Thayer Consultancy

ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: National Assembly Elections Carlyle A. Thayer May 17, 2011

[client name deleted]  Could you please provide your assessment of Vietnam’s National Assembly elections.  Q1. The 2007 election ushered in the first parliament since Vietnam joined the World  Trade  Organization.  Is  the  incoming  National  Assembly  of  any  significance  to  Vietnam’s socio‐economic development?  ANSWER: Since 1992, when the present state constitution was adopted, the role of  the  National  Assembly  has  been  to  turn  Vietnam  into  a  law  governed  state.  So  far  the National Assembly has played a modest role in reviewing legislation, approving  the  budget  and  questioning  ministers.  The  National  Assembly  must  gradually  develop a strong committee system so that government ministers and government  reports  can  be  reviewed  independently.  National  Assembly  committee  should  also  have the power to call experts from think tanks, universities and the private sector  to  add  their  views.  Even  the  current  modest  review  process  by  the  National  Assembly  gives  a  measure  of  reassurance  to  the  public  and  to  foreign  donors  and  investments about Vietnam’s socio‐economic development.  Q2. The National Assembly has been hailed for becoming increasingly vocal over the  past two years. But given that many outspoken lawmakers are stepping down in the  upcoming election, which direction should the parliament head for in order to avoid  being regarded as a rubber stamp for the Communist Party?  ANSWER: There is a great contrast between the National Assembly before 1992 and  after then. It is not a rubber stamp for the party and government in the way that all  National  Assemblies  were  prior  to  1992.  While  certain  deputies  in  the  National  Assembly have played stronger roles in the past two years, over bauxite mining and  the high‐speed rail project, it should be recalled that earlier the National Assembly  has twice rejected the Prime Minister’s nominations for ministerial appointments. Le  Minh  Huong  was  rejected  as  Minister  for  Public  Security  and  Cao  Sy  Kiem  was  rejected  for  reappointment  to  the  State  Bank  of  Vietnam.  Various  ministers  have  been  grilled  during  question  time.  The  issue  of  a  motion  of  confidence  has  been  raised but not implemented in the past.  More  deputies  should  become  full‐time  representatives.  The  National  Assembly  should demand greater resources in order to review draft legislation and ministerial  performance.  I  recommend  strengthening  the  research  capacity  of  the  National 

2 Assembly library along western lines. The library and its researchers should serve the  deputies and assist them in their work.  Q3. When the National Assembly rejected the government's controversial 56‐billion‐ dollar  bullet  train  project  last  year,  some  have  said  that  a  significant  threshold  in  national political institutional development had been crossed. But are you expecting  such a momentum to continue to sustain with the new parliament? Why or why not?  The  key  question  is  not  whether  the  new  National  Assembly  will  approve  or  reject  proposals  by  government  ministers,  but  whether  the  government  and  prime  minister  can  work  with  the  National  Assembly  to  avoid  another  high  speed  rail  rejection. This means bringing the deputies into the decision‐making process earlier  and  providing  more  detail  about  planned  projects.  It  is  my  belief  that  each  new  legislature will build on the legacy of its predecessor. All minister should be put on  notice  that  if  their  proposal  fails  to  meet  the  national  interest,  deputies  will  vote  against it. A majority out of 500 deputies is a good basis for reflecting the view of the  people.  Q4.  What  can  Vietnamese  grassroots  people  expect  from  the  incoming  National  Assembly?  The  people  should  expect  greater  consultation  with  their  deputies.  They  should  expect deputies to raise local concerns at the national level.  Q5. Are there any other observations you would care to make?  The  National  Assembly  will  be  enhanced  if  more  self‐nominated  candidates  are  elected, especially those with a background in business. 

3

Thayer Consultancy
ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: National Assembly Elections Carlyle A. Thayer May 17, 2011

[client name deleted]  Q1. Broadly speaking, what issues are you looking at in this NA election? What are  the  big  questions  hanging  over  the  election,  and  in  what  ways  might  the  outcome  make a difference to politics, or economic, foreign or other policy?  ANSWER: The key questions for me are to what extent will the number of non‐party  candidates, and more particularly self‐nominated candidates get elected. Of interest  will be how many candidates who were endorsed either centrally or locally will fail to  gain election. And associated with this, how many of the eighty odd incumbents will  fail to get elected. Finally, how well will individual members of the Politburo standing  for election do in comparison to other candidates.  Because  of  the  contrived  nature  of  the  canvassing  period,  National  Assembly  elections are not about policy choices. Candidates are not allowed to have personal  platforms  or  advocate  policy  change.  They  are  to  affirm  support  for  the  one‐party  socialist  system,  be  against  corruption,  and  support  the  broad  outlines  of  socio‐ economic policy adopted by the 11th party congress.  The  candidates  are,  as  in  the  past,  a  highly  educated  group.  More  of  them  will  be  made full‐time deputies than in the past. This will ensure better scrutiny and drafting  of legislation. A small number can be expected to be outspoken given the legacy they  are  inheriting.  A  bottom  line  assessment  is  the  National  Assembly  plays  only  a  marginal  role  in  key  political,  economic  and  foreign  policy  issues.  On  occasion  individual deputies can vent the feelings of the wider public on day to day issues of  concern  such  as  bauxite  mining.  The  National  Assembly  cannot  hope  to  win  a  confrontation with a determined Government, but the National Assembly can raise  awkward questions and cause ministers – even the prime minister – to rethink their  approach and policies.  The election of the 13th legislature should be seen as another evolution in creating a  law  governed  state  by  giving  increased  scope  to  the  National  Assembly  to  review,  comment  on.  Amend,  and  approve/reject  government  legislation.  In  the  last  legislature 90% of deputies were members of the Vietnam Communist Party. This is  not  a  formula  for  abrupt  changes  in  Vietnam’s  politics,  economic  policy  or  foreign  relations. 

4 Q2. Are there any candidates that you think are likely to take up the mantle of being  outspoken? Also, I understand that the Tan Tao Investment group brother and sister  business duo (Dang Thanh Tam and Dang Thi Hoang Yen) are standing for election.  I’m  not  sure  if  they  are  party  members,  but  they  run  one  of  the  biggest/most  successful private companies in the country. Are entrepreneurs normally included in  NAs? Or is this a relatively new development?  ANSWER:  Private  businessmen  have  been  elected  deputies  but  their  numbers  are  quite small. An effort is being made this time to increase their number. 

5

Thayer Consultancy
ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: National Assembly Elections Carlyle A. Thayer May 21, 2011

[client name deleted]  Q1. The NA has largely been viewed as a rubber stamp, but it has recently been a bit  more assertive i.e. the bullet train and Thuyet calling for the Vinashin investigation.  Do  you  see  the  role  of  this  body  slowly  (very  slowly)  changing?  It  is  more  empowered?   ANSWER:  The  National  Assembly  ceased  being  a  rubber  stamp  following  the  adoption  of  the  1992  state  constitution  and  new  electoral  laws.  There  is  no  comparison between the present National Assembly and its predecessor in the years  from 1954‐92. There are limitations on how independent the National Assembly can  be. Its members cannot initiate bills. The committee system is under resourced and  lacks effective power. And each successive elections since 1992 has now altered the  fact  that  ninety  percent  of  deputies  are  also  members  of  the  Vietnam  Communist  Party.   Prior  to  the  current  12th  legislature,  previous  National  Assembly  legislatures  have  twice  rejected  cabinet  nominations  by  the  prime  minister.  Government  bills  have  been  debated  and  amended,  the  press  bill  several  years  ago  had  over  thirty  amendments. And the National Assembly has used its powers to questions ministers,  sometime pointedly. The National Assembly sits for longer periods than before and  an increasing number of deputies are being given full‐time roles. Public hearings are  being  mooted  for  the  first  time.  The  National  Assembly  is  slowly  evolving  and  the  legacy of progress from one legislature is passed to the next. But the empowerment  of  the  National  Assembly  is  moving  at  glacial  pace.  Deputies  may  debate  bauxite  mining  but  they  have  no  power  to  overturn  the  decision  of  the  Government  to  proceed.  Q2. What can we expect from these elections? Do they really even matter, given that  the course of the country is already so mapped out from above?   ANSWER: No policies issues will be debated in this election. No national office – such  as  the  state  presidency  –  is  at  stake.  There  are  no  direct  elections  for  the  state  president. Even key political offices, such as that of the prime minister, are decided  before hand by the party. The new National Assembly will not have a choice of who  should be prime minister. 

6 The elections are primarily a mobilization process in which citizens are expected to  perform  their  civic  duty  by  voting.  What  is  important  will  be  what  occurs  at  the  margins. Fifteen self‐nominated  candidates are standing. In the past only  one (12th  legislature) and two ) eleventh legislature) were elected. Will this number increase?  Will the number of party members who are deputies – currently about 90 percent –  decrease?  Who  among  the  centrally  nominated  candidates  will  fail  to  get  elected?  Who  many  incumbents  (eighty  odd)  running  for  election  will  fail?  And  will  run‐off  elections be necessary in cases where candidates fail to get fifty percent plus one of  the  vote?  What  were  the  local  issues  that  led  to  this  impasse?  In  the  last  election  three candidates failed and the decision was made not to hold off run‐off elections  and to leave the seats vacant. Since all members of the Politburo are running, what  will  be  the  variance  of  popular  vote  each  received?  Will  local  candidates  outshine  Politburo members in their constituencies? Finally, will the winning margin of victory  continue  to  be  highest  in  the  northern  provinces  and  lowest  in  the  southern  provinces? Sifting through these issues and results does indicate that some popular  expression  is  seeping  through  a  heavily  contrived  and  controlled  electoral  process.  But  is  it  not  a  real  democratic  election  because  the  citizens  cannot  change  the  government peacefully via the ballot box.  Q3. How important do you think it is for the Party to get a handle on these surging  prices?  Do  you  think  this  will  be  a  focus?  Food,  gasoline  and  electricity  costs  are  insane  here  now,  does  this  worry/threaten  the  Party?  And  do  you  think  this  is  an  issue that the NA will try to address when it meets in July?   Q4. ANSWER: Vietnam’s electoral process has been designed to prevent hot button  issues from being discussed by the candidates. Voters are not presented a choice of  candidates  who  differ  on  how  issues  such  as  inflation  and  rising  prices  should  be  addressed.  But  the  vast  majority  of  candidates  are  vetted  and  chosen  locally  and  once elected they can  be  expected  to  reflect popular views. It  is already clear  that  economic issues will top the second meeting of the party Central Committee in June.  The party is very concerned because its economic performance is the main basis for  its  legitimacy.  The  National  Assembly  will  definitely  consider  these  issues  in  July  when  they  approve  the  prime  minister’s  nomination  of  Cabinet  ministers.  This  will  be a real trying time for Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung, who is expected to be re‐ nominated. If all goes according to script some of his party critics will hold important  state posts. Truong Tan Sang  will be state president  and  Nguyen Sinh Hung will be  chair of the National Assembly Standing Committee. 

7

Thayer Consultancy
ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: National Assembly Elections Carlyle A. Thayer May 21, 2011
 

[client name deleted]  Q1.  Do  you  think  the  National  Assembly  attracts  attention  and  interest  from  Vietnamese people?  All  Vietnamese  people  are  aware  that  national  elections  are  being  held  due  to  the  information and propaganda activities of the party and state. All citizens are aware  that it is in their interests to vote even though voting is not compulsory.  But what interest can there be in elections in which the people do not directly elect  the highest state officials, such as the president, and elections in which there are no  issues  to  be  debated  and  discussed?  The  electoral  system  is  designed  to  focus  on  local  constituencies.  While  citizens  do  have  a  choice  in  which  candidates  to  strike  from  the  list,  they  are  not  given  a  choice  of  choosing  candidates  on  the  basis  of  policy differences. For example, Vietnamese in the Central Highlands do not have the  opportunity  to  hear  debates  between  those  in  favour  or  bauxite  mining  and  those  opposed to it. Vietnamese citizens who live in the area where nuclear power plants  are  being constructed also  do  not  have  the  opportunity  to  hear  candidates  debate  nuclear safety issues.  Vietnamese elections stress the credentials of the candidates and their loyalty to the  constitution  and  Vietnam’s  socialist  orientation.  Citizens  vote  in  high  numbers  because  it  is  their  civic  duty;  the  absences  of  issues  and  real  choices  between  candidates means the Vietnamese people do not have real interest in the elections.  Q2. Is there any democratic progress at this National Assembly election?  This election will see more self‐nominated candidates than before. But past results  indicate that no more than 1 (12th legislature) or 2 (11th legislature) will be elected.  The number of candidates per constituency is kept carefully limited. Five candidates  may run for three seats. A step towards greater democracy would be to permit more  candidates to run. But the electoral rules requiring a fifty percent plus one vote to  win may have to be amended to a plurality of the votes to win. In the last election  there were several constituencies where several candidates failed to get 50 percent  plus  one  and  their  seats  were  left  vacant.  That  is  why  the  National  Assembly  does  not have 500 deputies. The law provides for a run‐off election but none was held. 

8 The  selection  process  for  being  nominated  as a  candidate  has  not changed  so  that  individuals  offering  a  differing  view  on  political  issues  are  excluded.  There  is  more  continuity with the past than any signs of real democratic change. No policy issues  are put before the people and not candidates are allowed to express their views on  the everyday concerns of the Vietnamese people, even pressing local issues. 

9

Thayer Consultancy
ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: National Assembly Elections Carlyle A. Thayer May 23, 2011

[client name deleted]  Q1.  For  National  Assembly  elections,  how  is  the  country  broken  down  into  constituencies?  In  other  words  –  do  deputies  run  in  specific  electorates,  are  they  district or provincial level?  Q2.  Who  do  voters  actually  vote  for  in  a  poll?  A  local  deputy,  or  do  they  vote  for  someone in the PC [party committee?] who then in turn votes for a provincial level  deputy?  ANSWER: For purposes of the National Assembly elections, each province is broken  down into electoral units based on  districts. These constituencies are distinctly local.  Candidates  are  nominated  at  central  and  provincial  level  and  then  allocated  to  constituencies.  Prime  Minister  Nguyen  Tan  Dung  has  been  allocated  to  Hai  Phong  (he ran there five years ago). There are no head to head contests involving members  of the Politburo or Central Committee.  The ratio of candidates to seats is contrived and varies. But a typical example would  be 5 candidates vying for 3 seats. Voters are given a ballot and cross off the name of  the required number of candidates. In my example, they would cross off two names.  A candidate wins if he/she obtains fifty percent plus one of the vote. In cases where  candidates  no  not  attain  the  winning  margin,  a  run‐off  is  held.  But  at  the  last  elections five years ago a decision was made not to go ahead and three seats in the  south were left vacant. Instead of the statutory 500 deputies only 497 were elected. 

10

Thayer Consultancy
ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: National Assembly Elections Carlyle A. Thayer May 27, 2011

[client name deleted]  Could  you  please  provide  a  brief  assessment  of  Vietnam’s  forthcoming  National  Assembly elections?  ANSWER:  On  the  elections:  they  mark  the  last  stage  in  the  leadership  selection  initiated  at  the  11th  party  congress.  Eleven  members  of  the  14  member  Politburo  have been given their work assignments (party posts). Now ll that remains is for the  National Assembly in July to elect Truong Tan Sang state president, Nguyen Tan Dung  as prime minister for a second term, and Nguyen Sinh Hung as chair of the National  Assembly standing committee.  Dung  will  then  have  his  work  cut  out.  Ten  ministers  who  were  on  the  Central  Committee elected at the 10th party congress were not re‐elected in January at the  11th  party  congress.  Dung  will  have  a  chance  to  reshuffle  his  Cabinet  and  make  many new appointments. Further, three of five deputy prime ministers have moved  on.  After  the  last  congress  Dung  tried  to  reduce  the  number  of  deputy  prime  ministers (from 3 to 2) and appoint two new younger members. The end result was  that  three  remained  and  were  joined  by  his  2  nominees.  Instead  of  reducing  their  number  it  was  expanded  to  five.  Three  have  now  moved  on.  So  Dung  has  pick  his  deputies.  All  of  Dung's  nominees  must  be  approved  by  the  Politburo.  So  there  is  an  opportunity for his detractors and political rivals, Truong Tan San and Nguyen Sinh  Hung, to promoted their supporters.  One  unexpected  loss  at  the  party  congress  was  Pham  Gia  Khiem  who  was  both  Deputy  Prime  Minister  and  Foreign  Minister.  It  is  as  yet  unclear  who  the  foreign  minister  will  be.  He/she  is  unlikely  to  be  a  member  of  the  Politburo.  Dung  could  appoint an outsider (like Khiem who was not a career diplomat) or the most senior  deputy foreign minister, Pham Binh Minh the son of former Former Minister Nguyen  Co Thach. Thach was viewed as pro‐American and anti‐Chinese. It remains to be seen  if the adage "like father like son" sill apply.  Other sign points of positive political change:  Will the number of deputies who are also party members drop below the 90% figure  for past National Assemblies. 

11 Will more than 1  or 2  self‐nominated candidates get elected.  One  was elected last  time, two the time before.  How  will  candidates  with  a  background  in  the  private  sector/private  businessmen  fare?  There are some 89 or so incumbents standing for re‐election. How many will fail to  grain re‐election.  The  new  National  Assembly  should  inherit  the  legacy  of  the  last  legislature  where  deputies  were  more  assertive  than  in  the  past  (over  bauxite,  high‐speed  rail,  Vinashin, and no confidence motion).  The  new National  Assembly  will  meet in July. The new party  secretary will meet in  June and focus on economic issues ‐ inflation, rising prices, trade deficit etc. To what  extent will the new National Assembly take action to address popular concerns and  anxieties over the economy. 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful