law Violation
Saturday, Nov. 1. 08
Criminal Mischief
Saturday, Nov. 1. 08
Friday, Dec. 12
9 p.m.
Student Union
Intensity Trivia
Challenge
Saturday, Dec. 13
9 p.m.
Student Union
Santa’s Secret Shop
NEWS
Page 5 December 10, 2008
The Adopt-a-Family Project at Mercyhurst
College sends student volunteers to help refu-
gees from other countries learn how to live in
America.
The refugees come to the Unite States through
the International Institute in Erie.
So far this year, the Institute has helped around
300 families settle in Erie.
According to Teresa Hoerres, the college’s
contact at the Institute, as soon as their plane
lands, they are responsible for the family.
This includes not only picking them up and
driving them to their new house, but also making
sure their house has everything they need for
everyday living, such as towels, silverware, dishes,
furniture, appliances, etc.
The Institute also offers English and nutrition
classes, child care services and job searches.
Rachel Wojcik, a senior at the college who
volunteers with a family from Burma along with
two other seniors, Hailee Maiorano and Angela
Schumerth, said on the visits, they play with
the family’s four children, help them with their
homework, take them to the store and basically
answer any questions they have.
“We are the only people they know in the U.S.
and we are their lifeline,” Wojcik said.
Any questions or interest in volunteering can
be directed to Greg Baker in Campus Ministry at
extension 2429 or Teresa Hoerres at the Interna-
tional Institute at (814) 452-3935 or to her e-mail
thoerres@interinsterie.org.
By Alaina Rydzewski
Staff writer
Students volunteer to adopt a family for the holidays
Who are we as human
beings? What values and
principles should guide our
future?
As individuals, we are con-
fronted with these ethical
issues on a daily basis and as a
society, we are faced with even
bigger economic, political and
social challenges.
How should we handle these
kinds of ethical questions in
our personal and professional
lives? And what strategies
are there for dealing with the
unprecedented challenges of
the contemporary era?
While it seems like we have
more ethical questions than
answers, the newly established
Evelyn Lincoln Institute for
Ethics and Society at Mercy-
hurst College is ready to help.
The Institute for Ethics and
Society, which had its first
advisory board meeting Oct.
9, was formed as a continu-
ation of the values-focused
outreach central to the col-
lege’s mission.
In the future, the institute
will be located in the new
building that will be built
where the Warde townhouses
currently stand.
“I am proud that Mercyhurst
is taking the lead on this cru-
cial issue of ethics and society
especially at this moment in
our national history,” college
President Dr. Thomas Gamble
said.
“The initiative also reflects
our mission’s commitments,
especially around issues con-
cerning the ‘dignity of work.’
I want to thank all the indi-
viduals at Mercyhurst and in
the broader community for
making this initiative a real-
ity in particular Dan McFee,
Kevin Sullivan and Emily and
John Costigan.”
At the October advisory
board meeting, Dr. David
Livingston, vice president for
advancement and a religious
studies professor, announced
that Emily Lincoln Costigan,
class of 1964, and John Costi-
gan gave a $250,000 gift to
endow the newly named insti-
tute.
The institute was named for
Emily and her mother, Evelyn
Jacobson Lincoln, who also
graduated from Mercyhurst
with the class of 1930.
Directed by Dr. Daniel
Mcfee, associate profes-
sor of religious studies, and
Dr. Kevin Sullivan, associate
professor of philosophy, the
institute’s goal is to develop a
place where leaders and learn-
ers gather to engage in an
exchange of ideas that moves
toward a just, sustainable and
participatory society.
Not only will it create an
opportunity for the college to
live out its mission in the city
of Erie and the surrounding
region, but it will also promote
increased attention to ethical
issues for the college commu-
nity.
Members of the advisory
board include representatives
from colleges, businesses, law
firms and other interested
institutions in the region such
as Hamot Medical Center,
Engineered Plastics and Erie
City Council.
Although the institute hopes
to stimulate ethical action
within the community, its mis-
sion is centered primarily on
generating opportunities to
develop greater ethical aware-
ness, “The institute is basically
a think tank for stimulating
action,” McFee said.
According to the co-direc-
tors of the Institute, Mercy-
hurst is qualified for this kind
of establishment, because
Mercyhurst is focused on
developing the overall ethical
formation students.
In addition, ethics plays an
integral role in education at
the college.
“Mercyhurst is uniquely
positioned to provide just such
a values focus for the exami-
nation of the problems and
issues that confront our region
and our world,” Sullivan said.
In order for the institute to
fulfill its ambition and move
towards modeling a just, sus-
tainable and participatory
society, it will investigate three
areas: business ethics, technol-
ogy and ethics, and environ-
mental ethics. Roundtables
and lectures with guest speak-
ers will be held in all three
areas every year.
The first event held by the
Institute for Ethics and Soci-
ety occurred last spring at the
college, when internationally
known bioethicist Dr. Stephen
Post discussed his most recent
book, “Why Good Things
Happen to Good People” and
participated in a roundtable
discussion with students. The
event was very successful.
On Thursday, Dec. 11, the
Institute will sponsor another
public academic roundtable
and lecture titled “Creating a
Culture of Trust: Conflicts of
Interest and Business Ethics.”
Mercyhurst graduate P.
Kelly Tompkins, CFO of
RPM International Inc., is the
keynote speaker for the lec-
ture. Faculty sponsors include
McFee, Sullivan, and Dean of
the Walker School of Business
James Breckenridge.
“The ethical problems evi-
denced by the Enron, World
Com and recent financial crisis
point to a need for increased
education on the ethical dimen-
sions of the business environ-
ment. The lecture and round-
table events on the Thursday,
Dec. 11, recognize this need
and signal Mercyhurst’s com-
mitment to business ethics
education,” Breckenridge said.
The lecture will take place
Thursday at 8:15 p.m. in the
Mercy Heritage Hall.
College establishes ethical, value-focused institute
By Nicole Cerilli
Staff writer
Mercyhurst seniors Rachel Wojcik, Hailee Maiorano and
Angela Schumerth spend time with a Burmese refugee family.
Contributed photo
This past weekend
brought the beginning of
lots of holiday cheer to
Mercyhurst College. SAC’s 2nd
annual Winterfest took place
on Saturday following the
women’s hockey game against
Syracuse.
Events included horse-
drawn carriage rides, s’mores,
a snow-sculpting contest
and a make-your-own mitten
station.
SAC programmer Cerissa
Lynch thought the event was
a success.
“We really want to make Win-
terfest a tradition at Mercyhurst,
and we try to make it bigger
and better every year,” she said.
“We had a lot of fun planning
the event and we had a great
turnout.”
MSG’s 9th annual tree light-
ing ceremony took place Sunday
in the student union.
The evening opened with
voting for the best-deco-
rated trees on display in the
student union, all decorated
by RSCOs.
The Anthropology Club’s tree
had the most votes.
Dr. Federici gave an inspir-
ing speech to help welcome
the spectators, followed by the
tree lighting and singing of
“Silent Night.”
This year’s tree lighting
event was programmed by
MSG Event Coordinator
Jacquelynne Brown.
“Between the inspirational
Christmas message, and beauti-
ful trees from the RSCOs, this
year’s annual tree lighting was
truly a way to set a positive tone
on campus this holiday season,”
Brown stated.
There are still plenty of
opportunities in the coming
weeks to help get in the
Christmas spirit.
Mercyhurst’s annual Christ-
mas on campus event takes
place Saturday, in the student
union.
Children from around
the Erie area will travel to
campus to have fun with their
student “buddy.” They will
make crafts, enjoy some
snacks and receive a present
from Santa.
RSCOs participate in this
event by sponsoring activities
for the children during the day.
This weekend, SAC is pre-
senting Santa’s Secret Shop,
which will feature gift-wrap-
ping and prizes for students
to win.
Come to Santa’s Secret Shop
to win gifts for your family
and friends! Each person that
attends gets one free raffle ticket
to put toward great gifts.
Bring some new or gently
used winter gear to receive addi-
tional raffle tickets.
All items will be donated
to those in need around
the holidays.
SAC Programmer Haylie
Starin is optimistic about the
upcoming events.
“We’re really excited about
the opportunity to plan an event
for the students while also help-
ing the community by collect-
ing things like hats and mittens
during the holiday season,”
Starin said.
FEATURES
Page 6 December 10, 2008
6” Sub $4 Combo $ 5
12” Sub $5.75 Combo $ 6.75
Wrap Combo- Veggie $ 5
Other Wraps $ 4
11:30 a.m -8 p.m.
Lunch $ 5
Dinner $ 5.50
Lunch $ 5
Dinner $ 5.50
Lunch $ 5
Dinner $ 5.50
Make any sub a wrap for no extra charge!
Broccoli & Cheddar Bites
No ‘bah humbugs’ at Mercyhurst College
By Allie Miniri
Contributing writer
Students and faculty gather outside the student union for the
annual tree lighting ceremony.
Scoot Williams photo
FEATURES
Page 7 December 10, 2008
JET-TV gives comm majors amazing opportunity
Thanks to Brian Sheridan,
communcation professor at
Mercyhurst College and a JET-
TV employee, students were
given the opportunity to be at
JET-TV on election night, one
of the most exciting nights in
political history.
Preliminary results were
beginning to be put up and the
tension was rising.
Reporters were deciding
which headquarters to go to,
which candidates to talk to
and what questions to ask.
Students were given a huge
responsibility: making sure
the station was broadcasting
updated information.
Each student had a com-
puter to work on for the
night and each had five dis-
tricts to report results from
including Clarion, McKean,
Warren, Forest, Indiana and
numerous others.
The numbers the students
entered went directly on the
news ticker at the bottom
of the television screen, to
the anchors reporting the 11
p.m. news and to all of the
other districts and cities in
Pennsylvania.
The entire state was depend-
ing on the results they posted.
To know that student vol-
unteers could affect what went
on television and the informa-
tion the anchors were getting
blew them away.
It was a big responsibility on
a legendary night.
Tyler Frey, a sophomore at
Mercyhurst, had five districts
to cover.
“It’s really cool to be influ-
encing the whole state and to
be the first people to know
what’s going on,” Frey said.
Shannon Kelly, a 2008
graduate of the college and
employee at JET-TV, was guid-
ing the students on the ins and
outs of covering the event.
Kelly showed students how
to obtain the results, post
them up and also giving tours
of the station, explaining what
she does and much more.
Kelly interned at the sta-
tion before graduating and
was offered a job there not
long after.
She produces “Good Morn-
ing Erie” which includes
updating stories from the day
to use in the morning, sending
out shooters to get the story
so she can write it and work-
ing through the night to have
the show ready.
“It’s been really exciting to
have an election in the first
year [of this job],” Kelly said.
She offered students tips
on scoring future internships
and jobs.
Volunteering at JET-TV on
election night provided the
students with fresh perspec-
tives and experiences that will
be valuable to them in their
daily lives as communication
majors at Mercyhurst College
and in their job search.
Working in broadcast
doesn’t mean you’re going to
be on screen.
There are a lot of people
behind the scenes that are cru-
cial to making the show work.
Getting a good internship
is a major step in the road to
your “dream job.”
At the end of the night,
when a majority of the
counties had posted their
final results, the voice of
John McCain came on the
television.
He was beginning his
concession speech.
He was very sympathetic,
starting his speech with kind-
hearted remarks directed
towards Barack Obama’s
family, especially his grand-
mother, who passed away the
night before the election.
McCain urged each and
every one of his supporters to
not only congratulate but also
support Obama and bridge
the differences between
the parties.
Even though it was a con-
cession speech, it was still
inspirational to hear a leader
like McCain be as compas-
sionate as he was.
Obama was the prime illus-
tration of a relaxed leader
who was confident in himself
and his abilities to keep the
nation safe.
Obama’s acceptance speech
was powerful and moving,
and he addressed citizens of
all types: young, old, white,
black, rich and poor.
“In all those watching
tonight from beyond our
shores, from parliaments and
palaces to those that are hud-
dled around radios in the for-
gotten corners of the world;
our stories are singular, but
our destiny is shared. The
new dawn of American lead-
ership is at hand.”
The final electoral vote
count was 338-155.
JET-TV provided stu-
dents with experiences they
could not have obtained else-
where on election night, and
it will be a night no one will
ever forget.
By Alaina Rydzewski
Staff writer
Sophomore Tyler Frey working on the computer to keep the state informed on the election
progress.
Contributed photo
JET-TV is a Fox affiliate news station in Erie, Pa. located on Peach St.
yourerie.com photo
Students assisted crew in November’s election progress updates
Want to give your special
someone a unique holiday gift
directly from the shores of
Lake Erie? Look no further
than Relish Inc. Jewelers.
Located east of the Erie
International Airport at 3835
W. 12th St., Relish Inc. is a
beach glass studio and gal-
lery featuring the handmade
jewelry of owners and sis-
ters Terri Reed-Boyer and
Jennifer Reed.
Growing up along the Lake
Erie shoreline, the Reed sisters
developed a “relish” for col-
lecting beach glass.
After majoring in art and
metalsmithing in college, they
combined their talents, skills
and love for beach glass to start
Relish Inc. in 1996.
In 2001, they opened a 3,000
square foot studio and gal-
lery to feature their genuine
beach glass jewelry made with
sterling silver and 14-carat
gold metals.
Like the Reed sisters, junior
Carrina Crow’s mother also
works with sea glass.
“My mom’s friend taught her
how to make sea glass jewelry,”
Crow said.
“But she mostly makes [sea
glass] mobiles.”
Crow said the mo-
biles are very pretty but
time consuming.
“She is making a few this
year as Christmas presents and
has made me two of them in
the past,” Crow said.
So, what exactly is
beach glass?
According to the Relish Inc.
Web site, beach glass is rem-
nants of glass or plastic bottles
worn down by the sand and
sea current.
The exact origin for each
piece of glass is unknown.
Still, the color of each rock
can offer several suggestions
of its origin.
Various shades of blue could
have originated from jars of
Vick’s Vapor Rub, Noxzema or
Blue Coral car wax.
Brown rocks could have once
been Clorox or beer bottles and
clear beach glass could be the
product of worn down milk or
shampoo bottles.
Cobalt, periwinkle, clear,
aqua, seafoam, lime, dark
green and amber are some
additional colors.
Unlike many jewelry stores,
Relish does not alter the size,
shape or color of each rock.
Rather, they create pieces of
jewelry with the glass as it is
found on Lake Erie’s shore.
Want to give a gift by using
your own beach glass?
Send it to Relish and they will
consult you with potential gift
ideas that can be produced.
Such gift ideas are gold and
sterling silver necklaces, brace-
lets, anklets, earrings, eyeglass
holders, ornaments, framed
artwork, purse holders, cuff
links, note cards, bookmarks
and more.
Depending on the type of
jewelry, prices range between
$30 and $560, respectively, with
gold chain necklaces costing
the most.
Other gifts like handcrafted
cards and ornaments are less
expensive at $25 each.
You can view Relish Inc.’s
gift selection and shop on-
line by going to their Web
site, www.relishinc.com/
ndex.html.
“Usually for my really good
friends I will make homemade
gifts, and for other friends I
give more traditional gifts,”
Crow said.
FEATURES
Page 8 December 10, 2008
MARCH FOR L¡FE
Washington. DC + January 22. 2009
X
1he 5RHY:DGH and 'RHY%ROWRQ $upreme Court
declslons of 1913 leeallzed abortlon for vlrtuallv anv reason
durlne all 9 months of preenancv. $lnce then there have
been over 50,000,000 abortlons ln the Unlted $tates.
X
Manv Amerlcans thlnk thls pollcv ls too extreme and
want fewer abortlons throueh more protectlve laws and
better support for women faclne dlfflcult preenancles.
X
More than 200,000 people eathered ln Washlneton, bC
on the annlversarv of 5RHY:DGH last Januarv to call for
these chanees. 1hls Januarv, so can vou.
X
Grab a seat on our 26-hour March for Llfe . . .
BU8 TR¡P
X
Chartered buses wlll leave £rle at 11 PM, Januarv 21
and return about 1 AM, Januarv 23. $eats are $40.
$tudent sponsorshlps are currentlv avallable.
X
Call (814) 882-1333 for more lnformatlon or vlslt . . .
www.peopleforlife.org
´&KDQJHGRHVQRWUROOLQRQZKHHOVRILQHYLWDELOLW\
EXWFRPHVWKURXJKFRQWLQXRXVVWUXJJOHµ
5HY0DUWLQ/XWKHU.LQJ-U
0reanlzed bv People for 0reanlzed bv People for 0reanlzed bv People for 0reanlzed bv People for Llfe, lnc. Llfe, lnc. Llfe, lnc. Llfe, lnc.
1625 W. 26th St. and 1611 Peach St., Ste. 321, Erie, PA
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1126, Erie, PA 16512
(814) 882-1333 + ++ + (814) 459-1333 + ++ + (814) 464-0266
By Liz Maier
Staff writer
‘Relish’ unique gifts from the Erie shore
Give friends and family a
piece of the Lake Erie shore
with beach glass accessories
from Relish.
relishinc.com photo
Want to give your special
someone a unique holiday gift
directly from the shores of
Lake Erie? Look no further
than Relish Inc. Jewelers.
Located east of the Erie
International Airport at 3835
W. 12th St., Relish Inc. is a
beach glass studio and gal-
lery featuring the handmade
jewelry of owners and sis-
ters Terri Reed-Boyer and
Jennifer Reed.
Growing up along the Lake
Erie shoreline, the Reed sisters
developed a “relish” for col-
lecting beach glass.
After majoring in art and
metalsmithing in college, they
combined their talents, skills
and love for beach glass to start
Relish Inc. in 1996.
In 2001, they opened a 3,000
square foot studio and gal-
lery to feature their genuine
beach glass jewelry made with
sterling silver and 14-carat
gold metals.
Like the Reed sisters, junior
Carrina Crow’s mother also
works with sea glass.
“My mom’s friend taught her
how to make sea glass jewelry,”
Crow said.
“But she mostly makes [sea
glass] mobiles.”
Crow said the mo-
biles are very pretty but
time consuming.
“She is making a few this
year as Christmas presents and
has made me two of them in
the past,” Crow said.
So, what exactly is
beach glass?
According to the Relish Inc.
Web site, beach glass is rem-
nants of glass or plastic bottles
worn down by the sand and
sea current.
The exact origin for each
piece of glass is unknown.
Still, the color of each rock
can offer several suggestions
of its origin.
Various shades of blue could
have originated from jars of
Vick’s Vapor Rub, Noxzema or
Blue Coral car wax.
Brown rocks could have once
been Clorox or beer bottles and
clear beach glass could be the
product of worn down milk or
shampoo bottles.
Cobalt, periwinkle, clear,
aqua, seafoam, lime, dark
green and amber are some
additional colors.
Unlike many jewelry stores,
Relish does not alter the size,
shape or color of each rock.
Rather, they create pieces of
jewelry with the glass as it is
found on Lake Erie’s shore.
Want to give a gift by using
your own beach glass?
Send it to Relish and they will
consult you with potential gift
ideas that can be produced.
Such gift ideas are gold and
sterling silver necklaces, brace-
lets, anklets, earrings, eyeglass
holders, ornaments, framed
artwork, purse holders, cuff
links, note cards, bookmarks
and more.
Depending on the type of
jewelry, prices range between
$30 and $560, respectively, with
gold chain necklaces costing
the most.
Other gifts like handcrafted
cards and ornaments are less
expensive at $25 each.
You can view Relish Inc.’s
gift selection and shop on-
line by going to their Web
site, www.relishinc.com/
ndex.html.
“Usually for my really good
friends I will make homemade
gifts, and for other friends I
give more traditional gifts,”
Crow said.
FEATURES
Page 8 December 10, 2008
MARCH FOR L¡FE
Washington. DC + January 22. 2009
X
1he 5RHY:DGH and 'RHY%ROWRQ $upreme Court
declslons of 1913 leeallzed abortlon for vlrtuallv anv reason
durlne all 9 months of preenancv. $lnce then there have
been over 50,000,000 abortlons ln the Unlted $tates.
X
Manv Amerlcans thlnk thls pollcv ls too extreme and
want fewer abortlons throueh more protectlve laws and
better support for women faclne dlfflcult preenancles.
X
More than 200,000 people eathered ln Washlneton, bC
on the annlversarv of 5RHY:DGH last Januarv to call for
these chanees. 1hls Januarv, so can vou.
X
Grab a seat on our 26-hour March for Llfe . . .
BU8 TR¡P
X
Chartered buses wlll leave £rle at 11 PM, Januarv 21
and return about 1 AM, Januarv 23. $eats are $40.
$tudent sponsorshlps are currentlv avallable.
X
Call (814) 882-1333 for more lnformatlon or vlslt . . .
www.peopleforlife.org
´&KDQJHGRHVQRWUROOLQRQZKHHOVRILQHYLWDELOLW\
EXWFRPHVWKURXJKFRQWLQXRXVVWUXJJOHµ
5HY0DUWLQ/XWKHU.LQJ-U
0reanlzed bv People for 0reanlzed bv People for 0reanlzed bv People for 0reanlzed bv People for Llfe, lnc. Llfe, lnc. Llfe, lnc. Llfe, lnc.
1625 W. 26th St. and 1611 Peach St., Ste. 321, Erie, PA
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1126, Erie, PA 16512
(814) 882-1333 + ++ + (814) 459-1333 + ++ + (814) 464-0266
By Liz Maier
Staff writer
‘Relish’ unique gifts from the Erie shore
Give friends and family a
piece of the Lake Erie shore
with beach glass accessories
from Relish.
relishinc.com photo
Christmas is a holi-
day centered on giving
and receiving.
For poor college students,
Christmas may be the most
stressful holiday as well.
since we need to come up
with a large amount of gifts
for friends and family on a
low budget.
In case you still haven’t come
around to finding that special gift
or cannot afford the one you had
in mind, here are some unique,
inexpensive ideas for giving this
holiday season.
At findgift.com, you will find
unique, affordable gift ideas no
matter who the recipient is.
Freshman, Daniela Car-
camo, uses this Web site to
find gifts for everyone on her
Christmas list.
“It has affordable, unique
ideas and presents that
my friends would like,”
Carcamo says.
The Web site gathers items
from different stores and you
can sort presents through cat-
egories such as romantic or eco-
friendly and organic.
In this last one you will find
things like a staple-free sta-
pler for $19.99 and a recycled
candy wrapper clutch purse
from Uncommon Goods
at $28.
Even if you have no idea what
to get someone, you can use
the gift wizard from the home
page.
The wizard will ask you who
the gift is for, your relationship
to the person, their age and what
the occasion for the present is.
It will then show a huge variety
of nice, unique presents which
can be sorted by price range or
categories.
If you have any meaning-
ful pictures, you can create a
personalized gift right
around the corner at
CVS Pharmacy.
They have afford-
able projects you
can add a photo or
two which will make
it personal.
These items range from cal-
endars (starting at $9.99), mugs
(from $12.99), playing cards
($24.99), aprons, towels, pillows
and much more.
They even offer a per-
sonalized ceramic
pet bowl!
All you have to do is upload
your photo to cvs.com,
choose the project you want
and then picking it up at their
photo center located inside
the pharmacy.
You must order Thursday in
order to receive it in time for
Christmas.
If all else fails, there’s always
personalized greeting cards.
You can get a pack of 20 for
$14.99
at CVS or a single
one
for 33
cents at
walmart.com with free in-store
delivery.
Another option is buying a
nice picture frame and printing
a regular picture for it.
If photo projects are not your
thing, don’t worry, there’s other
cheap gifts available.
For people who like
to bake, a basket of
cookies or
brown-
ies will always be welcome at
any home.
It is an inexpensive way
of getting all your presents
done at once and certainly a
good option when you are on
a budget.
FEATURES
Page 9 December 10, 2008
Perfect presents on a penny-pincher budget
By Javi Cubillos
Staff writer
Use the gift wizard located on the Web site’s home page to
get ideas for someone special this holiday season.
findgift.com photo
A unique idea for your sister, girlfriend, or just a friend who is into colorful patterns
is the recycled candy wrapper clutch purse. Juicy fruit meets Christian Dior with
eco-friendly fashion.
findgift.com photo
Can’t think of a gift for your boyfriend? The compact charger powers
your cell phone instantly. The Instant Cell Phone Charger gives you 30
minutes of instant talk time or 15 hours of stand-by time.
findgift.com photo
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
Page 10 December 10, 2008
There are few musicians with
the grace, charisma, talent and
determination as the five mem-
bers of Erie’s newest sensational
act known as Awaken, North
Wind.
Vocalist/guitarist Brian Mor-
gante and keyboardist/vocal-
ist Kris Paulson recorded and
released a six-song EP in the
winter of 2007.
Upon return from a tour with
Edison Glass, Morgante and Paul-
son enlisted the talents of Josh
Seymour (ex-Stillframe Sky), Jesse
Spellman and Tyler Long. The band
then recorded their 10-song debut
album with engineer Eric Buman
(Silence the Sanity), mixed at Red
Red Studios in New York with Josh
Silverberg (Edison Glass).
After seven months of hard
work and dedication to Awaken,
North Wind, the quintet debuted
their new material live at Forward
Hall on Nov. 3, 2008. The show
was spectacular, theatrical and
energetic.
Unfortunately for fans of the
band that have only been able to
stream a few songs from the record
via MySpace, “Doubt” was not
pressed in time for the debut show.
The record, arguably a master-
piece of lyrical prowess, harmony,
melody and structure, consists of
full band versions of five of the
six songs on the acoustic EP “It’s
a Long, Long, Long Way Down.”
The album opens with an
instrumental track booming with
real emotions and energy.
The next track, “Intentions,”
speaks bluntly of the hypocrisy,
fault and the self-consciousness
which make us all human.
“Grace,” a self-examination
on the part of Morgante, reaches
deep into the spirit of the human
soul with the profound line, “Why
do we fill our hearts with all these
empty words?”
Originally recorded live for the
acoustic EP, the song “Melody”
is now rounded out, filled, and
perfectly engineered, making
the band’s message even more
powerful.
The chorus poses a question
about faith, “If there is no God,
then there is no song to sing.”
Morgante answers this question,
closing by singing, “There is a
God, he loves to hear me sing,” in
a somber, humble voice.
“Breathe,” the next, and per-
haps best track on the record,
is a song of desperation, with a
chorus proclaiming “I’m calling
out, I’m calling out for someone
/ to tell me where to go in a life I
just don’t know.”
The next track speaks of the
human condition, and its tenden-
cies to become apathetic towards
life, love and faith. “Passion” is a
dynamically diverse song, starting
soft and somber, and gradually
gaining energy and depth until the
massive sound of a crowd sing-
ing along with Morgante almost
overtakes the instrumentation.
“Vultures,” a song heavy in
programming and electron-
ics, speaks of a world where
people are brought down by their
mistakes.
“Prayers” is a melancholy song
about faith and how it can help
you face your past mistakes and
your future, featuring Josh Silver-
berg’s guest vocal appearance.
“Shadows,” the second acous-
tic track is reminiscent of spiritual
folk artists singing in church park-
ing lots and on the street corner,
trying desperately to convey their
message of hope and love.
The final track, the epic 11-
minute, 30-second “Afraid,”
explores the depths of influences
within the band, with guest vocal-
ist Ed Wiezorick.
Check myspace.com/awaken-
northwind for upcoming shows
and select songs from the record.
By Greg Summy
Staff writer
Awaken, North Wind debuts near-perfect album
The five members of Awaken North Wind are (left to right) Kris
Paulson, Josh Seymour, Brian Morgante, Jesse Spellman and
Tyler Long.
Contributed photo
Tyler Long (left), Brian Morgante (center) and Kris Paulson
rock out during Awaken, North Wind’s performance at For-
ward Hall.
Contributed photo
Beautiful, amazing and talented
does not start to describe James
Nalley’s performance in the
Walker Recital Hall on Thursday,
Dec. 4.
Nalley was extremely expres-
sive. His grand movements made
it appear as though he was almost
acting his pieces.
It was definitely amazing to
watch his technique and the emo-
tion he poured out into his per-
formance.
There were so many dynamic
changes in mood throughout all
of the pieces.
During Beethoven’s “32 Varia-
tions in C minor,” Nalley gave
each variation its own life and
personality.
Nalley described Toru Take-
mitsu’s “Litany” as the composer
sitting alone “on a cold winter’s
night,” also evoking the condi-
tions on the night of the concert.
Nalley was very inclusive,
speaking and introducing each
piece openly with the audience.
In the Franz List piece, “Bal-
lade No. 2 in B minor,” Nalley
told the story of a man lying on
his deathbed with angels calling
to him.
Finally, the overwhelming pain
possesses the dying man and he
ascends to heaven.
Every little detail described
was there in the music as Nalley
played out the scene perfectly.
After the intermission was a
very unusual piece called, “ South-
ern Lament for piano: 1. John
Henry was a Steel Drivin’ Man, 2.
Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve
Seen,” by Stephen Montague, in
which the performer is expected
to act out a bar scene where a
storyteller is depicting the tale of
John Henry.
Henry is the mythological
railroad worker who outworks
a steam hammer but dies of
exhaustion as a result.
Montague writes in distur-
bances in the pianist’s story by an
annoying person, and also hum-
ming symbolizing Henry’s soul
singing still after death.
It seemed as though Nalley
enjoyed acting this piece out the
most, because it called for a very
good performer to pull it off.
Nalley also had to stand up and
pluck the strings inside of the
piano, which had a very differ-
ent affect than a traditional piano
concert.
The most incredible piece was
the last, “Islamey: An Oriental
Fantasy,” by Mily Balakirev, an
obscure Russian composer.
It closed the concert perfectly
with its complexity and its beauti-
ful melody.
The piece is usually used as an
encore, which was not needed
since Nalley simply wrote it into
the concert.
If you missed this concert you
missed a huge opportunity. It was
really the concert of the year.
By Marie Karbacka
Staff writer
James Nalley’s piano performance amazes crowd
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
Page 11 December 10, 2008
REPORTERS
Sample News Group
Publishers of
The Daily News, Huntingdon
The Daily Herald, Tyrone
Bedford Gazette
Mountaineer-Herald, Ebensburg
News-Chronicle, Shippensburg
Is seeking full-time reporters to join our staff of
talented journalists. Feature stories, general as-
signment community journalism all part of this
fun job. Experience preferred, but will consider
talented recent graduates. Competitive pay and
benefits, friendly work environment.
Send cover letter with salary expectations and
resume to George Sample, The Daily News,
P.O. Box 384, Huntingdon, PA 16652, grsam-
ple@lazerlink.com
Lumen submission deadline approaches
Whet your pens to carve your
name in creative lore, for Mer-
cyhurst College’s literary arts
journal, “Lumen,” is accepting
submissions until Friday, Dec. 19,
the last day of class before winter
break.
Senior Editor-in-chief John
Ladd noted that “Lumen” takes
submissions in the forms of
poetry and short fiction.
All submissions should be
sent to adviser Dr. Schiff ’s e-mail
address, kschiff@mercyhurst.edu.
Submissions should be in the style
of attachments in Microsoft Word.
Schiff has been advising Mer-
cyhurst’s literary journal for more
than 20 years, guiding it through
a number of name and format
changes.
Past incarnations include 1992’s
space cowboy-themed “Paradigm”
and a timeless, Monty Python-
inspired, lace-entwined compila-
tion known as “Outlook,” edited
by then-students, current faculty
members Jeffrey Roessner and Jodi
Staniunas (now Staniunas-Hopper,
who serves as the graphic design
adviser for Lumen).
“The graphic design program
has been involved in Lumen since
1998,” Staniunas-Hopper said.
“Since 1999, we have received an
[Erie AAF Student Addy] award
every year for the book and a
separate award for the interac-
tive disk once that was included.
[Lumen offers] a showcase design
opportunity for a successful
design student’s work.”
This year’s print designer is
junior Bill Cundiff.
The compact disk component
is an innovation of the past five
years. “The CD especially allows
us to include more fiction, which
is sometimes a strain to get to fit
within our space limitations in
print,” Ladd said.
“Additionally, we’ve been able
to branch out into other media,
including music and dance pieces.
There is no difference in quality
between the print version and the
CD version. It does allow us to
consciously try to keep a balance
in what we publish.”
“Lumen” will not publish
entries submitted after Christmas
break in this year’s edition. Also,
anonymous submissions will not
be considered.
All fiction and poetry entries
will be judged anonymously by
the editorial staff of “Lumen,”
which is comprised of student
volunteers.
There is an editorial meeting
after Christmas break, and authors
should know whether their work
has been accepted sometime in
early February.
The unveiling of the “Lumen”
is the culmination of the English
Department’s annual Literary
Festival. It will occur Thursday,
April 30 at 8:15 p.m. in Taylor
Little Theatre. At that time, the
awards for best pieces will be
announced.
By Kyle King
A & E editor
Lumen
Mercyhurst’s literary arts magazine is
accepting submissions through Dec. 19.
E-mail all entries as Word attachments
to kschiff@mercyhurst.edu.
First Place: $250
Second Place: $150
Third Place: $100
Student-run musical ‘Sweet
Charity’ holds auditions
Auditions for the student-run
musical, “Sweet Charity,” will
begin Thursday, Dec. 11 at 7 p.m.
in Walker Recital Hall.
Auditions are open to majors
and non-majors alike.
“Sweet Charity” has nine lead-
ing and featured roles, several of
which ask for competency in sing-
ing, dancing and acting.
There will also be more than 25
small, ensemble, speaking roles.
Interested students should
bring a short piece of music to
sing (with piano accompaniment)
or be prepared to sing “Happy
Birthday.”
Those interested in being a lead
should prepare a monologue.
Interested dancers will learn a
short combo with the choreogra-
pher and should wear clothes in
which they can move easily.
If bringing music, it should
be able to stand on its own on
the piano. No Xerox copies are
needed. Music should be complete
piano and not just a vocal line.
Make sure printed music is in
the key you want to sing. Only
a verse and one chorus will be
sung.
There are many people involved
in the judging of the audition pro-
cess, including senior producer
Kara Stadelman, junior choreog-
rapher Trevor Sones, junior assis-
tant producer Everett Olszewski
and senior music director Chris
Von Volkenburg.
Also assisting in the process is
the Erie Playhouse’s David Mat-
thews, who will serve as director.
D’Angelo School of Music fac-
ulty member Brent Weber serves
as adviser to the student-run
group.
Because most of the students
heading the production will
graduate this spring, a number
of undergraduate ‘shadows’ have
already been named who will
eventually fill their positions.
“Sweet Charity” originally
opened on Broadway in 1966,
directed and choreographed by
Bob Fosse and with a book by
Neil Simon.
It was nominated for 12 Tony
Awards and won one for best
choreography.
The show was later turned into
a 1969 film, “Sweet Charity,” also
directed and choreographed by
Fosse. Shirley MacLaine starred
as Charity Hope Valentine, the
central force of the musical.
Anyone with questions can e-
mail kstade80@mercyhurst.edu
or check out “The Official Site
of the Student-Run Musical” on
Facebook.
Look for updates on “Sweet
Charity” in future issues.
By Kyle King
A & E editor
September 3, 2008
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
Page 12 December 10, 2008
Faculty art show premieres variety of media
Cummings Art Gallery pre-
miered the Art Department’s
faculty art show Dec. 4 from 7
to 9 p.m. Included in the works
were projects by Daniel Burke,
Gary Cardot, Cathlyn Hahn, Tom
Hubert, Camille Nischal, Peter
Stadtmueller, Jodi Staniunas-
Hopper, Jamie Borowicz and
Carole Werder.
The premiere had the most
attendees of any exhibit yet, with
over 40 people inside the Gallery
at a time.
Camille Nischal’s art education
project headlined the show.
She, in conjunction with a proj-
ect with the Pennsylvania Gover-
nor’s Institute for Arts Educators,
created an avatar in the three-
dimensional virtual world Second
Life.
The character’s name is Abraha-
mLincoln Magic, and is designed
to examine the nexus and relation
of people, art and technology.
Nischal hopes to focus on the
concept of seeing art as it per-
tains to the context of the char-
acter, a postmodern theoretical
term known as ‘viewership.’
She hopes to ask questions
of who is looked at and who
is looking in this relationship.
Does AbrahamLincoln Magic
have a special status as ‘celebrity’
or ‘icon of the state’ in a virtual
world?
To add to the effect, Nischal’s
section was cordoned off with
velvet rope and red carpet, and
students conducted interviews
with people involved and viewing
the project.
There was a live streaming
broadcast during the premiere,
in which the character was con-
trolled by Nischal and a research
assistant, freshman Tyler Stauffer.
Other prominent pieces
included a seaside watercolor
by Borowisz. “Beach Passages”
contains a myriad of intricately
detailed, powerfully colored
stones, each individually arrest-
ing but mesmerizing as a whole
and framed by simulacra of the
shore, stationary ice and flowing
water.
“My favorite piece was ‘Beach
Passages,’” said junior art therapy
major Lauren Halpin.
Additionally, Werder had two
interesting pieces comprised of
oil pigment, glow paint, metal leaf
and craft sticks, all of which was
mounted on wood. “Sojourn-
er’s Truth” created an almost
Renaissance-looking work of an
older African-American woman
resembling Sojourner Truth who
appeared almost under the glow
of a halo.
Burke contributed “Habitat,”
one of his trademark pieces,
returning again to the motif of
trying to place perched birds in
their natural environment.
Art department chair Tom
Hubert crafted a number of
ceramics pieces for the exhibit, as
well. “I’ve taken a ceramics class
before, and you can tell he fired
some of these pieces at least 10
times,” Halpin said.
The faculty exhibit will remain
displayed through Sunday, Jan. 4.
The Cummings Art Gallery
is open Tuesday through Friday
from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Thurs-
days 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
By Kyle King
A & E editor
Art education professor Camille Nischal explains how the
avatar AbrahamLincoln Magic interacts within the Mercyhurst
environment in Second Life.
Scoot Williams photo
Photography professor Gary Cardot looks over his Type C prints at the faculty art show last
week. His series focused on neon lighting at regional locales in Erie and eastern Ohio.
Scoot Williams photo
September 3, 2008
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
Page 12 December 10, 2008
Faculty art show premieres variety of media
Cummings Art Gallery pre-
miered the Art Department’s
faculty art show Dec. 4 from 7
to 9 p.m. Included in the works
were projects by Daniel Burke,
Gary Cardot, Cathlyn Hahn, Tom
Hubert, Camille Nischal, Peter
Stadtmueller, Jodi Staniunas-
Hopper, Jamie Borowicz and
Carole Werder.
The premiere had the most
attendees of any exhibit yet, with
over 40 people inside the Gallery
at a time.
Camille Nischal’s art education
project headlined the show.
She, in conjunction with a proj-
ect with the Pennsylvania Gover-
nor’s Institute for Arts Educators,
created an avatar in the three-
dimensional virtual world Second
Life.
The character’s name is Abraha-
mLincoln Magic, and is designed
to examine the nexus and relation
of people, art and technology.
Nischal hopes to focus on the
concept of seeing art as it per-
tains to the context of the char-
acter, a postmodern theoretical
term known as ‘viewership.’
She hopes to ask questions
of who is looked at and who
is looking in this relationship.
Does AbrahamLincoln Magic
have a special status as ‘celebrity’
or ‘icon of the state’ in a virtual
world?
To add to the effect, Nischal’s
section was cordoned off with
velvet rope and red carpet, and
students conducted interviews
with people involved and viewing
the project.
There was a live streaming
broadcast during the premiere,
in which the character was con-
trolled by Nischal and a research
assistant, freshman Tyler Stauffer.
Other prominent pieces
included a seaside watercolor
by Borowisz. “Beach Passages”
contains a myriad of intricately
detailed, powerfully colored
stones, each individually arrest-
ing but mesmerizing as a whole
and framed by simulacra of the
shore, stationary ice and flowing
water.
“My favorite piece was ‘Beach
Passages,’” said junior art therapy
major Lauren Halpin.
Additionally, Werder had two
interesting pieces comprised of
oil pigment, glow paint, metal leaf
and craft sticks, all of which was
mounted on wood. “Sojourn-
er’s Truth” created an almost
Renaissance-looking work of an
older African-American woman
resembling Sojourner Truth who
appeared almost under the glow
of a halo.
Burke contributed “Habitat,”
one of his trademark pieces,
returning again to the motif of
trying to place perched birds in
their natural environment.
Art department chair Tom
Hubert crafted a number of
ceramics pieces for the exhibit, as
well. “I’ve taken a ceramics class
before, and you can tell he fired
some of these pieces at least 10
times,” Halpin said.
The faculty exhibit will remain
displayed through Sunday, Jan. 4.
The Cummings Art Gallery
is open Tuesday through Friday
from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Thurs-
days 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
By Kyle King
A & E editor
Art education professor Camille Nischal explains how the
avatar AbrahamLincoln Magic interacts within the Mercyhurst
environment in Second Life.
Scoot Williams photo
Photography professor Gary Cardot looks over his Type C prints at the faculty art show last
week. His series focused on neon lighting at regional locales in Erie and eastern Ohio.
Scoot Williams photo
OPINION
Page 13 December 10, 2008
The views expressed in the opinion section of The Merciad do not necessarily reflect the views
of Mercyhurst College, the staff of The Merciad or the Catholic Church. Responses on any sub-
If you regularly check your
Mercyhurst e-mail accounts,
you will have noticed we all
received a “timely warning
notification” about an armed
robbery at PNC bank’s ATM,
across the street from our
much beloved CVS Pharmacy.
For those of you who
skipped over it, let me give you
a recap. On Nov. 29, a black
male robbed somebody at the
ATM, and used a 9 mm hand-
gun in the commission of this
crime.
We live on and attend a col-
lege campus where our sworn
police officers are not allowed
to be armed.
Not with guns, not with
tasers, not even with batons in
most cases. The most effective
piece of equipment our Police
and Safety officers carry to
use against perpetrators, with
the intent to cause us harm
on our campus is a can of
pepper spray.
Pepper spray is a civilian ver-
sion of mace and not nearly
as powerful. However, many
pretty blue lights there are on
this campus, it doesn’t change
the fact that blue lights will
not help you if the same guy
from PNC decides to move
his game over a block onto
our campus.
As much as Police and
Safety may want to help, we’re
all going to have to depend on
the Erie Police Department to
get here in time to incapacitate
an individual bent on causing a
student or professor harm.
If and when an incident
occurs on this campus where
a criminal means to cause
someone harm, the victim
will not be forced to wait for
Police and Safety—the police
on campus—but the Erie
Police Department. The
response time of the EPD was
touted in The Merciad last year
as five minutes. Virginia Tech
and city police in that area
took three minutes to respond,
another five to enter the build-
ing the infamous gunman had
entered. In that time—no more
than nine minutes—32 people
were dead.
Those were armed police
responding quicker than EPD
can. Our administration needs
to learn: When seconds count,
the police are only minutes
away. Stop protecting your
pride or politics, and start pro-
tecting your students.
By Devin Ruic
Contributing writer
Since 9/11 our rights have
been systematically dismantled
piece-by-piece.
Few in the federal govern-
ment have opposed the blatant
attack on our Constitutional
rights and with the vast major-
ity of congressmen being po-
litically statist and authoritarian,
there is a hard fight ahead for
the forces of liberty and the
freedom movement.
The following will shed some
light on some of the most
tyrannical and fascist laws re-
cently passed.
God save the Republic.
Patriot Act: Presented to
Congress one day before voting
on that allows the government
access to your financial, e-
mail, medical, church, mosque,
travel, and phone records with
no court order. They can also
search your home anytime
without a warrant.
Patriot Act II: Allows se-
cret gover nment ar rest s,
the legal authority to seize
your American citizenship,
and the extraction of your
DNA if you are deemed a
“potential” terrorist.
Since 9/11, the Patriot Act
has been abused in numer-
ous cases involving Amer-
ican citizens, including toy
store owners, the homeless,
owners of Web sites, writers,
artists, photographers and
common.
NSPD 51: Allows the presi-
dent to declare martial law,
transforming the U.S. into a
dictatorship with no checks and
balances from the legislative or
judicial branches.
The president could suspend
elections and take complete
control of every level of gov-
ernment. Parts of this direc-
tive are considered classified
and members of Congress
have been denied the right to
review it.
Military Commissions Act of
2006: Transforms the United
States of America from a free
republic into a de facto dicta-
torship, legalizes torture, ends
protection of prisoners of war
by the Geneva Conventions,
creates a secret committee con-
trolled by the president that can
declare anyone to be an “enemy
combatant” and thereby strip
away their legal rights guar-
anteed by the Constitution,
revokes habeas corpus thereby
giving the power to imprison
people without trial for as long
as the president likes, ends the
right to an attorney and the
right to court review of one’s
detention and arrest.
John Warner Defense Au-
thorization Act: Allows the
president to declare a pub-
lic emergency and station
troops anywhere in Ameri-
ca and take control of state
national guards without the
consent of the governor or
local authorities to “suppress
public disorder.”
Effectively ends the Posse
Comitatus Act of 1878 that
prohibits the military from
policing the streets.
By Thomas Kubica
Contributing writer
During Thanksgiving break it
came to my attention that many
of my friends had a negative
opinion of student athletes.
As a former student athlete
I obviously felt the need to
defend myself, but at the same
time their criticisms are similar
to the ones I have myself.
It’s not a secret to people
who know me that I am less
than satisfied with athletics
at Mercyhurst.
While I’m more than happy
to cheer on the home team
during a game, I am not pleased
with the way certain teams
seem to skate through college
by merely playing their sport.
Is this the way it’s always
been? Yes.
Will my opinion piece change
anything? Probably not.
But just because things are
the way they have been it doesn’t
mean I have to be happy about
it, or keep quiet. I know some
teams bring more money or
recognition to the school and
I understand it’s appropriate to
reward their achievements.
The bottom line for me
however, is students that are
failing their classes and missing
more class than they are al-
lowed to should not be getting
full scholarships.
I know this goes on at Mer-
cyhurst and it’s extremely un-
nerving. These students should
also not be getting the special
privilege of missing more class
than everyone else just because
they have games to attend.
If the coach doesn’t under-
stand, they are students first
and athletes second, something
is wrong. It appears things
will always be wrong though,
as we continue to support
athlete students rather than
student athletes.
By Rhonda Marable
Staff writer
’Hurst police need guns to defend campus
Americans’ rights under
Congress’s thick thumb
Student athletes or
athlete students?
Priorities differ in college when
athletics are involved
OPINION
Page 14 December 10, 2008
@mercyhurst.edu
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The Merciad is the official student-produced newspaper of Mercyhurst
College. It is published throughout the school year, with the exception of
finals weeks. Our office is in Hirt, Room 120B. Our telephone number is (814)
824-2376.
The Merciad welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be signed
and names will be included with the letters. Although we will not edit the
letters for content, we reserve the right to trim letters to fit. Letters
are due Mondays by noon and may not be more than 300 words. Submit
letters to box PH 485 or via e-mail at opinionmerciad@mercyhurst.edu.
If you don’t want it printed . . . don’t let it happen.
Editors
Casey Greene
Amanda Valauri
Emily Grabowski
Heather Donovan
Brad Moehringer
Sam Sellinger
Kyle King
Scoot Williams
Tyler Stauffer
Caitlin Bly
Gretchen Yori
Ashley Pastor
Bill Welch
Brian Sheridan
Positions
Editor-in-Chief
News Editor
Features Editor
Opinion Editor
Sports Editor
Sports Editor
A&E
Photographer
Photographer
Advertising Manager
Copy Editor
General Assignment
Adviser
Adviser
To me, education is the one
path that shapes a person into
who he or she can be. Since
I was a child I have pressed
toward living this educational
truth: “There is no road a
young man such as me can-
not travel if education is the
first priority.”
One’s advancement in educa-
tion is supported by individual
intuition and by the help of
the educational community and
family members. The road is
not easy but is worth taking.
One thing I know is through
education I can be open to
reasoning and using my liberal
arts education to connect to
the world.
My life in Kakuma refugee
camp in northwestern Kenya
was very hard, but it has helped
shape who I am today.
The Kakuma refugee camp is
between the border of Kenya
and Southern Sudan, and it
is inhabited by Turkana peo-
ple. I spent almost ten years
there, and it was this camp that
helped me know the advantage
of education.
I remember when I was
taught outdoors under the trees
(buildings were not available,
so teaching happened outside),
daily I would learn lessons
from small mobile chalkboards
while sitting on the hard and
dusty ground.
Some of my teachers were
qualified instructors, but others
were volunteers who had dedi-
cated themselves to teaching
me no matter the barriers.
These selfless teachers tried
very hard to raise the impor-
tance of education in my mind
as a young southern Sudanese
boy. Many non-profit orga-
nizations were very involved
with educational opportunities
in the camp: CRS, UNHCR,
JRS, LWF and many other hu-
manitarian groups helped bring
books, volunteers, pencils,
paper and other supplies, all of
which aided my learning.
My elders back in the camp
used to gather us youngsters
and advise us to value the
importance of having knowl-
edge because-to them-this was
the primary lack that contrib-
uted to our communities be-
ing dominated by Muslims in
the north.
It was this lack of educa-
tion that caused us to lose our
freedom of religion and ethical
practices and was a factor in our
forefathers being forced to fol-
low Muslim Sharia law.
Sudan has been left behind in
terms of education because of
this long war that has plagued
the nati on for more than
two decades.
Many young people have
the heart to learn, but the lack
of opportunities has hindered
their ambition. I was one of the
lucky individuals among other
lost boys of Sudan to find ref-
uge and education in America.
My experience at Mercyhurst
has been a blessing.
I give thanks always as I
walk from McCauley Hall to
Zurn Science Center during
my class days, because it is an
honor both to be a past-refugee
and now to share the value of
education with other groups of
young people.
The Sisters of Mercy have in-
vested in us through our educa-
tion and it is our responsibility
to hold up the torch and let it
shine for many more years.
We are to be globally re-
sponsible, as stated in our
Mission Statement, and to be
a force of mercy and solidarity
through education.
Chol John is a freshman, one of
the lost boys of Sudan who came to
Erie on April 29, 2004 His major
is biology; after college he plans to go
to medical school. He would like to
be a physician, return to Sudan and
help open a hospital to aid the sick.
His favorite aspect of Mercyhurst: I
love the commitment that young peo-
ple are exemplifying in this Institu-
tion; many of the students here have
left their families from as far away
as Alaska and Nepal to join the
Mercyhurst educational community
to advance their future dreams.
As the whirlwind of senior
year whips me through the liv-
ing hell that was the Graduate
Record Examinations to the
dreaming potentials of what
might be, I stand in awe of all
those so sure of their career or
profession.
Perhaps my indecisiveness
is my weakness, because it has
me lost in a myriad of ideolo-
gies and myths people weave to
make their own realities.
I have sought to discern
truth from fiction, yet the rela-
tivism so many cling to when
establishing beliefs hinders an
honest search. What constitutes
pure acceptance of an ideology
if contingent on the interpreted
words of those already past?
Are we not absent of their
contextual reality and tangible
experience? Why pretend to
understand what someone who
never came into contact with
nearly as much information as
we have without attempting to
know ourselves?
Should not all situations be-
come a medium for praxis of
philosophy in constant tension
with other competing philoso-
phies in action?
Is one application more suit-
able and who becomes the
ultimate judge?
Is suitable based on the as-
sumption that a man who wears
a suit carries more validation in
deed and creed?
I fail to understand why
we exchange paper, tattooed
with illuminist symbols, back
and forth in exchange for a
plethora of material goods we
covet, let alone why wearing
an uncomfortable mini-noose
is acceptable dress.
The whole system seems bi-
zarre and foreign, like wearing
powdered wigs must have been,
just ridiculous.
I beg for the reasoning be-
hind why we continuously
and quite seamlessly, support
a civilization that fails to feed,
clothe and provide justice for
its people.
However a culture that cel-
ebrates and advertises the use
of depressants as a lubricant
to reinforce social interaction
actively creates dissonant per-
ceptions of reality.
Culture has become divided
and conquered. Everyone
wants to play in their own fields,
as opposed to observing the
silly games and building coher-
ent means to flourish.
By Jerrod Markle
Staff writer
Appreciating an educational opportunity
Determining your future
OPINION
Page 14 December 10, 2008
@mercyhurst.edu
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The Merciad is the official student-produced newspaper of Mercyhurst
College. It is published throughout the school year, with the exception of
finals weeks. Our office is in Hirt, Room 120B. Our telephone number is (814)
824-2376.
The Merciad welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be signed
and names will be included with the letters. Although we will not edit the
letters for content, we reserve the right to trim letters to fit. Letters
are due Mondays by noon and may not be more than 300 words. Submit
letters to box PH 485 or via e-mail at opinionmerciad@mercyhurst.edu.
If you don’t want it printed . . . don’t let it happen.
Editors
Casey Greene
Amanda Valauri
Emily Grabowski
Heather Donovan
Brad Moehringer
Sam Sellinger
Kyle King
Scoot Williams
Tyler Stauffer
Caitlin Bly
Gretchen Yori
Ashley Pastor
Bill Welch
Brian Sheridan
Positions
Editor-in-Chief
News Editor
Features Editor
Opinion Editor
Sports Editor
Sports Editor
A&E
Photographer
Photographer
Advertising Manager
Copy Editor
General Assignment
Adviser
Adviser
To me, education is the one
path that shapes a person into
who he or she can be. Since
I was a child I have pressed
toward living this educational
truth: “There is no road a
young man such as me can-
not travel if education is the
first priority.”
One’s advancement in educa-
tion is supported by individual
intuition and by the help of
the educational community and
family members. The road is
not easy but is worth taking.
One thing I know is through
education I can be open to
reasoning and using my liberal
arts education to connect to
the world.
My life in Kakuma refugee
camp in northwestern Kenya
was very hard, but it has helped
shape who I am today.
The Kakuma refugee camp is
between the border of Kenya
and Southern Sudan, and it
is inhabited by Turkana peo-
ple. I spent almost ten years
there, and it was this camp that
helped me know the advantage
of education.
I remember when I was
taught outdoors under the trees
(buildings were not available,
so teaching happened outside),
daily I would learn lessons
from small mobile chalkboards
while sitting on the hard and
dusty ground.
Some of my teachers were
qualified instructors, but others
were volunteers who had dedi-
cated themselves to teaching
me no matter the barriers.
These selfless teachers tried
very hard to raise the impor-
tance of education in my mind
as a young southern Sudanese
boy. Many non-profit orga-
nizations were very involved
with educational opportunities
in the camp: CRS, UNHCR,
JRS, LWF and many other hu-
manitarian groups helped bring
books, volunteers, pencils,
paper and other supplies, all of
which aided my learning.
My elders back in the camp
used to gather us youngsters
and advise us to value the
importance of having knowl-
edge because-to them-this was
the primary lack that contrib-
uted to our communities be-
ing dominated by Muslims in
the north.
It was this lack of educa-
tion that caused us to lose our
freedom of religion and ethical
practices and was a factor in our
forefathers being forced to fol-
low Muslim Sharia law.
Sudan has been left behind in
terms of education because of
this long war that has plagued
the nati on for more than
two decades.
Many young people have
the heart to learn, but the lack
of opportunities has hindered
their ambition. I was one of the
lucky individuals among other
lost boys of Sudan to find ref-
uge and education in America.
My experience at Mercyhurst
has been a blessing.
I give thanks always as I
walk from McCauley Hall to
Zurn Science Center during
my class days, because it is an
honor both to be a past-refugee
and now to share the value of
education with other groups of
young people.
The Sisters of Mercy have in-
vested in us through our educa-
tion and it is our responsibility
to hold up the torch and let it
shine for many more years.
We are to be globally re-
sponsible, as stated in our
Mission Statement, and to be
a force of mercy and solidarity
through education.
Chol John is a freshman, one of
the lost boys of Sudan who came to
Erie on April 29, 2004 His major
is biology; after college he plans to go
to medical school. He would like to
be a physician, return to Sudan and
help open a hospital to aid the sick.
His favorite aspect of Mercyhurst: I
love the commitment that young peo-
ple are exemplifying in this Institu-
tion; many of the students here have
left their families from as far away
as Alaska and Nepal to join the
Mercyhurst educational community
to advance their future dreams.
As the whirlwind of senior
year whips me through the liv-
ing hell that was the Graduate
Record Examinations to the
dreaming potentials of what
might be, I stand in awe of all
those so sure of their career or
profession.
Perhaps my indecisiveness
is my weakness, because it has
me lost in a myriad of ideolo-
gies and myths people weave to
make their own realities.
I have sought to discern
truth from fiction, yet the rela-
tivism so many cling to when
establishing beliefs hinders an
honest search. What constitutes
pure acceptance of an ideology
if contingent on the interpreted
words of those already past?
Are we not absent of their
contextual reality and tangible
experience? Why pretend to
understand what someone who
never came into contact with
nearly as much information as
we have without attempting to
know ourselves?
Should not all situations be-
come a medium for praxis of
philosophy in constant tension
with other competing philoso-
phies in action?
Is one application more suit-
able and who becomes the
ultimate judge?
Is suitable based on the as-
sumption that a man who wears
a suit carries more validation in
deed and creed?
I fail to understand why
we exchange paper, tattooed
with illuminist symbols, back
and forth in exchange for a
plethora of material goods we
covet, let alone why wearing
an uncomfortable mini-noose
is acceptable dress.
The whole system seems bi-
zarre and foreign, like wearing
powdered wigs must have been,
just ridiculous.
I beg for the reasoning be-
hind why we continuously
and quite seamlessly, support
a civilization that fails to feed,
clothe and provide justice for
its people.
However a culture that cel-
ebrates and advertises the use
of depressants as a lubricant
to reinforce social interaction
actively creates dissonant per-
ceptions of reality.
Culture has become divided
and conquered. Everyone
wants to play in their own fields,
as opposed to observing the
silly games and building coher-
ent means to flourish.
By Jerrod Markle
Staff writer
Appreciating an educational opportunity
Determining your future
OPINION
Page 15 December 10, 2008
Light Up night, Mercy-
hurst’s annual Christmas
tree lighting ceremony had
a great turnout in Garvey
Park this past Sunday.
Syllabus week was a blast.
Limited class work and no
homework left plenty of
time for late night extra
curricular activities. It al-
ways helps when there’s not
much to miss when you’re
struggling in your 8 a.m.
The ‘lost weeks’ of winter
term are here. Professors go
from 0-60 mph in a matter
of weeks, so prepare to
be bogged down before
Christmas.
The salt trucks are out
ladies, your Ugg boots are
going down.
Dr. Gambl e’s e-mai l
meant to inform students
about the current economic
status of the college left
most baffled as to what
it means for us. Money is
an awful touchy subject at
a school as expensive as
Mercyhurst.
Please e-mail any suggestions to
opinionmerciad@mercyhurst.edu.
The GB&U is a compilation of
student opinions.
It snows in Erie.
It snows a lot.
Every winter.
From approximately the
end of October to mid-April
there is snow. Still, every year
I hate it more. I know, you’re
probably thinking, “Then why
do I go to school here?”
But really, isn’t everyone
thinking the same thing when
it snows something like two
and a half feet in one night?
Or actually, what’s the deal
with the roads and sidewalks?
I know the rest of Erie is
also aware of how bad the
winters are here. Still, the
roads are never plowed and
the sidewalks are always icy.
Although walking to class is
always an adventure, I could
do without it. Not only is it
extremely embarrassing, it is
also dangerous.
I really do not think it is
too much to ask to have the
sidewalks salted.
I understand our roads are
not priority—as annoying as
that is—but shouldn’t we at
least be able to walk since we
can’t drive?
I cannot tell you the amount
of people I have seen wipe out
and then panic to quickly grab
their things and hide their face.
I am no different.
I have been a victim to the
wipe out many embarrassing
times.
Walking through the parking
lot on the way to Hirt, the tread
on my snow boots is below
par and about to show me just
how unreliable it is.
I start to lose control and
my stomach tightens as I am
a little scared of getting hurt,
but also horrified that I am by
myself and about to plummet
onto the ground, alone.
To most, like my roommates,
this incident is trivial. They
actually told me when I was
writing this, it sounds like
I was describing my death.
But to me, the annoyance of
the constantly-icy cement
continues to grow.
Just thought I’d let you
know.
By Jordan Zangaro
Staff writer
Have you been back to your
high schools in recent years,
perhaps over break?
Have you taken notice of
how the young women are
dressing? My roommates and
I were talking about how pro-
miscuous high school girls
and even middle school girls
are dressing.
Now, I wouldn’t consider
myself to be a conservative
dresser. And I remember some
girls in high school dressing
pretty provocatively, but there
were only a dozen or two in a
very large school.
My friends and I have noticed
it’s the majority of girls now
that are dressing completely
inappropriately for their age.
Women in college are the
ones dressing much more con-
servatively, even if it is the
style lately. There seems to be
a whole societal shift in what is
age appropriate.
It used to be acceptable to be
a little more revealing, especially
when twenty somethings go out
partying. Now middle school
girls are dressed like their going
to a club. And I find myself in
regular jeans and a top.
What’s wrong with this pic-
ture? Maybe it’s a trend to
dress like this for kids. There
was the grunge of the 1990s,
the preppy look of the turn of
the century. Is it now, as little
clothing as possible?
If this were a fad, girls
wouldn’t be embodying this
look with the connotations
that come with it. These girls
are engaging in sexual acts. A
friend’s 8th-grade brother had
to dump his girlfriend for send-
ing nude pictures of herself to
her classmates via cell phone. I
remember the teens that were
more advanced and every gen-
eration has things that shock
those older.
But there’s no reason to grow
up so fast. I’m still trying to
slow down the process, and it’s
getting inevitably harder.
If this trend continues, who
knows where the next genera-
tions will end up. Sex education
in preschool? Not cool.
By Heather Donovan
Opinion editor
With all the forecasts of
gloom and doom being pro-
jected by the pundits, I believe
the current economic downturn
could be a blessing in disguise
if handled properly.
The current fiscal crisis didn’t
occur overnight. This mess is
due to carelessness, irrespon-
sibility and downright crimi-
nality over a sustained period
of time.
Greed, deregulation along
with a Republican administra-
tion and Congress that looked
the other way while their bud-
dies (corporate cronies) looted
America. The disease of cor-
ruption has been festering for a
long time; we’re just starting to
feel the effects of this chronic
disorder.
Finally, the American people’s
eyes have been opened; thank
God it was exposed before
another Republican administra-
tion could take office.
They tried to pull the wool
over our eyes one last time by
stating, “the economy is eco-
nomically sound,” but by that
time the barn door had been
kicked down and all the animals
were running wild. The pain
had become unbearable.
Enter Barack Obama!
While campaigning, he told
people the bitter truth. The
time was right for a dose of
reality, because the Ameri-
can people were no longer in
denial.
Now he needs to follow up
on his campaign promises
by investing in America and
restoring credibility to our
country by being honest with
our people and the rest of the
world.
After all the lies and deceit
of the last eight years some
honesty, even if it hurts will be
refreshing. It’s time to rebuild
our infrastructure, invest in
education, make health care
affordable for all Americans, so
our country can begin to heal.
You still have skeptics saying
we can’t afford to do this, the
truth is we can’t afford not
to. It’s just common sense,
economics 101, if you want to
make a profit there needs to
be an initial investment, put-
ting America back to work will
eventually generate revenue
in the form of tax dollars and
spending that will stimulate our
economy.
The days of something for
nothing are over, we need to
bury that myth along with
deregulation and trickle down
economics. America, the time
is at hand, don’t miss this
blessing.
By Eric Jackson
Staff writer
Recessed economic situation looking up
Misinterpreting maturity
Really Erie?
Men’s Hockey......................Dec. 5, W 6-3, American International
Dec. 6, W 11-1, American International
Women’s Hockey..........................................Dec. 5, W 5-1, Syracuse
Dec. 6, W 9-2, Syracuse
Men’s Basketball...................Dec. 6, W 74-54, Salem International
Women’s Basketball..........................Dec. 3, L 88-38, West Virginia
Dec. 5, L 79-54, West Virginia Wesleyan
Dec. 7, W 63-58, Wheeling Jesuit
Wrestling....................................Dec. 3, W 25-10, West Liberty State
Dec. 6, 5th/10, PSAC Championships
Schroter and Powell Named All-Americans
Mercyhurst College women’s soccer players sophomore Jamie
Schroter and senior Sarah Powell were named to the Daktronics
All-American teams. Schroter was voted to the first team while
Powell received second team honors. The two were the only
PSAC representatives on the first or second teams and Schroter is
the only Laker to ever receive first team honors.
Boyce Named First Team Academic All-American
Mercyhurst College football team senior Bryan Boyce was recently
named to the ESPN The Magazine/CoSIDA Academic All-Amer-
ica first team. Boyce currently has an 3.81 grade point average as a
biology major while leading the Laker defense with 91 tackles.
Editor’s Game of the Week:
THINK PINK! This weekend head to the Mercyhurst Ice Center
as the No. 8 Lakers host No. 4 St. Lawrence Friday at 7 p.m.. and
Saturday at 2 p.m. Dec. 12 is the CHA’s annual Skate for the Cure
to raise money for breast cancer. Wear Pink and win prizes and
come out and support the Lakers!.
Matt Pierce-Men’s Hockey
Senior forward Matt Pierce earned Athlete of the Week honors for
his performance over the weekend against American International.
Pierce tallied six goals to go along with two assists as the Lakers
swept the Yellow Jackets. Pierce collected a hat trick on both
Friday and Saturday night to help extend the Laker’s win streak to
six games.
Andy Lamancusa-Wrestling
Andy Lamancusa, a junior, paced the Mercyhurst College wrestling
team during the PSAC Championships this past weekend to earn
Athlete of the Week honors. Lamancusa finished fourth in his
class while the Lakers finished fifth out of ten teams.
Lakers squash the Orange
The No. 9-ranked Mer-
cyhurst Lakers posted two
immense victories this week-
end at home over their CHA
conference rival, Syracuse
University. With a 5-1 win on
Friday evening and a 9-2 vic-
tory Saturday afternoon over
the Orange.
After winning seven straight
games, the Lakers are now 10-
4-0 overall and 4-0-0 in College
Hockey America (CHA). On
Saturday afternoon the Lakers
were scored on early by Syra-
cuse freshman Megan Skelly.
But with only five minutes left
in the first period, the Lakers
bounced back by firing three
shots into the back of the net.
Mercyhurst went on to lead
5-1 in the second period of
play as two power play goals
were scored by junior Megan
Agosta and sophomore Ashley
Cockell.
The lead quickly grew to 8-
1 before Syracuse slipped one
more into the net. The Lakers
ended the game out shooting
Syracuse 50-22.
Friday evening, Mercyhurst
beat Syracuse, for the first
time on the Lakers ice 5-1 in
a great match-up. Both teams
played great defense as they
kept the game scoreless for the
first thirteen minutes play. The
Lakers then scored three goals
in a two-and-a-half-minute
span to take the lead.
Freshmen goaltender, Hill-
ary Pattenden had this to say:
“I think our team is look-
ing better and better as each
game goes on, with the right
people stepping up and taking
control. Our performance this
weekend against Syracuse has
given us the confidence we
need heading into this next
weekend when we play St.
Lawrence.”
The Lakers face No. 3 St.
Lawrence at the MIC at 7 p.m.
on Friday and 2 p.m. . Saturday.
By Katie Waldin
Staff writer
The Lakers celebrate a goal during Saturday’s 9-2 win over College Hockey America opponent,
Syracuse, at the Mercyhurst Ice Center.
Tyler Stauffer photo
Men’s Hockey......................Dec. 5, W 6-3, American International
Dec. 6, W 11-1, American International
Women’s Hockey..........................................Dec. 5, W 5-1, Syracuse
Dec. 6, W 9-2, Syracuse
Men’s Basketball...................Dec. 6, W 74-54, Salem International
Women’s Basketball..........................Dec. 3, L 88-38, West Virginia
Dec. 5, L 79-54, West Virginia Wesleyan
Dec. 7, W 63-58, Wheeling Jesuit
Wrestling....................................Dec. 3, W 25-10, West Liberty State
Dec. 6, 5th/10, PSAC Championships
Schroter and Powell Named All-Americans
Mercyhurst College women’s soccer players sophomore Jamie
Schroter and senior Sarah Powell were named to the Daktronics
All-American teams. Schroter was voted to the first team while
Powell received second team honors. The two were the only
PSAC representatives on the first or second teams and Schroter is
the only Laker to ever receive first team honors.
Boyce Named First Team Academic All-American
Mercyhurst College football team senior Bryan Boyce was recently
named to the ESPN The Magazine/CoSIDA Academic All-Amer-
ica first team. Boyce currently has an 3.81 grade point average as a
biology major while leading the Laker defense with 91 tackles.
Editor’s Game of the Week:
THINK PINK! This weekend head to the Mercyhurst Ice Center
as the No. 8 Lakers host No. 4 St. Lawrence Friday at 7 p.m.. and
Saturday at 2 p.m. Dec. 12 is the CHA’s annual Skate for the Cure
to raise money for breast cancer. Wear Pink and win prizes and
come out and support the Lakers!.
Matt Pierce-Men’s Hockey
Senior forward Matt Pierce earned Athlete of the Week honors for
his performance over the weekend against American International.
Pierce tallied six goals to go along with two assists as the Lakers
swept the Yellow Jackets. Pierce collected a hat trick on both
Friday and Saturday night to help extend the Laker’s win streak to
six games.
Andy Lamancusa-Wrestling
Andy Lamancusa, a junior, paced the Mercyhurst College wrestling
team during the PSAC Championships this past weekend to earn
Athlete of the Week honors. Lamancusa finished fourth in his
class while the Lakers finished fifth out of ten teams.
Lakers squash the Orange
The No. 9-ranked Mer-
cyhurst Lakers posted two
immense victories this week-
end at home over their CHA
conference rival, Syracuse
University. With a 5-1 win on
Friday evening and a 9-2 vic-
tory Saturday afternoon over
the Orange.
After winning seven straight
games, the Lakers are now 10-
4-0 overall and 4-0-0 in College
Hockey America (CHA). On
Saturday afternoon the Lakers
were scored on early by Syra-
cuse freshman Megan Skelly.
But with only five minutes left
in the first period, the Lakers
bounced back by firing three
shots into the back of the net.
Mercyhurst went on to lead
5-1 in the second period of
play as two power play goals
were scored by junior Megan
Agosta and sophomore Ashley
Cockell.
The lead quickly grew to 8-
1 before Syracuse slipped one
more into the net. The Lakers
ended the game out shooting
Syracuse 50-22.
Friday evening, Mercyhurst
beat Syracuse, for the first
time on the Lakers ice 5-1 in
a great match-up. Both teams
played great defense as they
kept the game scoreless for the
first thirteen minutes play. The
Lakers then scored three goals
in a two-and-a-half-minute
span to take the lead.
Freshmen goaltender, Hill-
ary Pattenden had this to say:
“I think our team is look-
ing better and better as each
game goes on, with the right
people stepping up and taking
control. Our performance this
weekend against Syracuse has
given us the confidence we
need heading into this next
weekend when we play St.
Lawrence.”
The Lakers face No. 3 St.
Lawrence at the MIC at 7 p.m.
on Friday and 2 p.m. . Saturday.
By Katie Waldin
Staff writer
The Lakers celebrate a goal during Saturday’s 9-2 win over College Hockey America opponent,
Syracuse, at the Mercyhurst Ice Center.
Tyler Stauffer photo
The Mercyhurst women’s
basketball team has eight more
games before they have a
chance to show the Pennsylva-
nia State Athletic Conference
(PSAC) what they’re all about.
The Lakers hold a record
of 2-3, with one loss coming
from the No. 1 ranked North-
ern Kentucky and another one
coming from Division I West
Virginia University.
The Lakers look forward to
their second home game this
Saturday at 1 p.m. in the MAC.
Mercyhurst had a strong
showing in their home opener
vs. Glenville State on Nov. 19,
beating them 83-47.
Sophomor Samantha Load-
man has a positive outlook
on the season thus far even
though not everything has
been in their favor, “the
season is going well. We lost
our starting point guard due to
an ACL injury and we are bat-
tling a few other less serious
injuries, but we are confident
for the future.”
Fellow teammate sopho-
more Amy Achesinski couldn’t
be more excited about the
2008-09 basketball season,
“I believe we have a lot of
potential this year to do great
things. We are competing in
a new conference and have
everything to gain. It’s very
exciting!”
The Lakers are coming off
a big win this past weekend
when they took on the Cardi-
nals of Wheeling Jesuit. Mer-
cyhurst outscored Wheeling
Jesuit 12-2 over the final 3:30
of play Sunday, using superior
shooting to pull out a 63-58
victory over the host Cardi-
nals.
Amy Achesinki scored 14
second-half points to ignite
the late rally, while Mara Drei-
ser had the game-winning
three-pointer with 38 seconds
remaining.
The Lakers hope to use this
fighting mentality in their next
few games leading up to their
PSAC opener vs. Slippery
Rock at 5:30 p.m. in the MAC.
It may not have been the
most ideal start for the Mer-
cyhurst College men’s hockey
team to the season. The
Lakers started the season win-
ning only one of their first
eight games.
Since then, the Lakers are
arguably one of the hottest
teams in the Atlantic Hockey
Association, going 6-1-1 in
their next eight games and
racking up the offensive num-
bers.
The Lakers came into the
weekend series in Springfield,
Mass., against American Inter-
national facing some adversity.
During the week, the Lakers
lost their captain senior Ryan
Toomey as he decided to
forego the rest of his season
to sign a professional contract
with the Cincinnati Cyclones
of the East Coast Hockey
League.
With the loss, former assis-
tant captains seniors Matt
Pierce and Kirk Medernach
will take over as captains.
In Friday night’s game
newly appointed, captain Matt
Pierce, tallied his first career
hat-trick to lead the Lakers
offense.
Sophomores Mike Gurtler
and Brandon Coccimiglio and
freshman Phil Ginand tallied
the rest of the goals as the
Lakers defeated the Yellow
Jackets 6-3.
Sophomore net minder
Ryan Zapolski finished the
night with 33 saves to pick up
the win.
In Saturday night’s game
the offense unleashed on the
Yellow Jackets for 11 goals.
Mercyhurst was led by
sophomores Steve Cameron
and Scott Pitt who finished
the game with six points a
piece.
Cameron notched two
goals and four assists while
Pitt contributed a goal and
five assists.
For the second straight
game senior captain Matt
Pierce had three goals and
added two assists to finish
with five points.
Senior Matt Lundin got the
start in net on Saturday and
made 28 saves to pick up his
second win on the season.
The Lakers now stand at
7-8-1 overall on the year and
5-2-1 in the Atlantic Hockey
Association.
Mercyhurst is on the road
again this weekend when
they travel to Rochester, N.Y.,
to battle AHA foe Roches-
ter Institute of Technology.
Face-off for both games is
scheduled for 7 p.m.
SPORTS
Page 17 December 10, 2008
Lakers roll over Yellow Jackets Women’s basketball
kicks off season
Men’s basketball opens with six straight wins
By Sarah Powell
Staff writer
It’s another Erie winter and
we all know with that comes
too much ice and wind. While
there is nothing we can do
about the weather, there is
one thing to look forward to
this winter, and that’s the start
of basketball on the campus.
Last year the men’s basketball
team went 15-13 and this year
they are looking to improve on
that.
The Lakers have retooled
this year, bringing in six new
players to the team. Five of
the newcomers to the campus
are transfers and bring a great
deal of experience with them.
This will help as the Lakers
graduated four seniors last
season. The new recruits have
looked to make their mark on
the team right away.
The Lakers are off to a great
start. While most of the stu-
dent population was home
for Thanksgiving break the
Lakers were winning the first
six games they played.
Starting 6-0 is the best start
in the program’s history since
the 1977-78 season. This
Lakers team looks to be play-
ing at its best by the time con-
ference games begin after the
holiday break.
Most recently, the Lakers
took down Salem International
on Dec. 6. Junior Nnamdi
Nnadili lead the team with 19
points.
Mercyhurst had three other
players contribute double
figure points. Junior Elliot
Engelmann added 18 points
and six rebounds while junior
Jordan Armstrong and senior
Brian McTear each added 10
points. As a team, the Lakers
shot 14-of-33 from behind the
arc and 52.8 percent from the
floor for the game.
The next home games are
coming up this weekend as
part of the Mercyhurst Clas-
sic at the Mercyhurst Ath-
letic Center. Ohio Valley and
Columbia Union will take on
the Lakers on the Dec. 12 and
Dec. 13 with both games start-
ing at 6 p.m.
By Gary Coad
Staff writer
By Brad Moehringer
Sports editor
The Lakers have gone 6-1-1 in their last 8 games to improve
to 7-8-1 on the year.
Scoot Williams photo
Page 20
Senior (16) Hayley
McMeekin controls the puck
Saturday in the Lakers 9-2
win over Syracuse
THE ARMY ADVANTACE FUND.
BECAUSE S0LD!ERS DESERVE M0RE.
Ncw the Army cives ycu mcre chcices fcr ycur future. Earn up tc S40,000
tc start the business cf ycur dreams cr buy the hcme ycu aIways wanted.
Lcc cntc ccarmy.ccm/aaf tc Iearn mcre abcut the Army Advantace Fund.
©200S. Paid Ior by the United 5tates Army. All rights reserved.
THE ARMY ADVANTACE FUND.
BECAUSE S0LD!ERS DESERVE M0RE.
Ncw the Army cives ycu mcre chcices fcr ycur future. Earn up tc S40,000
tc start the business cf ycur dreams cr buy the hcme ycu aIways wanted.
Lcc cntc ccarmy.ccm/aaf tc Iearn mcre abcut the Army Advantace Fund.
©200S. Paid Ior by the United 5tates Army. All rights reserved.
SPORTS
Page 19 December 10, 2008
Wrestling takes fifth at PSAC Championship
As the host of the
66 Annual Pennsylvania
State Athletic Conference
Championships on December
6, the Mercyhurst College
wrestling team gave a strong
performance, finishing fifth as
a team with 60 points, out of
the 10 teams present.
With 173.5 points, Edinboro
University of Pennsylvania
earned its fourth consecutive
team title, becoming the first
team in over 50 years to win
more than three straight
trophies. While the Lakers’s
didn’t win the trophy, many
of the members performed
good.
Junior Andy Lamancusa
scored a fourth place finish at
157 lbs. after falling to Clarion
University’s Hadley Harrison
in the third place match.
Lamancusa led the Lakers
throughout the session.
While Lamancusa pulled off
a fourth place finish, it seemed
the team was destined to place
fifth.
At 125 pounds senior Payne
Lint finished in fifth place, as
did freshman Kevin Hardy at
174 lbs.
Wrestling at 133 pounds,
freshman Michael Baxter
ended in fifth too. So did
heavyweight senior Kenny
Bluska.
Edinboro’s Gregor Gillespie
won the distinction of a
three-time champion at the
tournament and was named
the tournament’s Outstanding
Wrestler for the second
consecutive year.
The Lakers will be back in
action this Friday, where they
will be grappling for victory
over rival, Gannon University.
The event will be held at the
Erie Civic Center at 6 p.m. and
will be sponsored by the Laker
Spirit Club as the Battle for
Erie—War at the Shore.
By Samantha Sellinger
Sports editor
Junior Andy Lamancusa,left, takes down Mitch Smith at the
PSAC Championship, he finished fourth in his weight class.
Scoot Williams photo
Senior Payne Lint finished fourth in his weight class at the
PSAC Championships held at Mercyhurst last Saturday.
Sports Information photo
HOUSES FOR RENT
Johnson & Johnson
Properties
Starting June 1, 2009
814-860-8817
100-mile challenge gets students in shape
With one of the best
turnouts for an Intramural
Program sponsored event in
Mercyhurst College history, the
100 Miles a Term Challenges
promises to help students stay
in shape this winter.
The program has 302
participants–students, faculty
and staff.
“The event should be open
to faculty and staff, in addition
to students, so all of the
Mercyhurst community could
reap the health benefits,”
said the Assistant Director of
Intramurals, Nola Hessom.
Those who complete
their 100-mile pledge in the
recreation center by running,
biking or any other exercise
they choose, will earn a t-shirt
to show off their achievement.
The idea was thought up by
the Vice President of Student
Affairs, Dr. Gerry Tobin, and
presented to the Intramural
Director, Joe Spano and
Hessom. Spano and Hessom
were both in immediate
support of the event.
Many students suffer various
forms of winter depression
and the program serves as a
weapon against it.
“Dr. Tobin thought it would
be a good way to get students
moving and endorphins
flowing,” Hessom said. In the
past, the Intramural Program
has had difficulty promoting
events, but after sending out a
mass e-mail to the Mercyhurst
community, it would prove to
be the most popular intramural
event ever.
After an hour of sending
out the e-mail, Hessom had
signed up 40 participants. By
the end of the deadline, there
were people still asking to
participate.
“Being able to send
promotional e-mails directly
out to the potential activity
participants, especially the
students, resulted in the
program becoming the most
successful intramural event
ever in campus history,”
Hessom said.
Since the program received
so much popularity for this
term, Hessom and Spano have
decided to run the event

By Samantha Sellinger
Sports editor
again in the spring.
For those that found the
challenge not challenging
enough, they would also like
to offer a 200-Mile a Term
Challenge.
Tyler Stauffer photo
Caption on page 17
Laker Sports
Picking up
steam
Women’s hockey wins seven in a row
<< Page 16