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D e s t i n at i o n M a r k e t i n g U p D at e

Destination marketing and branding are an essential part of any promotion project set to market attractions, city, region or the whole country. Get updated on the role of social media in marketing, on a recent findings regarding city branding, and on efficient event marketing.

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D e s t i na t i on M a r k e t i ng u pda t e

City branDinG MuSt refleCt on the paSt anD point to the future
City branding and identity of place have assumed centre-stage in policy debates around both economic development and urban leadership in recent years, as urban areas are forced to increasingly compete against each other for investment, talent and visitors. A report by EUroCiTiEs examined the best practice among Europe’s leading metropolises as a means to provide a toolkit for others to apply this learning to formulate their own brand identity and positioning strategy. The report takes in examples from cities as diverse as manchester, ghent and Tampere.
introDuCtion

in early 2010, EUroCiTiEs established a Working group on City Attractiveness and Brand Management, which involved over 40 European cities in a dialogue around a workable understanding of the role of place branding and global positioning in their economic development strategies. The work, discussed at several events across Europe, culminated in a special conference in zaragoza, spain in December 2010, where the report was adopted. in his introduction, the Deputy mayor of lyon and Vice-President of greater lyon JeanMichel Daclin charts the emergence of city branding as a consequence of the economic
May, 2011

dimension of urban development, following its earlier concentration on spatial, security and sanitation issues. This new urban emphasis on marketing and branding, he considers, is a nat-

ural development given the global era in which cities now have to compete internationally for talent, investors, events and tourists. As a key tool of urban development therefore, city

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elopment after the Crises

es – Poverty Alleviation

of Tourism
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Order Form and tables, , with numerous figures

Peter Keller and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bieger

Tourism Development 5 m Research and Concepts, Volumeafter the Crises Global Imbalances – Poverty Alleviation

.00, ISBN 978-3-503-13002-3

dited by Prof. Dr. Peter Keller and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bieger

o. ...........................................................

011, XII, 248 pages, with numerous figures and tables, (D) 39,95/USD 58.00, ISBN 978-3-503-13002-3

on ........................................................

nternational Tourism Research and Concepts, Volume 5

............................................................. ompany/Organisation ........................................................

ame / Customer-No. ........................................................... .............................................................

unction ..............................................................................

Lessons T to be learned for the Future T of Tourism

D e s t i na t i on M a r k e t i ng u pda t e

his book provides a unique analysis of the recent financial crisis on world tourism and particularly the development models which contribute to reduce poverty.

Order Form
Tourism Development after the Crises
Global Imbalances – Poverty Alleviation
Edited by Prof. Dr. Peter Keller and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bieger 2011, XII, 248 pages, with numerous figures and tables, € (D) 39,95/USD 58.00, ISBN 978-3-503-13002-3
International Tourism Research and Concepts, Volume 5

his book provides a unique analysis of the recent financial crisis on world tourisma The volume is based on the knowledge of and particularly the development models network of more than 300 researcherswhich and contribute to reduce poverty.

.............................................................

ddress ...............................................................................

Order Form

ostcode .............................................................................

.............................................................

Asia. It focuses on the latest economic crises as a framework for analyses and as a real life case A substantial contribution for the impact study.

includes experiences from Europe, Africa and Asia. The volumeonbased on the knowledgecrises as It focuses is the latest economic of a network for analyses and as a real and a framework of more than 300 researcherslife case includes experiences from Europe, Africa and study.

Company/Organisation ........................................................ Name / Customer-No. ........................................................... Function .............................................................................. Address ............................................................................... Postcode ............................................................................. Fax ..................................................................................... Email .......................................................................... Date/Signature ....................................................................

....................................................... ax .....................................................................................

ourism Development after the Crises mail ..........................................................................

lobal Imbalances – Poverty Alleviation

.............................................................

of tourism development in time of global A substantial imbalances! contribution for the impact
of tourism development in time of global imbalances!

ate/Signature .................................................................... dited by Prof. Dr. Peter Keller and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bieger

dt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG& Co. KG rich Schmidt Verlag GmbH ompany/Organisation raße 30 Straße 30 G GenthinerG ........................................................ 0785 Berlin, Germany Germany ame / Customer-No. ...........................................................

011, XII, 248 pages, with numerous figures and tables, (D) 39,95/USD30 25 00 85-275 ax +49 (0) 58.00, ISBN 978-3-503-13002-3

25 00 85-275

his book provides a unique analysis of the For further information:

ternational Tourism Research and Concepts, Volume 5

T www.ESV.info/978-3-503-13002-3

For further information: world tourism and recent financial crisis on particularly the development models which www.ESV.info/978-3-503-13002-3 contribute to reduce poverty.

Fax +49 (0) 30 25 00 85-275 Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG Genthiner Straße 30 G 10785 Berlin, Germany
Right of revocation: Customers may revoke from the contract within two weeks after receipt of said goods. The notification of revocation must be in writing to either your bookshop or Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Genthiner Str. 30 G, 10785 Berlin, Germany, Fax +49 (0) 30 250085 275, email: Vertrieb@ESVmedien.de (sending in due time is sufficient). We only collect and process your data for the performance of the contract, for the fostering of the ongoing customer relationship and to inform you about our offers and prices. You can stop your data being used for advertising purposes at any time. If you would like to do so, please send a letter by post or fax, or send us an email at Service@ESVmedien.de. Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG · Sitz: Berlin · Persönlich haftende Gesellschafterin: ESV Verlagsführung GmbH · Amtsgericht: Berlin-Charlottenburg · 93 HRB 27 197 · Geschäftsführer: Dr. Joachim Schmidt

ostcode30 250085 275, your data for the performance of the contract, for the +49 (0) ............................................................................. e only collect and process email: Vertrieb@ESVmedien.de

nction .............................................................................. ght of revocation: Customers may revoke from the contract within two weeks ter receipt of said goods. The notificationwithin two weeksbe in writing to omers may revoke from the contract of revocation must ther your bookshop or Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Genthiner Str. 30 G, ddress ............................................................................... The Berlin,cation of revocation must be275,writingVertrieb@ESVmedien.de 785 notifi Germany, Fax +49 (0) 30 250085 in email: to ch Schmidt time is GmbH & Co. ending in dueVerlag sufficient). KG, Genthiner Str. 30 G,

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stering of the ongoing customer relationship and to inform you about our offers cient). nd prices. You can stop your data being used for advertising purposes at any time. xyour data forto do performance oflettercontract,fax, or send us an email at ..................................................................................... you would like the so, please send a the by post or for the stomer relationship and to inform you about our offers rvice@ESVmedien.de.

A u f schmidt t r a u n erich W i s s e n v e rverl eag
A u Please order at i sbookshopn sendv the to: r a A substantial contribution fordirectlyimpact u e n f W your s e or it e r t
Please order at your bookshop or send it directly to: Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG — 18 — Genthiner Str. 30 G · 10785 Berlin · Germany
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The volume is based on the knowledge of a network of more than 300 researchers and includes experiences from Europe, Africa and Asia. It focuses on the latest economic crises as a framework for analyses and as at verl ag erich schmid real life case study.

ate/Signature .................................................................... & Co. KG · Sitz:May,Persönlich haftende Berlin · 2011

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developers have to consider “What is a city brand? How should it be developed and with whom? Which communication tools should be used? How should the brand be managed?” he argues. m Daclin counsels however that the report should not be seen a finished product of readymade branding solutions applicable in all European cities but moreover that it should be the starting point for debate, as cities are “by definition, multilayered and highly varied entities, where specific tailor-made policies are a prerequisite for durable long-term results.” It is worth noting that the academic publishing market is slightly over-burdened with costly ‘how to brand cities’ titles and that the immediate value of this (free) report is that it considers emerging patterns and success stories for wider debate rather than off-the-peg policy consumption.
Main finDinGS

The report argues that having a city brand strategy brings the following value to cities: • increased competitiveness, resulting in a positive impact on investment, jobs, inhabitants, visitors and events; • higher returns on investment in real estate, infrastructure and events; • coherent city development, as the physical, social, economic and cultural aspects combine to deliver the brand promise; • pride in the city as the inhabitants, businesses and institutions experience a new sense of purpose and direction.
May, 2011

it cites the example of genoa, where in the 1980s and 1990s, its evolution from an industrial port to a city economy centred on tourism, services and technology saw the internationally renowned architect renzo Piano employed by the city to construct a new image. Piano’s plan saw genoa re-imagined as an ‘urban laboratory’ proud of its past but open to innovation, while fostering a sense of inclusion as well as growth through the planning process. This was symbolised by a new logo, centred on the word genoa but signifying warmth. in contrast, the swedish city of karlstad has retained the same branding since

1989, relying on its reputation for hospitality and quality of life. The report considers that key to this process of working up a city brand is: • allowing cities to develop a long term vision for themselves – by thinking about what the city is, what the city wants to be, and how it wants to get there; • helping cities to focus on how they wish to develop in the future; • encouraging cities to think beyond their current situation in order to create new opportunities; • creating a dynamic environment that will attract and retain collective or individual talents. it also argues that cities need to define the strategy for the brand, including the key messages, the objectives, and the target audiences. When dealing with a brand anchored in a city’s identity, a number of options are available: • the fully architectured brand: the brand has a logo and a slogan with a precise meaning that creates an image and is highly memorable; • the propositional brand: the brand is a statement of, and a proof of, the positioning of the city; • the naked brand: the brand is the city itself, and the marketer has to change people’s perceptions of the city. Here the example of munich is given, whereby before the 2006 World Cup, the city decided on building a city brand for a variety of uses. it began by defining a set of require-

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D e s t i na t i on M a r k e t i ng u pda t e

ments for the brand: that it should be quick to create, self-explanatory, cover all facets of the city, build on recognised symbols, be intelligible to global audiences, suitable for public and media relations, use the city itself as medium and allow for partner integration. The end result, the slogan ‘Munich loves you’ was considered to reflect all these requirements. Design features and imagery were then generated to capture the city’s core characteristics: quality of life and leisure time; excellent networks; economic and scientific hospitality; tolerance and cosmopolitan outlook; dynamic with high-achieving sports. The report also advances the view that stakeholder development is crucial for any successful city brand as city authorities cannot act alone but require input and ownership by the local private sector, tourist facilities and civil society. As such, the stakeholder approach must encompass a number of strands: • partnership: the stakeholder representatives need to work together using a partnership approach, to ensure buy-in and brand credibility; • leadership: the stakeholders partners need strong leadership to overcome any internal differences and to ensure progress and effective decision making; • continuity: continuity is fundamental in both the partnership and in the leadership, to ensure a long-term strategy and brand durability; • shared vision: stakeholders must share a vision for the future of the city if they are to formulate a clear brand strategy;
May, 2011

• action-based implementation: to implement the brand strategy and create the brand, stakeholders must agree an appropriate set of actions at each stage. Finally, once the city brand has been developed, it needs to be promoted and communicated to its identified target groups. The report suggests that number of trends can be identified in terms of how cities currently promote their brands: • traditional media such as newspapers, magazines, radio and TV, are still very much part of the mix; approaches vary from traditional press relations to obtain editorial coverage in targeted newspapers, magazines or TV channels, to pure advertising, right through to promoting a city’s ranking in national or international city comparison tables; • specific events, where cultural, sporting or economic activities are hosted, are useful in promoting the city’s message to a specific target group; • ambassador networks are helping to spread city messages across the globe and are also useful in gaining brand support from members of the local community, by giving them Ambassador status; • social media increasingly offers the opportunity to communicate with younger target audiences who may be harder to access through more traditional media; merchandising tools can still be a very efficient way of promoting the city brand to a large audience.

ConCluSion

The report concludes in drawing three central recommendations from the work over the past year: • as part of the link between a city’s brand offer and its identity, it must ensure that the brand message both points to a future perspective and remains rooted in the true story of the city. Cities should not seek to stretch the gap between rhetoric and reality however. • there are no shortcuts to successful branding, stakeholder involvement in brand development is crucial to ensure continuity and shared vision. However, clear leadership and brand management and governance are also necessary. • there is no single formula for success as cities have to respond to their own particular situation, but those which are proactive and aware of the experiences of others stand a greater chance of succeeding.
By Andrew Stevens http://www.citymayors.com

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D e s t i na t i on M a r k e t i ng u pda t e

DeStination MarketinG for GerMan travelerS

Working on the German market gives quite an impressive view on how the whole world is competing to attract the german tourist to their own destinations. Even in 2010, germany, the so called “world travel champion”, confirmed its position as the top spender in leisure and business trips.
May, 2011

Every possible strategy is developed and millions are spent in advertising campaigns. Nevertheless, to a certain extent, Germany remains largely traditional in its approach to advertising. For instance, if the social media are generally taking a wider part in the marketing strategies, on the german market their

influence is definitely less relevant than elsewhere. The general public tends to be faithful to its own choices, sometimes visiting the same tourist destination for generations. Certainly it is quite difficult to define a linear or a trend strategy on such a market, a mix of best practices remains a viable solution. Even if, in gathering travel information, internet use has reached the widest majority of the population, to some extent certain target groups still search a human contact in order to place the final choice. For this reason fairs play a very important role and some among the most successful tourism exhibitions in the world take place in germany. it is quite common to visit a fair as a family sunday event. Press work plays a very important role in a country where newspapers and magazines are widely spread and are generally considered authoritative. Therefore a good article often motivates more people than web 2.0 strategies. The organization of press and fam trips

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PROFESSIONAL

D e s t i na t i on M a r k e t i ng u pda t e

has for this reason a paramount importance in order to convey the “destination experience” to the media and the travel trade. The need of comprehensive information before making any destination choice means that it is not always an easy task to motivate a client to change its habits for something new. To communicate new facts about a well known destination or to try leading a costumer towards a new one involves proficient writing and a good mix between advertorial and advertising techniques. The germans need to feel safe and to prepare a trip thoroughly in

order to minimize potential risks, meaning also not to find themselves in an unfamiliar situation without knowing how to react. Despite the complexity this market might present, working in germany is highly rewarding especially in terms of general public faithfulness. once convinced, and positively impressed, the german will probably keep coming back to a tourist destination and spread the news among his acquaintances.
By Maggioni Tourist Marketing http://www.maggioni-tm.de

May, 2011

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D e s t i na t i on M a r k e t i ng u pda t e

SoCial MeDia MarketinG: touriStS are the neW MarketerS
As the popularity of social media increases among users, so does the popularity of social media marketing among destinations. The key words for tourists and marketers in this constantly-changing online game are CrEATE, sHArE and inTErACT. In recent years, a growing share of destination marketing efforts was directed to social media tools such as blogs, Twitter, Facebook and youTube. social media marketing seeks to engage customers with the destination, in an active state in which users become participants. social media marketing revolves around social interaction, conversation, collaboration and the creation of online content. in 2011, this marketing trend is gaining even more power, as the popularity of social media breaks all limits. For example, there are now over 500m active Facebook users and approximately 175m Twitter accounts. Even of greater importance, is that social media channels are becoming major tools for human interaction, in which people share information and learn what’s new and what matters. social media marketing in 2011 takes the use of the audience one step further, shifting even more control and responsibility into the hands of web users. Within this context, the online tourist is now taking several roles:
May, 2011

• CREATE. Web users are creating a tourism-related user generated content, such as uploading pictures and videos, share experiences and recommend attractions. For this purpose, a growing number of destinations provide online interaction

platforms such as a Facebook page and a Twitter account. • SHARE. Web users share the content they generated with their social network, adding more friends to the conversation and distributing the destination. Destinations

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D e s t i na t i on M a r k e t i ng u pda t e

might support the sharing process using competitions in which users have to gain votes or ‘likes’. • INTERACT. Web users interact with the destination, leveraging single visit to a long-term online relationship. By creating and maintaining relationships, the destination will echo lauder and longer through the web, and in real life as well. For example, ‘Capture Jordan’ is a new marketing initiative launched by Jordan Tourism Board in march 2011. in this photo contest, people who visited Jordan are encouraged to upload
May, 2011

their pictures and compete for a prize. This simple contest enfolds the key social media marketing components: users are creating content by uploading pictures; share the pictures with their network to gain more votes; and interact with destination Jordan, re-living their memories and supporting tourism for the country. To conclude, as the popularity of social media increases among users, so does the popularity of social media marketing among destinations. in this constantly-changing online arena, web users are now becoming the center of a game in which they generate the content, distrib-

ute it and consume it. While the role of web users changes, so does the role of destination marketing organizations, required for in-depth understanding of new media, ground-breaking creativity and pioneering innovation.
By Eran Ketter Eran Ketter is a tourism marketing professional, the director of E. Ketter Consulting and the co-author of the book: "Media Strategies for Marketing Place in Crisis: Improving the Image of Cites, Countries and Tourist Destinations" (Elsevier, 2008). http://www.eKetter.com

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D e s t i na t i on M a r k e t i ng u pda t e

DeStination MarketinG: CreatinG eventS With iMpaCt
“There is no point in average.” Wise words said by a colleague recently that have struck a chord. some of the buzzwords that have been prevalent in our industry in the past year have included 1. Value 2. sustainability 3. Creativity / Budget 4. ROI, ROE, ROR (I for investment, E for engagement, r for relationships) What we have are clients who still need to create events with impact, but who also must prove the value of the events to their internal clients. on incentive programs, we have definitely seen the numbers to decrease on programs as qualifying for incentive programs becomes more challenging when sales targets across all industries are harder to reach. For conference programming, numbers are slowly beginning to rise again as travel restrictions are lifted. The worldwide use of the internet and its many associated social media streams has made us globally closer and has exponentially increased our access to information. As the access to information continues to grow, the need for service providers who are experts in their areas will become even more important. This will cut across all sectors as the need for life-long learning drives conference
May, 2011

attendance for association members who must stay current with the rapid changes affecting all global industries. organizations at the agency level – incentive houses, Pr firms and experiential marketing agencies will need to remain ahead of the curve to ensure success for their clients. Destination management Companies who provide services to both end clients and agency clients representing others have an expertise that

includes the “bread and butter” logistics of transportation, accommodation, activities and events and when this expertise is fully utilized there is much gain to be had for the clients. First understanding your program objectives is critical. you must choose a destination that meets these objectives, whether these are reward, motivation, inspiration or transformation. once the destination is chosen, a partner who not only has the knowledge of the des-

— 25 —

elopment after the Crises

es – Poverty Alleviation

of Tourism
PROFESSIONAL

Order Form and tables, , with numerous figures

Peter Keller and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bieger

Tourism Development 5 m Research and Concepts, Volumeafter the Crises Global Imbalances – Poverty Alleviation

.00, ISBN 978-3-503-13002-3

dited by Prof. Dr. Peter Keller and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bieger

o. ...........................................................

011, XII, 248 pages, with numerous figures and tables, (D) 39,95/USD 58.00, ISBN 978-3-503-13002-3

on ........................................................

nternational Tourism Research and Concepts, Volume 5

............................................................. ompany/Organisation ........................................................

ame / Customer-No. ........................................................... .............................................................

unction ..............................................................................

Lessons T to be learned for the Future T of Tourism

D e s t i na t i on M a r k e t i ng u pda t e

his book provides a unique analysis of the recent financial crisis on world tourism and particularly the development models which contribute to reduce poverty.

Order Form
Tourism Development after the Crises
Global Imbalances – Poverty Alleviation
Edited by Prof. Dr. Peter Keller and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bieger 2011, XII, 248 pages, with numerous figures and tables, € (D) 39,95/USD 58.00, ISBN 978-3-503-13002-3
International Tourism Research and Concepts, Volume 5

his book provides a unique analysis of the recent financial crisis on world tourisma The volume is based on the knowledge of and particularly the development models network of more than 300 researcherswhich and contribute to reduce poverty.

.............................................................

ddress ...............................................................................

Order Form

ostcode .............................................................................

.............................................................

Asia. It focuses on the latest economic crises as a framework for analyses and as a real life case A substantial contribution for the impact study.

includes experiences from Europe, Africa and Asia. The volumeonbased on the knowledgecrises as It focuses is the latest economic of a network for analyses and as a real and a framework of more than 300 researcherslife case includes experiences from Europe, Africa and study.

Company/Organisation ........................................................ Name / Customer-No. ........................................................... Function .............................................................................. Address ............................................................................... Postcode ............................................................................. Fax ..................................................................................... Email .......................................................................... Date/Signature ....................................................................

....................................................... ax .....................................................................................

ourism Development after the Crises mail ..........................................................................

lobal Imbalances – Poverty Alleviation

.............................................................

of tourism development in time of global A substantial imbalances! contribution for the impact
of tourism development in time of global imbalances!

ate/Signature .................................................................... dited by Prof. Dr. Peter Keller and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bieger

dt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG& Co. KG rich Schmidt Verlag GmbH ompany/Organisation raße 30 Straße 30 G GenthinerG ........................................................ 0785 Berlin, Germany Germany ame / Customer-No. ...........................................................

011, XII, 248 pages, with numerous figures and tables, (D) 39,95/USD30 25 00 85-275 ax +49 (0) 58.00, ISBN 978-3-503-13002-3

25 00 85-275

his book provides a unique analysis of the For further information:

ternational Tourism Research and Concepts, Volume 5

T www.ESV.info/978-3-503-13002-3

For further information: world tourism and recent financial crisis on particularly the development models which www.ESV.info/978-3-503-13002-3 contribute to reduce poverty.

Fax +49 (0) 30 25 00 85-275 Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG Genthiner Straße 30 G 10785 Berlin, Germany
Right of revocation: Customers may revoke from the contract within two weeks after receipt of said goods. The notification of revocation must be in writing to either your bookshop or Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Genthiner Str. 30 G, 10785 Berlin, Germany, Fax +49 (0) 30 250085 275, email: Vertrieb@ESVmedien.de (sending in due time is sufficient). We only collect and process your data for the performance of the contract, for the fostering of the ongoing customer relationship and to inform you about our offers and prices. You can stop your data being used for advertising purposes at any time. If you would like to do so, please send a letter by post or fax, or send us an email at Service@ESVmedien.de. Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG · Sitz: Berlin · Persönlich haftende Gesellschafterin: ESV Verlagsführung GmbH · Amtsgericht: Berlin-Charlottenburg · 93 HRB 27 197 · Geschäftsführer: Dr. Joachim Schmidt

ostcode30 250085 275, your data for the performance of the contract, for the +49 (0) ............................................................................. e only collect and process email: Vertrieb@ESVmedien.de

nction .............................................................................. ght of revocation: Customers may revoke from the contract within two weeks ter receipt of said goods. The notificationwithin two weeksbe in writing to omers may revoke from the contract of revocation must ther your bookshop or Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Genthiner Str. 30 G, ddress ............................................................................... The Berlin,cation of revocation must be275,writingVertrieb@ESVmedien.de 785 notifi Germany, Fax +49 (0) 30 250085 in email: to ch Schmidt time is GmbH & Co. ending in dueVerlag sufficient). KG, Genthiner Str. 30 G,

mail .......................................................................... ur data being used for advertising purposes at any time. ich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG · Sitz: Berlin · Persönlich haftende

stering of the ongoing customer relationship and to inform you about our offers cient). nd prices. You can stop your data being used for advertising purposes at any time. xyour data forto do performance oflettercontract,fax, or send us an email at ..................................................................................... you would like the so, please send a the by post or for the stomer relationship and to inform you about our offers rvice@ESVmedien.de.

A u f schmidt t r a u n erich W i s s e n v e rverl eag
A u Please order at i sbookshopn sendv the to: r a A substantial contribution fordirectlyimpact u e n f W your s e or it e r t
Please order at your bookshop or send it directly to: Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG — 26 — Genthiner Str. 30 G · 10785 Berlin · Germany
Erich Schmidt Verlag GmbH & Co. KG of tourism development in time of global Genthiner Str. 30 G · Berlin · Germany imbalances! 25008510785 www.ESV.info · ESV@ESVmedien.de Fax +49 (0) 30 275 ·

The volume is based on the knowledge of a network of more than 300 researchers and includes experiences from Europe, Africa and Asia. It focuses on the latest economic crises as a framework for analyses and as at verl ag erich schmid real life case study.

ate/Signature .................................................................... & Co. KG · Sitz:May,Persönlich haftende Berlin · 2011

esellschafterin: ESV Verlagsführung GmbH · Amtsgericht: Berlin-Charlottenburg · lease send a letter by post or fax, or send us an email at 3 HRB 27 197 · Geschäftsführer: Dr. Joachim Schmidt

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tination, but an innate understanding of how to deliver relevant and impactful events that will drive to these objectives is critical. seamless operations are the average, the norm, the basis for your program. Understanding how to weave elements that will inspire imaginations, drive innovation, embrace and encourage connection and communication… this is when the experience becomes elevated and meaningful. This requires strategic development of a program that at each touch-point, from the first announcement to the final good-bye is memorable. it requires a team that is passionate about continually raising the bar, and welcoming guests to their home with open hearts and smiles that engage, and who wants to make sure that at the end of the day, the client basks in the glow of having made a great choice, even as we know they are moving on to another program. When seeking the services of any professional service organization, you do need to seek value, and to understand the value is not always the lowest price. rather great value comes from a combination of choices. For a meeting or incentive program this may include the airlift, ground transportation and accommodation options, amenities, overall feeling of the destination and the activities and events, and potentially education and networking opportunities. Ultimately part of this becomes about choosing a team that will have synergy with your team and bring a vision to life. When you can find the combination that has the best

fit, then you will be assured of a successful program where relationships are deepened and objectives are exceeded. That is the future of what every event needs to be. is it looking up? yes, definitely, clients are looking to the future rather than reacting so much to immediate needs, and are able to see that with planning and structure, programs that will drive sales are back on the rise and that travel incentives remain an “ultimate” reward, one that is worth spending the time to earn. Conferences as noted above are also

on the upswing, and trade shows are seeing improved attendance. The outlook is not quite rosy, but it is certainly refreshing to see that the importance of face to face connections is recognized, and the opportunities will continue to grow.
By Tahira Endean CMP–Director, Team Creative and Production, Cantrav Services Inc. http://www.cantrav.com

May, 2011

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