More information For general information regarding European statistics, please go to the Eurostat web site: http://ec.

europa.eu/eurostat For information on statistical classifications, please go to the Eurostat classification server RAMON: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/ramon For more information on European policies in the areas of enlargement, employment, social affairs and equal opportunities please go to the following web sites: http://ec.europa.eu/enlargement http://ec.europa.eu/social For more specific questions on statistics in relation to candidate and potential candidate countries, please contact: Eurostat Unit D1 - Statistical cooperation with European and Mediterranean countries 5, rue Alphonse Weicker, L-2721, Luxembourg e-mail: ESTAT-D1-REQUESTS@ec.europa.eu fax: (352) 4301-32139 For more information on statistics in candidate and potential candidate countries, please go to the websites of the National Statistical Institutes:
Croatia Iceland Montenegro The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Turkey Albania Bosnia and Herzegovina Serbia Kosovo under UNSCR 1244/99 http://www.dzs.hr http://www.statice.is http://www.monstat.org http://www.stat.gov.mk http://www.turkstat.gov.tr http://www.instat.gov.al http://www.bhas.ba http://www.stat.gov.rs http://www.ks-gov.net/esk

Compact guides

KS-30-10-627-EN-C

Symbols and abbreviations

In the graphs, names are abbreviated as follows: HR Croatia IS Iceland ME Montenegro MK* The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia TR Turkey AL Albania BA Bosnia and Herzegovina RS Serbia XK Kosovo under UNSCR 1244/99 * Provisional code which does not prejudge in any way the definitive nomenclature for this country, which will be agreed following the conclusion of negotiations currently taking place on this subject at the United Nations. The data for Serbia exclude Kosovo, which is under international administration in line with the UNSCR 1244/99.

Candidate and potential candidate countries
Population and social conditions

2011 Edition

ISBN 978-92-79-17714-9 doi: 10.2785/59129 © European Union 2011

to enable them to produce and disseminate harmonised and good quality data according to European and international statistical standards. Only Iceland recorded a higher employment rate then the EU-27 average. or based on population registers. Montenegro and Serbia were similar to those for the EU-27 in 2009. an employment rate in the other enlargement countries was below the EU-27. In 2009. The employment gender gaps in Croatia. while Albania. Turkey was by far the largest of the candidate countries and potential candidates. There are five candidate countries: Croatia (HR). (2) 2007 data. Source: Eurostat (online data codes: demo_pjangroup. while others are potential candidates for the future. was 20% above the EU-27 average. The population is based on data from the most recent census adjusted by the components of population change produced since the last census. In contrast. Bosnia and Herzegovina. is to follow the progress of the candidate countries and potential candidates in complying with the acquis (the body of EU law) in the field of statistics as well as to collect data from these countries. The European Union started accession negotiations with Croatia and Turkey in October 2005 and with Iceland in June 2010. the overall EU-27 employment rate averaged almost 65%. the gross domestic product (GDP) per inhabitant in Iceland. with populations of 319 thousand and 630 thousand respectively in 2009. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Kosovo recorded by far the highest levels of unemployment of around 32% and 45% respectively. . the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (MK*). the statistical office of the European Union. with above 71. it was only 4 percentage points in Iceland which was much narrower than the difference of 12 percentage points in employment rates between men and women recorded for the EU-27. The employment rate in Iceland was 78% in 2009. Population by age class. in some cases. Croatia. on 31 December of the previous year). In 2009. 2009 (1000) Total population on 1st January EU-27 ( ) 1 Population by gender Male 242 873 2139 162 310 1 027 35 901 1 585 1 878 3 567 1 101 Female 254 811 2 296 157 320 1 022 35 616 1 600 1 966 3 768 1 079 497 683 4 435 319 630 2 049 71 517 3 185 3 844 7 335 2 180 HR IS ME MK TR AL BA RS XK (1) 2008 data. Iceland was the only enlargement country to experience a lower unemployment rate than the EU-27. Source: Eurostat (online data codes: demo_pjangroup. Montenegro and Turkey registered GDP per capita between 30% and 60% below the EU-27 average. expressed in purchasing power standards (PPS). total and by gender. 2009 (%) under 15 EU-27 (1) HR IS ME MK TR AL BA RS XK (1) 2008 data. (*) Provisional code which does not prejudge in any way the definitive nomenclature for this country. GDP per capita in the other candidate and potential candidate countries was lower than that of the EU-27 in 2009. In 2009. Bosnia and Herzegovina (BA). (3) 2005 data. 15-64 67 67 68 68 70 67 66 68 68 63 65 and more 17 18 12 13 12 7 9 14 17 7 16 15 21 19 18 26 25 18 15 30 The role of Eurostat The role of Eurostat. In contrast. whereas Iceland and Montenegro were the smallest. almost 500 million people lived in the European Union. There are the following potential candidates: Albania (AL). ** ( ) Under United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1244/99. (4) 2008 data. All other candidate and potential candidate countries recorded substantially higher gaps. Iceland (IS). In contrast. the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Serbia were between 60% and 80% below the EU-27 average. demo_gind and cpc_psdemo). ranging from 19 percentage points in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to 40 percentage points in Turkey. Kosovo** (XK) and Serbia (RS). whereas in Iceland it was above 7%. It ranged from 26% in Kosovo to almost 57% in Croatia in 2009. Population: the inhabitants of a given area on 1 January of the year in question (or. In 2009. Montenegro (ME) and Turkey (TR).INTRODUCTION The process of enlargement and social conditions The European Union is currently made up of 27 Member States (EU-27). In 2009.5 million people. the EU-27 average level of unemployment was almost 9%. which will be agreed following the conclusion of negotiations currently taking place on this subject at the United Nations. while there is an ongoing process for its future enlargement. demo_gind and cpc_psdemo). The combined population of candidate and potential candidate countries represented nearly a fifth of the total EU-27 population. Population. At the moment several countries have the candidate status and are on their way to joining the EU. Iceland stood out as having by far the lowest gap in employment between men and women. Eurostat provides technical assistance and support to the national statistical institutes of the candidate countries and potential candidates.

5 Life expectancy at birth by gender.5 3. .5 2. 2009 (1) 2007 data. Male Female Source: Eurostat (online data codes: demo_find and cpc_psdemo). (2) 2008 instead of 2009. Life expectancy at birth: the average number of years a person would live if age-specific mortality rates observed for a certain calendar year or period were to continue.Total fertility rate (number of children per women) 0.0 2. (3) 2003 data. (3) 2003 data. Figures are given separately for men and women.0 3.0 1.0 EU-27 (�) 0. 2007 instead of 2009.5 1. (2) 2008 data. 2009 (years) 0 EU-27 (�) 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 HR HR IS (�) IS (�) ME ME MK (�) MK (�) TR TR AL AL BA BA RS XK (�) RS XK (�) 2000 (1) 2002 instead of 2000. Total fertility rate: the average number of children that would be born to a woman during her lifetime if she were to pass through her childbearing years conforming to the average fertility rates of each year. Source: Eurostat (online data codes: demo_mlexpec and cpc_psdemo).

2009 Male Female Source: Eurostat (online data codes: lfsa_urgan and cpc_pslm).Unemployment rates (%) 0 EU-27 10 20 30 40 50 60 Employment rates by gender. . Employment rate: the proportion of population aged 15 to 64 that is in employment. Unemployment rate: persons aged 15 to 74 who were not employed. as a proportion of the total number of active persons of the same age. had actively sought work during the past four weeks and were ready to begin working within two weeks. 2009 (%) 0 EU-27 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 HR HR IS IS ME ME MK MK TR TR AL AL BA BA RS RS XK (�) XK 2000 (1) 2001 instead of 2000. Source: Eurostat (online data codes: lfsi_emp_a and cpc_siemp).

GDP per capita is an indicator that is derived through the division of GDP by the total population. gas and other fuels Recreation and culture Health (1) 2008 data. . industries) engaged in production. Purchasing power standard (PPS) shall mean the artificial common reference currency unit used in the European Union to express the volume of economic aggregates for the purpose of spatial comparisons in such a way that price level differences between countries are eliminated.e. ME MK AL (�) BA (�) RS (�) PPS XK Food and non-alcoholic beverages Housing. Source: Eurostat (online data codes: nama_aux_gph and cpc_ecnagdp).europa. water. Economic volume aggregates in PPS are obtained by dividing their original value in national currency units by the respective PPP. 1 PPS thus buys the same given volume of goods and services in all countries. on products not included in the value of their outputs.Data are available FREE OF CHARGE on the Eurostat website: ec. and minus any subsidies. (2) 2007 data. (3) 2008 data. depending on the price level. Household expenditure: the value of goods and services used for household needs and classified by 12 main headings of COICOP (classification of individual consumption by purpose). GDP is equal to the sum of the gross value-added of all resident institutional units (i. whereas different amounts of national currency units are needed to buy this same volume of goods and services in individual countries. electricity. Gross value-added is the difference between output and intermediate consumption. Source: Eurostat (online data codes: nama_co2_c and cpc_ecnacoi). Gross domestic product (GDP) is a basic measure of a country’s overall economic health. As an aggregate measure of production. plus any taxes. 2009 (%) 0 EU-27 10 20 30 40 50 60 GDP per capita. except ‘Health’ 2007 data.eu/eurostat Household expenditure. 2009 0 5 000 10 000 15 000 20 000 25 000 30 000 EU-27 HR IS HR IS ME MK TR TR AL BA RS XK (�) EURO (1) GDP per capita in PPS: not available.

the only exception being minibuses. Passenger cars are defined as road motor vehicles. A mobile phone subscription to the use of public mobile telecommunication systems (also called mobiles or cell phones) using cellular technology. 2008 instead of 2009. Active pre-paid cards are also treated as subscriptions. 2006 instead of 2009. demo_pjan and cpc_transp). (3) 2003 instead of 2000. that are intended for the carriage of passengers and designed to seat no more than nine persons (including the driver). Source: Eurostat (online data codes: isoc_tc_ac1. 2009 XK ( ) 2000 (1) 2001 instead of 2000. (3) 2006 instead of 2000. (4) 2005 instead of 2000. taxis and hired passenger cars (with less than ten seats). 2009 Source: Eurostat (online data codes: road_eqs_carmot. (2) 2008 instead of 2009.Rate of motorisation (passenger cars per 1 000 inhabitants) 0 EU-27 ( ) 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Cellular mobile telephone penetration (number of subscriptions per 1 000 inhabitants) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 EU-27 HR HR IS IS ME ME ( ) MK ( ) MK TR TR AL ( ) AL ( ) BA ( ) RS BA XK ( ) RS 2000 (1) 2008 instead of 2009. People may have more than one subscription. the data presented should cover micro-cars (no permit required to be driven). demo_pjan and cpc_inisoc). Hence. other than motorcycles. estimated. . 2008 instead of 2009. (2) 2001 instead of 2000.

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