Susie Quesada Susie Quesada

F I L I P I N A WO ME N ’ S N E T WO R K
ANTI - VI OLENCE RESOURCE GUI DE
V V
D I A R I E S
8 t h a n n i v e r s a r y i s s u e | 2 0 1 1
COURTWATCH:
TEMPONGKO MURDER
VERDICT OVERTURNED
A Haircut
Saves A Life
FINDING ROMANCE
IN ALABAMA
ACT LIKE A MAN
F OODI E I NNOVAT OR . C U LT U R AL I NT E GR AT OR .
S OC I AL I NT R AP R E NE U R .
FI LI PI NA WOMEN’ S NET WORK | WWW. FI LI PI NAWOMENSNET WORK. ORg
Marily Mondejar
President,
Filipina Women’s Network
O
nce again, I am writing
my publisher’s
message. My eighth
message. Once again, I
am refecting on what we have
accomplished in the last year.
In the last 7 years. Am I
hopeful? Are we winning the
campaign to end violence
against Asian Pacifc American
women and girls?
Setback. March 30, the
Court of Appeal overturned the
Tempongko 2nd degree murder
verdict citing incorrect jury
instructions (page 16).
Imagining the possibility of a
murderer released from prison
as he waits for another trial is
unthinkable. The California
Attorney General has petitioned
the Supreme Court to review
the appellate court’s decision.
This process will take at least
two years. I’m hopeful.
At the conocimiento session
with the TVM cast and crew,
we asked the question, “Have
you ever experienced or
witnessed violence?” (page
15). 85% said they have. Many
shared their horrible
experiences but many also
shared how they turned their
experiences to positive
energies. We’re winning.
On page 14, Julianne
Hadfeld, our V-Diaries editor,
interviewed the men who
participated in a brilliant
program called Walk in Our
Heels. At this event, men wear
women’s high heels for half a
day. These young men are
learning healthy masculinity.
I’m hopeful.
The 2011 Vagina Warriors
move me (page 13). Three DV
survivors who have became
advocates for women. One
advocate who spreads the
word, breaks the cycle, and
brings hope to communities
nationwide with the power of
print – FWN’s V-Diaries:
anti-violence resource guide.
We’re winning.
Do not forget to read about
the brave women and men of
V-Day FWN 2011 celebrating
Asian Pacifc American
Heritage Month (pages 10-12).
We don’t quite have all the
APA communities represented.
I dream of the time when all
our communities will come
together and we’ll have a
whole week of TVM shows
in all APA languages.
I’m hopeful.
Al, Elena, Ken, Franklin,
Gen, Leah, Julianne – it’s been
a privilege and an honor. We
are winning because of your
dedication and commitment!
Mabuhay!
M
.
M e s s a g e f r o M t h e P U B L I s h e r
M e s s a g e f r o M t h e P r o D U C e r
I
never tire of continuing
advocacy work, as the
growing circle of women
involved in The Vagina
Monologues gives me annual
inspiration; and after eight
years of FWN’s involvement
with V-Day, there are still so
many who come to us – to
FWN – who take the time to
devote themselves to the
ever-increasing urgency of this
cause. In my professional life,
I help women in welfare fnd
meaningful jobs. With the rise
of unemployment, the
incidents of violence have also
increased, creating a ripple
efect on women in our
communities. In spite of all
other competing issues,
domestic violence is the one
that gets groups of women,
like the 2011 cast, to power
the engine of FWN and V-Day
every year. I am both honored
by and appreciative of these
women. They are women who
not only devote themselves to
the community, but who have
also come with a clear sense of
what V-Day, FWN and The
Vagina Monologues’ mission
is all about, and for that,
I thank them.
M e s s a g e f r o M t h e D I r e C t o r s
Message froM the ChaI r
Message froM the eDI tor
elena ManGaHaS
Board Chair,
Filipina Women’s Network
I
wish to recognize the courage of the cast and
crew for becoming a part of The Vagina
Monologues. For most, this is a big step not
only on stage but a step forward in life. Behind
the scripted words are real emotions, real stories that
breathe life into what is more than a performance,
but a moment of transformation.
I equally appreciate the loved ones who support
the cast and crew of The Vagina Monologues – for
understanding what the endeavor means to them
and their personal journeys, as well as what it will
mean to those whose lives will be touched. Between
the pages of he V-Diaries you will fnd a snapshot of
the cast and crew’s journey, as well as information
and refections you can take with you and share
where necessary.

leaH laXaMana
Producer
T
he V-Diaries is not only
a playbill, but it is a
tool of social change.
Included within are
resources for those who need
them, as survivors, as those
in need of legal services, as
the LGBT community, as
Asian women, African
women, Middle Eastern women, Latino
women, White women, of all ages, abilities,
and economic status. If someone you know
needs these resources, we ask that you pass
the V-Diaries along to them so that they may
put these wonderful services to use.
I am proud to say, as this year’s V-Diaries
editor, that the V-Day Movement has
continued to create a new form of
empowerment through The Vagina
Monologues performers and the communities
in which the monologues are performed. It is
in this light that we thank you, all those who
have attended our events and supported us
with love, kindness, and generosity. Without
you, V-Day would not be possible.
jUlianne HadField
Editor
L
et me begin by thanking our cast, crew,
and volunteers for their “superstar”
eforts in mounting this important
community event. “Don’t hide yourself
in regret, just love yourself and your set. I’m on the
right track baby, I was born this way.”
A few weeks ago, the amazing cellist Charles
Wang and I sat down to talk about the musical
scoring for this year’s production of The Vagina
Monologues. One choice we made was to include
Lady Gaga’s hit Born This Way excerpted above.
Ten days later, we were approached by a cast
member who proposed to sing the same song. You’ll
see how the lyrics have come to exemplify the spirit
of this year’s cast.
Since early rehearsals, this multicultural “family”
of women were on the right track. Their passion for
wanting to share with you the message of this piece
in the strongest way possible has been inspiring.
They are intent on breaking cultural and sexual
divisions, unifying to
speak out and demand:
no more hiding, no
more secrets, no more
violence against
women and girls
forever.
Ken MarQUiS
Director
E
ach year,
I tell the
cast during
our initial
introductions:
“This is more than
just a rehearsal, this
is more than just a
show. You will get
more out of this than you will ever expect.”It’s
during our daily journal writing and refections
after each rehearsal that each of us discover more
about each other and about ourselves. FWN’s The
Vagina Monologues has been a platform for
women to share their stories, to build sisterhood,
and be a catalyst for healing for the past
8 years. There are no words that can express the
metamorphosis of healing and relationship-
building through this process. Each year I witness
someone’s life changing before me and each year
I walk away with a new friend. Just as I feel on the
frst day of rehearsal during a new season, I never
know what to expect, but know that somehow
I will afect and save lives. I hope you share the
same sentiment when you leave the theatre
tonight. Your presence and support is appreciated
and is a big factor in contributing towards
our mission in stopping the cycle of violence.

GeneVieVe V. joPanda, Director
2
100 MOST INFLUENTIAL
FILIPINA WOMEN
IN THE U.S. AWARDS:
Nationwide search to identify
the most inspiring Filipina
women in the private and public
sectors, who exemplify
innovation, mentorship,
professionalism, empowerment
and leadership. The FWN 100
Awards is a working recognition
award, a key initiative of Pinay
Power 2012. Each selected
awardee “re-invents herself by
giving back”to the future of the
FilAm community by
womentoring ONE protégée
thus helping in developing
tomorrow’s Filipina leaders
today. Naming opportunity and
corporate sponsorships
available.
Call 415.935.4FWN or
email flipina@fwn.org
FWN PROGRAMS:
» FWN Salo Salo
» Filipina Leadership Summit
» 100 Most Infuential Filipina
Women in the United States
Awards (bi-annual)
» Filipinas Against Violence
Campaign
» Filipina Women Who Could
Be President Fellowship
» Pinay Power 2012: Time
Capsule Project
» Pinay Womentoring Circles
» Make ME a Filipina Millionaire
» Remarkable Filipina Women
» FWN Members Power Lunch
ANNUAL PUBLICATIONS:
• V-Diaries:Anti-Violence
Resource Guide
• FWNMagazine
A S I A N W O M E N A G A I N S T V I O L E N C E
Table of ConTe nTs
v-day spotlight 2011
About FWN .................................................. 3
Playbill ......................................................... 10
Cast & Crew Bios + Photos ........................... 10
oN thE CovER
Susie Quesada: Renewing a Legacy ............. 6
v-FEatUREs
Vagina Warriors ........................................... 13
V-Men: The Reformation of Masculinity ...... 14
Voices Against Violence ................................ 8
Update: Outrageous Vagina Fact .................. 16
Update: Tempongko Case ............................. 16
v-diaRiEs
10 Ways to Raise Children in a Positive Way .. 15
A Vagina Awakening .................................... 8
A “Hairy”Story ............................................ 15
DomesticViolenceThrivesinSilence ........... 8
Conocimiento ............................................... 15
Pin the Shadows .......................................... 8
v-REsoURCEs
FWN Community Partners ........................... 3
FWN Acknowledgments .............................. 3
Benefciaries:2011V-DaySpotlight
Campaign: Women and Girls of Haiti ........... 19
My Sister’s House, and
Asians Against Violence ............................... 17
salaMaT, aDVeRTI seRs!
FWN’s 8th Filipina Leadership Summit ........ 20
Dr.BambiLorica:BUSONG ........................... 7
Carnelian by the Bay .................................... 16
Charles Wang, Cello ...................................... 16
David&MarieCrayne:TheUPSStore#3145 ... 17
DelliePunla:GuardianSelfStorage ............. 5
Edcelyn Pujol: Northwestern Mutual ........... 12
Estrella Alan-Stephens ................................. 17
FAAE / Pistahan Parade & Festival ................ 17
FastEasyDivorce.com ................................... 5
Genevive Wines ............................................ 16
GMA Pinoy TV .............................................. 18
Ibarra Professional Law Corporation ............ 5
Ramar Foods International .......................... 20
Richard Gervais Collection ........................... 16
Sol Manaay: The Magic Pond ....................... 19
TopNotch Security ........................................ 7
fIlIPIna WoMen’s neTWoRK
Filipina Women’s Network
FWNisthenon-proftorganization
founded to raise funding and awareness
of the activities, careers and status of
women of Philippine ancestry living in the
United States. FWN is committed to
fostering the socioeconomic, political, and
educational advancement of Filipina
women through cultural heritage events,
career initiatives and professional
development programs. FWN strives to
enhance public perceptions of Filipina
women’s capacities to lead, change biases
against Filipina women’s leadership
abilities and build the Filipina
community’s pipeline of qualifed leaders,
to increase the odds that some will rise to
the President position in all sectors.
Filipina Women’s Network
P. O. Box 192143
San Francisco, CA 94119
www.fwn.org
Filipina@fwn.org
415.935.4FWN
FuNdraisiNg EvENts, CorporatE spoNsorships aNd NamiNg opportuNitiEs
availablE. PArTNEr WiTh ThE FiLiPiNA WOMEN’S NETWOrk AND SUPPOrT FiLiPiNA WOMEN, AMEriCA’S UNTAPPED
SOUrCEFOrLEADErShiPANDTALENT.
» www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org
» facebook.com/FilipinaWomensNetwork
» Twitter@flipinawomen
Acknowledgments
thE “v”tEam
DeVotedPublisher:Marily Mondejar
DiVineEditor:Julianne Hadfeld
LoVe Managing Editor: Leah L. Laxamana
DeLightfulCopyEditor:Charity Espiritu
AngelArtDirector:Al S. Perez
hEaRt CoNtRibUtoRs
2011 TVM Cast, Bennie Lou Quevedo,
CharmaineManglicmot,EmilyMurase,PhD,
EstrellaAlan-Stephens,JefMique,JoelCruz,
Jonokane,JulieD.Soo,Esq.,katrinaSocco,
Laarni San Juan, Safe Place Peer Educators,
Scott Campbell, Sean Kirkpatrick, Ramar Foods,
Sherrice Porter, XuanThu Pham
FWN boaRd
AlS.Perez
Dr.BambiLorica
Elena Mangahas
Josephine Romero
Marily Mondejar
Maya Ong Escudero
Lt. Col. Shirley Raguindin
© 2011 The V-Diaries is a publication of the
Filipina Women’s Network. All rights reserved.
V-DIARIES & SPONSORS
AcademyofArtUniversity:rebeccaDelgado•AsianWeekFoundation:TedFangandAngelaPang•herbstTheatre:
StephanieSmithandJohnBott•PhilippineConsulateGeneral:ConsulGeneralJunPaynor,TradeCommissionerJopin
romero,TradeSpecialistrosalieSay,ConsulLeahrodriguez•PhilippineNews:FrancisEspirituandMargeArgente•
Scott Campbell, SRC Productions, LLC, San Francisco (Photographic Services)
DONATIONS
In Honor of TVM Cast & Crew members: Steve Smith, Yvette Hochberg
In Honor of Bennie Lou Quevedo: Julie Hudson, Genevive Wines, Mary Jankowski, Mila Lansang
In Honor of Charmaine Manglicmot: Sabrina Fitranty
In Honor of Julianne HadfieldAmylinghuynh,MelissaCabal,PerchuiMavyan,YvettePaiz,VicenteViray
TICkET SPONSORS (donated to residents/staff members of Domestic Violence agencies and shelters)
In Honor of Bennie Lou Quevedo: CindyMcMurry,Ednaraga,MelanieMoniz,PollyS.Cortez
In Honor of Diana Reyes: XuanThu Pham
In Honor of Joy Neu: Cecille Pajarillo, Jan Bullard, Maria C. Matias
In Honor of Julianne Hadfield: AngelaFarrar,DonnaLaemmlen,EastonMillet,isabelChoi,Mrs.JaneCabansag
hadfield,MarcelinoUrioste,Matthewkulisch,MayStrickland,SuzanneGallante,WendyM.Lau,YvettePaiz
In Honor of Julie Soo: Alicia Boccellari, Benny Berlin, Cynthia Gouw, Janet Clyde, Leona Lau, Judge Lillian Sing
In Honor of Laarni San Juan: Manuel Villacorta
In Honor of Leah Laxamana: Joan Bernardo, Mike Lo, Will Banks, Yvette Nichols
In Honor of Marily Mondejar: Dr.EmilyMurase
In Honor of Maurine Cabansag, Shirley Hadfeld, Jane Hadfeld and Melina Geil for Mother’s Day: Julianne Hadfield
In Honor of Shinta Lim: Girija Bhomawat, Komal Chokshi
In Honor of XuanThu Pham: Mark Koba, Theresa Bui
COMMUNI T Y PARTNERS
APiLegalOutreach•AsianPacificislanderinstituteonDomesticViolence•AsianWeekFoundation•Consulate
GeneralofthePhilippinesinSanFrancisco•DomesticViolenceConsortium•FAhSi•Justice&CourageOversight
Committee•LilaPilipina•ThePhilippineCenter•V-DAY2011
san franci sco bay area
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CHILD ABUSE
Alameda County Social Services
Hotline: 510.259.1800
alamedasocial services.org
24-hour confdential hotline
Child Abuse Prevention Council
San Joaquin County
209. 464. 4524
Emergency respite childcare,
court-appointed advocates
Child Abuse Training & Technical
Assistance (CATTA) Center
707. 284.1300
cattacenter.org
Resources against child abuse
Family & Children Services
City & County of San Francisco
Hotline: 800. 856. 5553
www.sfhsa.org/174.htm
Child Abuse, respite care, counseling
FamilyPaths (Formerly Parental
Stress Service)
Alameda County
Hotline: 800. 829. 3777
familypaths.org
Emergency childcare, 24-hour
support hotline, English & Spanish
San Mateo County Child
Protective Services
Child Abuse Hotline
800. 632. 4615 / 650. 595. 7922
co.sanmateo.ca.us/smc/
department/hsa/home
COUNSELING SERVICES
ACCESS
24-hr Support Line: 800. 491. 9099
Crisis Support Services
24-hr Line: 800. 309. 2131
Girls, Inc., Pathways
Counseling Center
Alameda County
13666 E. 14th St.
San Leandro, CA 94578
510. 357. 5515
Concordia County
3000 62nd Ave.
Oakland, CA 94605
510. 430. 1850
COURT SERVICES /
LAW ENFORCEMENT
OFFICES
Court Info
www.courtinfo.ca.gov/courts/trial/
courtlist.htm
How to contact courts statewide by
county, searchable by zip code/city
Alameda County Superior Court
Berkeley Clerk’s Ofce
510. 644. 8999
www.alameda.courts.ca.gov
Temporary Restraining Orders
Alameda County Superior Court
Family Court Clerks
510. 208. 4935
Restraining order application
Alameda County Superior Court
Family Law Facilitator’s Ofce
510. 670. 5150
No-fee court afliated assistance
with custody, child support, etc.
District Attorney’s Ofce
Domestic Violence Advocate
Oakland
510. 268. 7276
asafeplacedvs.org/resources.htm
Domestic Violence Response
Unit / Elder Abuse
SF Police Department
415. 553. 9225
Victim Services Division
SF District Attorney’s Ofce
850 Bryant St., Room 320
415. 553. 9044
Comprehensive advocacy and support
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
SHELTERS
24-Hour Emergency Shelter
4700 International Blvd.
Oakland, CA 94601
510. 534. 6030
Women and children
AASRA-Federation of
Indo-American
800. 313. 2772 / 510. 657. 1245
So. Asian Languages; Women and
Children (Priority to South Asian);
M-F intakes; overnight emergency
Asian Women’s Home
2400 Moorpark Ave.
San Jose, CA 95128
24-hour hotline: 408.975.2730
aaci.org
Asian languages; emergency food,
clothing & shelter for women and
children, counseling, legal advocacy
Asian Women’s Shelter
3453 18th St., #19
San Francisco, CA 94110
877. 751. 0880
415. 751. 7110
sfaws.org
Various Asian languages; Emergency
shelter in confdential location
Building Futures with Women
And Children / Sister Me Home
1395 Bancroft Ave.
San Leandro, CA 94577
510. 357. 0205
bfwc.org
Spanish; Women and children
Community Overcoming
Relationship Abuse (CORA)
P.O. Box 5090
San Mateo, CA 94402
24-hr Hotline: 800.300.1080
Legal Info Line: 650. 259. 1855
corasupport.org
English & Spanish spoken;
Emergency shelter, transitional
housing, legal services
Community Solutions
6980 Chestmut St.
Gilroy, CA 95020
communitysolutions.org
Eden Info & Referral
570 B Street
Hayward, CA 94541
510. 537. 2710
edenir.org
Referral services, daily updates of
shelter availability in East Bay
Emergency Shelter Program
1180 B St.
Hayward, CA 94541
24-hr hotline:
Hayward: 510. 786. 1246
Oakland: 510. 534. 6030
Spanish; 90-day stay, women and
children of domestic violence
Futures without Violence
383 Rhode Island St., Ste. 304
San Francisco, CA 94103
415. 252. 8900 | TTY: 800. 595. 4889
futureswithoutviolence.org
Haven of Peace Women’s
Emergency Home
San Joaquin County
7070 South Harlan Rd.
French Camp, CA 95231
209. 982. 0390 / 209. 982. 0396
18+ years accepted; 35 space
capacity; assist women with food,
clothing and counseling
La Casa de Las Madres
1850 Mission St., #B
San Francisco, CA 94103
24-hour Crisis Lines:
Adult Line: 877. 503. 1850
Teen Line: 877. 923. 0700
lacasa.org
Emergency shelter; Domestic
Violence Response, Safe Havens
Project, Mary Elizabeth Inn Case
Management Program; Spanish,
Mandarin, Tagalog, French, Arabic
La Isla Pacifca
Gilroy, CA
24 hour Crisis Line: 408. 683. 4118
Bilingual services, emergency food,
shelter up to 45 days, drug/alcohol
treatment, outpatient domestic
violence counseling, legal assistance
Marin Abused Women’s Services
734 A St., San Rafael, CA 94901
Women’s English Hotline:
415. 924. 6616
Women’s Spanish Hotline:
415. 924. 3456
Men’s Hotline: 415. 924. 1070
maws.org
Emergency shelter, legal assistance,
reeducation classes for batterers
My Sister’s House
3053 Freeport Blvd.
Sacramento, CA 95818
24-hr multilingual helpline:
916. 428. 3271
www.my-sisters-house.org
24-hour help line, safe haven for Asian
/ Pacifc Islander women & children
National Domestic Violence
Hotline
1. 800. 799. SAFE (7233)
1. 800. 787. 3224 (TTY)
24-hr access through all 50 states,
English & Spanish, interpreter services
in 140 languages, local access to
shelters, information for immigrants
Next Door Solutions to
Domestic Violence
234 E. Gish Road, Ste. 200
San Jose, CA 95112
24-hr hotline: 408. 279. 2962
nextdoor.org
English & Spanish, comprehensive
emergency assistance services,
shelters in San Jose & Santa Clara
North American Islamic Shelter
for the Abused
P.O. Box 50515
Palo Alto, CA 94303
888-ASK-NISA / 888. 275. 6472
www.asknisa.org
Support and help to Urdu, Hindi,
Arabic, Farsi, Pushtu speakers
Safe Alternatives to Violent
Environments (SAVE)
1900 Mowry Ave., Ste. 204
Fremont, CA 94538
24-hr hotline: 510. 794. 6055
save-dv.org
Spanish, Hindi, Tamil; Emergency
shelter & longer term housing,
medical & legal assistance
Saint John’s Shelter for Women
& Children
4410 Power Inn Rd.
Sacramento, CA 95826
916. 453. 1482
stjohnsshelter.org
Emergency shelter up to 60 days
Shepherd’s Gate
1660 Portola Ave.
Livermore, CA 94551
925. 443. 4283 / 888. 216. 4776
shepherdsgate.org
Emergency shelter, job training, short
& long term programs
Stand Against Domestic Violence
1410 Danzig Plaza
Concord, CA 94520
888. 215. 5555 / 925. 676. 2845
standagainstdv.org
Emergency shelter, transitional
housing, Adelante Familia for
Spanish speakers
Tri-Valley Haven
3663 Pacifc Ave.
Livermore, CA 94550
800. 884. 8119 / 925. 449. 5845
trivalleyhaven.org
Cantonese, German, French, Spanish,
Tagalog, Hindi; Emergency shelter for
women and children of DV
Women Escaping Violence
(WEAVE )
1900 K St.
Sacramento, CA 95814
916. 920. 2952 / 916. 448. 2321
weaveinc.org
Response team, temporary housing,
crisis counseling, employment services
Woman Inc.
333 Valencia St., Ste. 450
San Francisco, CA 94103
24-hr Crisis Lines:
877. 384. 3578 / 415. 864. 4722
womaninc.org
Bilingual, bicultural services, counseling,
legal referrals, support groups
YWCA Support Network
for Battered Women
1257 Tasman Dr., Ste. C
Sunnyvale, CA 94089
24-hr Help Line: 800. 572. 2782
supportnetwork.org
English & Español; Crisis
intervention, counseling, legal
services, emergency shelter
HUMAN TRAFFICKING
California law defnes human
trafcking as “all acts involved in the
recruitment, abduction, transport,
harboring, transfer, sale or receipt of
persons, within national or across
international borders, through force,
coercion, fraud or deception, to place
persons in situations of slavery or
slavery like conditions, forced labor or
services, such as forced prostitution or
sexual services, domestic servitude,
bonded sweatshop labor, or other
debt bondage.”
» HumanTrafcking in California, 2007
» California Alliance to Combat Trafcking and
SlaveryTask Force
SERVI CE PROVI DERS:
BAYSWAN
P.O. Box 210256
San Francisco, CA 94121
415. 751. 1659
bayswan.org
Center for Gender and
Refugee Studies
200 McAllister St.
San Francisco, CA 94102
415. 565. 4877
egrs.uchastings.edu
Lawyers’ Committee for Civil
Rights of the SF Bay Area
131 Steuart St., Ste 400
San Francisco, CA 94105
415. 543. 9444
lccr.com
MISSEY (Motivating, Inspiring,
Supporting and Service
Sexually Exploited Youth)
Alameda County Family
Justice Center
470 7th St.
Oakland, CA 94612
510.267.8840 / 510.290.6450
missey.org
ADVOCACY ORGANI zATI ONS:
Department on the
Status Of Women
25 Van Ness Ave., Ste. 130
San Francisco, CA 94102
415. 252. 2578
sfgov.org/dosw
Human Rights Commission
25 Van Ness Ave., Ste. 800
San Francisco, CA 94102
415. 252. 3208
sf-hrc.org
Jewish Community
Relations Council
121 Steuart St., Ste. 301
San Francisco, CA 94105
415. 957. 1551
jcrc.org
FI LI PI NA WOMEN’ S NET WORK | WWW. FI LI PI NAWOMENSNET WORK. ORg
v- resources
S AN F RANCI S CO BAY ARE A
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5 A S I A N W O M E N A G A I N S T V I O L E N C E
IBARRA PROFESSIONAL LAW CORP
FAMILY LAW AND IMMIGRATION all areas,
including self-petition victim of spousal cruelty/abuse,
restraining orders, dissolution, custody, support,
property division, multi-jurisdiction issues; pre-nuptial,
post nuptial agreements; probate etc.
459 FuLTON STReeT, SuITe 109, SAN FRANcIScO, cA 94102
TeL: (415) 398-5329 | WWW.IbARRApLc.cOM
Fast Easy Divorce
582 Market Street, Suite 1004
San Francisco, CA 94104
415. 822. 2222
Email: help@FastEasyDivorce.com
www.FastEasyDivorce.com
LDA# 38-000017
Not For Sale
270 Capistrano Rd., Ste. 2
Half Moon Bay, CA 94019
650. 560. 9990
notforsalecampaign.org
LESBIAN, GAY,
BISEXUAL,
TRANSGENDER,
& QUESTIONING
Community United
Against Violence (CUAV)
427 South Van Ness
San Francisco, CA 94103
24-hr Crisis Line: 415. 333. 4357
cuav.org
Maitri Hotline
234 East Gish Rd., Ste. 200
San Jose, CA 95112
Hotline: 888. 862. 4874
408. 436. 8398 / 408. 436. 8393
maitri.org
South Asian Women; Peer support /
counseling for domestic violence,
family law, immigration domestic
violence issues, translation,
interpretation, transitional housing
Pacifc Center
2712 Telegraph Ave.
Berkeley, CA 94705
510. 548. 8283
pacifccenter.org
Group and individual counseling,
narcotics anonymous, HIV and
Aids group, social groups
Project Eden
22646 2nd St.
Hayward, CA 94541
510. 247. 8200
Counseling for LGBTQQ Youth
Sexual Minority Alliance of
Alameda County Youth Center
Alameda County
1608 Webster St.
Oakland, CA 94612
510. 548. 8283
Support groups for LGBTQQ youth
SF LGBT Center
1800 Market Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
415. 865. 5555
sfcenter.org
Legal referrals, Temporary
Restraining Order assistance
SF Network for Battered
Lesbians/Bisexuals
415. 281. 0276
LEGAL REFERRALS:
TEMPORARY
RESTRAINING ORDER
ASSISTANCE
The Cooperative Restraining
Order Clinic
San Francisco
415. 252. 2844
Bilingual Service; Restraining
Order Assistance free of charge;
Paperwork served to batterer at
reduced fee
Legal Aid of Napa County
1001 Second St. Suite 335
Napa, CA 94559
707. 259. 0579
legalaidnapa.org
Free legal services to seniors,
immigrants and low-income
residents of Napa County
Napa Emergency Women’s
Services
1141 Pear Tree Ln.
Napa, CA 94558
707. 255. 6397 / 707. 252. 3687
Help with restraining orders
LEGAL SERVICES
API Legal Outreach
1305 Franklin St., Ste. 410
Oakland, CA 94612
510. 251. 2846
apilegaloutreach.org
Walk-in clinic; family, civil,
immigration law restraining
orders, queer domestic violence,
Asian languages
OR
1121 Mission St.
San Francisco, CA 94103
415. 567. 6255
Family, civil, and immigration
law; temporary restraining order,
Gay Domestic Violence Project
Asian Women’s Home
2400 Moorpark Ave., Ste. 300
San Jose, CA 95128
408. 975. 2739
Temporary restraining order
assistance; counseling; serves all
counties; 24-hr crisis line, shelter;
works with translators to serve
Asian-speaking clients
Domestic Violence
Restraining Order Clinic
137th St., Room 185,
Richmond, CA
510. 965.4048
Restraining Order clinic held in
Richmond Courthouse
Law Center for Families
510 16th St., Suite 300
Oakland, CA 94612
510. 451. 9261
lcf.org
For families ineligible for
assistance from other programs,
but too poor to hire a private
attorney.
SEXUAL ASSAULT
Bay Women Against Rape
Oakland
Hotline: 510. 845. 7273
Rape and incest victims; Short-
term counseling, accompaniment
to hospital, court advocacy
DateHookup.com
datehookup.com/content-
what-you-should-know-about-
rape-and-sexual-assault.htm
The Sage Project Inc.
1275 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
415. 905. 5050 / 415. 554. 1914
sagesf.org
Recovery from sexual exploitation
& substance abuse
SF Women Against Rape
3543 18th Street
San Francisco, CA 94110
415. 861. 2024
sfwar.org
24-hr Hotline: 415. 647. RAPE
Counseling, support groups, legal
advocacy
SF General Hospital Trauma
Recovery Center – Rape
Treatment Center
2727 Mariposa St, Ste 100
Crisis Line: 415. 437. 3011
24-hr medical forensic exam
(SFGH Emergency Room), free
services, Spanish / English)
API RESOURCES
Community Health For Asian
Americans
Antioch
3727 Sunset Ln., Ste. 110
Antioch, CA 94509
925. 778. 1667
Berkeley
1995 University Ave., Ste. 450
Berkeley, CA 94704
510. 845. 1766
Oakland
255 International Blvd.
Oakland, CA 94606
510. 835. 0164
Richmond
3905 MacDonald Ave.
Richmond, CA 94805
510. 233. 7555
FI LI PI NA WOMEN’ S NET WORK | WWW. FI LI PI NAWOMENSNET WORK. ORg
I
n the Philippines, Maria Quesada
was a teacher who opened two
restaurants. Upon coming to the US,
Maria created yet another business,
Orientex, selling Filipino handicrafts
in the San Jose Flea Market. She and her
family’s company soon expanded into dry
food goods, and they were able to build a
distribution shop in Mountain View. What’s
most impressive is that she did all of this
with eleven children. It is no surprise that
Maria Quesada’s legacy lives on, not only in
her children, but in her grandchildren. And
it is also no surprise that Susie Quesada,
one of Maria’s grandchildren, carries on the
tradition of the family business, sharing the
culture of the Philippines through food.
Susie Quesada is currently the Executive
Vice President of Ramar Foods International.
When discussing the history of the family
company, Susie says that her grandmother
started the business in the US “because
people were missing the food from the
homeland.” She said her grandmother was
the driving force – the one with the mind
for business, and that persona was passed
on to Primo Quesada in particular. It was he
who jumpstarted the expansion of Orientex
and the development from dry food goods
into meats, meals and desserts within the
eight brands and three factory warehouse
locations of Ramar Foods. He was also the
one who convinced Susie to return to the
family business.
Susie worked for Orientex when she
was young. When she was a child, she
would place labels on the containers of ice
cream with her younger brothers. As she
got older, her responsibilities progressed
into store demonstrations and working in
the warehouses, but she wanted to serve
the community and so, in the same fashion
as her grandmother Maria, Susie became
a teacher. As a middle school teacher,
Susie taught social studies and music.
She wrote the entire curriculum for an
Understanding Music class where pupils
would submit lyrics and dissect them as
poetry. She enjoyed the creative energy of
the classroom and the freedoms she had as
an educator.
After a few years of teaching, her father
Primo asked her to try out the company
again just to see if she would like it. With
some convincing, she agreed and took a
leave of absence, working her way from
data entry to accounting and marketing,
and it was in marketing that her creative
voice and out-of-the-box thinking was found
again. She also realized the importance
of bringing Filipino food to the forefront of
American dining – after all, Filipinos are the
second largest population of Asians in the
United States, yet are underrepresented
within so many sectors, including the food
industry. She understood that Ramar Foods
was not just a business, but it was also
a way to bring the homeland back to its
people and to educate the masses about
Filipino culture.
“I look at being part of Ramar as…
a bigger scope of being able to educate
people about the Filipino culture and the
food, which is a big part of the culture…
I love food, I love teaching and educating,
so it’s kind of the best of both worlds…
[Why] I decided to stay… was that my dad
and his family had worked so hard to build
[the company] to where it is now and I just
felt like I needed to continue that legacy.”
Susie Quesada has been back at Ramar
for the last six years, and during this time,
Ramar Foods has created a scholarship for
students in the Philippines as well as those
within the company. PJ Quesada, Marketing
Director of Ramar Foods and brother of
Susie said that “at the end of this year, [the
scholarship will] be available through the
Pittsburg Unifed School District and Contra
Costa College Association.”
Susie has also started a wellness
program that includes an exercise
class which she teaches for the Human
Resources department, but the company
plans on expanding it through their
insurance company, in order to “take care
of the family” as PJ said, while also having
additional resources and health promotions.
Susie was proud to announce that
the company was completing a line of
all-natural, preservative-free, and gluten-
free foods. They have also become more
environment-friendly, changing their
reusable plastic containers to compostable
cartons, and will be running on renewable
energy in two years at their Pittsburg
location. Not only have they contributed
their energies toward education and causes
for the environment, but they have also
contributed to the V-Diaries in one of the
most signifcant ways possible: nationwide
distribution. When Susie was awarded with
the Vagina Warrior honor, she gave the
credit to her sales team, those who deliver
the resource guide, as the real warriors for
the Filipina Women’s Network.
“When we deliver our orders, we drop
magazines as well… So we’ve been
distributing them, not just in California, but
throughout the U.S., and I think we even
sent some to Canada,” Susie said. She
went on to say that Ramar Foods selects
Asian and Filipino stores frst, and if there
are extra, they’ll drop some off at more
mainstream locations, but their goal is
always to hit the target markets. So, they
take the V-Diaries they have been given,
divide them between their ten salespeople
with 200 accounts each (60-70% are
Filipino accounts), and they drop off one or
two bundles at the locations (each bundle
contains about 100-200 V-Diaries). Last
year, thousands of V-Diaries were dropped
off on pallets at the Pittsburg, Los Angeles
and Honolulu offces, then divided and
distributed throughout country for FWN.
Susie Quesada:
Renewing
a Legacy
By JULI ANNE HADFI ELD
6
Above: Susie with FWN Chair Elena
Mangahas, White House President
Connie Mariano and APALA Former
Executive Director Gloria T. Caoile, at
the 2010 FWN Summit in Las Vegas.
ELENA MANGAHAS COLLECTION
PHOTO BY JEFF MIQUE
A S I A N W O M E N A G A I N S T V I O L E N C E 7
Susie was frst introduced to FWN during
a business luncheon. She was quickly
inspired to join the group about fve years
ago. “I think I was inspired by meeting all
these women who were so driven and so
motivated and had so much to offer – that
I just wanted to be a part of it.” Susie has
continued to support FWN because she
found a community of women who come
from various cultural connections from the
Philippines and are a multigenerational
organization, as well as being an
organization of women who represent a
wide array of industries. FWN represents
the V-Day mission as well, which is another
cause Susie holds dear to her heart:
What does the V-Day mission mean
to you?
“I would say the majority of my friends
have been abused, and so, being able to
support that and especially get it out in
the Asian American community where it’s
really shunned and not talked about, it was
really important.”
What were the reactions you received
when you got involved in V-Day?
Susie frst brought her mom to the
monologues. “She was completely taken
aback, especially the part about the
Comfort Women… she just- she had no
idea. It might have been talked about
when she went to the University of the
Philippines, but just in that grand scope,
the way they approached it as well, where
it was from all the women, from their
mouths.”
Susie then took the women from the
Pittsburg offce. “Again, eyes were opened.”
The next year, the sales distributors.
“They understood the cause.”
What did the sale distributors
say when they had to deliver the
V-Diaries?
At frst, some of the distributors were
ready for the challenge, while other more
reserved distributors were more resistant;
but Marily Mondejar, President of the FWN
said that Susie called a meeting together
with all the staff of Ramar Foods and told
them, “This is about taking a stand against
abuse of Filipina women and girls. These
magazines contain powerful messages
that violence against women must stop.
You are all bringing these magazines
to areas that could result in saving one
woman’s life.”
And in the words of President Mondejar,
“FWN honors her for being a strong
advocate in our community. How many
lives have been saved? We will never
know.”
Julianne Hadfeld is completing her MFA in
writing at USF. She writes both nonfction
and short fction.
Above: Susie’s
grandparents, Ramon
and Maria Quesada,
founded Ramar Foods
in 1969.
Right: Susie leads Ramar
Foods with her brothers
Primo (left) and Ron.
PHOTO BY JEFF MIQUE
PHOTO BY RAMAR FOODS
PHOTO BY RAMAR FOODS
Congratulati ons and best wi shes
to the Cast of
the Vagina Monologues!
12 FI LI PI NA WOMEN’ S NETWORK | WWW. FI LI PI NAWOMENSNETWORK. ORg
One voice can
save a life.
It’s the right thing to do!
I believe young girls and
women should never be
treated that way. I speak out
because I am a survivor. I want
to stand up for all these young
girls and women to inspire
them, to give them the courage
to stand up, speak their minds,
and fght for their rights,
and to feel free.
I am a survIvor, I am an
actIvIst, I am a voIce
that wIll be heard.
The abused have been silenced
for too long, and it’s time to
give them a voice.
It hurts and could kill. The
trauma and pain it leaves to
human beings, especially with
children, can last a lifetime.
Violence has to stop.
Because the greatest crime
of humanity is causing
harm to each other.
I am a peace-loving person.
Anyone using violence
especially against women and
girls is an inhuman behavior
and should be punished.
If I don’t, who will?
It only causes damage to
indi viduals and society.
Because I can! I’m
doing it for those who are
too afraid or simply
unable to speak against it.
I want my voi ce to be
the vehi cl e that t urns
at l e as t one vi ct i m
i nto a sur vi vor.
Voices need to be heard.
Every human being deserves
to be treated with respect
and dignity.
I just want to end It. I’m sIck
of It. enough Is enough!
d
om
estIc VIolence thrIVes on sIlence
I am
a dom
estic violence survivor! I was in a long-
term
relationship with m
y high school sweetheart
for 11 years where the abuse cam
e out after 1 year
into our relationship. M
y ex-abuser was verbally,
m
entally, em
otionally, and physically abusive to m
e!
H
is abusive ways was a result of the vicious
“cycle of violence” that he grew up with in his
fam
ily environm
ent. I lived in silence and secrecy
for 10 years and never turned to anyone for help,
due to the fact that I was scared, confused,
and em
barrassed!
They say that “dom
estic violence thrives on silence.”
And the cycle of violence is a gruesom
e cycle that
affects fam
ilies, generation after generation, until
som
eone decides to change and whole-heartedly put
a stop to the cycle! …
N
ow as a survivor, m
oving
forward to becom
e a thriver, I want to speak against
violence and share m
y story to encourage other
victim
s and wom
en/girls to speak out against
violence and to seek help in m
oving to safer,
non-violent environm
ents! And to encourage our
com
m
unities to stand up and help the cause to
STO
P violence against wom
en and girls locally
and globally!
– Charm
aine Sydney M
anglicm
ot
Pin the Shadows
By XuanThu Pham
I have a technique
That most kids in my second grade class don’t have.
All you have to do is quietly tip toe to the bedroom door
No matter how loud it is inside the room
No matter how much crying and whimpering you hear
Be still like a leaf on the forest ground.
Stay low
Pretend you are a ninja of the night
And pin the shadows.
Stay low
Place your right ear on the foor
Breath only through your mouth.
Squint your eyes a little
To locate the movement of each footstep.
Pin your eyes to the shadowy feet
Don’t lose sight of it
So that it doesn’t take another step
And get too close.
A Vagina Awakening
Resistant and why? It is because I don’t want
to divulge my secrets to my children, my
husband, my relatives, my friends and my
community. I’m ashamed of what I’ve done
keeping my secrets. I’m scared of retaliation
from the person/s that did it to me. It is a
disgrace to my ethnicity. I don’t trust myself
anymore. I’m afraid I may not be able to
face the world because I was a victim of
domestic violence.
FWN taught me not to be resistant anymore
and open my box of secrets. Now, I’m relieved
of my worries and anxieties. I’m not afraid
anymore. I belong to the crusade to help
victims of violence and abuse to women and
girls. Fear is no longer in me. People can
look at my face eye to eye. Now, I can look
back with my head up, a bright face and
with a sweet smile.
the vagina monOlogues cast:
I Am Speaking Out
Against Violence
Because …
At the orientation of The Vagina Monologues,
the cast and crew were encouraged to capture
their thoughts as the production progressed.
Ultimately, they were fnding a deeper meaning
to their participation as buried memories and
feelings started surfacing. The following are
excerpts from their journals refecting their
involvement in The Vagina Monologues.
Tama Na
Tama Na
Tama Na
Stop
Stop
Stop
Stop
Stop
Berhenti
Stop
Stop
Stop
EVE ENSLER’S
V - D ay F i l i p i n a Wo m e n ’ s n e t Wo r k i s p r o u D t o p r e s e n t a b e n e F i t p e r F o r m a n c e o F
DirecteD by:
ken marQuis &
GeneVieVe JopanDa
proDucer:
leah laxamana
eXecutiVe proDucers:
marily monDeJar &
elena manGaHas

Hentikan
Hentikan
FRIDAY, MAY 13, 2011
7:30 PM | HERBST THEATRE
401 VAN NESS AVE, SAN FRANCISCO
. . . . . . . . . . . .
celebratinG
. . . . . . . . . . . .
asian paciFic american HeritaGe montH
ASIAN AMERICANS
AgAINST VIOlENCE
A community event
in collaboration with
V-Day’s global Campaign to
STOP
the violence against
women and girls.
Tomare
Tomare
Tomare

T
he Vagina
Monologues

T
he Vagina
Monologues
Berhenti
The Vagina MOnOlOgueS,
frst performed off-Broadway by
Ms. Ensler, dives into the mystery,
humor, pain, power, wisdom, outrage
and excitement buried in women’s
experiences. Through this play and the
liberation of this one WORD, countless
women throughout the world have
taken control of their bodies and their
lives; giving voice to experiences and
feelings not previously exposed in
public.
MORe inFO: 415. 935. 4FWN
TiCKeTS:
CityBoxOffce.com
415. 392. 4400
$28 FWN Members, Seniors &
Students
$38 general Admission
$100 VIP (Box and Orchestra Seats)
BeneFiCiaRieS:
V-Day Spotlight
2011: Women and
girls of Haiti,
Filipinas Against
Violence and
My Sister’s House
FI LI PI NA WOMEN’ S NET WORK | WWW. FI LI PI NAWOMENSNET WORK. ORg 10
The Vagina Monologues is a celebration of
female sexuality in all its complexity and mystery. based on
interviews with over 200 women about their memories and ex-
peri ences of sexuali ty, the vagi na monologues gi ves voi ce to
women’s deepest fantasies and fears, guaranteeing that no one
who reads it will ever look at a woman’s body, or think of sex, in
quite the same way again. “at first women were reluctant to talk,”
ensler writes. “they were a little shy. but once they got going, you
couldn’t stop them.” the vagina monologues has now been trans-
lated into over 24 different languages.
Bennie lou QueVedo
assistant vice president,
privatewealth management
edcelyn Pujol
financial consultant,
northwestern mutual financial
network
dr. eMily Murase, Phd
executive director,
sf department on the status of
women; commissioner,
sf school board
esTrella alan-sTePhens
president &co-founder, rizal
high school alumni association
of north america
Fiona Ma
speaker protempore,
assemblywoman,
district 12
chariTy esPiriTu
fellow,
filipinawomen’s network
charMaine ManglicMoT
soulciety
charles Wang
cellist; electrical engineer
crisTina M. iBarra
student,
sf university high school
The Vagina Monologues
julianne hadField, MFa
mfawriting student,
university of san francisco
julie d. soo, esQ.
senior staf counsel, ca dept.
of insurance; commissioner, sf
commission on the
status of women
laarni san juan
public health nurse,
san mateo county health
department
liz aguilar Tarchi, esQ.
assistant district attorney,
san francisco
rosie josue
executiveteamleader,
assets protection,
target
saBrina T. FiTranTy
correspondent &marketing,
kabari media
shinTa liM
financial services professional,
mass mutual financial group
sonia T. delen
senior vice president,
banc of america leasing
MUSICAL FOREPLAY
charles wang, cello
WELCOME
from filipina women’s
network:
marily mondejar, president &
elena mangahas, board chair
Part One
INTRODUCTION
charmaine manglicmot,
edcelyn pujol, estrella
alan-stephens, Joy neu,
Julianne hadfeld, maria
rabuy inciong, sydney
Jimenez, diana reyes,
shinta lim, tina a. maninang
INTRO – HAIR
diana reyes
HAIR
Julie d. soo
WEAR AND SAY
bennie lou quevedo,
charmaine manglicmot,
cristina m. ibarra, channy
ith, diana reyes, laarni san
Juan, theresa noriega-lum,
sabrina fitranty, sydney
Jimenez, xuanthu pham
INTRO – THE FLOOD
diana reyes
THE FLOOD
estrella alan-stephens,
tina maninang
THE VAGINA WORKSHOP
Joy neu, edcelyn pujol,
maria rabuy inciong
VAGINA HAPPY FACT
bennie lou quevedo
INTRO – BECAUSE HE
LIKED TO LOOK AT IT
sonia t. delen
BECAUSE HE LIKED
TO LOOK AT IT
theresa noriega-lum
NOT-SO-HAPPY FACT
sonia t. delen
INTRO – SAY IT (FOR THE
COMFORT WOMEN)
genevieve Jopanda
SAY IT (FOR THE
COMFORT WOMEN)
charmaine manglicmot,
shinta lim
EXTRO – UPDATE ON
THE TEMPONGKO CASE
emily murase
MY ANGRY VAGINA
laarni san Juan,
sabrina fitranty
Intermission
RECOGNITION OF
2011 VAGINA WARRIORS
by marily mondejar and
elena mangahas:
» katrina socco,
san francisco bay area
coordinator, af3irm
» noelani sallings,president,
dawn – democratic
activists for women now
» nwe oo, wellness
advocate, community
health for asian
americans
» susie quesada, executive
vice president, ramar
foods international
Part Two
HANDPRINTS PLEDGE
(MEN AGAINST
VIOLENCE)
david chiu, president of the
san francisco board of
supervisors
Handprints Pledge is an
encouragement for men and
boys to come forward and get
involved in ending family
violence.
INTRO – MY VAGINA
WAS MY VILLAGE
laarni san Juan
MY VAGINA WAS MY
VILLAGE
diana reyes, xuanthu pham
LULLABY –
ILI-ILI, TULOG ANAY*
rosie Josue
EXTRO – SLAVERY IN
AMERICA (HUMAN
TRAFFICKING)
emily murase
INTRO – THE LITTLE
COOCHI SNORCHER
THAT COULD
theresa noriega-lum
THE LITTLE COOCHI
SNORCHER THAT COULD
channy ith, charmaine
manglicmot, cristina m.
ibarra, rosie Josue, sydney
Jimenez, teresa m. ibarra
THE MEMORY OF
HER FACE
beverly upton, liz
aguilar-tarchi, patricia bovan
EXTRO – THE MEMORY
OF HER FACE
Julie d. soo
OUTRAGEOUS
VAGINA FACT
xuanthu pham
INTRO –
CROOKED BRAID
channy ith
CROOKED BRAID
diana reyes, edcelyn pujol,
Joy neu, sabrina fitranty,
shinta lim, sydney Jimenez
INTRO –
RECLAIMING CUNT
charmaine manglicmot
RECLAIMING CUNT
IN TAGLISH
bennie lou quevedo,
maria rabuy inciong
A SIX-YEAR OLD
WAS ASKED
tina a. maninang,
teresa m. ibarra
INTRO – THE WOMAN
WHO LOVED TO MAKE
VAGINAS HAPPY
Joy neu
THE WOMAN WHO
LOVED TO MAKE
VAGINAS HAPPY
Julianne hadfeld and
vulva choir
INTRO – I WAS THERE
IN THE ROOM
leah l. laxamana
I WAS THERE
IN THE ROOM
edcelyn pujol,
estrella alan-stephens,
tina a.maninang,
cristina m. ibarra,
teresa m. ibarra
FILIPINO LULLABY –
SA UGOY NY DUYAN**
2011 SPOTLIGHT
INTRODUCTION
hydra mendoza
2011 SPOTLIGHT
MONOLOGUE: THE
WOMEN AND GIRLS OF
HAITI (MYRIAM MERLET)
fiona ma
SPEAK OUT
marily mondejar
CURTAIN CALL
*Text: “Ili-Ili, Now Go To
Sleep” (Cebuano).
P. Magdamo, Arranger
**Text: “From the Cradle”
(Tagalog), Lucio San Pedro,
Composer; Levi Celerio (Lyrics)
10
AS I AN WOME N AGAI NS T V I OL E NCE
Hydra Mendoza
President,
San Francisco Board of Education
Joy neu
Wife, Mother
Beverly upton
Executive Director,
Domestic Violence Consortium
CHanny ItH
Administrative Assistant
davId CHIu
President,
SF Board of Supervisors
dIana reyes
Manager,
California Corporate Afairs,
Chevron Corporation
Al S. Perez is the founder of Creative
i Studio, which specializes in translating
marketing objectives into creative
strategies. He is an award-winning graphic
designer, producing marketing programs
fromFortune 500 to start-up companies.
Al is excited to be a part of TheVagina
Monologues since 2004 as its art director.
Al is Commissioner of the SF Entertainment
Commission.
Bennie lou Quevedo is
Assistant Vice President of a private wealth
management company. Agraduate of
Pepperdine University, she is a member of
social &fnancial investment organizations.
She worked as a medical logistic liaison
with Homeland Security during Hurricane
Katrina. As a cancer survivor, she is 10 years
cancer-free.
Beverly uPton is the Executive
Director of San Francisco Domestic Violence
Consortium, a 17-member consortium
of domestic violence organizations and
their supporters committed to efective
direct services and public policy. With a
background in business and design she
joined the struggle for the human rights
of garment workers in the US as well as
India and Pakistan to formalize“codes of
conduct”for garment factories before her
“calling”to work in domestic violence. As a
survivor, she brings both her commitment
to human rights and her passion to end
family violence to the movement.
BonggA dAtileS, Celebrity Hair &
Make-Up Artist, www.SuperBongga.com
ChAnny ith made plans to move to
SF a fewyears ago because she longed for
a life saturated with art. SF was perfect.
After graduating fromSF State University
with a degree in performance arts, she is
delighted to fnd the merging world of art
and healing through FWN.
ChArity eSPiritu is a FWNFellow.
With a background in economics and
public policy, she is excited to help support
TVM. Charity hails fromthe Excelsior
neighborhood of San Francisco.
ChArmAine mAngliCmot is
honored to be a volunteer for theV-Day.
org Movement/Vagina Monologues and
FWNbecause she is a Domestic Violence
Survivor. Her professional background
is in customer relations/business
administration. In addition, she is very
passionate in supporting our communities,
especially through various elements of
Hip Hop.
ChArleS WAng graduated fromthe
University of California at Berkeley with
honors in Physics. He was worked in the
felds of Real Estate and Engineering. He
is a former member of the San Francisco
Symphony youth orchestra at Davies
Symphony Hall. Charles has a great passion
for music and performing. Charles performs
at various events including recitals, house
parties, yacht parties and is always willing
to expand his venue. He is very grateful to
his late cello teacher, Xiao Fang Lu, who
was a great mentor and friend.
CriStinA m. iBArrA is a high
school scholar who is adept at feld
hockey and soccer, likes to volunteer with
homeless children, does photography, and
works in mystery/criminal psychology.
She’s artistic; she can rock!
SuPerviSor dAvid Chiu was
elected in November 2008 to represent
San Francisco’s District 3 and elected
President of the Board of Supervisors in
January 2009. Before joining the Board,
David was a founder and Chief Operating
Ofcer of Grassroots Enterprise, an online
communications technology company.
The eldest child of immigrant parents,
David grewup in Boston and received
his undergraduate degree, lawdegree,
and master’s degree in public policy from
Harvard University.
diAnA reyeS is Manager of
Public Afairs in California for Chevron
Corporation. She is an award-winning
communications professional and holds
a Business degree fromNYU. She is also
on the board for the FRIENDS of the San
Francisco Commission on the Status of
Women and Leadership California.
edCelyn Pujol is with Northwestern
Mutual Financial Network. She provides
expert guidance on fnancial security
issues. She is a Primo’s Run for Education
committee member in San Ramon,
Danville Chamber Ambassador, and FWN
member. She has two beautiful children
and is happily married for 27 years to Cesar.
elenA mAngAhAS is a Journalism
graduate of the University of the
Philippines where she was also active in
theatre production with the University
of the Philippines Repertory Company.
Fromcampus theatre she moved into
independent theatre productions until
her immigration to the U.S. She settled
in Stockton and continued theatre work
leading to her V-Day involvement in 2004
to this day. Social service is her day job
and Elena serves as chair of Little Manila
Foundation for historic preservation of
Filipino American history in America and
the FilipinaWomen Network’s Board of
Directors. Elena was selected 100 Most
Infuential FilipinaWomen in the U.S. by
the FilipinaWomen’s Network in 2007 and
awardedWoman of theYear for 2009 by
the California LegislativeWomen’s Caucus.
emily m. murASe, Phd, is
Executive Director of the SF Department on
the Status of Women. In 2011, she became
the frst Japanese American woman to be
elected to serve on the Board of Education.
Acommunity advocate, she lives in SF
with husband Neal Taniguchi and two
daughters.
eStrellA AlAn-StePhenS is
president and co-founder of Rizal High
School Alumni Association of North
America. Aformer optometrist in the
Philippines and retired analyst from
Chevron Corp., she’s a proud mother
of two children, Allan and Elaine, and
grandmother of three grandsons, Gabriel,
Mateo, andTimmy.
FionA mA is the Assemblywoman
of California’s 12th District and Speaker
ProTempore. Ma, as the MajorityWhip,
is responsible for ensuring the passage
of crucial legislation to improve public
education, expand healthcare access and
protect our environment. Ma serves as the
Chair of Assembly Select Committee on
Domestic Violence where she has worked
on legislation to protect victims of domestic
violence. From2002-2006, she served as
a member of the San Francisco Board of
Supervisors.
FrAnklin m. riCArte’s name
originates from President Roosevelt. The
motto he lives by is “no day but today.”
His least favorite thing to do is swim in
the ocean. His legacy is to live a life
without regret.
genevieve dWyer is a trueVagina
Warrior (selected in 2004) volunteering
her time unselfshly to helping women
in abusive situations. Her work includes
afordable divorce and family lawservices.
genevieve v. joPAndA,
a community advocate for the past
15 years has served through her work in
anti-domestic violence advocacy with the
FilipinaWomen’s Network and teaching
positive alternatives through art to at
risk youth with Soulciety.org. She is
currently a District Representative for
Assemblywoman Fiona Ma and recently
elected as the Northern California
Vice- Chair of the Filipino American
Democratic Caucus.
hydrA mendozA is the frst Filipina
American to be elected to the San Francisco
Board of Education. She was re-elected to
a second termin November 2010, receiving
over a 100,000 votes. She is currently the
President of the San Francisco Board of
Education and is also Education Advisor for
San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee.
jASon riCArte is a sophomore at
San Francisco State University pursuing a
marketing degree. Raised in Bloomfeld
Hills, Michigan, he graduated fromLasher
High and then went on to Michigan State
University. He loves sports especially
basketball (Varsity-Starting Point Guard)
and golf (Junior Varsity). He coached the
Bloomfeld Basketball League and was
camp instructor for the Lasher Basketball
Camp. He interns with the Golden State
Warriors and is a sales associate for Lacoste
San Francisco.
joy neu is happily married to Ken and
has two lovely kids, Donovan and Kristina.
She was featured in the book“Age of
Confdence”and in the magazine“Working
Mom.”She is a licensed CPA. Her passion
is helping people growspiritually to fnd
peace and helping domestic violence
victims.
juliAnne hAdField frst saw
theVagina Monologues in 2006 at the
University of LaVerne. So moved by the
performance, she decided to participate
the following year, and did, performing
“They Beat the Girl Out Of My Boy”and
“Cunt.”She is proud to join FWNin this
year’s performance!
julie d. Soo, eSQ. is senior staf
counsel with the California Department of
Insurance. She volunteers in a variety of
community causes, including hate crimes
projects, civil rights education, campaigns,
and community health advocacy. Julie
serves on the SF Commission on the Status
of Women appointed by Mayor Gavin
Newsom.
ken mArQuiS was a child actor
with credits including“TheWaltons”and
“The Addams Family Halloween Reunion.”
More recently, Ken’s behind the scenes
producing/directing activities include
theatrical plays &pageants, television (live
and pre-taped) production, and outdoor
cultural/music festivals. Credits include
“TheVagina Monologues”(stage), Ginoong
Pilipinas (stage), Flawless de Mayo (stage),
The Journey: Stephanie Reese (stage),
MSNBC’s“The Site”hosted by Soledad
O’Brien (national TV), “Digital CamFilm
Festival”(national TV), “TechTV’s HDTV
Special”(national TV), “The Screen Savers”
(national TV), DARPAUrban Challenge
(corpTV), Pistahan Main Stage (festival),
and the SF Giants Filipino Heritage Night
(festival). Ken lives happily ever after in
San Francisco with Al Perez, his partner
of 20 years.
lAArni SAn juAn “Get busy living
the life you want.”
leAh l. lAxAmAnA was a 2006
cast member of TheVagina Monologues
and nowa Fellowfor FWN. She has
worked in project management roles in
the non-proft and business sectors and
is currently with Korn/Ferry International.
One of her most meaningful life experience
was working with women’s groups and
teaching dance as a Peace Corps Volunteer
in Honduras. Leah grewup in Manila in a
Kapampangan household.
liz AguilAr tArChi, eSQ.,
is Assistant District Attorney in SF for over
22 years and is a Hate Crimes Specialist. She
is bicultural and speaks Spanish and Italian
fuently. She graduated fromHastings
College of the Lawin San Francisco and
decided to make the Bay Area her home.
mAriA rABuy inCiong is the
youngest of 12 siblings. Born in Quezon
City and raised in Union City, Ria graduated
fromUCLA. She married her best friend,
Randy Inciong, and they have two children,
Zoe andTeo. She is a 2-year breast cancer
survivor and lives life to the fullest.
( CONTINUED ON PAGE 12 )
Cast & Crew Bios
MarIa raBuy InCIong
Student Admin Systems
Manager,
Stanford University
patrICIa Bovan, esq.
Board Member,
FRIENDS of the
San Francisco Commission on the
Status of Women
sydney JIMenez
Auditor, Lavante
teresa M. IBarra
Student,
Chinese American International
School
11
www. Fi li pi nawomensnet work. org 16
Producer
Leah L. Laxamana
Fellow,
FilipinaWomen’s Network
Executive Producer
mariLy mondejar
President,
FilipinaWomen’s Network
Hair & Makeup Artistry
mona hamiLton
Hairstylist/Makeup Artist
theresa noriega-Lum
Finance Director,
BlackRock
tina a. maninang
Pediatric Registered Nurse,
UCSF Children’s Hospital
xuanthu Pham
Marketing Director,
Stanford University
Director
geneVieVe joPanda
District Representative,
California State Assembly,
District 12
Production Assistant
jason ricarte
Student,
San Francisco State University
Director
Ken marquis
TeamManager,
George P. Johnson
Executive Producer
eLena mangahas
Chair,
FilipinaWomen’s Network
Production Manager
FranKLin m. ricarte
Social Media Strategist
Production Assistant
geneVieVe dwyer
President,
Genevieve’s Corporation
Art Director
aL s. Perez
Commissioner,
San Francisco Entertainment
Commission
Hair & Makeup Artistry
Bongga datiLes
Stylist
Playwright
eVe ensLer
Founder,
V-DAY
CAST & Crew BioS, ConT.
Mona HaMilton is a graduate of
SFIEC, a Paul Mitchell partner school, and is
fast becoming one of the most well-respected
newstylists in SF. She is a skillful image expert
specializing in haircutting and styling, makeup,
and wardrobe makeovers.
Patricia Bovan closes deals worth
billions of dollars for Symantec and chairs its
local Women’s Action Network. She recently
joined the FRIENDS Board and the Gender
Equality Principles Initiative. Patricia led an
award-winning mentoring programat SF
Juvenile Hall and is a Leadership California
2011 Class member.
rosie Josue is a performing artist
and studied psychology and criminal justice
at SF State University. She is an executive
teamleader in assets protection for Target
Corporation. With a passion for community
outreach, she uses acting as a means to
illustrate challenging social issues
while promoting social awareness.
saBrina (inna) t. Fitranty hails
fromJakarta, Indonesia, lived in Australia, and
came to the US in 1999 to pursue her BAand
MBA. She calls SF home. Inna works for Kabari
News. Due to personal experience, she works
as an advocate and interpreter for Indonesian
domestic violence and trafcking survivors.
sHinta liM came to SF fromJakarta,
Indonesia, in August 2001. She currently
serves as VP at the Indonesian Professionals
Association. She works primarily with business
owners and families. She is happily married and
has a beagle named Leo.
sonia t. Delen is Senior Vice President
at Banc of America Leasing, a subsidiary of
Bank of America. In 2007, she was selected
as one of FWN’s 100 Most Infuential Filipina
Women in the United States and was one of the
original cast members of the FWNproductions
of“TheVagina Monologues.”She lives in San
Francisco with her husband, Christopher
Fitzsimmons and their three boys: David, Justin
and Matthew.
syDney JiMenez looks forward
to going back to school to study child
development and nursing.
teresa M. iBarra is in middle school,
is a crack rock climber and ballerina, and dances
with a professional company. She’s a tech whiz
and endowed in the visual arts. Wow!
tHeresa noriega-luM is a proud
mom of two young daughters, and a wife
to her soulmate, Gary. She graduated from
UC Berkeley and is currently a Finance
Director at BlackRock where she is also the
Vice Chair for BlackRock’s Women’s Network
on the West Coast.
tina a. Maninang works as a UCSF
pediatric nurse. She’s great with children, likes
to paint and hike. Nature gives her a sense of
calmand refuge. She’s starting a foundation
with her sister to educate poor children and
provide health care.
XuantHu PHaM is the Marketing
Director at Stanford University, Summer
Session. She is also the Director of
RedRadish Marketing, a boutique marketing
communications consultancy. She is also the
Philanthropy Curator for the Asian Philanthropy
Forum. In her spare time, she records stories,
makes soup, and watches Star Trek.
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A S I A N W O M E N A G A I N S T V I O L E N C E 13
“VAGINA WARRIORS” CELEBRATES
NEW ACTIVISTS AND LEADERS
WHO ARE WORKING TO END
VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN IN THE
FILIPINO AND ASIAN
COMMUNITIES. VAGINA WARRIORS
ARE THE WOMEN AND MEN WHO
HAVE OFTEN EXPERIENCED
VIOLENCE PERSONALLY OR
WITNESSED IT WITHIN THEIR
COMMUNITIES AND DEDICATED
THEMSELVES TOWARD ENDING
SUCH VIOLENCE THROUGH
EFFECTIVE, GRASSROOTS MEANS.
THE FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK
IS PROUD TO HONOR THESE
INDIVIDUALS WHO PERSONIFY
SUCH COURAGE AND CONVICTION.
THEY HAVE FACED AND OVERCOME
ADVERSITY IN THEIR LIVES AND
ARE ACTIVELY INVOLVED IN OR
HEADING EFFORTS TO END
VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN
AND GIRLS.
Katrina Socco
Katrina Socco is Senior Director of the
Youth Leadership Institute, as well as
the SF Bay Area Chapter coordinator of
AF3IRM. Not until she met Ninotchka
Rosca, founder of GABNet (rechristened
AF3IRM) around 2003 was she able to
talk about surviving domestic violence
and sexual assault. In joining GABNet,
she found a way to channel her energies
through transnational feminism.
Some causes of AF3IRM are the
Purple Rose Campaign: exposing and
fghting sex trafcking, Export Quality:
monologues of Mail Order Bride
survivors, reclassifying Mail Order Bride
murders as Hate Crimes, and Justice for
Laya: standing against the alleged
attacker of Laya by UC Student Regent,
Jesse Cheng.
Katrina Socco is a powerhouse
activist and loving mother, “Every night
I get to put my daughter to sleep,
and she’s safe. And, other women can’t
do that…I have to work in solidarity
with all of them so we can have a
safer world.”
Noelani Sallings
Noelani Sallings is an educational
activist and political trailblazer. She
has been the current President of
Democratic Activists for Women Now for
the last three years and involves herself
in other political organizations, like the
Silicon Valley Asian Pacifc American
Democratic Club and BAYMEC. In 2006
and 2008, she ran for the Santa Clarita
Unifed School Board. She is also a
graduate student at Notre Dame de
Namur, earning her Masters in Public
Administration and Marriage and Family
Therapy.
Before politics, Noelani planned on
counseling. She had always been
interested in how a person’s biology and
environment afected one’s psyche. As a
survivor of domestic violence, Noelani
turned her victimization into
survivalism, becoming a change agent,
one to give voice to those unheard and
power to those unseen. Her motivation
and inspiration to work as an advocate
generates from her hope to make this
world a better place for her daughters.
Nwe Oo
Nwe Oo, a refugee from Burma,
Bangladesh, Thailand. A mother of three
children who survived severe isolation
and domestic violence. An activist of
over ffteen years for women and child
rights, for peace, for youth, for
indigenous and immigrant populations.
A multi-lingual, highly-educated,
widely-involved, passionate political
advocate. A voice. A presence. A power.
Nwe has worked with many
organizations in her lifetime, the most
recent is the Community Health for
Asian Americans: API Connection. In this
program, Nwe and her colleagues work
within East Bay communities of mainly
immigrant populations, and help
connect the community’s needs to
providers, such as with language
schools, hospitals and interpreters. As a
woman who fghts for the
empowerment of women and children,
she urges us all to stand beside those
sufering from abuse and feel shame no
more.
“We are creating a culture that [is]
free. No violence. Peace. Love. Care.
That’s my philosophy.”
Susie Quesada
Susie Quesada is the Executive Vice
President of Ramar Foods International.
However, Susan had not planned on
working in the family business. She had
hopes of becoming a teacher, and after
earning her undergraduate degree,
Interdisciplinary Studies in Multicultural
Education and Literature at UC Berkeley,
she continued on for a teaching
credential and began to teach middle
school. It was not long, however, before
she was invited to join the family
business.
Susie started in the warehouse
doing data entry. Then she went into
accounting and fnally, marketing. It was
in this position where Susie fourished
and realized that her creative side found
a home within the company. Now,
six years later, Susie oversees the
operations, fnances and planning with
her father and two brothers. But Ramar
Foods is not just an international
company, they are also the proud
nationwide distributors of thousands of
V-Diaries printed annually.
2011 VAGI NA WARRIORS
Vagi na Warri ors | 2010 Gerri Nuvall • Gloria T. Caoile • Nilda Valmores • Rozita Villanueva | 2009 Elizabeth Aguilar-Tarchi • Genevieve Jopanda • Paulita Lasola Malay • Rodel Rodis
| 2008 Annalisa Enrile • Ken Marquis • Ken Theisen • M. Evelina Galang • Mona Pasquil • Nenette Flores • Sonia Delen • Justice Tani Gore Cantil-Sakauye | 2007 Al S. Perez • Bettina Santos Yap • Elena B. Mangahas • Laureen Laglagaron •
Perla De Jesus • Rudy Asercion • Bincy Jacob • Krittika Ghosh • Venessa Manzano | 2006 Beverly Upton • Dorka Keehn • Gloria Megino Ochoa • Imelda Oppenheim • Jonah Oliverio • Ligaya Hattari • Sarah Jane Ilumin • Tess Crescini |
2005 Kamala D. Harris • Giovannie Pico • Gloria Ramos • Rita Villavicencio Schmidt • Velma Roset Veloria | 2004 Blesidla Ocampo • Cherie Querol Moreno • Clara Tempongko • Genevieve Dwyer • Tisa Mendoza • Vangie Cononizado Buell • Leni Marin
By J UL I ANNE HADF I E L D
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The Reformation of Masculinity
I
smael de Guzman is a
Marriage, Family and
Children Counseling gradu-
ate student as well as a
Prevention Education Specialist at
San Francisco State University. He
began his community work through
HIV prevention education with
various organizations. Since then,
he has also become a certifed crisis
counselor, going to conferences
through SFWAR, the Pacifc Lutheran
University Regional Conference and
Men Can Stop Rape. He has worked
as a Prevention Education Specialist
since the inception of the Men Can
Stop Violence program for the last
three and a half years. The SAFE
Place is a unique program among
the California State Universities
because it successfully provides
workshops, events and presentations
with the Counseling and Pyschologi-
cal Services department, both on
and of campus, and has done so
since Nina Jo Smith advocated for it
over twenty years ago.
In her 2003 article for the Na-
tional Sexuality Resource Center on
April 20th, Smith wrote, “I thought
there really should be somewhere
people could go. I thought it would
be great if we could have a rape crisis
center on campus by the time I fn-
ished my degree. I wanted to be part
of that efort.”A survivor herself, she
worked tirelessly with the faculty
and staf to create that sort of refuge
for the campus community. The SAFE
Place opened just before completing
her degree.
In some of the SAFE Place’s
workshops for programs like Men
Can Stop Violence, de Guzman
uses exercises like Act Like A Man
Box conceived by Paul Kivel. In
Kivel’s article, “Boys Will Be Men,”
he discusses how boys are trained
at early ages to “grow up and act
like a man,”meaning they should be
silent, tough, aggressive, unfeeling,
and if men and boys were to act
outside of that box, they would be
harassed and possibly ostracized.
De Guzman uses Kivel’s exercise in
Men Can Stop Violence workshops
because it highlights how sexism
and homophobia are subconsciously
created through the socialization of
boys and men. The Men Can Stop
Violence programs work from the
roots of male socialization to create a
new way of looking at masculinity.
Walk in Our Heels is an event
which helps to both undercut the
notion of hyper-masculinity and to
get the campus involved in male
ally-ship against violence. During
this event, the participating men
turn in their usual shoes at 8:30 am
for a pair of high heels. While in their
heels, they must also wear a Men
Can Stop Violence shirt and hold a
sign with statistics of sexual violence
against women. From noon to
about two o’clock, the men go to the
campus plaza where they are inter-
viewed about their experience. One
man told de Guzman how he had
been harassed by another student,
but he had come to understand
that an action like that had to do
with the harasser’s masculinity, not
his own, and he would never have
had that understanding without
his fraternity’s partnership with the
SAFE Place. This event ended with
a dance-of by the men in heels
and gave the YouTube community
something to rave about with their
SFSU Single Ladies video!
The Clothesline Project:
Fighting Violence Against
Women is another prominent
campus event. De Guzman said
that one year, when the SAFE Place
put on this event, a woman was
triggered by what she saw and came
to write her trauma on a t-shirt as a
way to release the internalized story
she had kept inside. Creating the
shirt gave her a way to express her
traumas. De Guzman described the
shirt as violent, “in the way that she
had written it, in the way that the
messages were in there.”He said her
shirt was hung along with the others
in the university’s Student Center.
The purpose of events like these is
to get the attention of the campus
community and provide services
for those in need of resources and
healing.
“Cocktales” is also on the
yearly calendar. De Guzman says he
wanted to “[create] awareness and
a space for men to talk about their
stories – in however it materialized
for them.”Cocktales is a combination
of monologues and dance where
participants are able to give voice to
their experiences under the themes
of “Re-examining Masculinity
and Manhood,”“Honoring Our
Stories,”“Confessions,”and next
year’s “Fathers and Sons.”In past
shows, Cocktales has included LGBT
members, poets, athletes, fraternity
brothers, and more. Cocktales
“[allows] them to be whoever they
are that they believe [themselves]
to be…students and performers
really appreciate that…It’s about
really looking internally, right? And
looking at yourself as a man…
honoring your story. In some ways,
also saying that you love yourself.”
BY J UL I ANNE HADF I E L D
FI LI PI NA WOMEN’ S NET WORK | WWW. FI LI PI NAWOMENSNET WORK. ORg 14
My second cousin was raped
and murdered.
My mom’s cousin was raped
and murdered.
My sister, cousin, AnD
Aunt Are All DoMestic
Violence surViVors.
As a public health
nurse who works
with mothers and
children, I directly
hear stories and
witness the fears
and tears the
victims go through.
I’ve experienced abuse and
violence (physical, mental,
verbal) in 2 of my past
relationships, and I am a DV
survivor and have survived
a broken nose and a 2 year
felony DV case in Fremont!
FI LI PI NA WOMEN AGAI NST VI OLENCE
P
arents have the op-
portunity to discipline
(“teach”) in a positive way
that would encourage children to
be confdent, socially competent,
and have self-discipline.
1) MODEL the behaviors
you want to see – this is very
powerful. Behave in the way that
you would expect your child to
behave. If you want your child to
talk in a respectful tone, speak in
a neutral tone of voice, not yell,
even when you are feeling angry
or frustrated. Children watch and
model what they see from their
trusted adult fgures.
2) Encourage children to
COMMUNICATE and SHARE
FEELINGS instead of “act out”
their feelings. Label feelings
(“sad” “frustrated” “happy” “ex-
cited”). If you see sadness in their
facial expression, physically bend
to their eye level and acknowl-
edge what you see. Suppressed
feelings of pain or fear ultimately
get acted out towards others or
back towards themselves.
Teach your child how to say
“no” when situations cause them
discomfort, fear or anxiety. If
children are pressured to do
things they are not comfortable
with, the consequences could be
harmful for themselves or others.
3) SPEND 15 MINUTES A
DAY with your child – make no
criticisms, do not scold, do not
judge - allow the child to guide
the conversation and the time
together. This gives the message
that you care and he/she is
special.
4) BE CLEAR when you
speak. Say clearly what you
want to see or hear. “Please pick
up your pants and shirt and place
them in the hamper so you do
not trip on them” is much more
efective than “clean your room”.
5) GIVE A REASON when you
ask children to do something
– this teaches what we value and
children are more likely to carry
out the behavior when we are
not present to observe – “please
put your bike in the garage now
because someone might steal it
from the driveway.”
6) PRAISE your child at
least three times a day on
what you see or hear, such as an
accomplishment, on appearance,
efort, or respectful behavior.
“That was wonderful how you
woke up early this morning,
picked out your own clothes, and
brushed your teeth.” Children will
naturally repeat behaviors when
they receive positive attention for
specifc behaviors.
7) SET UP YOUR CHILD FOR
SUCCESS – be aware of your
child’s strengths and abilities and
create age-appropriate requests
which would allow them to feel
“successful.” Encourage a 4-year-
old to put his toys away (be
specifc with which ones) before
going to bed and follow up with
praise.
8) Teach about CULTURE,
TRADITIONS and CUSTOMS –
this develops a sense of identity,
a sense of struggle, and a sense of
history, which will keep them in
tune with their sense of purpose.
9) Help children FORM
RELATIONSHIPS with other
family members and com-
munity members – from the
interactions, children learn a
deeper sense of respect, trust,
support, and fairness.
10) Instill the idea of form-
ing a personal RELATIONSHIP
WITH A GREATER SPIRIT – this
teaches that although life is chal-
lenging, a Greater Spirit is there
to nurture, guide, and protect.
A “hairy” Story
By BEnnI E Lou QuEvEdo
It was my frst time to see
and know about Lila-Pilipina.
I heard from my parents and
grandparents the Comfort
Women’s stories during the
Japanese occupation in the
Philippines, but not really any
mention of these women as vic-
tims of the war in this capacity,
the continuous abuse for the
carnal pleasures of the invading
troops, and then shame and
betrayal upon the women’s
return, if they survived. These
women had no choice. Being
kept as sex captives for years
was so much to bear, not only
physically but mentally. They
had to survive for the sake of
their family, their children, and
loved ones. But then they were
forgotten after the war. They
should have been celebrated as
heroes – in the way that they
did what they had to do in or-
der to save themselves and save
their loved ones who would
have been punished and killed if
the women did not obey. Tears
are not enough to bring out the
sorrow and sadness in anyone’s
heart, especially in mine.
One story that my parents
told me about was of their elder
sister, who was in her early
twenties during the war. She
was a very beautiful “mestiza”
woman, born to my grandfa-
ther who is a Castilian from
Spain and my grandmother
who is a Filipina. To prevent the
Japanese troops from raping
her, my parents and grandpar-
ents cut her hair short like a
man’s and painted dark mud
and soil all over her skin. They
let her wear man’s clothes, so
as not to be seen as a woman.
They made her look like an ugly
little boy if she had to go out.
Miraculously, it worked. She
survived the war, grew up to be
a teacher, and has since grown
her hair long.
Family history like this
makes me appreciative of our
freedom today and helps me to
realize that War, no matter
where, has no place. aBuSe
to women and children has
no place. We have to STOP all
kinds of abuse throughout our
entire society.
10 Ways to Raise ChildRen
in a Positive Way
By LaarnI San Juan, rn, MPH
H
ave you experienced or
w
itnessed violence?
from the vagina monologues
cast journals...
V
D I A R I E S
I am a
date rape
survIvor.
My younger
brother was
killed,
still unsolved.
My mom was
slapped hard
and dragged out
of her house
gal l er y
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S
he reported being beaten and strangled by
her boyfriend to police 6 times. Her injuries
were documented by the police. She had
several emergency protective orders signed
by judges to keep her ex away from her. She
told police that he was violent with her18 times in the
frst 6 months they were together. In June 2000, she
predicted her own death at the hands of her
ex-boyfriend.
The October 2000 murder of Claire Joyce
Tempongko, who was stabbed by ex-boyfriend Tari
Ramirez 21 times in front of her two young children,
shocked the community. Following the murder,
Ramirez fed to Mexico. By no small miracle, he was
apprehended there in 2006 and brought to trial in
2007. In September 2008, Tari Ramirez was convicted
of second-degree murder with a knife and later
sentenced to 16 years to life in prison.
On March 30, the state appellate court overturned
the murder conviction of Tari Ramirez, citing incorrect
jury instructions about what constitutes murder versus
manslaughter, and introducing the possibility that the
case may have to be retried.
To be sure, measurable progress to better address
domestic violence has been made since 2002. Following
the murder, the San Francisco Commission on the Status
of Women launched an investigation conducted in
partnership with then-City Attorney Louise Renne and
her staf. The fnal report revealed serious failures in the
criminal justice response to the situation that ultimately
escalated into the tragic homicide. The Commission
adopted recommendations for fundamental policy
reforms in the 2002 report Justice and Courage: A
Blueprint for San Francisco’s Response to Domestic
Violence.
In addition, the City’s investment in direct services
to address domestic violence has grown steadily, from
$1.8 million in 2003 to $2.7 million in 2010. In 2010,
nearly 30,000 individuals were served by the
Department on the Status of Violence Against Women
Prevention & the Intervention Grants Program.
The combination of policy reforms and direct
services has made the number of domestic violence
homicides plunge. Today, this number is down from 10
to 2 or less – 80% decline. While 2 homicides are still
too many, the decline is signifcant.
Though the tragic murder of Claire Joyce Tempongko
has given rise to fundamental policy reforms, justice for
the Tempongko family is now in serious jeopardy. The
California Attorney General’s Ofce has petitioned the
California Supreme Court to review the March 30 ruling
of the Court of Appeal. We are confdent that the jury
verdict was appropriate and urge that the second
degree murder conviction of Tari Ramirez be reinstated.
I
t is illegal to sell vibrators in the following
states: Alabama, Texas, Mississippi,
Georgia, Louisiana and Indiana…It is
totally legal to sell guns in all of these
states, though, we have yet to hear of a
mass murder committed with a vibrator.”This
Outrageous Vagina Fact was in The Vagina
Monologues cited from the book The Technology of
Orgasm, published in 1999. But now, Alabama is
the only state left on the list, upholding their 1998
Anti-Obscenity Enforcement Act which makes it
unlawful to sell any “obscene devices”that are
“useful primarily for the stimulation of the human
genital organs”. Anyone caught with the intent to
sell faces a 10,000 dollar fne and up to a year in
jail. As recently as February 2011, the ban
continues to be challenged.
In Alabama, it continues to be legal to carry,
purchase and sell guns. The only permit needed is
when carrying a handgun or carrying a gun in a
vehicle, but there is a glimmer of hope for the
lovers out there.
Pleasures, a self titled “one-stop romance shop,”
held a promotion to get guns of the streets and
bring romance back in the sheets. Sherri Williams,
owner of Pleasures, held a pre-Valentine’s day
event where people swapped guns for sex toys,
and all guns not used in criminal acts were sold at
16
No Justice For Family of
Domestic Violence Murder
By EMILy MuRASE, PhD
Outrageous Vagina Fact
By SHERRICE PORTER
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A S I A N W O M E N A G A I N S T V I O L E N C E
F
ilipinas Against Violence is the Filipina
Women’s Network’s annual anti-domestic
violence campaign in collaboration with
Eve Ensler’s V-Day organization to raise
awareness through theatre, popular culture and
education about the high incidence of violence in
Asian homes and intimate partner relationships.
Our mission is to encourage Filipina and Asian
women in abusive relationships to take action
and seek help. Engaging the Filipino and Asian
communities through the V-Day shows and
hearing the women’s stories “hits home”and helps
the Asian community understand the broader
connections of Asian values such as respect for
women, dignity, family, equality and justice to
social and economic issues and to class and
religion. More info: www.fwn.org/vdayfwn.
M
y Sister’s House was Sacramento’s first
shelter for battered Asian/Pacific
Islander women and children. They act
as a safe haven for the Central Valley’s
unique and diverse community. They approach
survivors in a culturally appropriate atmosphere
and offer shelter services, a 24-hour crisis line,
and programs like Women to Work. Since 2003,
My Sister’s House has provided over 12,200 bed
nights for women and children, responded to
over 2,600 phone calls on their multilingual
Help Line, and served over 400 domestic
violence survivors in their Women to Work
program.
Their goal is to not only serve those who are
survivors of domestic violence, but to also serve
the community in trying to eliminate domestic
violence by having community presentations
and family education, alongside supporting the
increase of self-determination for API women.
Within the last seven years, My Sister’s House
has made over 200 presentations on domestic
violence to groups of all backgrounds and
denominations, educating more than 8000
people. Their annual conferences also train
beyond 250 service providers in the Central
Valley on how to work with battered immigrant
women from a culturally appropriate approach.
Though My Sister’s House has been open for
seven years, the conception of this shelter
began in June of 2000, when a public campaign
began to create a safe haven that addresses the
needs of the API community. Within seven
months, they became an officially nonprofit
organization with a Board of Directors and
Advisory Committee installed the following fall.
With a major grant in 2002, My Sister’s House
was able to jumpstart a Women at Work
Program, and on April 22, 2003, they opened
their doors.
My Sister’s House will proudly celebrate their
ten years of service at the 10th Anniversary
Gala on May 23rd, 2011.
asian women Against Violence Campaign
My Sister’s House
17
a frearm-lover’s auction to beneft victims of gun
violence. Williams made headlines twice before
this. She also opened the country’s frst drive-thru
window for sex toys, and in 2007, she challenged
the ban on vibrators, stating that it violated
constitutional rights.
“My motto has been [that] they are going to
have to pry this vibrator from my cold, dead hand.
I refuse to give up,”Williams said, according to the
USA Today 2007 article about her frst reported
challenge to the U.S. Supreme Court (“Court leaves
Alabama sex toy ban intact”). However, the
Supreme Court refused to hear the challenge
because, although using vibrators is a private
act, selling vibrators is a public one.
There is a loophole to the law however. Vibrators
can be sold and purchased with a doctor’s note.
Needless to say, there are probably a lot of very rich
doctors in the trigger-happy state of Alabama.
Vibrators and
Sex Toys!
FI LI PI NA WOMEN’ S NET WORK | WWW. FI LI PI NAWOMENSNET WORK. ORg 18
A S I A N W O M E N A G A I N S T V I O L E N C E 19
ABOUT V- DAY
V
-Day is a global activist movement
to stop violence against women and
girls. V-Day is a catalyst that
promotes creative events to increase
awareness, raise money and
revitalize the spirit of existing anti-violence
organizations. V-Day generates broader attention
for the fght to stop violence against women and
girls, including rape, battery, incest, female
genital mutilation (FGM) and sex slavery.
In 2010, more than 5400 V-Day events
took place around the world. To date, the
V-Day movement
has raised over
$75 million and
reached over 300
million people.
Performance is just the beginning.
V-Day stages large-scale benefts and
produces innovative gatherings, flms and
campaigns to educate and change social
attitudes towards violence against women
including the documentary Until The
Violence Stops; community briefngs on
the missing and murdered women of
Juarez, Mexico; the December 2003 V-Day
delegation trip to Israel, Palestine, Egypt
and Jordan; the Afghan Women’s Summit;
the March 2004 delegation to India; the
Stop Rape Contest; the Indian Country
Project; Love Your Tree; the June 2006
two-week festival of theater, spoken word,
performance and community events UNTIL
THE VIOLENCE STOPS: NYC ; the 2008,
V-Day 10-year anniversary events V TO THE
TENTH at the New Orleans Arena and
Louisiana Superdome ; the Stop Raping
Our Greatest Resource: Power To The
Women and Girls of the Democratic
Republic of Congo Campaign; the V-Girls
Campaign and the V-Men Campaign,
which launched in 2010.
The V-Day movement is growing at a
rapid pace throughout the world, in 130
countries from Europe to Asia, Africa and
the Caribbean, and all of North America.
V-Day, a non-proft corporation, distributes
funds to grassroots, national and
international organizations and programs
that work to stop violence against women
and girls. In 2001, V-Day was named one
of Worth Magazine’s “100 Best Charities”,
in 2006 one of Marie Claire Magazine’s Top
Ten Charities and in 2010 was named as
one of the Top-Rated organizations on
GreatNonprofts. The ‘V’ in V-Day stands
for Victory, Valentine and Vagina. www.
vday.org
MI SSI ON STATEMENT
» V-Day is an organized response against
violence toward women.
» V-Day is a vision: We see a world where
women live safely and freely.
» V-Day is a demand: Rape, incest,
battery, genital mutilation and sexual
slavery must end now.
» V-Day is a spirit: We believe women
should spend their lives creating and
thriving rather than surviving or
recovering from terrible atrocities.
» V-Day is a catalyst: By raising money
and consciousness, it will unify and
strengthen existing anti-violence
eforts. Triggering far-reaching
awareness, it will lay the groundwork
for new educational, protective, and
legislative endeavors throughout the
world.
» V-Day is a process: We will work as long
as it takes. We will not stop until the
violence stops.
» V-Day is a day. We proclaim Valentine’s
Day as V-Day, to celebrate women and
end the violence.
» V-Day is a ferce, wild, unstoppable
movement and community. Join us!
SPOTLI GHT ON
WOMEN OF HAI TI :
Each year V-Day increases awareness by
focusing on a specifc group of women in
the world who are resisting violence with
courage and vision. In 2011, V-Day’s
Spotlight Campaign will be on the Women
and Girls of Haiti. The Spotlight will
highlight the high levels of violence
against women and girls in Haiti, and will
focus on the increased rates of sexual
violence since the devastating earthquake
that took place in January 2010. All funds
raised through the Spotlight Campaign
will be used to support a revolutionary
national campaign in Haiti lead by a
coalition of women activists - including
longtime V-Day activist Elvire Eugene -
that will address sexual violence through
art, advocacy and legal services.
EVE’S BI OGRAPHY
Eve Ensler is a playwright, performer,
activist and the founder/artistic director of
V-Day. Eve’s plays include Necessary
Targets, Conviction, Lemonade, The Depot,
Floating Rhoda and the Glue Man,
Extraordinary Measures, The Good Body,
The Treatment, O.P.C., and most recently,
I Am an Emotional Creature. In 2006, Eve
released her frst nonfction book, Insecure
At Last: A Political Memoir, and co-edited A
Memory, A Monologue, A Rant and a Prayer,
an anthology of writings about violence
against women. Both were published by
Random House. Eve’s flm credits include
an HBO flm version of The Vagina
Monologues. She also produced the flm
What I Want My Words to Do To You, a
documentary about her work with women
in prison, which won the Freedom of
Expression Award at Sundance and was
shown on PBS. Eve has written numerous
articles for Glamour Magazine, Marie Claire,
Hufngton Post, Utne Reader, as well as a
regular column in O Magazine. She has
won many awards including a
Guggenheim Fellowship in Playwriting
and an Obie, in addition to a number of
honorary degrees. Eve is currently working
on a flm version of her play Necessary
Targets.
HOW TO STAY I N
TOUCH WI TH V- DAY
For more information about V-Day, the
global movement to end violence against
women and girls, please visit the V-Day
web site at www.vday.org.
100 Most Influential
Filipina Women
in the United States
Awards Ceremony
This year the Filipina Women’s Network will
be honoring the 3rd group of Inuential
Filipinas paying tribute to their work in our
communities that collectively enhances the
rich history of our Filipina American culture.
The summit sessions will highlight the
FWN 100 Groups for “Kwentuhan”– sharing
experiences, being strategic in cross-racial
alliances and partnerships, building capacity,
getting elected, civic participation, social
entrepreneurship, leadership lessons,
engaging the youth, developing our pipeline
of trailblazers:
» Founders & Pioneers
» Innovators & Thought Leaders
» Policymakers & Visionaries
» Behind the Scenes Leaders
» Builders & Emerging Leaders
» “Nicole”
REGISTER NOW.
Super early bird rates still available.
FilipinaWomensNetwork.org/Events
The 8th Filipina Leadership Summit is an an-
nual opportunity to network with peers and
engage in small groups to discuss urgent
issues that confront our community.
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE!
A limited number of summit and travel
scholarships are available. Factors taken
into consideration include: nancial need,
geography, and area of expertise.
APPLY TODAY!
Deadline: Monday, 8/1/11. Applicants
will be notied by Friday, 8/12/11.
Email lipina@FFWN.org to receive an
application.
HOTEL RATES:
The Stanford Court Renaissance located in
the beautiful Nob Hill area is the ocial
summit hotel oering a limited number
of rooms at $199/night for single/double
occupancy until August 31, 2011. Call
1-800-227-4736

to reserve your room NOW.
Stanford Court Renaissance
905 California Street – Nob Hill
San Francisco, CA 94108
Connect With FWN and Your Peers Socially!
Facebook.com/FilipinaWomensNetwork
Twitter@FilipinaWomen
www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org
415.935.4FWN
OCTOBER 13-15, 2011
STANFORD COURT RENAISSANCE
SAN FRANCI SCO, CALI FORNI A
Most Infl uential
FILIPINA WOMEN IN THE U.S.
. 2 0 1 1 ,
8 t h a n n i v e r s a r y i s s u e | 2 0 1 1
Ramar Foods International supports
FWN’s campaign against domestic violence
www.ramarfoods.com