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I

MISSION F

NO.

·1"7

to WN.

27 MAR 1945

GO PY NO. -: J

-ed LI.lie
... ...
No feature may be seminated approval Twentieth

'"

...

.
report or dls-

of this

reproduced

.. wi thout

pr1.or

of Head.quarters 4fr Force,.

This report

is the firl5t

m:l,ne-laying

operatlonll

or

the 31~th Bombardm.ent

Wing,

XlCI Bomber OQmmand.

XXI BOMB sa COMMAND
~O 234

lIEADQUARTERS

T;;'OTICAL MISSION,REPORT Field Order No. 16 313th Bolli~rdl!lent Wing Target
I

Misaion Shim,ono!!eki Strai,ts
27 Maroh 1945 Tabla of Contents

No.

47

&:

Suo Nada

Ta,etioe.1 Narrative
Annex A ~ Operation!!

..
0 • 0

,.

••
• • • 0

Page No. 1

•••••• •••• 9 Exhibit ~ Track Chart •• 10 Part I .. NIl."11gll.tion • • • • • • 11 Part II '" Mining •• • • • • 0 • • • • • •• 1.2 Section;" .. Mining Result!! • • • • •• 1.2 Section B .. Chll.rts Showing Mine Location • • • • 00 • 0 • 17 .. 21 Section C .. Code Designation of Yi'nes and MIne Operll,tion • • •• 28 SeotiQn b .. Minelaying Pr-ccedur e • " 30 Section E .. MIne Handling and I,o,ndingo 34 Part III .. Flight Engineering • • 0 • • • • •• 43 Part IV .. Radar • • '. • • • • • • • .' • •• 44 Part V .. Gunnery • • • • • • • • • 0 • 45 Part VI .. ~ar ..SeCi.Rescue Chart ••••• 46
• • 0 • • • ••

-we. ather ."..,.............. Part I ~Wenther Swnnnry • • • • • •• • • Part II' .. Forecast Weather vs Observed Weather. Par t I I I .. Prognost Ie Map ••••••••••• Part IV .. Synoptic Mnp 0 .' • • • • • • • •• • •
II •

47 48 50

51
52

Annex C ..Communio(ltlons • • • • • • • • • • • • Part I ..Radar Counter Mensures 0 • • • • 'Part I I ~ Rndl0 • • • •• • •• • • • • • •
'!!I' •

"

..

53 54
54

.Annex

D - Intelltgl)noe

(See Annex A. Part II, a.nd B. for RESULTS) ••• Part I - Enemy Air Oppo.sition •• Part II - Enemy ·.i>ntiaiNrai't •••• Sta.tlsticnl Sumllll\l'Y• and Ordar •

Seotions A

..

56 58

57

Annex E - Consolidnted

61

~nnex F ~ X:q Bomber Oomlllo.nd Directive 313th B6mbardm.ent Wing Field Annex G ~ Distribution,

• • • • • • • • • ••• Prepared
by

.... ·. . . . .
• 0

'7l
eli

I

A-2 Secti.on

XXI Bomber Comrno.nd.

: : I : : : I : : : : : : : : : : I : : : I II I

By

SEORET ~uth. of tho

:

C.G.:

19 Ma.y 4S Do.te

J:DG:
Initialrn

: : : : : ~: , : : : : : : : : : I : : : : : t I

XXI

HE::. DQUARTERS BOlliER CClJ.!:M.J.ND APO 234 19 May 1945

SUBJECT I

Report

of Oporo.tions, General,

27 March 1945 Twentieth Air Foroe, 'Washington

'1'0:
1.

Comanding

25. D.• O.

IPEN1IFIC4TION

OF MISSION.

0.. On 23 J~nuc.ry 1945, tho XXI Bomber Commo.ndissued 0. general directive to the 313th Bombardment 'Ving to prepare for mln.lo.ying operations against area.s of inmedillte strategic and to.ctioo.1 importo.nce to the enemw. On 11 March 1945, Il directive was issued to tho Commanding Gsnernl. 313th Bombardment Wing. to initiate opero.tions,

b. Field Order Number 16, Headquarters 313th Bombardment Wing. do.ted 25 Mo..rch 1945, directed the 6th. 9th, 504th and 505th BOl:lbo.rdment Groups to conduct the initl1l1 mine-lo.ying operation of this Commo.ndon 27 Mllrch 1945. c. Targets (1) Specified; Arenp:

Primqrv

(Il) Shimonoseki erel;: Minefield Miko (Fgrge ~ - Milln shipping channel through the western ent.ranceto Slumonoaek i Stro.i ts wi th the grea.test mine density o.t turns in channel around hino. Mo.tSur6. and Hiko Shima. nnd the outer portion of Woko.mntsu Hnrbor; Minefield Milee (Foroe Bnker) .. Main shipping channal through the western nppro~ch to Shimono&ekl Ko.ikyo with grentest mine density in nr ea bet .....en Futnoi nnd Shira. Shimo.. and a.ddi tione.l e di stribut10q 1n Mitushima. Suldo. C\llchora.ga north of Yi'e.k!llMtsu, e..nd the area bo~nded by MurotBu Saki, Mutsure Sbimo., ~nd ~oken Saki, (b) .§l.!.o, Nndll !..re91 MiMfield Love (For(le COOr11.) Ma.in shipping lane through Suo i No.de. with less dense minoflelds a.eross Hime Shima. S\l.ido nnd the. are". between Hime Slrimo. a.nd the 01 ty of B.ofu. This field was lo.ter extended to include 0. 11.00 of min.es ncross Suo No.da. from Hime Shima. to No.ga. Shibltl1blooldng the entrance to the Na.val Port of Tokuye.mo..

(2)
secondo.ry

§J.oondQ£Y .}reql

(0.)
oreo. specified 33/58N - l31/06E 33/53N • 13l/01E

Main .shipping Inne, t.hrllugh was bounded by: 33/S4N • 131/14E 33/46N - 131/10$

Suo Nl'ldo..

The

33/47N - 131/54E 33/4lN • 131/53E

SECRET

2.

STR..;.TEGY.eNDLQ,N OF QPERp.TION§: P ~. Strategic Importange of Tnrgets:

(1) Shimonoseki is the most important shipping oenter in the Japanese Empire. Sinoe persistent subaard ne attaok hall pra.otioully elimin ted shipping through Bungo Suido and Kii Suido (southern entranoes to the Inland Sea) a.nd the oonstriotion of the Japanese ec oncmy to the Inner Zone hilS substantially reduced the mnritime importance of Nagoya and Yokohanu.\,thCil majority of all shipping en route to the Japanese homeland passes though Shimonoseki Straits. It is estimated 'that 500 ship passages per month occur through this stro.tegio water-way, tot~lling some 2,000,000 tons of shipping. The blocka.ding of this area by mine attack can be expected eithar to isolate water-borne shipments from the main terminal ports in the western portion of the Empire. 9r to forca a diversion of shipping south of Kyushu or north of Honshu. thereby adding hundreds of miles to normal Shipping routes and exposing vessels to attack by our submarines. (2) The industrial centers and cities in the area proposed for blockade in this operation include Yawata, Kokura, MOji, Shimonoseki, Tobata. Wakamatsu, Chofu Onoda, Ube. Kanda, nakatsu, Bofu and Tokuyama, The first 6 named form one of the major industrial cen.ters in Japan proper. This center includesl the largest plants prodUCing pig iron, ingot, and rolled steel in the Japanese Empire; important plants producing alumina. heavy industrial chemicals, and semi-finished iron and steel products; and a large part of the Shikoku coal fields. the most important in Japan. The area has some plants manufacturing machine tools, machinery parts, and finished equipment of various kinds. but its primary importance lies in the fact that it furnishes a major part of the coal, iron, steel. semifinished iron and steel, and other basic materials for further proceSSing in the manufacturing districts in central Honshu. Shimonosaki is also a major transportation center. being the terminus of the 2 costal rail line connecting with central Honshu and the terminus of the important rallraod tunnel under the Strait of Moji. A recent concentration of war industry is reported at Knnada, and reported improvement to the harbor at Chofu may indicate war industries there. Tokuyamn is an important naval fueling port; portions of the Japanese fleet "''ere observed there after the Carrier Task Force attacks on the Inland Sea on 22-25 March 1945, (3) Partial blOCkade of the Horoshima and Kobe-Osaka area will asLe be eff'ected by blockading Shimonoseki, insofar as ,all shipping to these areas from the Outer Zone will be required to pass through waters now under interdiction by our submarines, b, Tactical Situstion:

(1) The mining of Shtmonoseki Strait waS planned as ~ support operation fOT the invasion of Okinawa Gunto in the RyUkus. The immediate tactioal objectives of the mining operation were to prevent supplies and reinfor.cements being sent from the embarkation posts of Mutsure and Hiroshima in the area under attack: and to restrict the movement of the Japanese Fleet in opposing the invasion. c. Details of Planningl (1) Operational Planning:

(a) As indicated a general directive to prepare for mini:l-layingoperations was given to the 313th Bombardment Wing

by the XXI Bomber Command on 23 January 1945. At this time 2 (e.nd later 8. third) naval officers were assigned to the Wing for minewarfare liaison, In the period intervening between this date and tbe first minelaying operation, an extensive experimental program was carried out to determine mine-laying tactics suitable for B-29 alrernft. making maximum use of the radar _quipment consistent with the previ.ous training of the orew radar operators. These tac'tics were then taught to all crews of the Wing by radar-navigator specia. lists, and additional instruction in mine warfare was undertaken. All ordnnnce and armament personnel in the Wing were also given training in mine handling and loading prior to the first mining effort. (b) The directive for Mining Mission No, I, issued from the XXI Bomber Command, specified the time and area of attack, the approximate number of sorties and density of the minefield, the preparation of the mines, and general limitations on the altitudes of att~ck,
11 March 1945

(c) The tact ical planoi ng for thi s operation '~C.s Carried out by the 313th Bombbardment Wing, In this planning. nn effort was made to make maximum use of experience ~ained in the Commund' s low .. evel inCendio.ry attEtOks ol'l.'the l ·~ajor -l"c.po.nese O;!Ues, and at the same time employ the most suitb.bla mine.lo.ying to-ctics for the B-29, (d) Selection of approaches and mine-laying runs waS largely influenced by enemy antiaircraft defenses, heights of mountains surrounding the area under attack, position of a good initial point, and suitability of: radar aiming points for indl vidutl.laircraft. (e) All mine-laying runs were planned and briefed as radar runs, Beco.use of the advantageous position of the moon, 0.11 crews were 0.1110 briefed on the possibilities of visual runs on their targets should they be vis ible. (f) The large number of aircraft that would be over the target area necessitated a scheduling system simila.r to that employed in ,Jrevious low-level inC6ndio.ry attacks. Airoraft of Force Able und Charlie were to take-off at one-minute intervals, while those of force Baker were to take off at 30-second interva.ls, All Ilircraft were to proceed independently to the target. An appropriate time interval separated the major forces to reduce to a minimum the possibility of aircraft on different axes of attack over the target area. At the same tillie,it was planned to saturate enemy de!'euses insofar as possible. follows: (g) The Tact1 cml PIQP fpr this PoerBtlon was as

1. Force Able, consiting of 24 aircraft of the 505th Group, was to mine the western entrance to Shimonosekl Straits at an nIt! tude of 5000 feet and axis of attack of 300 degrees true. from the initial point,
£, Immediately following this attack, Foroe Baker, oonsisting of 20 airero.ft of the 504th Group and 30 !I..ircraft of the 6th Oroqp. was to mine the western approach to Shimonosekl Stra! ts at an a Iti tude of 5000 feet an.d axi s of attack of 240 degree!! true from the initial point,

SECRET

~. The third force, Force Charlie, oonsisting of 31 airoraft of the 9th Group. was to mine Suo Nado.. 25 at un altitude of 5000 feet, nnd 6 at an altitude of 8000 feet, all at different axes of attack from the same initial point, immediately following the attacks of Force Baker, (2) Details of AttaCk Planl

313th

(11) All deta.1ls of the attack plo.p. are given in Bombardment Wing Field Order No. 16 with amendments thereto.
(3 )petGTmiMtion of Mirp~l

(a.) Complete co.lculations were mOode by the Wing Flight Engineer to deterlIline the maximum mine load possible on this mission. As a result of these Computations, it was decided to load a.ircraft with 12.000 pounds of mines and no bomb bay tanks; in the Case of some aircruft, it WIlS decided to permit the Group Flight Engineer to specify a minimum load of 10,000 pounds for individual airoraft not oapable of c~rrying the full load,
(b) Mine Locdf ng for e ech o.ircruft was specified in an annex to Field Order 16. For purposes of' security and euse of handling. all mines were identified by a code designation whioh is given o.s Po.rt II. Seotion C, of Annex A, bf this report. (c) Details of handlin~ and loading of mines in a.i rornft VI.ere specif led in par agr-aph 4 (:3) thru 4 (9) of Field Order 16 and in Taotical SOP 15-8 (Part It (E) of Annex A). (4) Mining Ins±ruotionsj

(n) All mines were to be laid:~ 1 of 2 methods outlined in 313th Bombardment Wing Tactical SOP No. 100.2 (Part II (d) of Annex A). The specifi cut Lon of the method to be used in each tun was given in an annex to Field Order 16. (b) Jettisoning Ilreas were deSignated immediat~ly off the runway east of Tinian and en route to the Japanese homeland. Instructions for jettisoning mines were furnished in paragraph 4 (2) b thru 4 (2) d of Field Order 16.

(0) Instruotions were given to 0.11 crew navigators to accurately plot the positions of all m.ines rOleased, including those jettisonsd o.nd those relso.sed in Case of emergency. Details of radar scope photography to identify the position of mine release were gi vqn in pEll'agraph 4, (11) of Fie Id Order 16.
(S) Nayigationw, (a) Details P~!lnning: 9f Route:

1.
Forces Able and Buker:

Routes

PIAnA0p ~

Out:

BaBe 1st Check Point 2nd Check: Point 3rd Check Point Individual I.P,

'Unlan lwo Jimo. Ooordina.te Sada. Mieo.ki and/or R.A.P. for

l5/04N 24/S0N 32/30N 33/20N

• -

14S/38B l41/15E 132/3.QE 132/01E

soJlh sart..ie

-4-

Force

Charlie:

Snse 1,st Check Point 2nd. Check Point

I.P.
Individual (b ) Foreo Able
I

B.A.P.

Tinio.n lwo Jimo. Coordino.te Sada Misaki for each so.rtie. - Return
I

15/04N 24/50N 32/30N 33/aON

..

145/38E 141/15E 132/30E 132/01E

RoutegP

hpned

Manauver after attackl stro,ight oheo,d until clenr of anti.airero,ft a.t Yawo.to.. then left to 32/36N - 131/45E. climbing to Ia minimum o.lti.tude of 8000 .feet c.rosBing Kyus·hu. 1st Check Point Leaving Land Base Coordinate Neo.r Nobeoka Tinlan 33/37N .. 130/34E 32/36N .. 131/45E 15/04N .. 145/3BE

ForC'e Baker;

Maneuver nf'te.r ntto.ek I after cl eo.I'ing to right of anti .. 0.1reI' a£t are 0. 0.t Yawnta. alert tuxn to 32/36N - 131/ 45E, climbing to minimum altitude of 8000 feet crossing Kyushu. 1st Oheek Point Leo.ving Land Base Coordinnte Near Nobeoko. Tlnlan 3S/37N - 130/34E 32/35N .. 131/4SE lS/04N .. 145/38E

Force

Chn.r11e:

Maneu vel' a£ten
minute

0. ttaek : e 11mb B tr.ai ght ahead for 1 after mine release, then turn right continuing to cl fmb to minimum nIt i tude of 8000 feet cross ... :!lng Shikoku. Adjust turn Ili'ter mine release to o,void defenses at Tokuyamo..

Leo.ving Base (5) R@dar Pl ra.dar runs.

Notsu So.k:a Tininn

33/09N .. 133/13E
15/04N - 145/38E run.s were p Laaned

and. bri.efed

ODn 1 ne::

Al1 .mins-1o.ying

Q.S

for
4;

(7) .Ro.d[\r Gounter Mtp.sures: Routine sear ch w~p1o.nned enemy I'lldll.l;' signo.ls on frequencies be~en 38 mco..nd 3000 me by
obse r-ve r.s ,

(8)

Air-Sen.

Rescue Plqnn tog

I

(a)~: The No.vy wns furnished with th1.s mise1on. and requested to furni!>havo.l1able fnci11ties sell rescue purposes. The following we.re lml..dao:vo.ilab1e:
1SS/00E for the e.ntire ~. One submo.ri.ne miss'ion.
WaS

details of for o.ir-

stationed

at 30/00N

..

ll. One destroye.r 137/00E from 262.200Z to 27.2200Z.
144/30E from 262QOOZuntil

was 5tationed

Il..t 28/0vN ..

A.

One plon.e tender wa.s s.tatlonad the end o.fthemis.sion •
WillI

at

18/00N-

142/00.E from 271900 to

.!.

On~ Dumbo o.ircro.ft 272100Z.

stnti.oned

o.t 20/00N_

-5-

(b) XXI Bomber Command assigned 2 Super Dumbo aircraft to orbit the submarine position at 30/00N - l35/00E from 27l500Z to 271800Z.
3.

EXECUTION OF MISSION:

a. Take-orf I Aircraft of Force Able were SCheduled to take off at 270600Z. Force Baker at 270630Z. and Force Charlie at 270700Z. Actual take-ofr was acoomplished as follows:

~
Able Baker Charlie Total

AIRCRAFT AIEBORNE 22 49
...,ll_

FIRST TAKE::9FF 27055BZ 270627Z 27Q§5BZ 270558Z

LAST TAKE-OFF 270622Z 270657Z

102

21Q:Z3QZ
270730Z

b. Route Outl The course flown was generally as briefed. substantial deviation was made en route to various initial points. Deviations in mining runs may be seen on charts of mining runs. (Annex A. Part II)

Wo

o.

Over Target: (1) Primary Areas:

(a) or the 102 aircraft airborne, 92 mined primary areas. A total of 549 Mark 26-1 or 36-1 and 276 Mark 25 mines was dropped in primary minefield~. A detailed breakdown of the types of mines and their locations is given in Annex A, Part II.
(b) Times of release of mines by Force Able varied from 27l337Z to 271435Z. by Force Baker from 271408Z to 271506Z. and by Force Charlie from 27l410Z to 27l542Z. Altitudes over-all ranged from 4900 feet to 8000 feet. Headings varied in accordance with mining instructions, Length of mine runs varied from 1 to 16 minutes. Indicated Air Speeds ranged from 185 to 230 miles per hour,

(2)

Secondary Areasl

(a.) Two aircraft of Force Baker placed 12 Mark 25 mines in the alternate area, minefield Love.

(3~

Jettispned:

(a) The following mines were dropped in the jettisoning areas spe cUied in theFte ld Ord!'!rl Mark 25 Able Baker Charlie
by

o
6

o

37 1

12

13., Route Back I Briefed route was followed substantially al1 aircraft, although a someWhat wider turn than antiCipated was necessary to avpid a.ntiaircraft and searchlightll in the Yawata. are a,

e, Lqndinr: Airoraft under good weather conditions

of the main force lQnded at base as follow!1 Lg.st Lg.ndin, 260055Z 260235Z 2723Q6Z 272306Z to anti-

~
l\.ble

First Lg.ndinr 272033Z 272034.Z 272024.Z 272024.Z

Bilker Charl1e

Total

t, ~I Three B .. s were lost, presumably 29' aircro.ft over the target area. g. Operations SummGry!

(1) Nqvigntion: (See Annex At Part I for details). Routes, initinl paints. o.nd radar aiming points were very satisfaotory. Of 50 runs plotted by analysis of radar scope photogi-apllB,52 por ,oent were ",ithin one ..a.lf miie of' briefed loeation. h (2) ~I (See Annex A, Part II for details). Mining results are oonsidered exoellent. In Field Mike minefield, densi ty in tho mo..inshipp1ng Channel woos approxima.tely all p1a&ned, and the anohorage north of Waknmatsu was effeotively blooked. In Field Love, a high attrition of shipping is to be expected if the enelllYattempts to use esta.blished channels, (3) Flight Endneeringl (See Annex A, Part III details). This miuion waS the longest flown to dllte by the Bombardment Wing. D1stanoe WQS 26'78 nautical miles. Cru.lse wus made at 5000 teet o.nd oruise back WetS between 10,000 and feet. for 3l3th out 20,000

(4) ~I (See Annex A, Part IV for detailS). Radar equipment operated well on this mission, with 95 per oent of aircraft over the target having operative AN/APQ-l3, A total of 86 mines releases was made by rada.r offset method. (5) Gunnery; (Se~ .Annex A. Pa.rt V for details), EqUipment operated very flatisfo.otorily with only 3 ma.lfunctiono for the entire Wing. (6) Ai.r..Ssll..Rest)uQReport WQS reoeived that a. B ... I 2g crew was bailing out at 31/S5N - 133/15E. Two B-29's were immediately dispatohed to searoh the areo.. The submarine abo made a search. Results were negutive. h. We A.thelI (See Annex a for detailB). int'erfere with the exeoution of the mission. i. Communicat:lons: Weather did not

(1) Rg.dg,raounter Measure§ I (See Annex C. Pllrt I for details). A routine search wus oonduoted and 2'7 different signals Vlere intercepted. (2) ~I (See Annex C, Pllrt II for detll.llo). A totlll of 13 HF/DF bearings was requested and obtained. Net disoipline wao gOOd.

"*7-

j.

Intelli,eDoB

Summary

I

(1) Enemy Air Opposition: (See Annex D, Part I fot detail B ). ~emy Il.it oppo siti on was 11ght, only 13 atto.oks bei ng experienced. It Willi ina.ccurate o.nd uno.ggressive exoept in one case of Cltto.okby rooket-firing fighter which pressed to 200 yards, In o.ddition, o.pproximo.tely 60 aircraft were reported sighted but not atto.cking.

(2) Enemy Antinircrottl
details).

(Sse Annex D, Po.rt II for

(a.) Over minefield Mike, enemy nntlo.irora.i'tfire was rated as heavy and medium, intense o.nd more accurate tha.n on previous n.ight missions. Fire wall ooordinated with effeo·tive searohlights •. Vessels in the Wakamo.tsu areo. contributed to the intensity Qf the barrage. (b) Over minefield Love on east side of the stro.its. opposition wo.s meager to moderate and inaccurate. The o.ircraft closest to the Straits rated the intensity 0.8 modero.te. results and B.

or the mission are shown

(3)

Mining Results:

in Annex

Detailed

A, Po..rtII. Sectiol1llA

analyses

o~ the

ikLr.t/nv~
Major Generill. USA Commanding.

CURTIS E. LeMAy7·

\

ANNEX
A QPFlBb,1'IONS

Bxhibltt Part Part

Track

Chart

I - Navigation II • Mining Soction Section Section

A - Mlni.ng Rosillts B • Charts Show1ngMina
0 • Code Designo.tion. Mine Operation. DYinelo.ying

Looation

of lIines and

S!,!ction Sectio.n

Procedure

E • Mine Ho.ndling and Loading Engineering

Pa.rt III • Flight Part IV - Radar
Part Part V - Gunnery

VI - Air-Sen

Rescue Ohn.rt


Misdon No, 41
27 March 1945

APRIL 1945

"TRACK

CHART"

SECRET

a

MISSION NO ~7 DATE 27 Morch 45 XXI BOMCOM. _
313th. WIn KEY --.
Force

----I
J

"A"

"S'

,;;;.,,'_

iiLii"".;"i!iiiir

"C."

"01

I
I
,'CHICfJl JIt.1A

I

OKINaWA

- ---···r-· ...
J

I

I
I

_··--+---25" I
JIMA

I

J

I I

I

I

o

15·

-_. --_
1<>
.d'f;UAM
v

I
130· TRACK CHART XXI SOMBER 135. COMMAND SECRET 140'

I

J
145· RE:PROOllGED 35t~ PTU

PART I - NAVIgATION
1.
2.

Routes seleoted were very satisfactory.
A shortage

situntion
3. ~:

of large Loran map!! CD-used is being remedied.

some

d.ifficulty but the

0.. ~ti9ns Over Tpn:et I Visibility over the target WD.S good. Moonlight melds the I.P. and la.nd check points visible. AlA was meager to heavy so that evasive IJ.ction was neoessary.

b. I P Qud A, P,: The I.P. and A. p. were well selected and could be picked up easily in the radar soope. They could be seen visually as wall.
c. Use of Rn.Q!U' and Efficiency: Two methods lftIreused. in laying the mines. Ons method was a time run out from a Ro.dfU' .Aiming Point and the other used !l forward slant r~e to Radar Aiming Point. In general, the radar equipment was reported to function prop0rly.

~

d. Jimin, Point pnd Desoription: Each aircraft was ass1gned indiVidual aiming point us described in the field order.
e.

Mal1functions: (1)
6th

Bomb Group:
4

(a) Ale 836: Rack mo.lfunctio n Caused 0. delay in the rele(lse of the lust 6 mines in the bomb bay.

second

(b) Ale 881: One mine dropped ut the correot time but when the others did not relea~e. 5 were salvoed 45 seconds later.
30

(0) Ale 889: Sulvo ot the last 2 mines occurred minutes after trai.n:rem out. One parachute to.i.1ureW!l.S noted.

(d) Ale 901: Jettisoned all «5 mines in jettisoning area just o1'ter take-off dUG to engine fai lure. (e) Ale 889: Six mines had to be so.lvoed npproxw imately 150 ,seeonds o1't(3r normal releo.s9 of other 6. Broken wire in. aft bomb bay is believed to have caused hanging of bombs. (f)
(2)

Ale

783:
I

One mine had,paraohute

failure.

9th Bomb Group

(n) (b) (C) (3)
505th

Ale

791: Sixth mine had paraohate

failure. failure.

Ale 57*:
AIr; 835:

Sev$nth mine had p~rQchute

Fifth- nllne had pa.raohute failure.

Bomp

Group: out
of

(n) Ala 813: One mine wns jettisoned area on the way back to base due to ro.ck ma.lfunction.

target

(b) Ale 334: This Ale returned to base with 1 mine. Station tripped but the shaCkle would not release the mine. -11-

(4)

504th Bomb Group

I

(a) Ale 349: The eleventh mine wa.s released 30 seConds late and the twelfth mine was salvoed beoause of ,tation malfunction. lea.sed a minute (b) Ale 853 a Eleven mines in rea.r bomb bay were relate due to malfunction of bomb bay door.

(c) Ale 8521 Rack malfunotion ca.used eleven mine, to be ,alvoed 15 seconds after first mine was released.
(d)

salvoed due to ma.lfunotion.

Ale

834:

Three mines in forward

bomb bay were

4. Radar Soope Photo Resultsl
0.. Force Abl e (24.A/C,) - Plotting do-to. were not avo.llable tor 4 ~irornft. either beca.use there were no soope photos or because the photos obta.ined were not plottable. Five aircrnft dropped o.S briefed (within 10 mile), fl.nd within t mile. Of the remainder, one dropped 6 within 2 miles. one within 3, a.nd Il. third within 10 miles of the briefed position. The rema.inIng a.ircra.ftreturned eur1y or did not get off the ground.

b. Force Baker (50 A/e) - Plotting do.to. were not o.vo.llo.bla for 19 o.ircro.ft. Nine o.iroro.ftdropped as briefed or within t miles and 2 within 3 miles of briefed position. Three aircraft were missing, a.nd the remainder returned early or did not tQke off. c. Force Oharlie (31 A/C) - Plotting da.ta.were not available on 19 aircraft, including aircraft not complotipg the mission. Six aircraft dropped as briefed or within 1 mile, and the remainder dropped with o.n error of 1 mile or leSB. d, The results of the I:Ina.lysisre shown on the a SQotion Bf Part II. this AnnG%.) In general, errors were utic, but were of a compensating nature, thus produoing a field pattern. For FJ. detailed a.nalysis of the minefj,elds. D. Part III. cho.rts. (Sae not ~stemgood minesee An.nex

e. A tabulation

of the (lI,Ocura.ol obta'1ned i.6 as !'ollows I es g !iumb!i!r f B!!.1l1i
25

a.Ii 0 ],11: g,!;i;£
i mile
I mile 2 miles

fer°!i!!ilalii!Hr;e 52
28

14
6 :5

3 miles 10 m1le8

12 6

...l
50

--L

100%

PART 11 - SWC'UON A - MINING RESULTS 1. The followiqg report is submitted 1n accordanoe Department letter. AG 476.1 (20 Ootober 1943). with War

a. The charts following this section show the position of nIl mines planted in this operation. A legend on these charts indica.tes tbe method of plotting so as to differentinte between positions established by rudor scope photographs, by the na.vigator, or by the assumption that the crew p1a.nted their mines as briefed for o.frora.f't hat did not return t to bllse. Pos! tions estnbl1shod by rador photography a.rebel1eved accurate to 1mile, and those by the navigo.tor between i and 1 m1ler there is no way of estimating the accuracy or the other positions. b. The number of B-29 aircro.ft schedulsd for this operation wus 105. Of these, 3 failed to tQke off; 5 did not plnnt their mines in primo.ry or secondary areasj and 3 fo.iled to return to base. c, The marks and modifica.tions of all mines planted in this operation are listed in Table I (for code. Bee Section B) and are plotted on the oharts following this seotion. A total of 837 mines of all types was planted in fields MIKE and LOVE, of which ~ were Mnrk 25 ~d 549 were Mark 26-1 or 36-1. Because of the number of different mechanism preparations. and the fact that these were distributed between 26-1 and 36-1 cases, no attempt was made to specify type case in the 1000 Ib size. or the Mark 25 mines, approximately 80% were equipped with acoustic meChanisms A-3 Mod 1 MMl without ship counts or dela.yed arming. and 20% were equipped with magnetiC mechanisms M-ll with delayed ~rming evenly distributed between 1 and 30 da.ys and ship count, evenly distributed between 1 and 9. Of the Mark 26-1 or 36-1 mines. approximately 80% were equipped with aooustic meChanisms A-3 Mod 1 00 without ship oounts or delayed arming. and 20% were equipped with magnetio mechanisms M9 Mod 1. half with 8-second dead period and half with lO.S-seoond dead period. About 63% of the M9 Mod 1 mechanism with 10.5seoond interlook dend period were fitted with 20 ohm shunts across the sensttrol operating coil to coarsen the sensitivity, and had no delayed arming but had ship counts in the ratio of 67% on 1 and 33% on 2. The remaining M9 Mod 1 mechanisms had 68% set on I-ship counts and 32,( on 2-ship oounts (l-a hip count is the eq uivalent of no PDM' s ). With tbe approval of Commo.nder-in-Chief f U. S. Fleet, no sterili zers were used on any of the minss. The locations of all jettisoned mines are given in Table II, Section A. Assembly d. All mines used in this operation Depot No. Four. Tinio.n. ware obtained from Mine

e. All mines dropped in this operation were fitted with 6 ft parachutes. Six parachutes were observed by crew members to fail, o.nd 5 short static cords were returned. This is ~ negl1gible peroentage of the total mins6 dropped. Parachute installation Was ~s speOified in To.eticll.l OP 15...;8 S (See Seotion E). A.n undetermined number of jettisoned mines ware observed to explode on impact with the water when sto.tio lines were out or paraohutes failed. One aircraft jettisoning mines frem 7000 feet with severed static lines reported toot 7 of 12 mines Mark 26.1 or 35-1 exploded on water impo.ct.

t. The basio taotios used in this opera.tiol'l re given in 'ro.oa tical SOP 100-2 (Section C) and in paragraph 2 (c) of basio report. In general, an effort wClsmade to hnvo as lIlanya.1rornft Il.S poss1ble drop on forward slant range from n radar aiming point. In some Oases, however. it was necessary to drop on timed run or baOkward slant range from a radar aiming point. All IF's and radar o..imingpoints are speoified in .i.nnex3 of Field Order 16. Th.e general method of planning and briefing wo.s lUI follows I

(1) Upon receipt of the mining directive f~om the Bomber Command, n planning meeting was held by the Wing Pl~nn1ng Seotion. At this meeting. no IP nnd lUis of attack suitable for laying each DI.inef iald were deCided upon. mo.king the best compromise between o.voido.noe of flak arens and high mountainous terrain. seleotion of good radar a.1ming points, and se lection of most favorable nogle between the axes of the lines of mines nod the normnl shipping routes, (2) After deoiding the foregoing, tbe minefields were de~ signed by the Mining Section. taking into account depths of water, ship· ping routes, and grid densities specified by the Bomber Command, Mixed plane loadIngs for each a.ircraft were then specified by the Minto« Sec· tion in order to aSsure proper distribution of mine types through tho fields, (Only 1 size mine was used in any I airoraf to simplify loading.) These mineficlds were laid out on standard target oharts printed by the Bomber Comllltlnd.

t

1

for

(3) ea.ch string

Overlays were than plotted on standa.rd target chart •• of mines, for use by the navigator of eaoh alrornft.

(4) The V/ing Radar Nc.viga.tor then solect.ed radar a.iming points for each run. Sio.nt ranges, distance of run, laying track, and dropping interval were speoified on no.vig-,torl s and bombardier's fl1mBies nnd on ea.ch chart. The charts were then distributed to the individual navigators through the Group Operations Offioers, (5) ~neral and Specio.l briefings were heid in eae h of the Groups. At the special briefing for the navigators. radar no.vigo.tore were o,va.ila.ble to ass ist in explaining the individual charts and to mo.lce chunges as necessary. (6) Upon complet10n of the mission, naVigators turned In their individuo.l charts. on which were plotted the positions in whioh the mines ha.d been dropped. VIing radar personnel then plotted the run determined from rado.r scope pictu.res. A comPosite overlay of these chart. Vlo.S used to determine the positions of all mine:; 0.8 plotted on the nppon.dad Chart.
g.. Co.sunltio6 sustained in this o_pera.tion inolude 3 nircraft lost, :3 o.ircroft with ma.jor flak dCllnage. 5 aircraft with minor flak do.m.a.ge,2 men wounded o.n4 32 missing. All cQlualti"l5 were sustained in thG YJ.:Ift,rATJ. a, ere h. Critique of Minefie1ds;

(1) ~lald MIKE (western approaoh to Shimonoseki); The appended ohart of the minefield shows the final lOCations of all mines planted. 1.. sma.ll percenta.ge of the mines fell on la.nd or shallow water; their lOCations nre such, however, tna it must be assumed that 0.11 the mine types used 1n this operation were oompromised to the enemy, The minai'ield dell.B1 in the main ohannel is a.pproximately o.s planned, ty but ls centered slightly south of the main shipping lane. The Q.hcbornge north of WakOJna.tsuis effectively bLecked , oonsidering the large shQal axeas loco.te d the rEI • The weakest portion of the e.pproach ill througb M'izu6hima. Suf do, whl.ch is not known to be used as a. shipping 1MB, (2) Field LOVE (Suo Nada.) I Final post tions of 0.11 mines planted are shown in the nppended ohart. A heavy oonoentra.tion of mines wOoS ie.1d in the main shipping lane north of Rime Shima, bLLt the fields

r--.r-~-----------'----~~~~~·~ED-----r------------------~---

7f56a>

,_n_

~!!l!·'2Zr /'.

#

are aUght!y wenkto either side of the main channel, particulllZ'ly in the dl)8perportion. of .Hime Shimo.Suido. because ot o.ireratt returnlns early or c.iroro£t that did not get off the ground. The string at minea spec1tied in Amen.dment 5 to Field Order 16 wa.s lo.id well considering tM short time available for briefingl 0: rack fo.ilure. in. 1 o.ircro.ft. howe'ver, Caused 11 3 ..mile gate to be left in the field. Mine strings 65 and 70 are minea that were plo..nted in the s13oondo.ry area by Fo.ree llJ..KER. Stl" ing No 70 is partiGular:ly well situated. It should be sta.ted that Field LOVEa.s lo.l.d in this operation 'lfnS not iaten.dod for oomplete blooko.de. but that high o.ttrltion to Shipping should result if the enemy attempts to ueeestablisbed Channels. Tp.ble I to Seet~op A
SW!lma,ry

or

Mines Planted

(SHlMONOSEKIond SUO NADA. areas) Pie14 MIKE; Forc&!BiB
M,O

(SHIM9NOSEKI)
13 9 0 0

Mine Mo.rl-;36~1 or Mo.rk 26..1 (1000# she)

Q21-B'* CU ..1l9 C12",,89. Dll ..B9· -D12-89

D21..89 15

D22..B9

9 ~

TOTAL Total Mines Foroe ABLE

S

FisH. Mlkej

FgreEi

MKER

(Sm;MONOSEKI)
Cll ..B9 C12-B9 D11-B9D12-59 D21..119 D22 ..B9

Min.G Mo..rk 36-1 or Nark 26~1

Q21-B!1

182

14

9

9

5

6

2
221

(1000# slz:e)
Mine Mnrk2S

(2000#sl;!;6 )

TOTAL 156. TatOol Mlnes Force BAKER oW Field LOVE I Force CHARLIE (suo: NAD,A)
Q.21 ...B9

Mine Mo.rk 36 ..1 or Mark .as.. 1

77

On ...B9

8

a l.2..B9
is

nll ..B9
4.

D12..!9

1

021-89

(looqi! /lite)
Mine Mork 25 (2000 '# she)

0 TOTAL

D22-B9

0 96

TOTAL 132 Total. MIn.os PO.I'OIl! OHARLIE 228 Tota.! Minas Plo.nte.d
.co

-

For oode deaignc.tion

see Section

C

or

tbis

Annex.

\.J>,~n"J'S"&r..

7fS6C15

FlED

Tilble Sl!!!!!!!2.tJl:

II to

Seg~iop A

2!: M~D2a~2~~i!2P2~
Lgtitude
15/03 15/03 15/05 15/05 15/05 15/05 N N N N N N

ll2.
5 1
6 2

kk
25 25 26 M 26 26 26 26 26 26 26 26 26 26 26 26 26 26 26

~
Q21-B9* Mll-P9 Q21-B9 011-B9 D12.B9 Q21-B9 q21-B9 Q21-B9 Q,21-B9 012-89 D22-B9 Q21-89 011-B9 D22-B9 Q21_B9 Q21-B9 012-B9 D21-B9 OU-B9
se e

Longitude 145/53 145/53 145/55 l405/55 145/55
146/00

1
1

1 1 10 1 1 10
1

1
6 :3

1 1
1

or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or or

36 36 36 36
3e

E

E
E

E

E E

36 36 36 36 36 36 36
36 36

31/59 N
29/50 N 24/51 N 24/51 N

24/51 N 27/35 N 27/35 N 27/35 N

14/56/30 15/01/15

N N

36 36
36

15/01/15 N 15/01/15 N 15/01/15 N

132/42 E 135/29 E 138/38 E 138/38 E 138/38 E 136/16 E 136/16 E 136/16 E 146/10/1.5 HIS/seilS 146/32/15146/32/15 146/3~15

E

E E
E E

For code' des igno.tlon.

Secti on C of thi s Annex•

Table III to Section A
SUbl!D!l.rv of Mines Planted

.i.n PrimID

Arens I
• • 960

Supplement

to Table II In knne; L of Starvation •

Total mines sOheduled Mines in

Ala fuiling to tnke off

. . . .. .
• • • ••
• ••

36

Mines jettisoned Mines planted

(See Tv.ble II to Section A)

•• 56
18
12

in Field L (Runs 65 & 70)

Mines planted outside Field M (Run 28) Mines returned (Field. hiI: Run 9) •••

• •• -..1., 123

Total mines plo.ntBd in pr1mo.r.Y target • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 8:57

-16-

L-~----------------====~~-~ ..
'

SE JilE

· TARGE.
'$.O.i!l.l.E

A-OUTER
II 5 7,5'8 M1L ~

tI

~AUtU;;lld!J I

'~~~~:~L.~~~~~
i: •
10'

MIl.ES

eN

lor

MINES PLANTED
(5!l.IM·ONOSE'KI

BY FORCE MIKE
IT S STRA

A8LE

Ml'NEF1ELD

AR.EA)

o-----e
......_

n.

A

1000

I.e..

"LEGEND
MlrtE$ QROEIt 'P~OTO.$ 01'" MI"'IN"'lI:llr'1'
11"1 MI'I~"'II'I.s.

.............
Ttl!!.

APPROX. POSITION VeRIFleo BY SCOPE PHOTCl3 ,..0 SCOPE PHOTOS· .. I'IAVlC;ATOIiS' I!STIMPITEDF posnlaN IMliltATE
SCOP!!

NUMERAI.S
KII!.Y TQ

ANO

"It!!

SECRET

I

TARGE,
! I !i,l!iOT1C,o,L,1
I '500,0'0

AMIL..E
0

OUTER
• 100 MIL.E:S O~

SC::A'L.E I, !7.i5Q6
~ CAL-E OF

WE 'E ,M 5- PLOTTE,A:

l

I

"'
~

s

MINES

PLANTED 8'( FORCE SAKER

MJNEFIEL.D MII<I!' 'SKJI"IOP'fOSI!j(1 5TII."1 TS ""I:I!'~)

LEGEND
•• aOOOLI!. MU'W!!5 IiI--EI Jll,PPRO'll. "OSITIO~ VI!:RI,"I£D av SC_ fOHOTO.s 4---+ ~o SCOpeF'HOTO!. .•I'II'IVI6ATOItS·IiJJTU""'1T,eO.F' G--Q

-

J~"lOOOI..B,MlnES

,I

POSITION. () MINI5:$ SAI.VOEP 1'I!lJIljIl'"OIILSINDICI'I". _·0 •. " .0.1" /"lINING TO ScoPiIE F;H()T03 ."" .MI!\Al'ioINS.

.-

RUN A"iO ARt' K~Y

S!Cft!T

SI~CRET


TA,RGET AOUTER
SC4I..,E I !7.~b~ II NAIJTLIJAd M!L..E • re MII..,EB ON ~,~O'O~Oi!,)O SCAk.£ OF' WIE:E:;~S P,-OTT!" l

.. .. ~
..I

:I

~.

I
I

ALL MINES PlANTED BV FORCES Af)LE' AND 8Af(ER
MINeFIELD MIKE

(SHIMONOSEKI STRIiJTS AREAl

.LEGEND
12 ..1000 L&. MIf'ilIiS G----€) 8 .. 2000 L..a. MINI!S a---.--El' APPROlI. PO$ITLO,NveRIFIeD !!Il:apl! PHOToS ~ NO 5COPl! l'IIO'tos. HIIVI"'''''ORS·l!$TI...,,.,,a .... PQ5!1"IO1'1. ;;. MrI'lE.:s S... .. o~1) ( ..... HIJMERflLS If'DIC'II1',e OADe" 01" MI"U'l~ RUN
<3---()

"'f

,

SI~CRET
I

:~,

_.

,

."

TARGE
SOAL.E
I. Nl\tJTI(;ALI

A-OUTER
I I!.".!!IIIII~
• 10 IotIL.iiS ON ~I"'E.

r

'!:~~: ~,~~~~,~:,
l O~

DESIO"

OF" MIN~FIe:L.O
~~I'T~

MII<,E.
A~Il"")

($HIMONO"'~I(I

FORCE.S

AB!...E. ANO

SAI(E"

'0--E) ",. G-----EJ ......
\'".~

G----e

+-----+

12.~. lOCO Le .. MINES 2000 L.e. MI~~S

6RIe:FEO eRleFED

L.OCATION 'L.OCAT10N

NAVIC,A"ORSe;liiI'TIMA,.e; OF Di<OF> P.P~OXIMA,.!!!: LQCA"IO·N AS SHOWN

ev

1"-jRADAR
MIN!!!:S

$COPe: PHO"OS, SALVOI'tO .

:HEAVY

NUME!:RA"'S InplCA.,.e ORD~R LIN~$ INDICATE ee:~T R.MATIO.N ·ON LOc;.A"l'ION 011' i!!ACt-l

MINE

1'<1..11"'"\.

MIN!!.
MINEFISLD

PL.AMTEO

BV FORCE ~LIE

L.OVE (SHIMONOSEKI STIIAms AREAl

LEGEnD

o o

o

o o

Q

la. 1000 L.e.

MlNI!S

,. .. aOOOL.B. M'N~$ APPROX. pO.ITIOn V.RIFIEO

• ..,. KQPa

~o

•.

TARGET
seAL E
(I

LI I,U!t7a
ill

T
MJLEs ON

NO acOPI!PHO'TO$. n"'IGiA'TOIlS ".'TIMofiio'T1! 01= POSl'TfON
NUMERAL-to
IC~"( 'TO IMDICA"TE

"A~nc:.t,l.. WEEMS,

MIL.!:

ao

1.11'000;000

SC;;ALE II Q'F jIIt..QTTE'~·1

SC9~_

PHOTO'S.

OQOI!Q OF R.un AND 1M MAI=2GU", So

AlaE

~,

s

----~~

DE;SIQN

( ~I-I'M or", 0 & EK.I

OF MINEFIELD

LOVE

51'I<.A'1'S AQ,e:.A.)

I-EQENO
e--El 12; K 1000 L.S, MINE;S L.B. MINI!S BI'lIEFEO L.OCA.Tlon.

G-E) +----+

....~ aeoe

B,l:i.II!!F=e:O L.OC""TION, 01'"

NAVIGATO~S AF'PI'lOX IMATI!. BY !:lA-OAR

ESTIMATE.

o ROP,

.......
( I

L..OCATIONAS S\.IOV.IrI &COPE PI.IO'OS .

'-~

\ I

MINES

$AL.VOe:O. .

NUMERAL..S INOICATE O~OE,Q. 01'" MLNIMC "'-UN, HetAVY L.1r'lE.S InOICATE BI!ST AVAIL.. ... L.E. INFO.B RMATION OM L.OCA"TION OF EACH MINE RUM.,
ON

.I.,

I

..

o~

I

I

I I

b

J

~

..
,01

C)

J.
~:"

']" .,eoe , •

A
-

-

I

It,.~r.

L
"'~II

""

A
d.·

/

/

_,o

., " NAUJ

.

'P.

(;op.W.lIUI.

"''!oil I;:~

SECRET

'T4flI~~i,.:U'£A
II,~ ..... '

;y....

-

SEGRET

":'1"'' ' :'
I,

;I,

II'

I II.

<:....

y
o


I

t
I
I

pu:rtm;o 11'1OQNE.flR

ICINAl PO SITIO NS O!:RLL MINE 5
(~HlttDII(}S~II' SHUnts, fUUA)

'MISS'ION NO.4 7
!:lE\.D

MIHE.

~

LI;GI;!10 lODD~!! MII'IE(,LO~1J11!!n·tOIl~IRMEDBV IlAOAIl sCOPE PI40TOS) IDOD LB MlnE(LO'A'TI(lnE!;TABU~HEb BV InTERROGATl!!") 1000 LB MtnIiIBA'&FEo LDlRTIO!1.IUA. CRAl'TftOT RE:TIIII.,. m& FROM MISSlol'tl • 2000 LB MIIU{L!!CilTlOII [O!1~IIIMEO II¥ 111101'111 SCOPE PIUHOS I o 2000 Llil MIII:E(LDUlTIOII ESTA8,L'SH~O BV I"TEIlIIO~ATID") ~ ~OOG1.11 I'll !'I,E(BRIEFED ~DumO"' In~. (,Rlln nor A.E:lURIUnE: FROM MH.SI,Dn) ,:~:~ SALVO (I) M InESt 11II MUlA L n ~ liDl E 5 1IaUF .. "nES·[III<lE DEnOlES \IlE PunE AnD LonFIlI.l'l1t TID" 11.5 TO LoC Rlmn:) I'IOTE·PII.EPI'IIlIlIIOn, O~ 'OlIO Mlllrc Ib U1111Ulri u In II..' nEt e HI ~,IEW OIUl,EIl II;, A.HD\( "LtD ru """'UI'" IIIIJAlf.nr ro U"E 0 ~ ruru s· OlWtll OFDIIU I'PlnG IS rRO" A.ll,!lf rD. tarr'

NOT

TO BE AIR

REPRODUCED FORCE.

WITHOUT HQ •. XX

AUTHORIT Y

SECRET

...
./

~./
,-

/

SFXtTIQN C COPE DESIGNATION

CF

MINms AND MINE PREPARATION

1. To simplify all requests for m.ine preparation and for la.beling mines after assembly, the use of the following code is suggested.
2.

The Type Mine Case wtll be specified TYPE CASE Mk-l:5. Mod 6 Mk-25 Mk-26. Mod 1 Mk-:56, Mod 1

by code words .QQQlI
Lad

o.s

followsl

Mo.n Boy Son of the

Z. The type meChanism and the preparation and Botting components will be specified by codes QS follow ••
0..

FmST

'SYMBOL - LETTER .. MECHANISM .. PREPARATlOO MECHANISM

COPE LEITm
A

DEAD PERIOD

mE LO(lS
.2 Look Reverse

B C D E
F G H I J K L M N

M-9
ft I I

8

Sl

:5

lot :5
8 :5



ft

"

Sf

•• •• 2 Look • ••


I

I

Random
I

" •

lOt

I'


14-11

e

5t

S Look Reverse

lOt Normal

• .. •

2 Look Reverss

P

o

R

Q
S

A-3 ModI MM1

T
U V W

condenser in firing Ohannal) A-3 Mod2 (2 Mircof'o.red oo.ndenser in firing Chnnnl'l)

A-3 14od2 (4 Miorofarad

X
Y Z

b.

SJ!t!OND SnmOL - NmmICR - SENSITIVITY SETTING ACOUSTIC MEeH INDUCTION MEDH COPE NO SENS SW' SET11NQ SENSITlVITY 1 r 1 Fine (Normal) 2 2 Medium :5 !5 COOJ'ss
-28-

.§l.Q.B.!I


c. THIRD snmOL - NUMBER - SlITP COUNT SETTING ACTUATIONS TO FIRE 1
2 3 4. 5 5
7

(NOT PIlI

SETTING)

RODE

1

NO

, NQW! Eli ON TB)

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

6
9

a
d.

10

DASH BETWEEN THIRD SYMBOL AND FOURTH SnmOL FOURTH SYMBOL - LETTER - DELAtED ARMING SETTING

a.

~QJ2E !&Il'ER
A B C D E F

ABl41HQ '2t~I~
45 min 3 hra 12 bra Ie bra 1 dllY 2 days 3 days 6 days 1 days lcb days 13 d!IYs 15 days 18 days

QQ~

N 0 P

LllIIIIlE.

ARYIliw mil':
20 25 30 35 4.0 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 clays dQoYI days dllYI days days dllYa days daYI!I days duyll days days

Q
R

G

S
T U V W X Y Z

H I

J

K

L
Ii

1'. FIFTH

SYMBOL - m.lMEI R .. S'l'ERILIZJ..TION E 1

TrnE AFT1!:R .ARMING TIME AfTER @MING
0-15 days

GODS NUMBER
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 EXMlplos,
CI..

§:IERILIZATION

?

15-30 do.ys 30-50 days 50..:s0days
60.110 days

11 O-~40 da.ys 140-170 dc.ys 170-200 dc.ys

none

~-26, Mod 1 Mine. ).1-9 14echnnism 3 SBC dead poriqd
2 r ever se lOo;lks

3 hour clock delay

Nq

Normal
b.

Sensitivity Codal

Set to fire en Srd ship Boy A13 ,. B6 10 days delayed arming
86 day sterll1z€l.tion

delayed arming \33 d(l.y staril1zution

Mlc-25 mine M-ll MeChanhm

Norma.l Opera.tion Normal Sensitivity
..(lOdE) I

Set tq fire on tenth ship

;.An, :;10 .• :r5

Mk-36 Mod 1 mine , A.3, Mod1, !tIM1 Medium(2) senaitivity
Oodel

3 Hour delayed Il.rmi~ No ateril1r.a.tIon No ship-count Sgn 921 - 89

SECTION D
I:JinelPJd,ng Procedure·

1, It is direoted tha.t the mineloying procodure olltl1ned below be placed into effect immediately. 2. Mlnela.ying by a.ircraft of the 313th Wing will genero.lly be cc.rl'1ed out in wec.ther unsui tc.ble to.r hit;h-Ievel precision bombil\li. Depending on the particular tactical sitllation, altitudes of o.tta.ok may ~ary from severnl hundred feet to 50,000 feet. Each run will be ma.de by ro.da.r, and genElrnlly by single-plane flights, If viatbil1 ty and the method used are such that the bombo.rdler ce.n got v1auo.l check points, he will take over the mining run in the samemaMer 0.8 n bombing pun, but 1n most Cnsas ro.dnr techniques will be I.laed throughout. 3. Minelaying from aircraft presents the fundamental problem ot placing the mine at a designated position in tha wo.tcr, using ro.do.r o.iming pOints or visua.l check points on adjc.cent const lines (ma1nlaad or islo.nds) to loco.te that position. This requ.ires thAt 0. reference point method be used. sinca the aim1ng point will not coineide with the target ("hioh is the deSignated position 1n the wnter). The one outstanding difference between minel~ying c.nd reference point bombing is thnt the mines ~sed ure equipped with small parachutes which retard their speed of 1'0.11o.nd also ccuse them to drift downwindafter role~Be from the ~ircruft. At high winds o.nd nIti tudes of 25,000 to 30,000 feet, Q. mine moy drift downwinduS much !l.S 5 to 6 m.iles before hitting the wo.terI at o.ltitudes of 5000 feet and normal windll, the d.rift will be about i mile. Therefore, in nrrlving at the dropping position it is necessary to correot for the wind drift of the mine as well ns the oourse nnd rate ot tb9 a.ircraft, In other respects, minelo.ying is similar to reference. point radar bombing. 4. Regardless of the method.used to arrive o.t the dropping posi. tion when plnnting mines, it is necesso.ry to first compute this position from the target lOCation a.ndwind data. over the target. Strictly speo.king, it is not possible to do this until o.fter an o.couro.tewind run hns been made in the vicinity of the target, In pruct1oe. however, it will be a. sto.nding prooedu.re to compute the dropping position from the predicted wind given o.t the last weather brief1ng prior to tnke-off. This caloulation will be revised, if necossnry, after o.n aCoura.te wind rtlu has been made during the apprOach to the tlll'get. 5. The method to be used by the no.v1go.torin oomputing thG drop... ping pos! tion of the first mine from Elp,ch niroraft is as f·ollows: a. From the predicted (or measured) wind at nltltude, compute the bnll1atio wind that will be l10ting on the mine during its time of fall. This is done by ascerta1ning the approximate bal11st10 fo.otor in Table I and multiplying the wind at 0.1 tude by tht s faotor; assume ti direction of bullistlc w1nd to be the same 118 thnt of wind o.taltitude, • 313th BombardmentWing To.ctlcalS.
O.

p. Number 100-2.

'D. In the Fie14 Order for la.ylng the mines, the tarljot (or lntend6d position of tho .flrst mine) will be specified in relo.tion to 0. ro.dcr CLimi~ point (RAP), to!;ether with 1 of the 2 methods of lnyl!l1 outlined in po.ro.grCLphs a.nd 8, On 0. cha.rt of suitable sco.le, plot the 7 ta.rgot loco.tion o.nd the no..wind course of the CLil"cra..ft. The lo.tter w111 be determined frolll tho mothod apecif'iGd q.s follows I If Method.w is given, the direction of the no-wind oourse will bG fram to.rget looo.tion to ra.dur aiming point. while if Method i8 given, the direction w111 be from ro.dnr Ilimill!; point to ta.rget. Theft o.scortain the wind drift ot tho mine tor tho bo.llistio wind determil'l.Odin s\ib-pc.ro.e;ra.ph11, flbovo. In tho Oo.SO the lOOO-lb mine (Unrk 26 o.nd 36 80ries), of this will be found i:.n To.ble IV, while in the cnse ot tho 2000-1b mine (Uo.rk 25 80rlos) th1. will be found in To.ble V. If 0. mixo_d~oa.d of mines is being dropped on. tho same run. use tho wiJl.d~t'li't tound in Ta.ble IV. Plot the wine! drift vector by laying off the diato.nee thus determined baok into th~ diroction~rom whioh tho wind is blOWing. On the vector di~rama shown b~low, nt this point vectors RT o.nd Tl'1 helve been drawn.

m

o. Newdetermine the no-wind ra.~o of tho first mine to bo dropped frolll the true o.ir spoli'd nnd tho 0.1ti tu.de. Thia"rill be tound in Ta.blo II for lOCO-lb minos nnd in To.ba III tor 2000.1b mines. llea.s1.11'0 off this disU1.nco wi th 0. pl1lr of oempo.ases. n.nd dro.yt 0. oircle on the vector di~ram with '1" 0.5 oenter a.n~ ro.dius equid to the no"'lrind range of the mine.
d. Compute the hoo.dlng of the d~oro.ft duri~ the lI11n1ng run by Ill1- o.pproximo.tlon method as follows. Draw veotor aT'. whioh elpproximntes the oourse of the airoraft during the mining run. Set th~s course on a.n E6B computer. and determine the drUt angle of the aircraft tor the wind at 0.1 tude. t1 Md 0 r Bubtro.ct thi a nng1e f.r om.the cou.rse (d.pending on whether the drift is left or right respeotively) in order to determine the hending during the mining run. a. Determine the droppinj!; poBitioll or rolense point 0.1' the first mono (p) by drawing a Une from '1" to the circumfarenoe of tho ro.nge cirole Illong a bearing 1800 from the heading of the aircra.ft ~ deterJnined in sub-parngr!lPh d. The Gffecti ve tro.jectory of the mine 1. now given by the dll1ita.ncePT, with PT' being the component due to tho set i'o",o.rli of the mine. and TIT the component due. to wind drift during the a.ctuo.l time of fall.

t. The OO\1rsato be ma.degood in the minitl! run wU 1 be given by the d1l'eetion of the vector RP, while the offset distance (or horizontal range trom ra.dar aiming point to release pos1tion tor the first llIina) will b~ the length of vector RP.
g. In the cas" of 10Vi inds that will be encountered at low w o.lti tudes (be19w 5000 t't). the dire9tion of iU' will lle app.l'Oximlltely the sruno as RTt and the hoe.cling may be assumed to be that of RT'. thu. e11minll.ting the naoes.slty for atep (d) a.blllve. In the (1).80 of very high 0:-055 wi.nds at h1gh altitudeB. ho'Weve.r,it may be neoessary to make an. additional oa.lcult>.ti9n. This wHI oonsist ot detebnining the rert.ed heading n.08asary to make good the Oourso RP; if this hoad1ng is ~roeiably d1rforo~ from TIP, ro-plot tho poUtion pi on the 'ballia of th9 .nowh.oatUng and thon detormine the reViI!Ied. our.o. R,P', to be usod in laying. c

he Thh method of computing tho dropping poe1tion is nlu.trll~ 04 ;in tho ·Vootor Diagrams and Samplo CalcI11o.tion.'

.IlilJl

Oa Two basic methods will be used for m1nolaylng, the oholoe be1DC dependont upon the particular taetioal oltuation involved. UothodJlDi will be spocified when It is oonvaniGnt to fly towa.rds the radar alzn1ng point (RAP) but not OVGr it, and will be particularly suitod to low altitude ~ttack. while Method TWO will bo specifiod whon it is convonient to fly over e. rlldar aiming point, IUld w111 bs partioularly suited to acourate minela.ylng close to shore. The two mothods are explained in dotail below. 7.
vector Method ONE (Target

aetwoen

:FlaM

and

MPh

a. From the predicted wind data. the navigator will plot a diagre.m ae shown Cn Page 35. following the mothod in paragrapb 5. He will soale off the horizontal rango RP. in nautioal miles. He will then convort this horizontal range to slant rango for tho altitudo to be flown, and give this slant range to th0 radar operator. The later will set up a bomb rolease Circle for this slant range on the PPI soopo whGn on tht;) mining run, b , Maleo an accurate wind run when approaching the target aroe,. If the measured wind is significantly different from the pr~dlctod Wind. tho na.vlg~tor will ro-plot the veotor diagram on the b~sls of the now wind data, and will furnish the new slant range to the rad~r operator.

c. The IP will be ta.ken about 30 mileS" from the r.adar ~1m1ng pOint. along course RP a.s f'ina..lly det0rm.ined on the basis of' the wine! data. being used,
d. Tho turn will be made on oourse a.t the IP in the same mannor 0.8 in n b9mb1ng run. The first mine will be released by the banb· nrdier on 0. ·Mark' from tho radar operator when the bomb roleaso circle intersects the rnd!:lr cdming point. Tr'l0 nir speed nnd cou.rse mu..lltbe mo.intnined throughout the mining run. e. The bombardier will preset tho anglo betwoen ~nd tho radar aiming point at tho roleCl8~ position on his drop visually if' he eun SOO thG radnralming point. This that tho bombardier compute this anglo from the altitude range oaloulated by the naviglltor.

the vortioo.l bombsight. and will roquiro Bnd horizontal

cour-se o.t pre-determined
stop-wo.tch

r•

Sue:ceed~ng mines will usuo.lly be droppGd on the SlllJII) time 1.nterva.ls, whiCh will be mea.ured on a by the bombardier.

g. The naVigator ....,ill taks a plotl1re of the radar soope at tbEl dropping posltio~, while the r01e~se cirole ia still on tbG BOOP$. and will note the run~ and time at wh19h the photo WaS taken. h, One of the gunners (de6igno.ted by pilot) will observe mines dropped to ascertain if the mine po.rnohutes open properly. the

a. If the a1ti tude of attack is grea tar than. 5000 feet, the procedure ol1tlined thrOl.'.gh pa1"agraphs 8, b to i will be followed. FoJ" al t i tu des of 5000 r eet 0 r 1e sa I al tar thi s method e. s gl ven in paragraph 8, j.

b. From the predicted wind data. the n~vigator will plot the vector di~gr~s 1:1.3 shown on Page 35, following the method in paragraph 5. He will sonLe off the horizontal range. lIP, in nautioal miles. Hit will then determine the ground speed that t.he o.iroraft will be making in the predicted wind from an E6B computer, and calculate the time of run on deo.d reckoning to COVGr istance lIP. This oalcu1ation will be checked by d the bombardier. c. Makean accurate wind run when approaohing the target areas as in paragraph 7, b. If a re-plot is necessary, the n~v1g~tor will reca.1cula.te the horizontal range and ground speed for the new wind data, !ll'l.d tm time of run to cover RP. This co.lculation will again be checked by tho bombardier. d. If the a.ltitude of a.ttack is above 5000 ft, the ra.dar opero.tor will be supplied before the f light with slant ranges for synchron1zing wi th the bombard ier on the RAP, a.s in a. bombing run. The purpose of synchronizing is to supply the bombardier with a precision poin'\: tram which to start a ti~ed run on dead reckoning. If the altitude Qt attack is 5000 rt or below, the radar operator w111 be givon 1 slant runge to sot up a bomb release circle for starting tho timed run, and no aynchronlzatlon will be used. e. The IP wlli be taken as in paragraph 7, c and the turn w111 be mado on eourso as in a bombing run. From this point on, the mining run will be made in the same manner as a bombing run with navigator and pilot kUling d.r itt. and ro.do.r opera tor and bombard iar killing course. '!'he only difference will be tM bombardier I s procedure, a.s des!lribed in para.graph 8, e below.
f. The bombardier will "et a disc speed into the bombsight for the SOO-lb bomb for the altitude flo~. )(hen the navigator gives him the ground ~peod. ho will ascertain the tangent of the dropping angle for that ground speed and n1titudo:l in bombing tables for the SOO-lbbomb. He will pre-set his rate index on the tangent ve.lue th~s determined. With the rate' motor off he will then engage the telescope clutch, witb the telescope index oppos1te the first synohronidng anglO, At the commalld 'Mark- from the radar operat.or, the bombardier will turn on tho rate motor. A.t tho' nOJl:,! 'ohsoli:'angls tho radar operator w1l1 again ~ll' out tho nEiw m.ngloo.nd 'Mark' when in thnt position. The bombardier will re-ut the telescope index to agree with the Sighting angle and will make an adjustment with ths rate knobI tu.rning 1t in the seme dlrE!otion EUI the dhplacement knob is turned. This adjustment will be repeated as Bach angle, and the rate will thus be killed on the IU.P the same as in bc:mbing" The bombnrd1er will not have the mine release when his indioes meet. however, but w111watCh the telesoope index until it is oppos1te 0°, and will sta.r~ his stop watch 0:" this time. At this point. the nircro.ft should be directly over tha RJ..P. At the end of' 1\1s timed run. he will togg Le off' the r irst mine. 1l.ddi tiol'1nl mines will be Q.ropped011 course at a pre-determined time interval between mines. g. Visual ~yncbronlu:t1on or Qourse determinnt~on will be used whenever visibility permits.

h. The navigo.tor will to..ka III picture of the ra.dar scope at the dropping position of the firllt mine. The radar ope1"ator will lea.ve the last range oircle used tor synchronhatiol'l on the scope until after this picture ill tnken: the naviga.tor will note this slant rangs and. the range and time at which the picture was takGn.

i.

11. gunner will

observe pnraohuta funotioning

as in paragraph

j. If the altitude of atta.ck is 5000 fee·t or leas, the method outlined in b nnd 0 above should be modified to allow for the fnct tho.t the timed run will beg in before (rather than over) the RAP, as stnted in paragraph a, d. In such cases, the length of run on dead reckoning will be the distance RP added to the horizontal range for the slo.nt range mnrkerset in by the radar operator.

9, The above procedure utilizes the sa.me division among the crew as the bom.bingprocedure. SECTION E
Min$? Handling!

of responBibil1ty

am

Lop.d.1ng*

1. In order tc ho.ve mines opera.te properly, it 18 ab801utely necessary that the procedure outlined below and on the check.otf lists be followed ip handling, preparing, and installing mines in aircraft. 2. The Mine Londing Plans (Page40-4l)' will be prepared by the Wing Ordnan.oe Officer a.nd will o.ccompllny the Fi sId Order +'0 Group Operations. There will be 0. separate liIine Loading Pla.n for ench Airpla.ne Commc.nder. a. Group Operations Willi

(1) Place the number of the airplnne that the Airplnna COllllIlnn.der will be assign.Eld on both sheets of' the Mine Loading Plan. (.2) Distribute Sheet I of the LolldinlJjPlnn to the Group Ordnanoe Officer and Sheet .2 to the Group ArmrunentOfficer ll11111Gdlntaly after the plane aSSignment is made. b. The Group Ordnance Offioer will distribute Sheet 1 of tho Mine Load.1ngPlan to the Ordnance OffiCers who are to load the partIcular aircraft concerned.

c.

The Ordntl.nceOfficer

(and His Sectign)

Willi

(1) Dra.wall the mines speoi!i.ed on the Uine Loading Plnns in hi S pOllS ion and th,e nece ssa.ry pD.l'B.chut~s, relsasil mechanisms, and ass soluble washers IUlddeliver them to the daslgnnted aircraft. (2) Give Sheet 1 of the Uine Loading Plan to the Chief Armorer for completion.. achutss (3) Plo.ce the mlnes on bomb crad~es and inliltall a.nd soluble washers on the mincs. (4) Attach the statIc cord.s to the pInna after list
tho!) PD.J'-

are loaded.

the minaG to the

(5) Complete 1;ha ordp,a:nce check-ofr Wing Ordnance Ofrloer.

and return

d. The Group Armament Offioer will distribute Sheet 2 of the Mine Londing Plan to the Ohlef Armorers assigned to the airc·raft OOJloo" cerned • ....313th Bombo.rdment ing Tnotlcd S.C.p. No 15008. W
-34-

§'~Q.R!I
VETOR DIAGRAM; FeR MINELAYIID COMPUTATIONS

MEI'HOD ONE

METHOD '!WO

/../AIE OF MIAIES

r " -"
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SJ.MPLE

COMPUTATIONS Altitude:25,OOO feet True Air Speed': 265 mph (230kts) wind: 150 kts fran 270OT. Ballistic \lind: 0.54 x 150 or 81 kts N041ind Range of Mine: 0.62 n.m. METHOD TiIO

Target (T): 5 n.m, bearing 180 from R Temperature: -40°C. c.! .A.S.: 179 mph (155 kt s) Milli:: Mark 26-1 (1000 lb size) TIind Drift of Mine

(TT'): 2.60

n.m.

MEl'ROD ONE Approximate Laying Course (BT'): Drift Angle: Aircraft Heading: ' Horizontal Range (RP); , Laying Course CPR) or CRP): Layine: Heading: Droppine: Slant Range: , Tangent of Fr,,-s~rt Angle: Bombardier s PI'e-set Ana1e: Ground Speed: Run-out Tims:
I

1680 T.

5.35 n an,
1720 T. 2120 T. 6.75 n.m.

2080 T.

400 Left

3480 T. 40° Right 3080 T. .4.40 n.m, 3520 T. 3120 T.

1.305 52.50

156 kts.
102 see ,

- 35 -

e,

The Ohief .Armorer 1f:1111
(1)

sequence directed (2) (3)

Prepare the bomb stations in the Mine Loading Plan. Mark the desired

to drop the mines in the on so.cb mine in chalk.

bomb station

Supervise loading the mines.

(4) Complete the 'bomb station- columns on Sheets 1 and 2 of the Mine LcndIng .Plan after the mines are lOaded. (5) (6) Turn Sheet lover to the bombardier of the al rcratt.

Return Sheet 2 to the Wing Ordna.nceOffioer.

3. There are 2 sizes of mines whioh will be used. The 1olk-25 series of mines weigh about 2000 pounds and are loaded In the awne way as 2000Ib bombs. The Mk-26 and Mk-36 series weigh about 1000 pounds and are loaded. in the same wa.yas lOOO-lb bombs. There are 2 major differences between bcmba and minas. the methoQ,of arming OJ1d the parachute which repla.ees the bombfinll.

4.. Mines are not urmed by a.ir trawl as bombs o.re. but by hydrostatic (water pr~ssure) devices aimilar to those used on depth bomba. All mines use 2 of these devices. The extender. which is in the deepest pocket of the mine, arms the explosive train of the mine by placing an electric detonator in the booster Charge. The clock starter, which i. in t~ shallow pocket, starts a clock which after 45 minutes connects the electric detonator to the firing mechanism and also arms the firing mecha.ni m, This clock can only :run while the clock starter 18 either s mo.nually depressed or when it is under water, so that the clock starter must be operated for a total or 45 minutes before the electrical system CM arm. Both the clock ste..rter and extender must be as lea.st 16 feet under wo.ter to operate' and will retract if pressure is removed.
5. Washers are always placed in the clock starters and extenders to prevent inexperienced personnel or impact from operating them. Wooden washers, which are painted blaCk fo~ identif ication, are always used until the mines are ready to be leaded, and keep the mine from arming even when under Vlate't. Directly before "hoisting the mines into the bomb racks the wooden wuhers are replaced with soluble washers by the ordncmce crews. These s01uble washers 0.1"'; "Whiteor brightly eoIo red tor identifioation and are madwot a salt which will dissolve within a few minutea when in- Wahl'. It is absolutely necessary that the arming devices be dry when the wo.Bhersare installed. If tor nny re ason minel! are removed from 0. plo.ne nfter londing. the soluble washerB must be repl~ced by the wooden washers before transporting b~ek to the dump. 6. In 0 rder to r~duca the 1mpnct whan minGI! hit the water. pn.ra.chutes 15 feet In dlruneter are used inBtead of bombfins. To prevent this paraohute fram dragging the mine whan it is under wnt~r. a release meo~ o.n1llm 111used. This dbconnects the pnra.cbute from the mine when.it str llcGII the wB.t(;r. The ordnnnoe eraws will assemble the pnrnohute and ralense to the mine. Thill relense consists of ! semi-c~roulo.r strape which fit aroultd the mine case and held together by 0. bol t on 1 side and n lend-weighted p'in on the other side, The lend weight must Il.lwo.yll be on tho forWllrd side of the releasa. ¥then the mine strikaa the water, the lend woight pulls tm pin out of the rele[1.se o.nd tM paddles on the .!

,.. 36l"

.

'§!.Q

lLILt

8~apS wipe the rela~se off the mine. In order for " on tM mine during descent and to Oollieoff on wo.ter lutely necossary that the bands be tightened to the release meOho.n1sm cnn be oriente.d in ~ oonvenient as long as the paddles are placed directly over the mine Case.

the release to .tar impact, it is ab.ocorreot tension, The pod tion on the caso lugs W01ded on tho

7. The par~chute is oentered on the mine case by means of 0. small pin on the oontor of the tnil plate and held on to the release by means of severnl shackles. On some mines a smnll well is located in the center of the taU plo;te. On these minos 0. oircular plate which fits into this WOIl must be screwed into the paraohute before installation. Tho paraohute is opened on dropping by a statio line ~tto.ched to a rigid member of tho plnno. It Is necessary t~t the paraohute be oriented on tho mine as shown on sketoh 1, so that this statio oord will come out ot t~ top of tho pooket of the parachute. For correct opero.tion th. parachute must b. ~bsolutely dry. B. After the mines nre installed in the plnne by the armament craws, it i.s n.eoossary for the ordnance crews to ntto.ch the pn.rnchute sto.tio cords to the plilne. It is neoessary to follow the method shown in sketch 2 in attaChing static lines to prevent premature opening or failures ot the pnrnchutes. Most of the parachute stat1c cords hnVG 0. small clasp on tho end. These onn be f~stened to nny oorreotly located member. On pnro.Clllu~ stat tc oords without olasps. it is neoessary to tie the end ot the cord to 0. member o.t leo-st i inch in diameter or to n clasp of another stntic 11ne. The length of the 11110 should nevor be shortened nnd tho end must be nttaohed to 0. smooth surface free of sharp edges. Mines should never be londed if the soluble washers or po.ro.ohutes are dttmp.

>,ATIC

£IAfE

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J./i,Jl viii PARACHtiTe

~"'ATIC. tllVE NI/Sr

PaCKer (V17i'lIN THIS ANGLE.

j7A£,ACHLI;:e;

IS€: //./ sv» L.Li?(? IF 7h'ES-iE ric Co.-!p_<:"
Al'i!e BROKEN.

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MelSt" 8£ FR6E c~AFroFAU T11E.STRAPS.

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- 38 -

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rlfi$ Plf.f/~ III IL $f 6e 16'5> tled;t 90" \

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PARAC',t/tlTE- ;

cVIF~Y ~7JV1C IIA//!!F ,wUS"T B€ ct.eAR 0.1= ()T#E,I( !"'rArl&: 1-I'('/£"5" !>O . 71IA7" £t~£ASE OF NOT OP"e-N aT#£;r.? ,PARACHUTeS" .
" ONS M/NE W/£.t.

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OF STATIC LINFS

- 39 -

MINE LOADINg
SHEET 1

PLAN

J..IRPW,NE P~A.NE 00. GRO~

COMMANDmR,

_

_ _

DATE OF MISSIONi..Dl>.TE LDADED~ TIME LOADED,

_ _ _

SQUllmO,.~
Required Dropping
Sgquence

__

Mlc-Mine

COd! Lotter

Bomb Statiop

Sequenc,

(ror Bombardier)
Dropped

1
2

5
6 7 6 9

10
11

12
Cheoked By.

o.fter mines were loa.ded

-===~~==~---CHIEF ARMORER s1&e
to Ordnanco Offioer

Mnrk 25 Mine ROUTING I.
2.
I

apoO#

size,

Marks 26 and 35 Mines 1000#

3.

mines from mine randy dump. ,-Chief Armorer for reoording bomb stations. S. Plane Bombo.rdier for record.ing sequenoe dropped. 6. Interrogo.tor for Int'orm.o.tlon and forwClrdlng to Wlng Ordnan.oe Offioer.

Or cup Op erGot!.ns r or Plane NUlllbl'. o e Group Ortl,no.Dce Officer for distribution ooncerned. Ordna~ce Orficor for drawing required

SHEEr
J.IRPL;.:NE PL.i.NE NO.,
GR01IP

2

COMMANDER:....... _
_

_ DATE OF MISSION~ OATE LOl!.DED TIME LOAJ)ED'-_ _ _

SQU.hDRON,
Required

_

Dropping
SeQugncg 1 Coae

Lettgr

Bomb Statign

2

4 5 6
7

8 9 10.

11 12 CFgEF 1. 2,
3,

.iJj.MC!R.!jJft.· 9REQK LIST oS

I

In1t\9.1a

Bomb Stations ass1gI;i.ed ~nd recorded. Bomb sto.tiona prepQ,red for lO!ldlng duignated minos. ,Proper bomb stD.tion, -and side o!'ple.ne plo.eec1. onsll,ch
min!> with

Ohttlk.

4. 5.
6.

Mine,; lotl,ded., Paraohutes are ary.
St(lot1c cords are connected to rigid members of the plane, o.b9~ and aft of thepe.raohute, oo.po.ble. of supporting
'250. 1l:!5 .•

7. 8.
9.

Mines o.re loaded in proper ato.tions,. Sheet (1) given to plo.ne bombardier. Afte.r plane returns. tag sto;ll1c l~nes with p,lane number and d().tl,>!l.ndreturn toVHng Ordnance o.fficer. (lIfnrk as Mina2000# size, Mark. 26 & 36 Mines 1000# IIba)
Group Opero.t1ons fo.r plan.e numbsr. Group Armtlmant OCfloer for distribution to chief D.rmorer concerned:. Chi.ef Armorsr for oompletion nnd forwarding to Vi1.ng Ordnance Officer

ROUTINGI

1,
2.

3.

ORPN4NCECHECK-PFF
Airplane FInne Gro~. Squadro .• ,. Ne. Commnnde.r _ _ _

LIST FOR

MINE LOADING
De.

(Fl11 out this part of 11st when mine is on oradle and before paro.chute ls instnlled) Dry soluble wo.shers (2) installed in enoh mine. Securing nuts tl(;ht over each wnsher. Lucite covers (2) removed from each mine. Parachute r&lease mechnnism oriented oorrectly on mine cnse so that inertia release is free of lugs on mine case. 5. Orientation lug placed on pase with cott~r key if one is not welded to Case. Lead. end of inerth. relense on forward end of releaSe» mecho.nism. Shear wire instnlled through wnsher nnd relenae pin and ends bent o.t right o.ngles. 8. Relense mechanism conforms to curvnture of mine Case. (No lnrge nir gaps between mine Co.se and raleo.se mechanism.) Release mechanism hnS proper tension. (Inertia weight should just slide with force nnd should feel sloppy when moved from side to side.) Lock nut tight. (Fill out this purt of list after pa.rachute is ~nstal1ed and before loading mine) Centering plate p Lnc ed on para.chute if necessary. Parachute correctly oriented on mine onse for londing on proper side of pI nne , Purnchube shroud liM sha.okle pins tight, Small wire fed through eyes of p~ruohute shroud line shackle pins. Soluble washers and parnchute a.re dry. (Fill o~t this part of list after mines a~e loaded in plane) Static cords are connected to rigid members of the plane, above and aft of the par uchu'te, cnpnb Le of supporting 250 pounds. Pnro.chutes o.re correotly oriented. Tie cords in pcckets of parachute are into.ct. All slaok is remo~ed from statio lines o.nd taped with Sootch or friction tape. Static lines are free· of tie straps. Sto.1:1011nes are olear of e ac h other so thnt relGo.se of one mine will not open oth~'r parachutes. Return wooden washers and LUCl te covers to ,i'ingOrd.no.noe Officer. Loade.d under supervision
of
--:"~-~---T

11.
12.

(Crew Chior)

Checked by__ ----~~------~~--~---(Ordno.nco Officer)
RE'l'URN THIS CHEDK.OFF LIST

TQ WING ORDNANCE OFFICER.

P.hBT III

- FLIGHI'

!!JNGINEEB1NI{

I, This mission Vfll.S flown by ind1vld)lal aircraft. The mu:imwn round-trip ground distance on this mission wo.a 2B76 nnutiCo.l miles. longer tho.n o.ny mission previously flown by thh Wing. The oruise out "o.s at 5000 foet. The mining a.ltitude WtU! 5000 i'(;Iet; the return was acoomplished at different altitudes between 10,000 and 20,000 feet. This mission W0.8 similar to other 10w-0.1 tude Missions previously flown. ti 2. The oruise to the target at 5000 feet wus a.ccomp1ished at npproximately 198 mph CASby most aircraft. The aircraft were in auto rich during the climb o.nd were able to mainto.~n auto lean power settings during the entire cruise before going on the mining run. 3. The mine-run a.ltitude.was the same consequently there was no olimb nseessary,
D.S

tho cruising

altitude,

4. Powers used on the mine-run proved interesting. The mu:1mam CASfor the mine-run was Bet at 230 mph to be under by 10 miles the reoommend0dmaximummining speed of 340 mph. The 9th Bombardment Group set maximumauto lean power at 5000 feet (2150 RPMand 33') and gOil 215 mph 018 on the run. Other Groups set approximately 2300 rpm nnd 39' during the lII.ine·run period of about 10 to 18 minutes and calibrated close to 230 mph. The extra power wns mostly as 0. precaution in OaS8 nn engine should be lost. . 5, After completing the mining run, the aircraft olimbed to altitude to return. Power was held on and the high speed of the l!ombing run mild\,)it po ss i ble to c 11mb rapidly. Ths return Vias aecomplished at altitudes between 10,000 nnd 20,000 feet; the aircraft returning at 0.1· titudes hbovo 15.000 feet generally made the most eoonomical return and returned so oner ,
6,

Summllry::
0..

Groups DQ.tg. 6th

Flight

!WL
12,000 3,220 5,561 1.129

.§Q!:th

505th

.t'l.ver::l.ge Bomb Load 12,100 Average Fuel to Target 3,413 l.vernge Fuel U.s.edTotal 5,872 ,;"verage Fuel Remo.ining 908 MinimumFuel Remaining 659 Average Gross Weight 133,177 ,Initial) Average Total Time 14:29
~I

12,130 12,840 3,452 3.390 5,810 5.745 975 956 656 634 438 133.35,7 133,357 131,915 14:33 bnding 15:01
14:59

These figures

do not inClude aircraft

at 1wo Jimo..

b. The use of briefed metro winds on return from mission is of extreme importnnce l briefing of crews on metro winds immedia.tely before the miSsion ha.s helped grea.tly. c. Cruise control wns satisfo..ctory on
th:j. B

mission.

j.!l.Q

lLi 1

PART III

- FLIGFn' ENGWiEBINQ

1. This mission wns flown by individ~al aircraft. The maximum round-trip ground dist~nce on this mission was 2676 nautical miles. longor thnn nny mission previously flown by this Wing, The oruise out was at 5000 foet. The mining altitude was &000 feet; the return was aocomplished at different altitudes between 10,000 and 20,000 foet. This mission wns similar to other low-altitude missions previously flown. 2. The cruise to the target at 5000 feet was acoomplished at approxima.tely 196 mph C.hS by most o.irornft. The o.irCraft were in auto rich during the climb and were able to maintain auto lean power settings during the entire cruise before going on the mining run. 3. The mine-run altitude.was tba SBme as tho cruising consequently there was no olimb necessary. altitude.

4. Powers used on the mine-run proved interesting. The mnxlmum GAS for the mlne-~n was sot at 230 mph to be under by 10 miles the reoommendad maximum mining speed of 240 mph. The 9th Bombardment Group set m~imum auto lean power at 5000 feet (2150 RPM rund 33·) and got 215 mph 01.5 on tho run. Other Groups set apprOXimately 2300 rpm nnd 39· during the mine-run period of about 10 to 16 mi.nutes and oalibrated olose to 230 mph. The extra power wos mostly as 0. precaution in cnsa nn engine should be lost. 5. Aftur completing the mining run, the o.ircraft Climbed to 0.1. titudeto return, Power was held on and the high speed of the 1I0mbing run made it possible to climb rapidly. The return was accomplished at altitudes between 10,000 nnd 20.000 feet; the aircraft returning at 6.1titudGS b.bovo 15,000 feet gene~o.lly made the most Goonomioa1 return and returned sooner. 6. Swnmo.rv:
Il,.

Groups

Fli!l;htQg,tg.

m

~

.§.Q!th

.§Q§:th

;.vero.geBomb Load 1lhlOO J..verageFuel to Target 3,413 Avernge Fuel Used Total 5,872 ";'vero.gauel Remaining F 906 Minimum Fuel R.emaining 659 J..vGrag~Gross Weight 133,177 (Initinl) .hvernge Total Time 14:29 N:OTEI These figu.res do not inolude airoraft

12,000 12,130 12,840 3,220 3,452 3,390 5,745 5,810 5,561 975 966 1.129 656 634 438 133,357 135.357 131,915 14:33 landing 15:01 14:59

!.'It Jima. 111'0

b, The use of briefed metro winds on return from mission is of extreme 1mportnn06j briefing of orews on metro winds immediately before the mission has helped greo.tly.
0.

Cruise o0ntrol was satisfactory

on this missioll.

P ART

IV - MDbR

1. or 102 ~irornft on taka-off. 101 or 99% h~d oper~tlve AN/APQ-13. After 5 early returns. of 97 over target. 92, or 96%. h~d operatIve AN/APQ-13. or airoraft Innding, 90( had operative AN/APQ-13. 2. ~ total of 146 radar wind runs ~d 1216 radar fixes Were taken; landfall 'WtLS at 0..0 nverage range of 42 ntlutical miles. 3. Loran fixes numbering 1056 were taken at average maximum range of ~pproxim~tley 1200 nautical miles,
4, 5.

Eighty-one

mIne releases were by radar-offset

method.

¥Slfunotionsl a. AN/AP9.-13 I (1) (2) 2: 3: 11
31

Crystal current fluctuating. Selsyns out of phase. Drop in crystal current when switching from 50 to Range limited to about 30 miles. Bomb release 11ne weak. because of' bad air-

(3) 20 mil e range. (4)
(s)

1:

(6) 1: Set out on return. possible cro.ft electr ionl system. (7) ~: verter on wny baok. (8) (9 ) (10) (11 ) (12) b. 1:
1: 1: 1:

Inverter went out over the tnrgot. used Loro.n inNo crystal current. Jittery trace. Sebyn frozen.

Seotor senn out. S11glrt VOltage f Iuc tua ti On,

I:

ANLJi!:N-41

(l) (2) (3)

Ell

Inverter

d1fficulties. onlibro.ted,

I: 1:

Station #3 not properly

6SV'7 tube burned out. no replncements.

FAIl;

Y•

OOHIiERI

1. en 8tructod out c:nd mission.

wo".

GIUUl"r,~"al'o darted, o.pprox1mD.tely 1 hour be1'orlll ID.11df'o.ll I>D4 tl», n1""t untU wall Ol1tt" un on tho return. Owmere were iD. ta notify tho p11ot8 of UOUSUD.l happenings. Thill waa oo.rri .."it o.ided, 0. groo.t den1 in the auc"essf'lll ll.ooompliBhment of' the only 3 iIIolf'uDotione 01'

2. or the o:lror ..f't ,ovor enemy territory. equipment were reportod.

.a. li .rU .J .1

PART

Y • !!UJm

1. Gwman "aro o.hrted o.ppronmntoly 1 hour b6tora la.n4t!111 IUI4 won on t"' 019rt until '11'611out to aGel on tho return. Gunnar. wera b.etl'ucted to notify the pilote of UIIU8u.o.lh!lppen1nga, Th1. was Co.rr1ed out, and it elided n grsnt denl in tho auooeuful Moompl1ahlllant ot the
m.1l18ion,

2, Of"tM o.'1ro·rnft ovc'r onemy territory, eq_uipm<lnt "era reportod,

only <5 mo.liunct'ioM ot

APRIL

1945

PART

I ----1--

3

I
I

I I I

I .---,--[ I -_ I I I
KEY
.-

I

'·CHICHI JIMA

----+-I
IW~ JIMA

I

I I

I

I

0.. -

SUBMARINE SURFACE
NAVY

VESSEL

DUMBO
DUMBQ

Il..-

SUPER

I

TRACK

CHART

XXI

BOMBER

COMMAND

SECRET

Ii EPROOUCEO 3·5 th.? T. U.

B

Part Port

I ~ Weo.ther Summory

U • Chart - Foreoa.st \'fenther vs Observed Weather
Part hrt III - Prognostio Map Map

IV -Synoptic

Miss1 on No 47 27 MArch 1945

PART

I -. WEATHER SUMl4ARX
PLANNING FOREChST

BASES:

~:

5/10 low oloud, b~se 1500 ft, tops 8000 ft, with 5/10 mt dd1e oloud, from 10 to 11,000 ft, both deere o.sing temporarily from 1000K to 16001 to 4/10 and increasing ~go.in. Showers light to modero.te in morning; modernte to heavy in afternoon. Some 0.8 o.t Guam except showers less intense, both periods. S/10 low cloud, basG 1200 ft, tops 6-8000 ft in we~ front with shower activity; 3/10 middle cloud, bo.se 11,600 ft, tops 12,000 ft. 6-7/10 low cloud, base 2000 ft, topa 6-7000 ft, 8/10 low cloud, base 1800 ft, tops 7000 ft with light showers. 4/10 middle cloud, base 1200 ft, tops l4,00ott. 3/10 cumulus. base 2000 ft, tops 4000 ft.

Saipan:

ROUTE,

To laoN:

To 24oN: To 27oN:

To 30oN;

TlIRGETS: Tokyo &1: 4/10 low cloud, bus e 3000 rt, tops 4500; 7/10 middle No.goyu cloud, buse 12,000 ft, to 14,000 rt nfter 1200K. KObe &: Oso.ko.l Snme us o.t Tokyo except middle cloud inorease ocourlng near 1000K. Sume as ~t Tokyo except middle clo~ neo.r 08 OOK. Opero.tienal Forecast Bnse at 5/10 low cloud, base 1500 rtf T~e Off; tap 7000 ftl 5/10 middle cloud, bnse 1~.000 ft, top 13,006 ft; 5/10 bigh cloud, base :,30,000 j va ibi).i 12 m! ft ty reduced to 1 mi in scattered showers. Route To 20on: e/l0 low oloud, base Oute 1500 ft. top 7000 ft; 7/10 middle cloud, base 13,000 ft, top 14,000 ftl 8/10 high cloud at 30,000 ft; visibility 12 mi dropping to 1 mi in BCll.tter13dain r showers.
290N to 25~: 6/10 low cloud, bnae 2000 ft, top 6000 ft; 3/10 high cloud. nt 30,000 ft, '

incroase oecuring

Weo.tMr Encountered B/10 oumulus. buse 1500 rt, top 700b ft; 8/10 altocumulus, base 10.000 ft; 5/10 cirrus, base 25,000 ft; visibility 15 mi lowering to 2 m1 in soattered
showers.

&sON to 30oN; 6/10 low cloud. b~s~ 2000 ft. top 6000 ft; 4/10 middle cloud, base 2000 rt, top 6000 ft, 4/10 middle cloud at 17,000 ft.

5/10 cumulus, base ft; 4/10 altostratus, base 10,000 ft, top 14,000 ft 1n layers; 5/10 cirrus, buse 25,000 ft; visibility 15 mi lowering to 2 mi in seo.ttere~ modero.te showers. 20~ to 300N I 4/10 oumu1ua be .. o~lng a/lO, bo.ses 2000 ft, top 6000 ftl 5/10 al tocurnulus, basI' 10,000 ft, top 14,000 ft, in layers; 9/10 cirrostratus, baSI 25.000 ft; v1sib1l1 ty 15 milas,

To 20OW' 1500 ft.

top 6000

;OO~to Tar;et Areal 6/10 lowoloud, bo.s$ 2000 rt j 6/10 middle cloud. base 15,000 tt, top 16,000 .i't.

300N to 33,50NI g/10 oumulus, ba48 unknown, top 6000 ft, elea.rinc a.t 33.50Nl 9/10 altoatra.tu .. ba.so 1214.,000 ft, top 16-1a,000 ft beooming oloo.r o.t 33,SoNI a/l0 011'1'0atra.tus. bo.lI6 27,000 tt; vll Ibll 1ty

15 miles.

bo.so 1500 ft, 'l'o.rget.1 5/10 low cloud. buse 1800 ft, 3/10 etro.tooumulus. top 6000 ft; ~/10 middle cloud, Oot top 5000 ttj 10/10 olrrostra.tus, 1p,OOO ftj visibillty 12 mi dropping bo.se 27.000 ttj visibility 10 mi, to 1 mi in soo.ttered showers.
Route Returning:

So.m(:) Route 0.19

Ou.tgoing.,

So.me 0.8 Route Outgoing. cumulus, bOose 1500 ttl 6/10 0.1 tostra.tus, bo.80 l~. 000 f't I 4/10 cirrostro.tue, bo.so 30,000 ttj visibility 12 mi; scattered Ught showers in tho vioinity.
5/10

BOos On 4/10 low cloud. bo.sa 1500 ft, a Return I tops 6000 ft; 3/10 middlo oloud,ba;se 15,000 ft j vi sibil! ty 15 mi lowering to :3 m.i in scattered
show()lI's.

Win!;1s Aloft
Bue e to 250N

.. Forecnst Ta.rget
270/70 270/55 25Q/45 260/55 280/25 360/20 040/15 ..22 ..13

25 oN to 54-oN 270/55 ..17

20,000
15,000 10,000 6,000 5,000 2,000

Sur.faee

::170/30 240/20 140/15 125/17 070/23 073/27 073/19

-..12
-03 06 09

265/45
250/33 235/28 210/23 175/19 100/12

..9 0
-01 04 08

..oa

17 23
27

14
16

-04 01 04

oa

Winds Aloft

- Oburved

5,000

250/~0
075/23

Surfa.ce

Hodar(l.te rime iCins: .Ilnd turbulel'iOe
300N a.nd 32oN.

were encountered

between

'I )

'}
Q)
<,

~c
~l)

r

Q
~ ~

~

~&p~ ~'~i
~

~J
'~

:~

.j
~

Ir~~ :t\ ·~
r~
,~

I';'~

\hjl
~ ~' ~~

<\J

K

ftJ
QJ
I

~

t")

Q

I

~

,..J

«

:I u

...
C
0

.. ...
III

• a
~

~~

~~
J

~ ~l
~'
.1

Ii

II

,

;"

'~ ~

:

...

.=. • ., • ..
1&
C

:i II

i~~
~ ~
,~

II V ~ '
~~

=
o

~~ U ~

r
~ ~ ~~
~~I
(\ (1

0

.~

C\

1---0 0 0

~E
a
0 t1'lN

f'

I~ I~
~ ~
,

~I I
I

~d
0 0 0-

a

0

o~

t')

lri'
()I

0

a a a

0N

a a a

..n-

a a a

a a

u.J

u

o-

0
l.l1

« u...
oc
V')

o

-

::>

o o~ o
1'1

0

a
0 0 N

0

a o

a

uo-

-~r

o o
o uo

u
~
«t

c.1

= In

I

\

\

,

-IWQ

JIM'A

If f1-~")
I

I

,

J

I .wo JIMA

"'1/ 5 S J

SYNOP

H + ,. rc MAP
/94~
~~~~_~~~~~

TRUK

~L.:.._!~~

__

...... '

AtM~E7r~fr60" _ 5 rt::r_., .';;n,.,~/1_ /__
n

--_

00007 28 -, MARCH
i

.....

COMMUNICATIONS
Par'll I - Radar COUl'lter Measures

Part II - Radio

Mission No. 27 M9rch

47

1945

-53-

PART I - RADAR

cOUNI'JiRMFA§tRm
ealll'oh

1. Purpose I. ' To oont1nue e.general enemy a c:a:mu.nioat ioIlS !Uld :radar ,sisals. 2. Method.:
B.

proeram

ct .mou'criDg

Outlined

as follows

I

28-143 me

ll". e,

,$..90
74-320

lARA " 1 AN<o-2 1 APR004 2
2

DlC

mo

APR-4 APR.5

d. e.

1000~3QOG mo

3APA-6 were used in connection with the radar receivers.

80/1500/99/330ON..l3200E_H 76/1500/99!3300N-13200E_H 75/1500/99/3300N-13200E_H 92/9 00/12/33 OON-132OOE-H lOO/lOOoI30/3400N-13130E":H 14o/750/6/333ON-131JOE_H 150/40 o/6/3400N-13 13OE-H 155/750!12/3400N-13130E_H IbO/SOO!12/3400N-13130:&-:H 147/750/6/3400N-13100E_H 96f,150 0/12/333 ON.. 13 03 OE--H 77/25 00/8/333 ON-J.303 OE'''H 79/750/62/3300N-13130E_H

155/5 10/.5/311 ON-13400E-H 15 0/1 OOO!18/3 12ON.13400E-H
95/1000/17/315ON-13330E-H 8O/1000/70/3200N-13320E-H

100/3000/10/3140N-13330E-H

135!l5 OO/12/313ON-1335

OE-H

145/700/2of3210N-13310E-H 73/400/40/3230N-1325{)E-H 143/8 oO/S/324ON-1323 OE ..H

152/1200/313230N-13130E~H

95!5 09t-3S/5Q300.il

89/20 00/5 O/270ON .. 3840E-.H 1 80/3 00/5 613 03ON-1343 O.E-H
3430E:",H

16U100/'l0/3300N-13230E-H

PART II

- RAPIO

this

1. Strike mis:sion.

BeFort/! (Mine" Away): .

Were not (l::611ed.or on f

2.

Fox 'Tl'ansmissrions l' a:egueneies

Weather and time were transmitted.

3.

.

r

3411 - R-5 5.4; 731_ • R-5 5-5 ;11l6.¢ - B-5 S-5 34lRl' - I2%' 7.31~ - 64:( 1116~ -.. 24% D/F contacts attempted 13. completed 13.
:Radio d.iscip1ine was good. broke rsd1.0 silence at ~812Z

4.
Violations to inquire
I) •

Navigational Aida.: of security; about esp,

5. Net Discipline snd, Security.:
One aircraft

Enemy 'l'ransmis I!! ions
Distress Messages.:

=

Normal. None.

7.

8.

F,guipnent Malfunctions:

ANT-13- 7 trailill8 wire antezmaB mo.li'uno ti one. ARN-7 -:3 eense antennas broken. - 1 needle hunting. RC-J4.8 - 1 inoperative half way haDe. - 1 weak. - 1 tuBe out. - 2 out.

9. T.inian Homer '!I'aB reportedR-5 $-5 enroute to and from tarpt. OOIete.tion WBII extremely sood tran lwo J'ilna Bouth but heaVily JIIIIIIIed north of Iwo J'ima.

iJ.Q.BII

D

%N'J!ELIiIogcB
.Put I - Enemy Air Opp od tion

Part II - Ene.my Antia.1rora£t

Whelon No." 27 Maroh 19~

PART. I ~ 1.

FNWY AIR oPPOOITIQN
location andaltltY4e:

TYpes of F/A attacking.

5 U/ITeJtget
2 2 2 1 U/I T/E U/l T/E U/l S/E U/l

1 Toll3'"

~laimed

JuatbeyObd target :rU8t beyond target Target area Target area Target area as destroyed. sighted
but not e.ttackipB:

area

5000' 5500'
5000' 5°00' 5000' 5000'

2.

Types

of

F/A

33 S/E U/l

8 U/I

14 TIE U/I 1 TIE U/I (with s/L
1 Irving
1 TIE U/l 1 TJ'lil 'OIl

'l'arget area Targst area Target area Target area
in nose)

5000' 500at

5°00'

5000'

Target area Target area
Tokunruni

5000'

1 TIE transport 1 U/l

5

mi. N of HilDa n.me. 10 mi. S of. Kudamatsu _Naval Base

9000' 3.5001 8000'

8500'

3. TyPe am accuracy of enemy fire and type projectile{!: A'Uacks were ina.ceurate am unagreasive except for 1 aJ.rcraft whieh was attacked by enemy aircraft firing roe keta !Tall 200 yards. Other aircraft attackiI8 used machine gun fire with one possibly mOUnting 20.mm cannon.

4. Enemy aircraftmarki!1&!.= At least 18 of the observed enemy aircraft had their ruoning lights on. Fow were reported as having 1 white light on the wing; 1 had an amber light on the right wing tip; 1 had a red port li.ght and an amber starboard light; .and others were reported merely BS having 1 or more runniIltg or navigiltion lights. One tw.in.~engine U/l had a strong s/r, mounted. ncse ,

i.n

were

5. Enemy Tactics, OneB ..29 observea.. (by means of the ra.dar ee.ope) 5 F/A following him. One. identified as Tony. finally attacked fran 6 o'clock level l1ithbreaial;l1ay at 7 o'oloc,k in diving left turn. This Ale fired only 1 ~. accurate as to alti't\ude but to the left of the B-29.Tracer.s were used , There Were reports of coard-ination bet'lteen searchlights end enemy aircraft over Yswat,a. B-2I)s wsreilluminatecl by S/L. whiCh \'Iers then turned Off to allQW fightar.s to attack. One ot our Ala was attacked by an U/l wb.ichdisch.argecl 2 rockets fran 200 yards at2 o'clock high. There was no de.ro.age. o.r the 13 attacks, .5
level
B.nd

8 l1ere from above.

No one

clock

position

liaS

favored.

(, •

Enemy t ClL"DlB t ions:

None uere

obsGlI'ved•

7. Om-tfll-ct ea and firet!~erV:l!. l enemY a ixcra:f'$ : Tactics consist(ld. of returning fire SSMon as E/A oJ:)en.ed :fire. MHd evasive action ;;rae also used. flames aoo plunge to burn.

.

s..
9.

Results

hits on EtAI One ToW· rm.8 observed to burst .into st.raisht dOl1n"fl"ard into .g-round. uhere it continued

Qlaiibs by

Ale

and gun pOSition,

'I'ail gunner.

1 Tony destroyed.

PART II

-

ENEMY ANl'IAlRCRAll'

1. The weather over the target' was good. visibility 10-1.5 miles and overhead a bright, full moon. The first Group mined the waters immediately 'west' of the mouth of the Straits on a heading ~ apprClltimately 3000• crossing through the bay and turning lett around Ashiya on the OngaRiver. The second and third Groups turned over the Southern Honshu island northeast of tm target and ran into the ShiJaon08eki Eay on a heading of 2400• crossing over and around western parts of the city of Ya'l"iateand turning left on departure. The tourth Group mined the Inland Sea remote fran Sh:l:monoseki traits S breaking away to rigbt{south)on leaving the mining area. 2. The first Group into the target met measer and inaccurate A/V tire from Hime J:Lma. Then. both A/Wand heavy ueapons flak wa. reported (meager to moderate and inaccurate) fran a point 5 miles west at Botu. No searohlights were reported. Heavy flak was reported as bobs meager and accurate at Ogori aId as meager and ilIacourate-. Dot , ...... Searchlights, AI« t a.nd heavy wea,POll8ere enoountered trQll both aurta.e w vessels and shore installations at Ube. The A/V tlak was meaaer am inaccurate. 17hile the heavy tlak ranged fran Dl£I8.ger intenae. to Both types of flak were inaccurate, as were 4 searchlight beams reported trCll1 ground installations, A/W 178S reported at Yoshimi (measer and 1mccurate). One S/Luas also reported i.n this vici.nity. Heavy flak bursts (moderate ard inaccurate) were reported at Ozuki am Ichinose.

3. Over the target. both flak and sIL were more effectively used than previously noted on other targets over the Empire. All types at 'I1eaponswere fired into an eIl.Vielop barrage over the Straits area. Predicted. fire 'only is believed to have been used on the outskirts at the target area. The target defense area may be roughly described as triangular in shape with the apex to the north at Futaoi Shima. One other cor-ner- to the east of Maji and the third at Kaneno Saki (point of land uest of Ashira) Vlouldcomplete the t20iangle. In this area.. tlak was reported from the emplaced weapons on land 'IIith the added fire power of' lOO.nyanchoredaurf'ae e vessels. The barrage of flak. consisting of both heavy and med.ium caliber weapons. was reported as intense and eff~ct1velY placed over the zone. The little predicted fire that could be lo~ated was inaccurate. Nevertheless, ifi the barrage over the Straits, 2 am possibly 3 Ale are believed to have been shot down. The most accurate flak 1s belieVied to have been delivered tram the vessels otf Wakam:ltsuarea a,nd the heavy guns on the islands of Fu.taoi, Ai Shima and Shima.

4. Searchlights were effectively used, being first in action on the east side of the straits approximately 5 miles off the coast. A systeJ1l,of lights turned on. with good accuracy. and carried the aircraft OVE'lr the land and intI'!)the mining area. Up to 30 ligllte were reporteil on the I{okure. ..Moji Peninsula from Sb1lnonoi;leki nd Hiko Islands. a Crewe were able to pi~point the following locations on islands in the areal 5 SIL at 34106 - 130/47 3 Sit at 34/00 - 130/43 5 S/L at 34/01 .. 130/43/30 1 sIL at 34/00/15 - 130/43/30' 6 SIL at 33/59 - 130/49' 4 S/L at 33/57 - 130/52 4 S/L at 33/56 .. 130153 1 S/L at 33/57 - 130152

5. A single barrage balloon (approximately 2000 teet) was reported on Ai Shima. There were no air-to-air or ground-to-air rocket. reported by the first gt"oup. The interesting observation was made that 1 airoraft, when coned by S/L's, would receive flak until the S/L's \7ere turned off. whereupon the flak would cease and nightfighter attacks were pressed. Desynchronizing engines thrEIIV ott sIL's only about half of the times tried. 6. The second and third Groups ran into the same fire as the first Group, plus the fire tran the islands to the north. Asain, the barrage was reported as efta,ctively placed and level in altitude. The heaviest concentration was encountered opposite Yawata atter crossing the Shimonoseki-Kaikyo Straits. The A/W fire.in th1B area. WU particularly intense with many tracers observed. This was, far the most part I inaccurate. Of the second Group, 2 aircr~t or 19 min.1ns this area encountered no AlA fire over Yawata a1l 272332X to 272335X at 4900 and 5400 feet respectively. They did, hOlfever, while lay1na mines 2 or 3 minutes later, observe flak in action behind than. The remaining am. following ai.rcraft ran through this tire over Yawata at 4900 to 5000 feet between the hours of 21233.5X and 280006X UJlder CAVU to 4/10 undercast and 8/10 overcast. OVer Yawata the tollar1Dg was also observed:
. a •. At272356K.at·4900 f,eeti'silver ~nd go~d_sprlrklea. dth no bursts, were seen. At 272357K at 4900 l'ee1l, there were several phosphorus bombs identified. At 280006Xat 4900 teet, a purple bUrst was noted floating down on route out. In the vicinity of Fukuoka, several crews reported meager and iMccurate heavy aDd medium flak.

7. The searchlights in and aroun.d Yawata and Shimonoseki were also reported as ef1'eetive. They were capable of engaging aircraft a~oBt'~ediately after being turneffi on and, despite violent evasive action. could not be evaded. In the other areas. the lights were not of the same effectiveness. ApprOXimately 40 to 50 searchlights were counted in and around Yawata, 10 to 15 at Shimonoseki. 5 at Hiko Island, 10 at Yu:lruhashi, 7 to 9 at Fukuolm. and 1 on Sada Misaki point.
8, The next group on this same headingmad.e .somewhatsimiliar observations. In addition, on the approach to the mainland prior to the I.P •• the [ol1017i08 vus observed: from the vicinity of Saeki on the eastern coast of K;yushu. fire appeared to be of heavy caliber although no mar'!!then 5 bursts wera observed. At Him.eShima. meager A/if fire \'IIiS met. At Boru the A/W tracers of meager intensity were also seen. Certain of the aircraft minini the outer limits of the target' zone reeeived little or no flal<;. The other arcraft were exposed to flak from the time of paSSing O'lor Uauki, into the mine 4rop area. and on bI"eakarlllY as far as Zuka. At this point. otter gUnS \7ere brought to bear from Fukuokn. On leaving the southeast coast of Kyushu, same meager A/'fl fire was observed coming from the area cf Tomitake. 9. The searchlights Vt£"eagain liepQl>ted as accurately directed. The aircra.ft Were suddenly bracketed by a half-dozen beams simulta.neously 17i hout thfil oust'emery. previously experienced scanning and t search. Aircraft were held in cone fer a longer period of time than heretofare j some Vlere carried as long as 10 minutes by coordinated carry lights. Searchlights Vlere obser.ved at Saeki. HimEl :Ti..!m. Bo.fu, Fukuoka and Tomitaki. but the m!l.inconcentration was centered onth& Shimonoseki Peninsula. frem Moji to Yawata. and fran the -"islands,west of the Straits. A confirming report of appra:x:im3.tely50 searchlights in operation over the area was Ill8de. In 1 instanoe. 3 searchlights were seen to move tOiiard aircraft. shlJt off for: 0. moment. and turn

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on again right on the plane. This occured 2 minutes before mines away am the plane was illlDninated for approxilMtely 1 minute before lifl\ta were shut off. At least 4 aircraft reported that firing their guns down into the searchlight source caused the lights to be extinguished. 10. Rockets or phosphorous banbs were observed over Yawata at 5000 feet and were described as large red or orange balls. sparkling and throwi.ng off streamers am gradually descending. The streamers seemed to be incandescent material that gave the object an ·octopus shape· or an -umbrella appearanoe·. 11. A oanplete blaokout existed, ni,th only a tew lIlinor disCl'epancies of lights in sane of",the small ooo.sta.l tCIwns su.eh ,0.8 Botu on ,the- Inland Se8.. 12. 'The last Group, mining the second area far east of the Shimonosaki area, received practically no AlA opposition. At the Vicinity ot Ube, probably fran a ship, 2 aircraft received 10 to 25 bursts (predicted concentration of bursts lOll, lett and followiog). Fiv.e bursts, iDaccurately appeared O'ler a plane at 33/45 - 1.31/25. One aircraft observed flak at .33/05 - 1.33/13 and from a ship north of Yaehima. 'l'hese airplanes flew from 4600 to 8600 feet altitudes. 13. Six searchlights were observed but only 1 picked up our aircraft. Onewas ae en at Hime Jima. 1 at 33/57 - 1.32/06 (which flashed straight up then turned off). 1 on O-Shllnanear Hoshi Saki, 1 on nest aide on inlet weat ot Mizoba. The 1 aearchlight that picked up our aircraft "ma at 33/58 - 131/5.3 but it only flicked the "cratt ftJr approximately 2 seconds. Aircraft uas at 5000 it. altitude.

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