and you could!

Vol.82, No.21/4.22.09/Free
Merciad
Read more on
Want to dance with
the Bad Boys of Dance
Submit your video online
Dance Off
big
bad
and win $500, too?
Page 8
NEWS Page 2 April 22, 2009
Students walk for Hanson brothers’ AIDS cause
The members of the band
Hanson are no longer just known
for their long hair and their song
“Mmm Bop.” Now, the Hanson
brothers have formed an orga-
nization fighting poverty, HIV
and AIDS in Africa called Take
The Walk.
On Saturday, Apr. 18, Mercy-
hurst College students walked a
mile around campus as part of
Take The Walk.
For each student who walked,
the organization donated one
dollar to help the impoverished
people of Africa. Participants
chose their dollar to go toward
access to medical care, medical
treatment, shoes, clean water or
education.
The appeal of Take The Walk
is that people are able to donate,
but they do not have to pay with
their own money in order to
support the cause, co-president
of Art Therapy Club sopho-
more Casey Harvilla said. Har-
villa organized the event.
Some of the students chose
not to wear shoes while they
walked the mile.
Harvilla explained this was
because the walk is designed
to help the AIDS epidemic in
Africa. The purpose is to walk
a mile in the shoes of an Afri-
can who is suffering from dis-
ease, but many people in Africa
do not own shoes. Therefore,
participants are able to have a
better understanding if they
walk barefoot.
“I was really glad about how
everything went,” Harvilla said.
About 35 students partici-
pated in the walk.
“I think it was good that we
raised 35 dollars by just walk-
ing a mile,” freshman Elizabeth
Bailey said. “I hope people real-
ize that simple things can have a
big impact.”
After the walk, students used
art supplies to decorate a pair of
TOMS canvas shoes.
TOMS is an organization
that donates a pair of shoes to
a needy child for every pair of
shoes that is purchased from
them.
The walk and shoe decorating
was Art Therapy Club’s first big
event of the year, according to
Harvilla.
About 25 students are
involved in Art Therapy Club.
The club hopes to hold more
activities in the future including
a craft show and a T-shirt sale.
For more information about
Take The Walk and TOMS,
and to find out how you can
help, visit takethewalk.net and
TOMSshoes.com.
By Kelly Luoma
Staff writer
Dr. Robert Bullard spoke at Mercyhurst College on Monday,
Apr. 20. His discussion was the first event of this year’s
Earth Week.
Scoot Williams photo
Earth Day is Wednesday, Apr. 22, and to com-
memorate, Mercyhurst College is holding a week-
long celebration in its honor.
To begin the celebration, the ’Hurst hosted Dr.
Robert Bullard on Monday, Apr. 20.
Bullard is founder of the Environmental Justice
Movement and is currently a professor of sociol-
ogy at Clark Atlanta College.
He has written 14 books, some of which are
“Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class, and Environ-
mental Quality,” “Unequal Protection: Environ-
mental Justice and Communities of Color” and
“Confronting Environmental Racism: Voices
from the Grassroots.”
The topics of his books include environmental
racism, urban land use, housing, suburban sprawl,
transportation and smart growth.
In addition to a lecture Monday night in the
Taylor Little Theatre, there was a roundtable dis-
cussion in the Mercy Heritage Room earlier in the
afternoon.
Panelists included Bullard, Communication
Department Chair Dr. Anne Zaphiris, Assistant
Professor of Intelligence Studies Dr. Stephen
Marrin and Student President of the Green Team
Margaux Valenti.
After opening remarks from Dr. Jim Snyder,
assistant professor of philosophy, Bullard gave a
presentation that the other panelists responded to.
Popular discussion topics were the water in
cities, the proposed tire plant for Erie and envi-
ronmental justice.
Environmental justice is a “global movement,”
Bullard said.
Environmental injustice is very broad and can
range from placing landfills in poor communities
to providing low income communities with dirty
water.
Closing the discussion, Bullard said, “I think
it’s important to realize and recognize that stu-
dents have a lot of power. … Young people can
make a difference when they want to.”
The event was sponsored by Mercyhurst’s
Evelyn Lincoln Institute for Ethics and Society,
the Mercyhurst College Green Team and “Beyond
the Dream: The Legacy and Challenge of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.”
By Alaina Rydzewski
Staff writer
Bullard’s discussion begins Earth Week celebration
The Art Therapy Club at Mercyhurst College led a mile walk
on Saturday, Apr. 18, to help fight poverty, HIV and AIDS in
Africa.
Tyler Stauffer photo
NEWS
Page 3
April 22, 2009
The Seventh Annual Mercyhurst College Liter-
ary Festival brought poet, activist and professor,
Sonia Sanchez, on Thursday, Apr. 16.
Born Wilsonia Benita Driver, Sanchez has been
associated with the Black Arts Movement and has
written over 16 books of poetry, plays and chil-
dren’s books, including “Homecoming,” “Love
Poems,” “Autumn Blues,” “Under A Soprano Sky”
and “Shake Loose My Skin.”
She has taught at eight universities, lectured at
over 500 colleges and was the first to create and
teach a course based on Black Women and Litera-
ture in the U.S.
Some awards she has won include the P.E.N.
Writing Award, the National Education Associa-
tion Award, the Lucretia Mott Award and the Gov-
ernor’s Award for Excellence.
She is known for her innovative joining of musi-
cal formats and traditional poetic formats like haiku
and tanka, and she tends to use incorrect spelling to
get her point across.
She is currently poet-in-residence at Temple
University, but has read her poetry in countries like
Cuba, Nicaragua, China and Canada, and on conti-
nents like Europe, Australia and Africa.
On Thursday, Sanchez held a writing workshop
and, she gave a speech in the Taylor Little Theatre
entitled, “Reflections on the Legacy of Martin
Luther King Jr.”
She opened her talk by naming people who have
made a difference in this world, such as Albert Ein-
stein, Barack Obama, Martin Luther King Jr. and
Gandhi.
Her speech encompassed the issues of racism,
militarism, abuse, peace and equal rights for all
people.
She read some of her poetry, including this line:
“Gonna remember Martin Luther King, Gonna
work to make his dream come true.”
When asked what inspired her poetry, Sanchez
said “Everything … as long as you have eyes and
ears, can hear, see, taste and touch, you can write.”
Sophomore Liz Geist said she thought Sanchez’s
speech was really powerful.
Sanchez is “a great story teller, great poet and
fabulous reader,” Dr. Brian Reed of the English
department said. “She brought a political voice to
the college that we don’t always get presented.”
Her advice for aspiring writers is, “You must
read everything you can possibly read, open up
your senses to the world and discover and redis-
cover yourself. Open yourself to the world.”
The Literary Festival will continue Thursday,
Apr. 23, with Dr. Samuel Hazo.
By Alaina Rydzewski
Staff writer
Poet, activist Sonia Sanchez
reflects on legacy of MLK Jr.
’Hurst defeats Harvard, Princeton
in RecycleMania competition
Mercyhurst College finished
12
th
in the national RecycleMania
competition.
By recycling 51.99 percent of
the college’s waste, Mercyhurst
beat 194 other schools in the
grand champion category.
“I was pleasantly surprised by
our performance. The dedica-
tion of the college community
as a whole, made the difference,”
Kenneth Stepherson, director of
the physical plant, said.
Mercyhurst took 19
th
in the
per capita classic competition by
averaging 31.58 pounds of cu-
mulative recyclables per person.
Overall, Mercyhurst recycled
164,989 pounds of waste. This
earned the college 84
th
place out
of almost 300 schools in the go-
rilla competition.
Mercyhurst will take part in
more categories in RecycleMania
2010.
“We will still be in the core
competition, but will branch into
targeted materials. We will build
on our success, as we have been
for over a decade,” Stepherson
said.
The winners of RecycleMa-
nia 2009 include California State
University, San Marcos in the
grand champion category and
McNeese State University in the
per capita classic.
Several colleges Mercy-
hurst beat include Tufts
University, Georgetown
University, Ithaca College
and Allegheny College.
“We beat out some top schools
and that is something to be proud
of. Tufts University is one of the
greenest schools often cited as
an example of a school to emu-
late in sustainable practices, and
we were ahead of them,” Green
Team President Margaux Valenti
said. “It isn’t often little Mercy-
hurst gets to say we did better
than Harvard and Princeton.”
By JoEllen Marsh
Managing editor
The woman who organized
Mercyhurst College’s first
Earth Day and helped found
the Green Team, Sister Maura
Smith, was presented with
the Mercyhurst Sustainability
Award Monday, Apr. 20.
Mercyhurst College President
Dr. Tom Gamble presented the
award.
“Mercyhurst is now emerging
as one of the top regional insti-
tutions with regard to sustain-
ability. Sister Maura Smith is ...
the individual most responsible
for this ongoing commitment
and the success and honor it
has brought to Mercyhurst,”
Gamble said.
The Sister Maura Smith
Peace Garden will be planted
this summer near the orchard.
“Sister Maura is indeed ‘the
heart and soul’ of environmen-
tal sustainability at Mercyhurst
College,“ Dr. Chris Magoc
said.
From Staff Reports
Mercyhurst College President Dr. Tom Gamble presented the
Sustainability Award to Sister Maura Smith.
Scoot Williams photo
Gamble presents award
for sustainability
Rent $1200 per month
plus utilities
Partially furnished
All appliances, including washer, dryer,
dishwasher, newer furance and central air
Call Jon Connole:
Days: 814-899-7602 ext. 314
Evening: 814-866-5102
Cell: 814-881-2087
Three-bedroom, 1,500 square
foot house for rent
Lease begins June 15
LESS THAN HALF A MILE FROM CAMPUS
NEWS
Page 4 April 22, 2009
What has been abolished
by 130 countries, is currently
served by 226 people in Pennsyl-
vania, was reinstated in the U.S.
in 1976 and is practiced more
often in China, the U.S., Iran
and Pakistan than in any other
countries?
The answer is the death pen-
alty, which is one of the most
discussed topics in the U.S.
Sister Helen Prejean, a sister
of St. Joseph of Medaille, is an
advocate for the abolition of the
death penalty.
Last week Mercyhurst Col-
lege hosted events centered on
Prejean and her beliefs.
The events included a dinner
and discussion and an afternoon
tea session. After these events,
Prejean gave a lecture inspired
by her book and movie, “Dead
Man Walking.”
The book is based on her
experiences with death row
inmates.
On Tuesday, Apr. 14, a dinner
and discussion hosted by Greg
Baker of Campus Ministry was
held.
Students watched “Dead Man
Walking” and listened to discus-
sions from different points of
view of the death penalty.
Three speakers took the po-
dium throughout the movie:
a lawyer who talked about the
legal aspect, a professor from
Mercyhurst who talked about
the humanity aspect and a nun
who works at a women’s prison
who talked about giving inmates
dignity.
Approximately 65 people,
including students, professors
and Erie citizens attended the
event to get an overview of
the movie in preparation for
Prejean’s speech the follow-
ing day.
On Wednesday, Apr. 15,
Prejean joined a group of stu-
dents in the faculty dining room
to answer any personal questions
they had about her life, work and
experience.
Dr. Thomas Forsthoefel, chair
of the religious studies depart-
ment, brought Prejean to the
college, because “She’s an im-
portant model of someone who
has allowed the gospel values to
shape her vision and identity and
is a good example of a thought-
ful, prayerful way of being in the
world and therefore inspiring.”
After the tea that night, Prejean
gave a lecture in Walker Recital
Hall about her experiences.
Every seat in the hall was
filled and there was standing
room only.
Freshman Megan McKelvey
said she gained “an insight with
what some people do in their
life to make a huge difference
for society.”
Prejean has been a spiritual ad-
visor and witness to six convicts,
and she helps them maintain
their dignity, because without it
they are defenseless.
Prejean said that being on
death row is “not only physi-
cal torture, but also mental and
emotional torture. … it’s just
another mother who has to
bury her child, another funeral,
another grave.”
She asked the comprehensive
question about the death penalty
that everyone strives to answer:
Does the death penalty truly have
a capacity for redemption and
healing, or does it just further
traumatize the victim and his or
her family?
Prejean has led an active life.
She created charities such as
Survive, an organization de-
voted to providing counseling to
families and victims of violence,
served as the chairperson for the
National Coalition to Abolish the
Death Penalty from 1993-1995,
and won several awards, such
as the World Methodist Peace
Award, Peace Prize of the City
of Ypres and Pax Christi USA
Pope Paul VI Teacher of Peace
Award.
She has written two books,
“Dead Man Walking” and “The
Death of Innocents.”
Freshman Kelly Craig said
she believes Sister Prejean has
“found her true calling. … The
dedication that she has to help-
ing others despite the debate and
criticism from many inside and
outside of the Church is quite
remarkable.”
Prejean continues her work to
have the death penalty abolished,
and is currently writing her third
book, “River of Fire: My Spiri-
tual Journey to Death Row.”
To read more about Prejean and
her inspiring efforts, visit prejean.
org or americancatholic.org.
By Alaina Rydzewski
Staff writer
Author of ‘Dead Man Walking’ discusses death penalty debate
Sister Helen Prejean came to Mercyhurst College to speak
about her book and movie, “Dead Man Walking.”
Tyler Stauffer photo
Mercyhurst IT Department
Resident Technician postition available
Payment of $2000
Fall 2009
Applications available on lakernet
Theft from vehicle
Saturday, April 4
Disorderly conduct
Friday, April 3
Lewis Avenue
Closed
April 3 - 11 2009
Mercyhurst College
Parking Lot 15
Closed
Mercy Suites
Erie Police detectives are investigating.
No other information has been released.
Audrey Hirt Center
Continued investigation
Baldwin Hall
Continued investigation
Egan Cafeteria
Continued investigation
Burglary
Saturday, April 11
Burglary
Friday, April 10
Theft
Wednesday, April 8
Forcible Sexual Assault
Sunday, April 5
NEWS
Page 4 April 22, 2009
What has been abolished
by 130 countries, is currently
served by 226 people in Pennsyl-
vania, was reinstated in the U.S.
in 1976 and is practiced more
often in China, the U.S., Iran
and Pakistan than in any other
countries?
The answer is the death pen-
alty, which is one of the most
discussed topics in the U.S.
Sister Helen Prejean, a sister
of St. Joseph of Medaille, is an
advocate for the abolition of the
death penalty.
Last week Mercyhurst Col-
lege hosted events centered on
Prejean and her beliefs.
The events included a dinner
and discussion and an afternoon
tea session. After these events,
Prejean gave a lecture inspired
by her book and movie, “Dead
Man Walking.”
The book is based on her
experiences with death row
inmates.
On Tuesday, Apr. 14, a dinner
and discussion hosted by Greg
Baker of Campus Ministry was
held.
Students watched “Dead Man
Walking” and listened to discus-
sions from different points of
view of the death penalty.
Three speakers took the po-
dium throughout the movie:
a lawyer who talked about the
legal aspect, a professor from
Mercyhurst who talked about
the humanity aspect and a nun
who works at a women’s prison
who talked about giving inmates
dignity.
Approximately 65 people,
including students, professors
and Erie citizens attended the
event to get an overview of
the movie in preparation for
Prejean’s speech the follow-
ing day.
On Wednesday, Apr. 15,
Prejean joined a group of stu-
dents in the faculty dining room
to answer any personal questions
they had about her life, work and
experience.
Dr. Thomas Forsthoefel, chair
of the religious studies depart-
ment, brought Prejean to the
college, because “She’s an im-
portant model of someone who
has allowed the gospel values to
shape her vision and identity and
is a good example of a thought-
ful, prayerful way of being in the
world and therefore inspiring.”
After the tea that night, Prejean
gave a lecture in Walker Recital
Hall about her experiences.
Every seat in the hall was
filled and there was standing
room only.
Freshman Megan McKelvey
said she gained “an insight with
what some people do in their
life to make a huge difference
for society.”
Prejean has been a spiritual ad-
visor and witness to six convicts,
and she helps them maintain
their dignity, because without it
they are defenseless.
Prejean said that being on
death row is “not only physi-
cal torture, but also mental and
emotional torture. … it’s just
another mother who has to
bury her child, another funeral,
another grave.”
She asked the comprehensive
question about the death penalty
that everyone strives to answer:
Does the death penalty truly have
a capacity for redemption and
healing, or does it just further
traumatize the victim and his or
her family?
Prejean has led an active life.
She created charities such as
Survive, an organization de-
voted to providing counseling to
families and victims of violence,
served as the chairperson for the
National Coalition to Abolish the
Death Penalty from 1993-1995,
and won several awards, such
as the World Methodist Peace
Award, Peace Prize of the City
of Ypres and Pax Christi USA
Pope Paul VI Teacher of Peace
Award.
She has written two books,
“Dead Man Walking” and “The
Death of Innocents.”
Freshman Kelly Craig said
she believes Sister Prejean has
“found her true calling. … The
dedication that she has to help-
ing others despite the debate and
criticism from many inside and
outside of the Church is quite
remarkable.”
Prejean continues her work to
have the death penalty abolished,
and is currently writing her third
book, “River of Fire: My Spiri-
tual Journey to Death Row.”
To read more about Prejean and
her inspiring efforts, visit prejean.
org or americancatholic.org.
By Alaina Rydzewski
Staff writer
Author of ‘Dead Man Walking’ discusses death penalty debate
Sister Helen Prejean came to Mercyhurst College to speak
about her book and movie, “Dead Man Walking.”
Tyler Stauffer photo
Mercyhurst IT Department
Resident Technician postition available
Payment of $2000
Fall 2009
Applications available on lakernet
Theft from vehicle
Saturday, April 4
Disorderly conduct
Friday, April 3
Lewis Avenue
Closed
April 3 - 11 2009
Mercyhurst College
Parking Lot 15
Closed
Mercy Suites
Erie Police detectives are investigating.
No other information has been released.
Audrey Hirt Center
Continued investigation
Baldwin Hall
Continued investigation
Egan Cafeteria
Continued investigation
Burglary
Saturday, April 11
Burglary
Friday, April 10
Theft
Wednesday, April 8
Forcible Sexual Assault
Sunday, April 5
FEATURES
Page 5 April 22, 2009
Dr. Jeremy Brown, President One of the 14 universities in Pennsylvania’s State Systemof Higher Education
School of Graduate Studies
Great things happen here!
1-888-845-2890
www.edinboro.edu
Congratulations!
G
rad
uates
Planning on continuing your education? We can help!
HIGHQUALITY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMINGANDCONVENIENT CLASSES
NATIONALLY ACCREDITED• NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED
...Plus, Teacher Certification in 20 areas.
• Master of Science
Biology
Educational Specialist
in School Psychology
• Master of Social Work
Master of Arts •
Communication Studies
Counseling
Space is still available: Online Programs
• Master of Education
Art Education
Early Childhood
Educational Leadership
Educational Psychology
Middle & Secondary Instruction
Reading
Special Education
There are a series of Web
sites we view daily.
For some it might be espn.com
while others prefer cnn.com,
and who can resist checking for
updates on Facebook.
Now there is another site
to check daily and it’s called
fmylife.com.
The Web site is like an online
confessional for people to
explain a bad situation and read
others’ bad experiences.
FMyLife introduces itself as
“a space where you can let it all
out and unwind by sharing the
little things that screw with your
day.”
Some entries make you
thankful you aren’t the one
writing it.
For example, “Today, I woke
up with really dry, chapped lips.
Still in bed, without my glasses
on, I sleepily reached down into
my purse for some ChapStick
and applied it. Upon awakening
later I realized I had mistaken a
mini Sharpie permanent marker
for chapstick. I have a job
interview today. FML.”
Other entries are just outright
funny: “Today, I went to a
cosmetic dentist and got a chip
in my tooth filled in that I’d had
since I was 7. I went out later and
my friend jokingly hit my head
against the table a few times to
make fun of me showing off
my teeth. He slipped. I fell. I
now have 2 chipped teeth and a
broken nose. FML.”
While there are others that
we can all relate to: “Today, I
bought a brand new flat screen
TV. When I brought it home it
didn’t work. Furious, I walked
into Best Buy and yelled at a
guy in a tucked in blue polo and
khakis. I asked him why it didn’t
work and he said he didn’t know.
I kept screaming. He didn’t have
a nametag. He didn’t work there.
FML.”
These are just two of the
millions of often embarrassing
and hilarious situations that are
constantly being posted on the
site.
“I think it’s good in two ways.
First it gives people an outlet
to blow off some steam for
something bad that happened in
their day, and second as you read
them you see that you aren’t the
only one with problems going
on,” senior Matt Wallenhorst
said.
“I go to the Web site almost
everyday. It’s like my new
addiction. I think it is so funny,”
junior Kelsey Gordon said.
Many other Mercyhurst
College students visit the site
to lift their spirits on a bad day
or just to take a break from
studying.
“I visit the Web site every
couple of days, just to catch up
and see what’s being written. But
my friend Margaret is religious
about it and checks it probably
three times a day,” sophomore
Laura McCarty said.
“I think it’s so popular,
because it is fun to relate to
other people’s bad experiences
and it also gives you a good
laugh,” she added.
There are some students who
don’t like this site.
“I’ve heard of the Web site
before because of facebook but
never really viewed it. At first,
I thought it was real funny, the
whole “fml” saying, then it got
over-used and annoying. […]
most of them are probably
made up. I don’t think it’s so
hilarious anymore,” sophomore
Kristen Ribelli said.
But like Facebook, FMyLife
is becoming another site you
cannot keep away from.
Love it or hate it, the impulse
to check updates is too great to
ignore.
So while you’re surfing the
Web check out fmylife.com or
go to facebook and add FMyLife
as a fan page or application.
By Andrea Conlon
Contributing writer
FML – Brightening our day through others’ misfortune
FEATURES
Page 6
April 22, 2009
Lunch $ 5
11:30 a.m. -8 p.m.
Lunch $ 5
Broccoli & Cheddar Bites
6” Sub $4 Combo $5
Make any sub a wrap for
no extra charge!
Wrap Combo- Veggie $5
Other Wraps $4
M
T
W
TH
F
Southwest Burger
Breakfast Sandwich
Sizzle Salad
Taco Salad
Goulash
Laker Burger
M
T
W
TH
F
Chicken Parm w/ Pasta
Philly Wrap
Gen Tso’s Chix or Tofu
Pierogies
Buffalo Popcorn Chicken
Chicken Bacon Swiss
S
Potato Bowl
Lunch $ 5
Mercyhurst College’s retail
management class, taught
by Jill Slomski, is getting real
world experience this spring
term.
The class has been assigned
to make a new business plan
for All Season’s Marketplace,
an indoor flea market located
behind the Millcreek Mall.
The Marketplace has
struggled with getting
their name out in the Erie
community and has asked the
retail class for help.
The store is owned by Dan
and Clara Strong and has been
open for about a year.
The business operates
Fridays and Saturdays 10 a.m.
– 8 p.m. and Sundays from 10
a.m. – 5 p.m.
The indoor flea market
includes a grocery store, food
court, art, jewelry, collectible
items, sports memorabilia,
gifts and hospital scrubs.
Slomski’s retail class is in
charge of making the store
known in hopes of boosting
its sales.
The class is in charge of
advertising, public relations,
designing a new Web site,
outside signage, looking at
competitors and trying to find
a new accountant.
They are in charge of making
a new contract for vendors,
making new brochures and
hiring a manager and intern.
Senior Katie Waldin said
she enjoys the idea of helping
All Season’s Marketplace and
the fact that this gives her the
experience of working in a
real-life setting.
“The All Season’s Market
Place is a great location with
a great idea; it is just a little
rough around the edges when
it comes to getting everything
organized,” Waldin said.
“With our class’ help I think
that we really can make the All
Season’s Market a successful
and well known business in the
Erie community,” she added.
Juniors Connie Morrison
and Mary Vuono said they also
like the project.
“I think the idea of an indoor
flea market is interesting, but it
is going to take a lot of work
on both their part and our’s
to get the business off the
ground and to be successful,”
Morrison said.
Vuono said he likes working
for All Season’s Market.
“It gives us experience
for the real world with
troubles that businesses are
going through with the bad
economy,” he said.
By Jenna Golden
Contributing writer
Spring term experience with All Season’s Market
All Season’s Market is located behind the Millcreek Mall and
includes a grocery store, food court and sports memorabilia.
Jenna Golden photo
FEATURES
Page 7 April 22, 2009
When buying from chain stores, only 4
cents of every dollar gets reinvested into
our community.
When buying from local businesses
instead, 40 cents of that same dollar gets
invested back into the community.
Local Motion is a local organization
trying to get Erie citizens to shop in local
businesses instead of chain stores in
order to keep the money in Erie, Pa.
Though non-partisan, this grassroots
organization came out of the Erie For
Obama Group which identified three
major local needs: small business support
(the most pressing issue), health care and
investment in youth.
Local Motion is trying to address the
first issue by networking small businesses
together in order to create awareness and
expand business.
Bob Merski, member of Local Motion,
said the group wants to help businesses
“owned and operated by people who
live and have invested in the Erie area
and that, at the same time, do not have
advertising or marketing backup.”
At one of their meetings, members
voted on the name “Local Motion” and
the tag-line: “Get into your neighbor’s
business!”
For their logo, Local Motion has
turned to Mercyhurst College for help.
Merski, a Mercyhurst alumnus,
contacted graphic design professor Jodi
Staniunas-Hopper for assistance.
Students in her Intro. to Graphic
Design class have the task of creating a
logo for Local Motion and the chance to
work on a real life project that will greatly
impact the Erie community.
“I enjoyed working on a project
for an organization whose purpose I
supported,” senior Grigoriy Grigoryan
said.
Sophomore Stacey Allen said she has
enjoyed this challenge as well.
“I feel like it’s a good opportunity. It’s
fun, but a lot more work than I thought
it was going to be,” she said.
Other big cities around the country
are also trying to increase small, local
business support.
Ithaca, N.Y., for example, started
printing local currency to promote
shopping in town.
People and businesses can buy this
currency or receive it in exchange for
community service, and then spend it at
locally owned business.
Local Motion is aware of these
initiatives and has thought of ways of
integrating them into Erie.
“One idea being discussed is a ‘local
restaurant week’ like they have in bigger
cities, with a flat price for a three or four
course meal at any participating fine
dining restaurant,” Merski said.
Since the group started, the Local
Motion team has met once a month
at Matthew’s Trattoria, but due to its
closure the group is looking for a new
place to meet.
This restaurant was one of the original
businesses to sign on to the project but
closed at the end of April due to an
increase in rent that Cindy Sarback, the
owner, was not able to afford based on
the current customer rate.
Merski said Sarback “never understood
why people will wait 45 minutes to eat at
a chain restaurant on Peach Street when
they can have a fresh meal with little to
no wait at a local restaurant.”
The Local Motion core team includes
union organizer Lisa Stark, Erie Public
School teacher and community organizer
Bob Merski, Cindy Sarback, marketing
professional David VanAmburg, and
Michael Mahler and Cathi Zelanzy from
the Erie County Democratic Party.
Merski said he believes Local Motion
has a lot of potential for development in
the future.
Having stickers on window displays of
locally owned businesses so customers
can identify them more easily is another
idea.
If you want to be part of this movement
and support Erie’s local businesses head
over to one of the businesses listed
below and look out for others that will
be joining soon.
– Erie Book Store (137 East 13th St.)
– Nickel Plate Mills (1932 Parade St.)
– Chameleon Clothing Co. (2608 W
8th St.)
– Manus’ Sunoco (26 E 12th St.)
– Kraus’ Department Store (810 Parade
St.)
– Latino’s Restaurant (1313 Parade St.)
– East Erie Turners Club (829 Parade
St.)
– Whole Foods Co-Op (1341 W 26th St.
# 100)
– Russo Pediatrics (3910 Caughey Rd #
170)
By Javi Cubillos
Features editor
Local Motion drums up business in Erie
Kraus’ is a local department store joining Local Motion. The store has been
around for more than 100 years.
Scoot Williams photo
Latino’s Restaurant serves authentic Mexican food and it’s owned by the
Reyes, a family that emigrated from Mexico to Erie.
Scoot Williams photo
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
Page 8 April 22, 2009
Big bad dance-off to put people on stage in PAC
So you think you can dance?
The Mary D’Angelo Perform-
ing Arts Center, in conjunction
with Highmark Blue Cross/Blue
Shield and goerie.com, wants to
put you to the test.
The groups are sponsoring
a contest coordinated with the
appearance of the Bad Boys of
Dance in the PAC on Saturday,
May 16, at 8 p.m.
Contestants can upload one to
three minutes of their best origi-
nal dance moves in any style until
12 a.m. on Tuesday, Apr. 28.
Voting will begin that day by
registered users of goerie.com.
They will be voting on the most
original and creative entry. Voting
will last until Friday, May 8.
On Saturday, May 9, the top
five entries will be notified, and
there will be an audition by these
groups in front of three local
dance professionals.
The winner will then be
announced on Thursday, May
14, and the winning individual or
group will receive $500 and the
chance to perform on stage with
the Bad Boys of Dance.
For a full list of rules and regu-
lations, see goerie.com/danceoff.
“I think holding events like this
helps form a really good connec-
tion between [the PAC] and the
students, not to mention they win
$500,” Assistant Marketing Man-
ager Michelle Ellia said.
“I see this contest as a really
great opportunity to prepare for
possible auditions with the Bad
Boys of Dance company,” junior
dance major Trevor Sones said.
“This contest seems like a really
good learning experience, espe-
cially for whoever is chosen as the
winner.”
Ellia also looks forward to
the reception of the company
on campus. “Because [The Bad
Boys of Dance] combine hip
hop and ballet and swing, I think
they make dance more relat-
able to the average person. Not
only are they incredible athletes,
they’re funny and entertaining
and they put on a good show,”
she said.
Tickets for the Bad Boys of
Dance are available at the PAC
box office. It is likely the show will
sell out before the night of the
performance. Tickets are $35 for
adults, $30 for seniors, students
and President’s Card holders.
Tickets for youth and Mercyhurst
students with ID are $15.
By Kyle King
A & E editor
Bruce Marks holds residency in dance department
In preparation for the performance
of “Giselle” on May 2 and 3, the dance
department invited noted dance expert
Bruce Marks to assist in the rehearsal
process.
From Apr. 14-18, Marks was in resi-
dence within the department, dealing
greatly with rehearsal of the pantomime
and pas de deux work in “Giselle,” while
also instructing the cast as a whole.
Senior Elizabeth Clain-Stefanelli, who
will perform the female role in the peas-
ant pas de deux, also had the opportunity
to work closely with Marks.
“He was very inspiring, especially in
his ability to create a character. When
Mr. Marks instructed, every part of the
movement had an emotion behind it.
We were dancing to express, not just to
move. Even the way that he would emote
a girl’s character during explanations was
amazing,” she said.
Throughout his 55-year career, Marks
has worked as a dancer, choreographer
and ballet director.
“It was inspirational to work with such
an established figure in the dance world.
He helped a lot with the pantomime, as
well as with breath and artistry within the
dancing,” junior Erin Alarcon, who will
dance the leading role of Giselle in the
afternoon performances, said.
Having grown up in Brooklyn, Marks
studied at the High School of Perform-
ing Arts in New York and later at the Juil-
liard School.
Though he studied mainly modern
while in school, Marks is noted for having
made the unusual switch from modern
dance to ballet in spite of critics’ remarks
that he was really a “modern dancer.”
He began his formal career in 1956
with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet and
went on to dance at many distinguished
companies like the American Ballet The-
atre and the Royal Danish Ballet.
He served as a director at establish-
ments such as Utah Civic Ballet (now
Ballet West), Boston Ballet and Orlando
Ballet.
“Mr. Marks was a great teacher and
mentor for me. I have many fond memo-
ries of our time together,” Dance Chair
Tauna Hunter, who knew Marks from
having worked with him during her pro-
fessional dance career, said.
While in residence and running
rehearsals at Mercyhurst College, Marks
taught class for the dance majors and a
Saturday master class through the Erie
Dance Consortium.
The department held a lecture during
which Marks spoke about his dance
career and his outlook on dance. Both
in the lecture and during classes, Marks
relayed many interesting and often amus-
ing stories from his past in the dance
field.
In addition, Marks set some of his
own choreography on a few Mercyhurst
students who will present this work next
year.
Senior Nora Beckenstein, who will
also appear in the peasant pas de deux
said, “It was incredible to work with Mr.
Marks and he has such a wealth of infor-
mation. He really showed us all what it
means to dance.”
By Sarah Mastrocola
Staff writer
Bruce Marks held a residency in the
dance department from Apr. 14-18.
Dance department photo
Entries for The Big Bad Danceoff can be submitted until 12 a.m.
on Tuesday, Apr. 28.
pac.mercyhurst.edu
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
Page 8 April 22, 2009
Big bad dance-off to put people on stage in PAC
So you think you can dance?
The Mary D’Angelo Perform-
ing Arts Center, in conjunction
with Highmark Blue Cross/Blue
Shield and goerie.com, wants to
put you to the test.
The groups are sponsoring
a contest coordinated with the
appearance of the Bad Boys of
Dance in the PAC on Saturday,
May 16, at 8 p.m.
Contestants can upload one to
three minutes of their best origi-
nal dance moves in any style until
12 a.m. on Tuesday, Apr. 28.
Voting will begin that day by
registered users of goerie.com.
They will be voting on the most
original and creative entry. Voting
will last until Friday, May 8.
On Saturday, May 9, the top
five entries will be notified, and
there will be an audition by these
groups in front of three local
dance professionals.
The winner will then be
announced on Thursday, May
14, and the winning individual or
group will receive $500 and the
chance to perform on stage with
the Bad Boys of Dance.
For a full list of rules and regu-
lations, see goerie.com/danceoff.
“I think holding events like this
helps form a really good connec-
tion between [the PAC] and the
students, not to mention they win
$500,” Assistant Marketing Man-
ager Michelle Ellia said.
“I see this contest as a really
great opportunity to prepare for
possible auditions with the Bad
Boys of Dance company,” junior
dance major Trevor Sones said.
“This contest seems like a really
good learning experience, espe-
cially for whoever is chosen as the
winner.”
Ellia also looks forward to
the reception of the company
on campus. “Because [The Bad
Boys of Dance] combine hip
hop and ballet and swing, I think
they make dance more relat-
able to the average person. Not
only are they incredible athletes,
they’re funny and entertaining
and they put on a good show,”
she said.
Tickets for the Bad Boys of
Dance are available at the PAC
box office. It is likely the show will
sell out before the night of the
performance. Tickets are $35 for
adults, $30 for seniors, students
and President’s Card holders.
Tickets for youth and Mercyhurst
students with ID are $15.
By Kyle King
A & E editor
Bruce Marks holds residency in dance department
In preparation for the performance
of “Giselle” on May 2 and 3, the dance
department invited noted dance expert
Bruce Marks to assist in the rehearsal
process.
From Apr. 14-18, Marks was in resi-
dence within the department, dealing
greatly with rehearsal of the pantomime
and pas de deux work in “Giselle,” while
also instructing the cast as a whole.
Senior Elizabeth Clain-Stefanelli, who
will perform the female role in the peas-
ant pas de deux, also had the opportunity
to work closely with Marks.
“He was very inspiring, especially in
his ability to create a character. When
Mr. Marks instructed, every part of the
movement had an emotion behind it.
We were dancing to express, not just to
move. Even the way that he would emote
a girl’s character during explanations was
amazing,” she said.
Throughout his 55-year career, Marks
has worked as a dancer, choreographer
and ballet director.
“It was inspirational to work with such
an established figure in the dance world.
He helped a lot with the pantomime, as
well as with breath and artistry within the
dancing,” junior Erin Alarcon, who will
dance the leading role of Giselle in the
afternoon performances, said.
Having grown up in Brooklyn, Marks
studied at the High School of Perform-
ing Arts in New York and later at the Juil-
liard School.
Though he studied mainly modern
while in school, Marks is noted for having
made the unusual switch from modern
dance to ballet in spite of critics’ remarks
that he was really a “modern dancer.”
He began his formal career in 1956
with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet and
went on to dance at many distinguished
companies like the American Ballet The-
atre and the Royal Danish Ballet.
He served as a director at establish-
ments such as Utah Civic Ballet (now
Ballet West), Boston Ballet and Orlando
Ballet.
“Mr. Marks was a great teacher and
mentor for me. I have many fond memo-
ries of our time together,” Dance Chair
Tauna Hunter, who knew Marks from
having worked with him during her pro-
fessional dance career, said.
While in residence and running
rehearsals at Mercyhurst College, Marks
taught class for the dance majors and a
Saturday master class through the Erie
Dance Consortium.
The department held a lecture during
which Marks spoke about his dance
career and his outlook on dance. Both
in the lecture and during classes, Marks
relayed many interesting and often amus-
ing stories from his past in the dance
field.
In addition, Marks set some of his
own choreography on a few Mercyhurst
students who will present this work next
year.
Senior Nora Beckenstein, who will
also appear in the peasant pas de deux
said, “It was incredible to work with Mr.
Marks and he has such a wealth of infor-
mation. He really showed us all what it
means to dance.”
By Sarah Mastrocola
Staff writer
Bruce Marks held a residency in the
dance department from Apr. 14-18.
Dance department photo
Entries for The Big Bad Danceoff can be submitted until 12 a.m.
on Tuesday, Apr. 28.
pac.mercyhurst.edu
Mercyhurst College will be presenting
a multimedia performance created using
original composition, video footage
and a narration of Leo Tolstoy’s “How
Much Land Does a Man Need?”
The project leader, mandolin virtuoso
Jamie Masefield, will perform at Mer-
cyhurst on Earth Day, Wednesday, Apr.
22, with three fellow musicians. They
call themselves The Jazz Mandolin Proj-
ect.
Since their debut performances in
Vermont coffee houses in 1993, the
Jazz Mandolin Project has released six
critically acclaimed albums and has been
invited to play at famous musical festi-
vals such as Bonnaroo.
Masefield has opened a new chapter
to the Jazz Mandolin Project by weaving
different media.
He spent months on the road trav-
eling through America on tour. While
going from gig to gig,
He captured a wide variety of Ameri-
can landscapes on film.
Elena Pankratov, a professor of Rus-
sian Literature, will be reading Tolstoy’s
“How Much Land Does a Man Need?”
Her voice will be woven into the per-
formance with the music produced by
the Jazz Mandolin Project while the dis-
play of Jamie’s footage rolls.
Masefield said that his goal was “not
be too overbearing with the music,
but to really allow the narrator tell the
story, and to support the narration of
the story with music that really fit the
moment.”
Phish’s Mike Gordon described
the multimedia performance as being
“brought on an adventure in a way that
you couldn’t with just one of the ele-
ments.”
Other audience members after view-
ing the show described it as an “amaz-
ing experience” and “an ideal beginning
for a new chapter to The Jazz Mandolin
Project.”
The show will begin at 7:30 p.m. at
the Mary D’Angelo Performing Arts
Center.
Tickets are available at the PAC box
office. Mercyhurst students with ID can
obtain tickets for $10.
April is National Poetry
Month.
Usually in high school this
means students dig out their
dusty editions of Frost, Dickin-
son and Whitman.
Erie County decided to go
down a road less traveled.
On Apr. 6, the County of
Erie unveiled the Erie County
Poet Laureate Initiative.
The Poet Laureate Initiative is
a means by which the commu-
nity will be exposed to excep-
tional poetry and can appreciate
the art form within the commu-
nity.
A partnering of the academic
community in the area and local
government, the Poet Laureate
Committee has been working on
the project for nearly a year with
members of County Council.
Representatives on the Poet
Laureate Committee include
faculty from all local higher edu-
cation institutions, a representa-
tive of the Erie School District,
a contributor to the City of Erie
poetry program and other local
government and media spokes-
people. Mercyhurst College’s
representative on the committee
is Greg Brown, lecturer in Eng-
lish and director of the college’s
Writing Center.
The committee will select
a Poet Laureate Jury of five
people, who will review appli-
cations for the post of Erie
County Poet Laureate.
Three of the jury members
will come from the committee,
and two other jurors will come
from the community at large.
According to the committee’s
press release, requirements for
the post of Poet Laureate include
residence within the county;
having work published in liter-
ary journals, books, anthologies
or other media; contribution to
the region’s poetry community;
comfort with public presenta-
tion and interaction; and a goal
to contribute to the history of
poetry in Erie County and to
foster the appreciation of verse
across the community.
The Poet Laureate will serve
a one-year term from Sept. 1 to
Aug. 31, renewable up to twice.
The Laureate will receive a
$3,000 honorarium and a $7,000
approved budget for a commu-
nity poetry outreach project, an
itemized budget of which must
be provided in the application
process.
For those seeking further
information with regard to the
project, please see eriecounty-
gov.org. Applications are due
June 1.
“This is a tremendous oppor-
tunity for the community,”
Brown said. “There are Poet
Laureates in some countries,
and even in major cities like
New York and San Francisco.
For Erie County to be able to
create a position like this, with
an honorarium and $7,000 dedi-
cated to a community poetry
outreach project, shows how
important poetry is to this
community.”
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
Page 9 April 22, 2009
HOUSES FOR RENT
Johnson & Johnson
Properties
Starting June 1, 2009
814-860-8817
Jazz Mandolin Project headlines Earth Week
By Jeremy Mando
Contributing Writer
Erie County announces Poet Laureate Initiative
By Kyle King
A & E editor
The Jazz Mandolin Project will perform at the ’Hurst on Wednesday,
Apr. 22.
pac.mercyhurst.edu
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
Page 10 April 22, 2009
Dance department features student work
The Mercyhurst Dance
Department will present two
original contemporary pieces
choreographed by senior dance
majors at the Mary D’Angelo
Performing Arts Center on
Sunday, April 26, at 7 p.m.
Caitlin Roberts and Justin
Hogan are enrolled in a special-
ized course designed to give
dance majors gifted in the cho-
reographic process the opportu-
nity to create a 30-minute piece
based on a completely origi-
nal idea while choosing music,
auditioning dancers, coordinat-
ing specific lighting designs and
publicizing their works to be
presented in a one-night perfor-
mance.
Roberts’ piece, titled “Psyche-
delica,” is about a surreal world
with a psychedelic flavor drawing
in young men entranced by tan-
talizing images of strong beauti-
ful women.
“Whenever I choreograph I
have to be inspired by the music,
and Hendrix always seems to
make me want to dance,” Rob-
erts said. “My initial intent and
hope is that the audience will
also be inspired by the music.”
Hogan has created a piece
titled “Stomping Ground,” with
music from several different art-
ists, including songs by Rufus
Wainwright and Béla Fleck and
the Flecktones.
Hogan has brought in profes-
sional dancer Dillon Anthony
from Dayton Ballet, who will be
performing as a guest artist.
“My piece deals with daily life
and the interactions between
people,” Hogan said. “I was espe-
cially interested in the behind-
the-scenes aspect of how people
communicate.”
The department is well-known
for fearlessly exploring eclectic
dance styles and producing a vari-
ety of different performances.
Tickets for both “Psychedel-
ica” and “Stomping Ground”
will be available Sunday after-
noon for general seating.
It is a free performance and
children are welcome.
By Kyle King
A & E editor
Graduate School at Mercyhurst College
POST BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATIONS:
- Accountlng
- Art Therapy
- Computer |nformatlon Systems
- Pashlon Merchandlslng
- Plnanclal Servlces
- Graphlc Deslgn
- Health Sclences / Pre-health
- Hospltallty Management
- Human Pesource Management
- Marketlng
- Small 8uslness Development
- wetlands Sclences
Become More.
MASTLP'S DLGPLLS:
- Admlnlstratlon of 1ustlce
- Anthropology
- Applled |ntelllgence
- Organlzatlonal Leadershlp
- Secondary Lducatlon: Pedagogy & Practlce
- Speclal Lducatlon
GPADUATL CLPT|P|CATLS:
- Lducatlonal Leadershlp
- Organlzatlonal Leadershlp
- Non-Proñt Management
- Admlnlstratlon of 1ustlce
Information Session
Great Room – Herrmann Student Union
Monday, May 4, 2009 - 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Come learn more about the graduate programs oered
at Mercyhurst. The graduate admissions team will
be available to answer your questions, assist with
applications and provide nancial aid information.
|ê14) ê14-11Iê · era6aate.merc¡harst.e6a
Department seniors to showcase own choreography
Mercyhurst dancers show-
case their own choreography.
Contributed photo
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
Page 10 April 22, 2009
Dance department features student work
The Mercyhurst Dance
Department will present two
original contemporary pieces
choreographed by senior dance
majors at the Mary D’Angelo
Performing Arts Center on
Sunday, April 26, at 7 p.m.
Caitlin Roberts and Justin
Hogan are enrolled in a special-
ized course designed to give
dance majors gifted in the cho-
reographic process the opportu-
nity to create a 30-minute piece
based on a completely origi-
nal idea while choosing music,
auditioning dancers, coordinat-
ing specific lighting designs and
publicizing their works to be
presented in a one-night perfor-
mance.
Roberts’ piece, titled “Psyche-
delica,” is about a surreal world
with a psychedelic flavor drawing
in young men entranced by tan-
talizing images of strong beauti-
ful women.
“Whenever I choreograph I
have to be inspired by the music,
and Hendrix always seems to
make me want to dance,” Rob-
erts said. “My initial intent and
hope is that the audience will
also be inspired by the music.”
Hogan has created a piece
titled “Stomping Ground,” with
music from several different art-
ists, including songs by Rufus
Wainwright and Béla Fleck and
the Flecktones.
Hogan has brought in profes-
sional dancer Dillon Anthony
from Dayton Ballet, who will be
performing as a guest artist.
“My piece deals with daily life
and the interactions between
people,” Hogan said. “I was espe-
cially interested in the behind-
the-scenes aspect of how people
communicate.”
The department is well-known
for fearlessly exploring eclectic
dance styles and producing a vari-
ety of different performances.
Tickets for both “Psychedel-
ica” and “Stomping Ground”
will be available Sunday after-
noon for general seating.
It is a free performance and
children are welcome.
By Kyle King
A & E editor
Graduate School at Mercyhurst College
POST BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATIONS:
- Accountlng
- Art Therapy
- Computer |nformatlon Systems
- Pashlon Merchandlslng
- Plnanclal Servlces
- Graphlc Deslgn
- Health Sclences / Pre-health
- Hospltallty Management
- Human Pesource Management
- Marketlng
- Small 8uslness Development
- wetlands Sclences
Become More.
MASTLP'S DLGPLLS:
- Admlnlstratlon of 1ustlce
- Anthropology
- Applled |ntelllgence
- Organlzatlonal Leadershlp
- Secondary Lducatlon: Pedagogy & Practlce
- Speclal Lducatlon
GPADUATL CLPT|P|CATLS:
- Lducatlonal Leadershlp
- Organlzatlonal Leadershlp
- Non-Proñt Management
- Admlnlstratlon of 1ustlce
Information Session
Great Room – Herrmann Student Union
Monday, May 4, 2009 - 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Come learn more about the graduate programs oered
at Mercyhurst. The graduate admissions team will
be available to answer your questions, assist with
applications and provide nancial aid information.
|ê14) ê14-11Iê · era6aate.merc¡harst.e6a
Department seniors to showcase own choreography
Mercyhurst dancers show-
case their own choreography.
Contributed photo
OPINION
Page 11
April 22, 2009
The views expressed in the opinion section of The Merciad do not necessarily reflect the views of Mercyhurst College, the staff of The Merciad
or the Catholic Church. Responses on any subject are always welcomed and can be e-mailed to opinionmerciad@mercyhurst.edu.
Where
readers
share their
thoughts.
It is really simple to be treated
like an adult. One must first act
like an adult.
The college stepping in [to
reprimand those damaging
McAuley Hall] is appropri-
ate. Mercyhurst College will
always be a business first. By
not allowing visitors to spe-
cific areas, they are protect-
ing their property. Maybe
the college should expel
these students. That would
be a much more appropriate
punishment for a real adult.
Jaramie Parrish, ’10
@mercyhurst.edu
editormerciad
mgeditormerciad
newsmerciad
featuremerciad
opinionmerciad
sportsmerciad
sportsmerciad
entertainmentmerciad
photomerciad
photomerciad
admerciad
copymerciad
apasto22
wwelch
bsheridan
The Merciad is the official student-produced newspaper of Mercyhurst
College. It is published throughout the school year, with the exception of
finals weeks. Our office is in Hirt, Room 120B. Our telephone number is
(814) 824-2376.
The Merciad welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be signed
and names will be included with the letters. Although we will not edit the
letters for content, we reserve the right to trim letters to fit. Letters
are due Mondays. by noon and may not be more than 300 words. Submit
letters to box PH 485 or via e-mail at opinionmerciad@mercyhurst.edu.
If you don’t want it printed . . . don’t let it happen.
Editors
Casey Greene
JoEllen Marsh
Amanda Valauri
Javi Cubillos
Heather Donovan
Brad Moehringer
Sam Sellinger
Kyle King
Scoot Williams
Tyler Stauffer
Caitlin Bly
Gretchen Yori
Ashley Pastor
Bill Welch
Brian Sheridan
Positions
Editor-in-Chief
Managing Editor
News Editor
Features Editor
Opinion Editor
Sports Editor
Sports Editor
A&E
Photographer
Photographer
Advertising Manager
Copy Editor
General Assignment
Adviser
Adviser
Stepping in was the only
thing the college did right in this
situation. The problem is the
action they took. No matter the
punishment, the fair thing was
to only punish the students who
violated the rules. The problems
happened after visitation hours,
so your theory is flawed. The
school’s concern should be
its students.
By Kelly Luoma
Staff writer
We’ve all heard the story of
Robin Hood, the noble thief,
who steals from the rich and
gives to the poor.
As children, this story is pre-
sented as a moral ideal. There
is a fatal flaw that could go a
long way toward shattering the
Robin Hood complex. The
biggest issue in “Robin Hood”
is never addressed. How the rich
acquired their wealth in the days
of Robin Hood was through
force, fraud and divine right. So
the origin of the wealth being
stolen by Robin Hood and redis-
tributed to the poor was moral.
The problem is there is no
distinction made in today’s soci-
ety between the origin of wealth
in Feudal Europe and the origin
of wealth in modern day. For
the first time in history, men
now create wealth with ability,
intelligence and perseverance.
Businessmen don’t vio-
late anyone’s rights in order
to become wealthy and all
of society benefit from
their achievements.
But children are never taught
this distinction and grow up
thinking wealth is a static entity
that has always existed. Also,
that modern day Robin Hoods
are moral in their actions of
“redistributing” wealth.
We need to stand up and
clearly denounce the Robin
Hood complex. It does not
apply to a country of self-made
men that earned their wealth by
right, not force.
We need to avoid our country
having leaders who consider it a
moral imperative to “redistrib-
ute” wealth.
By Thomas Kubica
Contributing writer
Have you ever had overdue
library materials? If so, you
know the hassle of paying the
20 cents per day, per item fine.
As a music student, I have to
listen to classical music, most
of which I get from the library
music collection.
I’ve never been great at turn-
ing materials in on time, but I
didn’t expect the time to go by
as quickly as it did.
All of a sudden I was faced
with an e-mail saying all 5 of the
CDs I had borrowed were each
5 days late.
Why did the library wait until
the materials were overdue to
notify me?
At public libraries, an auto-
mated system notifies you 5
days in advance, allowing you to
get the materials in.
In college where it’s required
to use the library, I don’t feel
such a high fine is fair.
By Alexandra Stacey
Contributing writer
Whoever is flipping the
benches over on campus is an
idiot. Is it that much fun?
When you are walking back
from the bar are you that much
of a macho man, you think it’s
cool to flip the benches over?
Heads up, it’s not. When you
wake up in the morning, is it
gratifying to walk around and
see what a beast you are?
Wow, you can push a bench
over. You are so strong; I am
just dying to hang out with you.
Not.
The same person flipping
benches is probably complain-
ing when tuition goes up and
ResLife makes new rules. If you
weren’t doing stupid things, new
rules and tuition increments
wouldn’t be necessary to fix your
moment of manliness mess.
It’s like a knock, knock joke.
It’s cute when you’re 5, but
when you’re 25 it isn’t funny.
It wasn’t funny, it’s not funny
and it’s not going to be funny.
By Seth
Hallam
Staff writer
Reader demands more
of students, Luoma
Luoma reiterates stance
Library fi nes add to
fi nancial frustration
Unnecessary vandalism
Shattering a fairy tale
September 3, 2008
OPINION
Page 12 April 22, 2009
Earth Week is upon us
and the Green Team has
a slew of events planned.
More importantly the week
falls in the heat of a nasty
fight between Erie residents
and ERE, a “renewable”
energy plant planning to
pollute the area for years
to come by burning tires.
There’s no better time to
fight for a greener Erie.
I realize not everyone
washes their jeans after
each use. But the salt rem-
nants on the cuffs of your
favorite blues have got to
go. One wash per season
is not to much to ask. On
that notoe, I understand the
urge to coax summer into
existence, but it’s not quite
short shorts and flips-flop
season yet ladies.
An intoxicated Erie Police
Department Patrolman,
James Cousins II, was vid-
eotaped at a Girard bar
making fun of a homicide
victim and his mother. The
department became in-
volved after the clip leaked
to YouTube. Real classy,
Erie.
Please e-mail any suggestions to
opinionmerciad@mercyhurst.edu.
The GB&U is a compilation of
student opinions.
Want to know how to save
money, breathe easier, increase
your lifespan?
Think life would be better if
the air smelled like roses and the
water tasted sweet and clean?
You can have all this and
more, just by helping the envi-
ronment.
Those benefits are real, but
it doesn’t always seem that easy.
Most of us like to say “people
should do this” and “the gov-
ernment should do that,” but
we don’t take responsibility
for our own actions. What are
you doing to
reduce pollu-
tion?
Do you
calculate how
much harm
you are doing
to the envi-
ronment? I don’t understand
why so many people take the
word of strangers in Washing-
ton, yet write their own neigh-
bors off as tree-huggers.
In 2006, the Center for Dis-
ease Control recommended that
millions of girls spend $375
each to receive a vaccination to
prevent cervical cancer, which
causes almost 4,000 deaths a
year. Air pollution kills 700,000
people each year and asthma
sends more children to the hos-
pital than any other illness, but I
don’t know many doctors who
prescribe their patients wind-
mills and solar panels.
There are scary facts out there
about environmental health
hazards. Have you heard them
from your doctor? Did you see
them on TV? Has anyone asked
you to buy products with the
sole purpose of cleaning up the
environment?
Our culture is so fear-based
and dependent on TV, insur-
ance companies, corporations
and the government to tell us
where our money is needed.
The wind and the sun don’t
have ad managers; the earth can’t
file a lawsuit. It’s up to us to be
stewards of the earth. If we do
not step up to this responsibil-
ity, there will be (and are) seri-
ous consequences.
These problems will have
effects in Africa where we can
ignore it, but it’s also here in
our faces (i.e. the tire-burning
plant).
I like to think that everyone
wants children to grown up with
clean air and drinking water, but
after listening to Robert Bull-
ard’s speech, I can’t let myself
believe that
anymore.
Someone
wants our
children to
live next to
refi neri es
and plants
that burn nerve gas; someone
wants schoolchildren in New
Orleans to play on arsenic-con-
taminated playgrounds; some-
one wants poor black kids to
suffer more than poor white
kids. We are damning hundreds
of thousands of our children in
this generation.
For those of us in college, our
kids will have a higher risk than
our little siblings. Think of your
reaction if someone walked up
to you and said, “I’m going to
kill your child at a young age. It’s
cheaper that way.”
This is what’s happening,
but it’s said in scientific terms.
I don’t know how many years
27 tons of volatile organic com-
pounds will take off my life, or
what percentage of 230 tons of
particulate matter will end up
on my sister’s playground, but I
don’t want to be forced to find
out. We have brilliant “green
thinkers” at Mercyhurst Col-
lege. Let’s listen to them.
By JoEllen Marsh
Staff writer
Happy Earth Week?
I see the Earth as sacred and
interconnected with various life,
including the omnipotent mari-
juana plant. But I won’t rant
about the healing powers of
ganja.
Even more dangerous than
our ignorance about the sha-
manistic plant of pot, is the lan-
guage we use to reference the
Earth.
By defining Earth as our
Mother, we have recreated the
mistake used by the patriarchs
in defining God as our Father.
These definitions are inher-
ently bias and limiting to the
discussion of what God and
Earth may mean in relation to
humans.
Sure the Earth has maternal
qualities, but those are not her
only attributes. God as Father
fails to highlight compassionate
sides of God. We only see Him
dishing out rewards and pun-
ishments with his omnipotent
judgment stealing our free will.
It is a shame we have created
a male/female dichotomy for
Earth and God, seemingly sepa-
rating the two based on the false
assumption that Earth and God
share our human experience.
I think this planet at higher
powers are done a disservice
when feeble minds attempt defi-
nitions.
I suppose the same people
believing this assumption
become afraid of both since
they curse the one and forsake
the other through ignorant
actions.
How could God and Earth be
both Father and Mother with no
recognized marriage, loved chil-
dren or shared home.
By Jerrod
Markle
Staff writer
The United Mexican States are
falling victim to the same finan-
cial crisis being felt worldwide
and they’re combating powerful
drug cartels simultaneously.
Besides the obvious difficulty
in waging a shooting war against
a country’s own citizens, Mexico
feels there is another part of the
conflict: guns from the U.S.
Some tallies say 90 percent of
the weapons seized in Mexico
are American. This is untrue.
The guns being catalogued
are indeed American, and the
people asserting the 90 percent
aren’t lying, they are merely being
disingenuous. Delegate Eleanor
Norton, went on CSPAN last
week touting this number and
claiming it is the lax gun control
policies of the U.S., allowing the
cartels to wage a war against the
Mexican government.
She forgot to mention, out
of all the guns seized in Mexico,
only the ones with American
markings are sent back to the
U.S. to be traced and 90 percent
of those weapons turn out to
be American. According to data
collected by John Lott Jr., these
American guns represent only
17 percent of all the guns seized
in the Mexican drug war.
Delegate Norton is not a bad
woman, trying to deprive Amer-
icans of their Second Amend-
ment rights, she’s just following
the pack mentality of media and
politics. I have no doubt she,
as a Democrat representative,
has nothing, but the best inten-
tions for her constituents and
the U.S., but the road to Hell is
paved with good intentions.
By Devin Ruic
Contributing writer
I’m going to kill your
child at a young age.
It’s cheaper that way.
JoEllen Marsh


Stepping up against
those stomping down
Seeking to unite
language dichotomy
Faux statistic threatens
Second Amendment
September 3, 2008
OPINION
Page 12 April 22, 2009
Earth Week is upon us
and the Green Team has
a slew of events planned.
More importantly the week
falls in the heat of a nasty
fight between Erie residents
and ERE, a “renewable”
energy plant planning to
pollute the area for years
to come by burning tires.
There’s no better time to
fight for a greener Erie.
I realize not everyone
washes their jeans after
each use. But the salt rem-
nants on the cuffs of your
favorite blues have got to
go. One wash per season
is not to much to ask. On
that notoe, I understand the
urge to coax summer into
existence, but it’s not quite
short shorts and flips-flop
season yet ladies.
An intoxicated Erie Police
Department Patrolman,
James Cousins II, was vid-
eotaped at a Girard bar
making fun of a homicide
victim and his mother. The
department became in-
volved after the clip leaked
to YouTube. Real classy,
Erie.
Please e-mail any suggestions to
opinionmerciad@mercyhurst.edu.
The GB&U is a compilation of
student opinions.
Want to know how to save
money, breathe easier, increase
your lifespan?
Think life would be better if
the air smelled like roses and the
water tasted sweet and clean?
You can have all this and
more, just by helping the envi-
ronment.
Those benefits are real, but
it doesn’t always seem that easy.
Most of us like to say “people
should do this” and “the gov-
ernment should do that,” but
we don’t take responsibility
for our own actions. What are
you doing to
reduce pollu-
tion?
Do you
calculate how
much harm
you are doing
to the envi-
ronment? I don’t understand
why so many people take the
word of strangers in Washing-
ton, yet write their own neigh-
bors off as tree-huggers.
In 2006, the Center for Dis-
ease Control recommended that
millions of girls spend $375
each to receive a vaccination to
prevent cervical cancer, which
causes almost 4,000 deaths a
year. Air pollution kills 700,000
people each year and asthma
sends more children to the hos-
pital than any other illness, but I
don’t know many doctors who
prescribe their patients wind-
mills and solar panels.
There are scary facts out there
about environmental health
hazards. Have you heard them
from your doctor? Did you see
them on TV? Has anyone asked
you to buy products with the
sole purpose of cleaning up the
environment?
Our culture is so fear-based
and dependent on TV, insur-
ance companies, corporations
and the government to tell us
where our money is needed.
The wind and the sun don’t
have ad managers; the earth can’t
file a lawsuit. It’s up to us to be
stewards of the earth. If we do
not step up to this responsibil-
ity, there will be (and are) seri-
ous consequences.
These problems will have
effects in Africa where we can
ignore it, but it’s also here in
our faces (i.e. the tire-burning
plant).
I like to think that everyone
wants children to grown up with
clean air and drinking water, but
after listening to Robert Bull-
ard’s speech, I can’t let myself
believe that
anymore.
Someone
wants our
children to
live next to
refi neri es
and plants
that burn nerve gas; someone
wants schoolchildren in New
Orleans to play on arsenic-con-
taminated playgrounds; some-
one wants poor black kids to
suffer more than poor white
kids. We are damning hundreds
of thousands of our children in
this generation.
For those of us in college, our
kids will have a higher risk than
our little siblings. Think of your
reaction if someone walked up
to you and said, “I’m going to
kill your child at a young age. It’s
cheaper that way.”
This is what’s happening,
but it’s said in scientific terms.
I don’t know how many years
27 tons of volatile organic com-
pounds will take off my life, or
what percentage of 230 tons of
particulate matter will end up
on my sister’s playground, but I
don’t want to be forced to find
out. We have brilliant “green
thinkers” at Mercyhurst Col-
lege. Let’s listen to them.
By JoEllen Marsh
Staff writer
Happy Earth Week?
I see the Earth as sacred and
interconnected with various life,
including the omnipotent mari-
juana plant. But I won’t rant
about the healing powers of
ganja.
Even more dangerous than
our ignorance about the sha-
manistic plant of pot, is the lan-
guage we use to reference the
Earth.
By defining Earth as our
Mother, we have recreated the
mistake used by the patriarchs
in defining God as our Father.
These definitions are inher-
ently bias and limiting to the
discussion of what God and
Earth may mean in relation to
humans.
Sure the Earth has maternal
qualities, but those are not her
only attributes. God as Father
fails to highlight compassionate
sides of God. We only see Him
dishing out rewards and pun-
ishments with his omnipotent
judgment stealing our free will.
It is a shame we have created
a male/female dichotomy for
Earth and God, seemingly sepa-
rating the two based on the false
assumption that Earth and God
share our human experience.
I think this planet at higher
powers are done a disservice
when feeble minds attempt defi-
nitions.
I suppose the same people
believing this assumption
become afraid of both since
they curse the one and forsake
the other through ignorant
actions.
How could God and Earth be
both Father and Mother with no
recognized marriage, loved chil-
dren or shared home.
By Jerrod
Markle
Staff writer
The United Mexican States are
falling victim to the same finan-
cial crisis being felt worldwide
and they’re combating powerful
drug cartels simultaneously.
Besides the obvious difficulty
in waging a shooting war against
a country’s own citizens, Mexico
feels there is another part of the
conflict: guns from the U.S.
Some tallies say 90 percent of
the weapons seized in Mexico
are American. This is untrue.
The guns being catalogued
are indeed American, and the
people asserting the 90 percent
aren’t lying, they are merely being
disingenuous. Delegate Eleanor
Norton, went on CSPAN last
week touting this number and
claiming it is the lax gun control
policies of the U.S., allowing the
cartels to wage a war against the
Mexican government.
She forgot to mention, out
of all the guns seized in Mexico,
only the ones with American
markings are sent back to the
U.S. to be traced and 90 percent
of those weapons turn out to
be American. According to data
collected by John Lott Jr., these
American guns represent only
17 percent of all the guns seized
in the Mexican drug war.
Delegate Norton is not a bad
woman, trying to deprive Amer-
icans of their Second Amend-
ment rights, she’s just following
the pack mentality of media and
politics. I have no doubt she,
as a Democrat representative,
has nothing, but the best inten-
tions for her constituents and
the U.S., but the road to Hell is
paved with good intentions.
By Devin Ruic
Contributing writer
I’m going to kill your
child at a young age.
It’s cheaper that way.
JoEllen Marsh


Stepping up against
those stomping down
Seeking to unite
language dichotomy
Faux statistic threatens
Second Amendment
Baseball.................................Apr. 10, W 3-2, W 6-0 Slippery Rock
Apr. 11, W 9-6, L 13-9 Slippery Rock
Apr. 17, W 10-2, W 8-5 Clarion
Apr. 18, W 9-0, W 7-1 Clarion
Softball................................................Apr. 9, L 4-1, L 5-4 Gannon
Apr. 10, L 5-2, L 5-2 California (PA.)
Apr. 11, L 0-3, L 4-7 West Chester
Apr. 13, W 9-1, W 9-1 Clarion
Apr. 14, W 10-2, W 10-2 Lake Erie
Apr. 16, W 1-0, W 6-3 Gannon
Apr. 17, L 4-2, L 9-5 Edinboro
Apr. 18, L 4-3, W 2-1 Slippery Rock
Men’s Lacrosse.............................................Apr. 11, L 8-7 Molloy
Apr. 18, L 10-5 C.W. Post
Women’s Lacrosse...........................Apr. 11, W 20-10 Millersville
Apr. 14, W 22-7 Indiana (PA.)
Apr. 16, L 18-16 Lock Haven
Apr. 19, W 17-13 East Stroudsburg
The Laker rowing teams
had an exciting past couple of
weeks.
Over Easter weekend in New
Jersey, both the men and women
came out on top.
The men first took gold with
the lightweight four, sailing
ahead of George Mason by 26
seconds.
After a two-hour intermission,
the same line-up competed in
the heavyweight event and won
with 5.5 seconds over Loyola.
Then, after just missing the
cut to the grand final Saturday,
the freshman four found
themselves victorious in the
petit final by 9.3 seconds over
Carnegie Mellon.
In the women’s events, the
varsity eight cinched first place
in addition to the four’s third
place finish.
Off the start, the eight looked
strong, but couldn’t shake
Dowling who built up a one-
third boat lead.
They sat behind Dowling
until halfway through the race
when the Lady Lakers made
their move.
By 1500 meters, they were
bow ball to bow ball and inching
ahead until they finally jumped
to a six-second lead to nab the
gold.
This race bumped the
Lakers up in the polls to tie for
first in NCAA with Western
Washington University.
This past week proved the
women deserve their No. 1
rank when co-captain Michele
Handzel led the varsity eight to
their second straight win of the
season in Oakridge, Tenn.
The four continued to
improve as well when they
finished third in their event for
the 15 spot overall out of 27
tough crews.
By Anne Sobol
Staff writer
Crew rows for gold
After two heartbreaking
losses against Gannon Univer-
sity two weeks ago, the Mercy-
hurst College softball team fired
back on Thursday, Apr. 16, and
swept the critical Pennsylvania
State Athletic Conference West
doubleheader.
Mercyhurst has not
shut out Gannon Uni-
versity since April 2005.
In the big win over the Golden
Knights, sophomore Michelle
Schmitz broke the single-season
RBI record with her 42 RBI of
the year, and freshman Kristi
Janoske registered her 10th
win on the season, marking
the second year in a row for a
Mercyhurst freshman pitcher to
record 10 wins.
After their big win against
Gannon, the Lakers dropped
two games to Edinboro Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania 4-2 and 9-
5, on Apr. 17.
On Saturday, Apr. 18, the
softball seniors played their last
game at Mercyhurst College.
After a 4-3 loss against Slip-
pery Rock University of PA
in game one, senior Danielle
Zubek made her last big state-
ment at Mercyhurst and came
through with a two-out game-
winning hits in the second game
to prevail 2-1 in eight innings
and earn the split.
“It was probably one of the
greatest feelings in the world to
be in the batters box with two
outs and the winning run on
second with all of my team-
mates cheering me on,” Zubek
said.
“We had a great pitch-
ing performance by Amanda
Norman that game and when
coach called on me to get the
job down I couldn’t have been
more excited and ready for the
chance,” Zubek said.
“I couldn’t have asked for a
better way to end my last home
game for Mercyhurst,” Zubek
said.
With the win against the
Rock, Mercyhurst has assured
its third straight season with 20
or more wins.
Lakers’ record stands at 20-
23, including a 6-10 mark in
PSAC West play.
Mercyhurst is the first team
to finish divisional games, and
will wait until early next week to
see if they will play in the PSAC
postseason.
The Lakers regular season
concludes on Apr. 22 at Notre
Dame College of Ohio.
By Sarah Powell
Staff writer
Zubek clutch in final home game
Steven Gorgos photo
Senior Danielle Zubek delivered a game-winning double in the Lakers 2-1 win against
Slippery Rock University in the Lakers final home game, on Saturday, April 18.
The end of the 2008-09 men’s
hockey season meant a new
beginning for four Mercyhurst
College players, but for three of
them, the beginning found its
end quickly. Four men’s hockey
players signed to professional
contracts with the East Coast
Hockey League (ECHL) on
March 31.
Since then, three have
returned to Mercyhurst for vari-
ous reasons. Seniors Kirk Med-
ernach, Bobby Phillips and Matt
Pierce were not able to play for
their teams as they make their
playoff runs.
The curtain fell March 21 on
the Lakers’ 2008-09 season in
a 2-0 loss to Air Force in the
Atlantic Hockey Association
tournament.
The five seniors compiled a
record of 68-67-17 during their
careers at Mercyhurst boasting,
two seasons with 20-plus wins.
The 2009 team also reached
the AHA championship game
the past two years only to come
up short against Air Force both
times.
“This class was a group of
hard-working and dedicated
individuals and will make ter-
rific pros at the next level,”
Coach Rick Gotkin said. “It’s a
shame they couldn’t pull out a
championship game win against
Air Force.”
Senior Matt Lundin signed an
amateur tryout agreement with
the Alaska Aces of the East
Coast Hockey League. He has
started one game and made five
appearances and allowed five
goals over the last two weeks.
Lundin transferred from the
University of Maine and played
two seasons for the Lakers,
compiling a 17-21-5 record
with a .908 save percentage. As
the team’s most valuable player
in the 2007-08 season, he set
the all-time single season save
record 946 saves.
“Matt brought us a great pres-
ence from when he transferred
to us from Maine and really car-
ried us deep into the conference
playoffs,” said Gotkin.
“My only regret was that we
could only have Matt for two
years. It was also disappointing
to see his struggles after surgery
and to lose his starting job to
Ryan who really stepped up in
his stead and led us to a great
conference playoff run but I
think Matt will make a great pro
at the next level.”
Medernach signed a contract
with the Cincinnati Cyclones.
The Cyclones play in the ECHL
and are based out of Cincinnati.
Originally from Cudworth, Sas-
katchewan, he was a key part of
the Lakers’ defensive line for the
better part of four years. Med-
ernach four goals and 28 points
in his career for the Lakers and
was a captain for the Lakers this
past year.
“I never thought I would play
at this level. I thought I would
play pro straight out of juniors.
I am glad that I did get the
opportunity to play at college,”
Medernach said.
“Kirk played regularly for
four years for us and provided
a very effective stay-at-home
defenseman for us on top of his
great leadership as a captain,”
Gotkin said.
Medernach was on schedule
to play for the Cyclones for the
end of the year, but he could
not obtain a U.S. work visa in
time to get some playing time
this year.
“What happened was our
season ended March 21 and I
was signed by the Cyclones on
March 31. The problem was
that in order for me to play, the
ECHL deadline for work visas
is April 1, the visa application
did not make it in time,” Med-
ernach said.
“I was sent back to finish col-
lege and I will be back to play
for the Cyclones next year.”
Pierce will be reunited with
Medernach as he also signed
with Cincinnati. He will also
have to wait until next season to
play at the next level due to his
desire to finish college.
“I have four classes currently
and I just feel it would be unfair
to the team. I would be leaving
all the time and that wouldn’t
help my team during their play-
off run,” Pierce said.
Pierce was one of Mercy-
hurst’s most potent offensive
weapons. He finished his career
with 54 goals, 47 assists and 101
career points.
“Matt had a great college
career and did many great things
here,” Gotkin said.
“He was invaluable as a leader
for team this year and the past
few years and I am sure he will
go on to do great things.”
Bobby Phillips signed with
the Elmira Jackals who play
in the ECHL. Phillips scored
four goals and added 22 assists
through his 125 career games.
“Bobby is a great stay-at-
home-defenseman. He was nor-
mally matched up against the
opposing team’s best scorer and
he almost never disappointed,”
Gotkin said.
Bobby will have to wait to
play until next season as he is
finishing up his college degree.
“Mercyhurst was a great time
and I am excited for my future
as a result of the experiences I
gathered here,” Phillips said
For these Mercyhurst seniors
the dreams of playing profes-
sional hockey will have to wait
SPORTS
Page 14
April 22, 2009
End of season means career change
The senior class of the Mercyhurst College hockey team will have to wait one more year to real-
ize their dreams of playing hockey professionally.
Contributed photo
By Nick Glasier
Staff writer
The end of the 2008-09 men’s
hockey season meant a new
beginning for four Mercyhurst
College players, but for three of
them, the beginning found its
end quickly. Four men’s hockey
players signed to professional
contracts with the East Coast
Hockey League (ECHL) on
March 31.
Since then, three have
returned to Mercyhurst for vari-
ous reasons. Seniors Kirk Med-
ernach, Bobby Phillips and Matt
Pierce were not able to play for
their teams as they make their
playoff runs.
The curtain fell March 21 on
the Lakers’ 2008-09 season in
a 2-0 loss to Air Force in the
Atlantic Hockey Association
tournament.
The five seniors compiled a
record of 68-67-17 during their
careers at Mercyhurst boasting,
two seasons with 20-plus wins.
The 2009 team also reached
the AHA championship game
the past two years only to come
up short against Air Force both
times.
“This class was a group of
hard-working and dedicated
individuals and will make ter-
rific pros at the next level,”
Coach Rick Gotkin said. “It’s a
shame they couldn’t pull out a
championship game win against
Air Force.”
Senior Matt Lundin signed an
amateur tryout agreement with
the Alaska Aces of the East
Coast Hockey League. He has
started one game and made five
appearances and allowed five
goals over the last two weeks.
Lundin transferred from the
University of Maine and played
two seasons for the Lakers,
compiling a 17-21-5 record
with a .908 save percentage. As
the team’s most valuable player
in the 2007-08 season, he set
the all-time single season save
record 946 saves.
“Matt brought us a great pres-
ence from when he transferred
to us from Maine and really car-
ried us deep into the conference
playoffs,” said Gotkin.
“My only regret was that we
could only have Matt for two
years. It was also disappointing
to see his struggles after surgery
and to lose his starting job to
Ryan who really stepped up in
his stead and led us to a great
conference playoff run but I
think Matt will make a great pro
at the next level.”
Medernach signed a contract
with the Cincinnati Cyclones.
The Cyclones play in the ECHL
and are based out of Cincinnati.
Originally from Cudworth, Sas-
katchewan, he was a key part of
the Lakers’ defensive line for the
better part of four years. Med-
ernach four goals and 28 points
in his career for the Lakers and
was a captain for the Lakers this
past year.
“I never thought I would play
at this level. I thought I would
play pro straight out of juniors.
I am glad that I did get the
opportunity to play at college,”
Medernach said.
“Kirk played regularly for
four years for us and provided
a very effective stay-at-home
defenseman for us on top of his
great leadership as a captain,”
Gotkin said.
Medernach was on schedule
to play for the Cyclones for the
end of the year, but he could
not obtain a U.S. work visa in
time to get some playing time
this year.
“What happened was our
season ended March 21 and I
was signed by the Cyclones on
March 31. The problem was
that in order for me to play, the
ECHL deadline for work visas
is April 1, the visa application
did not make it in time,” Med-
ernach said.
“I was sent back to finish col-
lege and I will be back to play
for the Cyclones next year.”
Pierce will be reunited with
Medernach as he also signed
with Cincinnati. He will also
have to wait until next season to
play at the next level due to his
desire to finish college.
“I have four classes currently
and I just feel it would be unfair
to the team. I would be leaving
all the time and that wouldn’t
help my team during their play-
off run,” Pierce said.
Pierce was one of Mercy-
hurst’s most potent offensive
weapons. He finished his career
with 54 goals, 47 assists and 101
career points.
“Matt had a great college
career and did many great things
here,” Gotkin said.
“He was invaluable as a leader
for team this year and the past
few years and I am sure he will
go on to do great things.”
Bobby Phillips signed with
the Elmira Jackals who play
in the ECHL. Phillips scored
four goals and added 22 assists
through his 125 career games.
“Bobby is a great stay-at-
home-defenseman. He was nor-
mally matched up against the
opposing team’s best scorer and
he almost never disappointed,”
Gotkin said.
Bobby will have to wait to
play until next season as he is
finishing up his college degree.
“Mercyhurst was a great time
and I am excited for my future
as a result of the experiences I
gathered here,” Phillips said
For these Mercyhurst seniors
the dreams of playing profes-
sional hockey will have to wait
SPORTS
Page 14
April 22, 2009
End of season means career change
The senior class of the Mercyhurst College hockey team will have to wait one more year to real-
ize their dreams of playing hockey professionally.
Contributed photo
By Nick Glasier
Staff writer
SPORTS
Page 15 April 22, 2009
Don’t be a bandwagon fan, Pittsburghers
This column is purely to
end some arguments before
they happen with respect to
the Stanley Cup Playoffs, and
specifically my Pittsburgh
Penguins.
I would first like to apologize
to NHL fans everywhere.
We did not make Sidney
Crosby the league posterboy.
It is not the Penguins,’ nor
their fans’, fault that he is
shoved down your throats by
the media.
I will not refute the talk of his
complaining, because he does
do that, but the NHL is a very
superstar-oriented league, and
every star gets special treatment
(yes, even Daniel Briere), and
Wayne Gretzky was worse than
Crosby in this.
Now can we please shut up
about him?
I am sick and tired of
people complaining about his
complaining.
That’s hypocrisy.
Get a grip people.
Second, many people have a
problem with Penguins fans.
A great many of them are
not Penguins fans, but merely
bandwagoners.
If a person claiming to be a
Penguins fan cannot tell you 3
people from the X Generation
(I’ll even include X Force),
or have no idea what you are
talking about, they are not Pens
fans.
They are bandwagoners, and
they make us all look bad.
Let me clear some things up.
If you cannot name anybody
from the X Generation, you are
a bandwagoner.
If Ramzi Abid, Dick
Tarnstrom, Konstantin Koltsov,
Sebastian Caron, and Alexei
Morozov mean nothing to you,
you are a bandwagoner, or a
sorely uninformed fan.
If you cannot name when the
Penguins won the Stanley Cup,
you are a bandwagoner.
If you didn’t follow the team
for year’s because they weren’t
very good, no matter how big
of a fan you were as a kid, you
ARE a bandwagoner!
But there is hope if you are
new to the Penguins fandom:
do not claim to be a super
fan, listen to facts and stories,
never claim that this team is
our best team (see: 1992-93),
never think that Crosby is better
than Lemieux, and never, ever,
consider yourself a bigger fan
than those who cheered through
the horrible losing seasons.
It happens with all teams.
My freshman year, I
learned to hate the Buffalo
Sabres because of their fans,
when in fact, it was only a
bandwagon which has since
dissipated.
So do not hate all Pens fans,
look a little deeper and better
direct your hatred; everyone will
be a lot happier.
By John
Baranowski
Sports columnist
Baranowski defi nes what makes a true hockey fan
Page 20
Sophomore Nick Gillung
delivers a pitch against
Clarion University of Penn-
sylvania on Apr. 17.
Laker Sports
Postseason
bound
Baseball clinches PSAC playoff berth
Scoot Williams photo
Caption on page 15

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful