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1 INTRODUCTION What is Advertising : The word advertising is derived from the Latin word viz, "advertero" "ad" meaning towards and "verto" meeting towards and "verto" meaning. "I turn" literally specific thing". Simply stated advertising is the art "says green." Advertising is a general term for and all forms of publicity, from the cry of the street boy selling newspapers to the most celebrate attention attracts device. The object always is to bring to public notice some articles or service, to create a demand to stimulate buying and in general to bring together the man with something to sell and the man who has mean or desire to buy". Advertising has been defined by different experts. Some of the quoted definition are : American marketing association has defined advertising as "any paid form of non personal presentation and promotion of ideas, goods or services by an identified sponsor. The medium used are print broad cast and direct. Stanton deserves that "Advertising consists of all the activities involved in presenting to a group a non- personal, oral or visual openly, sponsored message regarding a product, service, or idea. This message called an advertisement is disseminated through one or more media and is paid for by the identified sponsor. Advertising is any paid form of non ± personal paid of presentation of ideas goods or services by an identified sponsor. Advertising is a "non- personal paid message of commercial significance about a product, service or company made to a market by an identified sponsor. In developing an advertising programme, one must always start by identifying the market needs and buyer motives and must make five major decisions commonly referred as 5M (mission, money message, media and measurement) of advertising.

Importance of Advertising Generally, advertising is a relatively low-cost method of conveying selling messages to numerous prospective customers. It can secure leads for salesmen and middlemen by convincing readers to request more information and by identifying outlets handling the product. It can force middlemen to stock the product by building consumer interest. It can help train dealers salesmen in product uses and applications. It can build dealer and consumer confidence in the company and its products by building familiarity. Advertising is to stimulate market demand while sometimes advertising alone may succeed in achieving buyer acceptance, preference, or even demand for the product; it is seldom solely relied upon.

Advertising is efficiently used with at least one other sales method, such as personal selling or point-of-purchase display, to directly move customers to buying action. Advertising has become increasingly important to business enterprises ± both large and small. Outlay on advertising certainly is the voucher. Non-business enterprises have also recognized the importance of advertising. The attempt by army recruitment is based on a substantial advertising campaign, stressing the advantages of a military career. Advertising assumes real economic importance too. Advertising strategies that increase the number of units sold stimulate economies in the production process. The production cost per unit of output is lowered. It in turn leads to lower prices. Lower consumer prices then allow these products to become available to more people. Similarly, the price of newspapers, professional sports, radio and TV programmers, and the like might be prohibitive without advertising. In short, advertising pays for many of the enjoyable entertainment andeducational aspects of contemporary life. Advertising has become an important factor in the campaigns to achieve such societaloriented objectives such as the discontinuance of smoking, family planning, physical fitness, and the elimination of drug abuse. Though in India, advertising was accepted as a potent and recognized means of promotion only 25 years ago, its growing productive capacity and output necessitates the finding of consumers and advertising plays an important role in this process. Advertising helps to increase mass marketing while helping the consumer to choose from amongst the variety of products offered for his selection. In India, advertising as a profession is in its infancy. Because of this fact, there is a tremendous scope for development so that it may be productively used for the benefit of producers, traders, consumers, and the country¶s economy. Everyday consumers are exposed to thousands of voices and images in magazines, newspapers, and on billboards, websites, radio and television. Every brand attempts to steal at least a fraction of a person¶s time to inform him or her of the amazing and different attributes of the product at hand. The challenge of the marketer is to find a hook that will hold the subject¶s attention. In helping to achieve this, use of celebrity endorsers is a widely used marketing strategy. Pepsi too in this regard has always tried to tap the young segment of India through their promotions. Beginning from the famous ³Ahaa´ series of ads to the ³Yah Dil Mange More´ to today¶s ³Youngistan Meri Jann´, Pepsi has always made ads to attract the youth. They have always chosen the young stars, may not be established, as a face of young India. So the main reason of using Dhoni is same in case of the latest Youngistan Meri Jann ads. Pepsi is an intelligent brand which attaches itself with fun and enjoyment. It also shows its daring attitude, mischievous behaviour and outgoing nature. Pepsi Co invests large sums of money to align their brands and themselves with endorsers. Such endorsers are seen as dynamic with both attractive and likeable qualities and Pepsi Co. Basic Features of Advertising On the basis of various definitions it has certain basic features such as :

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

It is a mass non-personal communication. It is a matter of record. It persuades buyers to purchase the goods advertised. It is a mass paid communication. The communication media is diverse such as print (newspapers and magazines)

6. It is also called printed salesmanship because information is spread by means of the written and printed work and pictures so that people may be induced to act upon it.

ADVERTISING OBJECTIVES The long term objectives of advertising are broad and general, and concern the contribution advertising should make to the achievement of overall company objectives. Most companies regard advertising main objective as hat of proving support to personal selling and other forms of promotion. But advertising is a highly versatile communications tools and may therefore by used for achieving various short and long term objectives. Among these objectives are the following: 1. 2. 3. To do the entire selling job (as in mail order marketing). To introduce a new product (by building brand awareness among potential buyers). To force middlemen to handle the product (pull strategy).

4. To build brand preference by making it more difficult for middleman to sell substitutes). 5. To remind users to buy the product (retentive strategy).

6. To publicize some change in marketing strategy (e.g., a price change, a new model or an improvement in the product). 7. 8. To provide rationalization (i.e. Socially acceptable excuses). To combat or neutralize competitors advertising.

9. To improve the moral of dealers and/or sales people (by showing that the company is doing its share of promotion). 10. To acquaint buyers and prospects with the new uses of the product (to extend the PLC).

BENEFITS The functions of advertisement, and that purpose its ethics, may be discussion below : 1. It leads to cheaper prices. "No advertiser could live in the highly competitive arena of modern business if his methods of selling were more costly than those of his rivals." 2. It acquaints the public with the features of the goods and advantages which buyers will enjoy. 3. It increases demand for commodities and this results in increased production. Advertising: a) b) c) d) Creates and stimulates demand opens and expands the markets; Creates goodwill which loads to an increase in sales volume; Reduces marketing costs, particularly product selling costs. Satisfied consumer demands by placing in the market what he needs.

4. It reduces distribution expenses in as much as it plays the part of thousands of salesman at a home. Information on a mass scale relieves the necessity of expenditure on sales promotion staff, and quicker and wider distribution leads to diminishing of the distribution costs. 5. It ensures the consumers better quality of goods. A good name is the breath of the life to an advertiser. 6. By paying the way for large scale production and increased industrialization, advertising contributes its quota to the profit of the companies the prosperity of the shareholder the uplifts of the wage earners and the solution of he unemployment problem.

7. It raises the standard of living of the general public by impelling it to use to articles of modern types which may add to his material well being. "Modern advertising has made the luxuries of yesterday the necessities of today. It is a positive creative force in business. It makes two blades of grass grow in the business world where one grew before. 8. It establishes the goodwill of the concern for the test articles produced by it and in course of time they sell like hot cakes consumer search for satisfaction of their needs when they purchase goods what they want from its beauty, superiority, economy, comfort, approval, popularity, power, safety, convenience, sexual gratification and so on. The

manufactures therefore tries to improve this goodwill and reputation by knowing the buyer behaviour.

1.2. INDUSTRY PROFILE HISTORY OF SOFT DRINK INDUSTRY The production, marketing and distribution of non-alcoholic, generally carbonated, flavored, sweetened, water-based beverages. The history of soft drinks in the United States illustrates important business innovations, such as product development, franchising, and mass marketing, as well as the evolution of consumer tastes and cultural trends. Many Europeans long believed natural mineral waters held medicinal qualities and favored them as alternatives to often-polluted common drinking water. By 1772, British chemist Joseph Priestley invented a means to synthetically carbonate water, and the commercial manufacturing of artificial mineral waters began with Jacob Schweppe's businesses in Geneva in the 1780s and London in the 1790s. The first known U.S. manufacturer of soda water, as it was then known, was Yale University chemist Benjamin Silliman in 1807, though Joseph Hawkins of Baltimore secured the first U.S. patent for the equipment to produce the drink two years later. By the 1820s, pharmacies nationwide provided the beverage as a remedy for various ailments, especially digestive.

Though the drinks would continue to be sold in part for their therapeutic value, customers increasingly consumed them for refreshment, especially after the 1830s, when sugar and flavorings were first added. Soda fountains emerged as regular features of drugstores by the 1860s and served beverages flavored with ginger, vanilla, fruits, roots, and herbs. In 1874 a Philadelphia store combined two popular products to make the first known ice-cream soda. The first cola drink appeared in 1881. In the late 1800s, several brands emerged that were still popular a century later. Pharmacists experimenting at local soda fountains invented Hires Root Beer in Philadelphia in 1876, Dr. Pepper in Waco, Texas, in 1885, Coca-Cola in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1886, and Pepsi-Cola in New Bern, North Carolina, in 1893, among others. Reflecting two of the middle-class mores of the period²temperance and feeling overwhelmed by the pace and burdens of modern life²early marketing touted these drinks as alternatives to alcohol and/or as stimulants.

Coca-Cola inventor John S. Pemberton's first print advertisement for his creation read "Delicious! Refreshing! Exhilarating! Invigorating!," while Asa Candler, the eventual founder of the Coca-Cola Company, promoted his product in the years leading up to Prohibition as "The Great National Temperance Beverage." The history of Coca-Cola reveals how national markets in soft-drink brands developed. To limit the cost of transportation, manufacturers of syrup concentrates licensed bottlers to mix the product, package, and distribute it within a specific territory. Candler underestimated the importance of the bottling side of the business and in 1899 sold the national rights to bottle Coke for a fairly small sum to Benjamin F. Thomas and Joseph B. Whitehead, who then started a national network of bottlers, creating the basic franchising format by which the industry is still run. Candler and his successor after 1923, Robert Woodruff, were aggressive and innovative in marketing Coke as a leading consumer product and cultural icon. Coupons for free samples and giveaways of items bearing the drink's name and logo publicized the beverage, and pioneering efforts in market research helped define how best to take advantage of advertising and promotions. During World War II, Woodruff opened bottling operations overseas to supply U.S. military personnel, and after the war, Coke was poised to enter these international markets, not only as a consumer product, but also as a symbol of "the American Century." After World War II, the soft-drink industry became a leader in television advertising, the use of celebrity endorsements, catchy slogans, tie-ins with Hollywood movies, and other forms of mass marketing, particularly focusing on young consumers and emphasizing youth-oriented themes. As health and fitness consciousness and environmental awareness became popular, the industry responded with sugar-free and low-calorie diet sodas, beginning in the 1960s, and later, caffeine-free colas and recyclable containers.

The most famous rivalry within the industry has been between Coke and Pepsi, which waged two rounds of "cola wars" in the twentieth century. In the 1930s and 1940s, Pepsi challenged the industry leader by offering a twelve-ounce bottle for the same five-cent price as Coke's standard six ounces. In the 1970s and 1980s, "Pepsi challenge" taste-tests led Coke to change its formula in 1985, a campaign that failed because it underestimated the attachment Coke drinkers had to the tradition and symbolism of the brand. In 2001, the soft-drink industry included approximately five hundred U.S. bottlers with more than 183,000 employees, and it achieved retail sales of more than $61 billion. Americans that year consumed an average of 55 gallons of soft drinks per person, up from 48 in 1990 and 34 in 1980. The nine leading companies accounted for 96.5 percent of industry sales, led by Coca-Cola with more than 43 percent of the soft drink market and Pepsi with 31 percent. Seven individual brands accounted for almost two-thirds of all sales: Coca-Cola Classic (itself with nearly 20 percent of the market), Pepsi-Cola, Diet Coke, Mountain Dew (a Pepsi product), Sprite (a Coca-Cola product), Dr. Pepper, and Diet Pepsi. Domestic sales growth slowed in the late 1990s because of increased competition from coffee drinks, iced teas, juices, sports drinks, and bottled waters. The industry continues, however, to tap lucrative international markets; Coke and Pepsi each have bottling operations in more than 120 countries. INDIAN BEVERAGE MARKET The size of the Indian food processing industry is around $ 65.6 billion, including $20.6 billion of value added products. Of this, beverage industry is valued at $230 million; bread and biscuits at$1.7 billion; chocolates at $73 million and ice creams at $188 million. The size of the semi-processed/ready-to-eat food segment is over $1.1 billion. Large biscuits &confectionery units, Soya processing units and starch/glucose/ producing units have also come up, catering to domestic and international markets. The three largest consumed categories of packaged foods are packed tea, biscuits and soft drinks. The Indian beverage industry faces over supply in segments like coffee and tea. However, more than half of this is available in unpacked or loose form. Indian hot beverage market is a tea dominant market. Consumers in different parts of the country have heterogeneous tastes. Dust tea is popular in southern India, while loose tea in preferred in western India. The urban-rural split of the tea market was 51:49 in 2000. Coffee is consumed largely in the southern states. The size of the total packaged coffee market is 19,600 tones or $87 million. The total soft drink (carbonated beverages and juices) market is estimated at 284 million crates a year or $1 billion. The market is highly seasonal in nature with consumption varying from 25million crates per month during peak season to 15 million during off -season.

The market is predominantly urban with 25 per cent contribution from rural areas. Coca cola and Pepsi dominate the Indian soft drinks market. Mineral water market in India is 65 million crates ($50 million). On an average, the monthly consumption is estimated at 4.9 million crates, which increases to 5.2million during peak season.

GROWTH OF SOFT DRINK MARKET Carbonated drinks are dominated by artificial flavors based on cola, orange and lime with Pepsi and coca-cola dominating the market. The entire part of the drink is based on its artificial flavors and sweetening agents as no natural juice is used. MARKET ‡Cola products account for nearly 61-62% of the total soft drinks market. ‡Two global majors¶ Pepsi and Coke dominate the soft drink market. ‡ NCAER survey says 91% of soft drink in the country is in the lower, lower middle and upper middle class people. ‡The market is worth around Rs.5000 cores with growth rate of around 10-15%. ‡The production as soft drinks has increased from 5670 million bottles in 1998-99 to 9783million bottles in 2000-2008 industry source. ‡Growth market this year is expected to be 10-15% in value terms and 20-22% in volume terms. However, the market for carbonated drinks is stagnating and not growing as expected.

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Advertising is more than a tool for selling foods and services. It has one overriding task, to position a brand in the prospectus perception or perceptual space in relation to competitors, so as to created distinctiveness and preference. To formulate the problem scientifically, and to point out the importance of undertaking this study, it is essential to present a brief review of Researches undertaking in this area. Although the review involved a large number of studies only a few studies which have a direct and indirect bearing in the present study have been reviewed.

Raj (1982): Investigated the different advertisement effects on the purchase behavior of consumers of high loyalty increase brand and product purchase when advertisement for that brand increases, little switching occurs from competitive brands into the advertised brands. Effect of increased advertising carry over a few months after that advertising is lowered back to normal levels.

Petty 1983: He stressed the role of involvement in Advertisement effectiveness. He observed that the undergraduates express their attitudes about a product after being exposed to a magazine advertisement under condition of either high/low product involvement. The advertisement contained either strong or weak arguments for the product and featured either prominent sports celebrities or any citizen or endorser. The manipulation of argument quality had a greater impact of attitudes under high than low involvement, but manipulation of endorser had greater impact under low than high involvement. These findings were consistent with the views that there are two relatively distinctive routes to persuasion.

Karmali (1989): Supports the fact that the enhancement of brand appeal through celebrity appeal works. In these ads renowned personalities are used to enlarge, reassure the perspective customers. The ads using celebrity appeals had more brand appeal enhancing effect than the non celebrity appeals.

Schreiber and Appeal (1990-91): Assigned that researchers have been using surrogates for sales as a measure for evaluating the effectiveness of advertising. The use of surrogate measure necessarily implies a relationship between surrogate measure and sales which can be described mathematically as a curve of some sort. Hence the implicit assumption is that relationship between surrogate measures instead of sales is not with faults. Unnava and Brunkrant 1991: He did a study whose main objective was to compare the effects of varied v/s same execution of advertisements on brand name memory when the number of exposure toads is held constant. They found out that varied advertisement executions enhance

memory for brand name over repeated same executions. In varied advertisement executions learning was superior when execution remained same.

Gareth Parkin: ³Positive effects of promotional mugs´ says that a simple mug can be such a powerful marketing and Advertising tool. By embossing your company name, logo, message, website details on promotional mugs, you can impact a message to prospective clients and those around them. By using the latest printing techniques, promotional mugs can easily be decorated to reflect your business or brand .Style and advertising message for creating strong and lasting brand recall. Zaida and jayaram (1996): Reported the findings of a survey by a marketing and research group in September 1995 for Delhi based advertising and marketing magazine A&M, the result reflected the apparent failure of marketing strategies Pepsi ranked 7th while coca cola came 13 on the survey results of country¶s best marketing companies.

Srikant Kapoor (Advertising revisited-The Good, Bad, & Ugly): The difference in presentation of a Good, Bad & Ugly advertisement is mainly owing to the sponsor's view point & artists creative choices. However, someone has to be wasteful about what can be shown in public & what should remain hidden. Money making through unacceptable means may be prevented by law but awareness about what is good & what is not, is also important to discourage bad practices. If ignorance of law is not excused, ignorance about good & bad taste should not be excused. It may have far more significance for the betterment of the society, & its people

J. Varaprasdreddy (Role of Advertising in Creating Brand Personality): Brand personality being potent tool needs to be leveraged to achieve key objectives for existing &new brands. Consistency is also important, failing which dilution of brand personality or absence of it may occur. Other mix elements like distribution, pricing, promotion and packaging (apart from advertising) should support and strengthen brand personality.

Biswas S, Hussain M, O'Donnell K says that here is a positive, although moderate, impact of celebrity endorsements on attention and exposure of consumers. Implications for marketers as well as suggestions for future research are discussed. The article is of the view that although there is considerable risk in endorsing celebrities for products and services, the firms need to analyses the various factors that can reduce such risks and hence increase the likeability of transfer of leverage of the brand image from the celebrity to the products and services.

Dix S, Pougnet S (2009)B: In their research have found that Athlete role model endorsers have a positive influence on young adults' product switching behavior, complaint behavior, positive word-of-mouth behavior and brand loyalty. This confirms the assumption that sports celebrities are important socialization agents and can have significant impact on purchase intentions and behaviors. This research provides useful insight into the influence of athlete endorsers on young adults and suggests athletes have a positive influence on young adults' behavioral intentions in switching products, generating word-of-mouth and establishing brand loyalty. David H. Silvera, Austad B (2008): In their research topic have examined whether consumers infer that celebrity endorsers like the products they endorse, and presents a model using these inferences and other characteristics of the endorser to predict attitudes toward the endorsed product. Participants in two experiments examined written endorsement advertisements and were asked to infer the extent to which the endorser truly liked the advertised product and to rate the endorser's attractiveness, similarity to themselves, and knowledge of the product. Attitudes toward the advertisement, the endorser and the product were also measured. The resulting model indicated that product attitudes were predicted by inferences about the endorser's liking for the product and by attitudes toward the endorser.

Politz (1990): He found that purpose of campaign most often is to built an impression of product and service to generate sales, suggesting that campaign most only create awareness but also should be persuasive. A creative approach combined with persuasive message high lightning uniqueness of the advertised product often enables the advertisers to hold a long distance with the shoppers when the advertisement is heard or seen thereby enhancing its effects on the buyer at the time of purchase.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 3.1 INTRODUCTION

Research is defined as a ³Systematized Effort to Gain New Knowledge´. Research comprises defining and redefining problems, formulating hypothesis or suggest solutions, collecting, organizing and evaluating data, making deductions and reaching conclusions and at last carefully testing the conclusions to determine whether they fit the formulating hypothesis. It refers to the systematic method consisting of enunciating the problem, formulating a hypothesis, collecting the fact the data, analyzing the facts the reaching certain conclusion and either in the form of solution towards the concerned problem or in certain generalization for some theoretical formulation. 3.2 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

1. 2. 3.

To study the impact of advertisements in the minds of the consumers To find out the most popular soft drink brand. Reasons for preferring a particular advertisement.

4. Prevailment of annoying criteria about a soft drink advertisement in the minds of the consumers. 3.3 RESEARCH DESIGN:

A research design is an arrangement of conditions for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aim combine with relevance to the research purpose with economy in procedure. The researcher had done Descriptive Research for studying the Preferences of the Consumers. 3.4 SAMPLING METHOD

Sampling method used here is ³Convenience sampling´ it was used due to lack of time and lack of through knowledge about the Universe. The sampling size was 120 respondents.

3.5

DATA COLLECTION

To find out the Impact of Advertisement on Soft Drinks Industry in Trichy, both the primary and secondary data were collected. PRIMARY DATA Data collected originally by the researcher himself for the purpose of his study are known as Primary data. Primary data were collected from employees, students, business peoples, housewives and some other persons in the Trichy city through well structured QUESTIONNAIRE. SECONDARY DATA Data which are not originally collected by the researcher but obtained from Books, Records, Journals, published and Unpublished report available in the office in Trichy and Website. 3.6 TOOLS OF ANALYSIS

In the researcher collected the data should analysis and convert raw data to finished data analysis are percentage analysis, chi-square test and correlation methods. 1. PERCENTAGE ANNLYSIS Percentage is used in making comparison between two or more services of data.

Number of Respondents Percentage = x 100 Total Number of Respondents

2. Chi-Square(X) Test It is symbolized as X. It is applied in statistics to test the significance of association between two attributes. (O ± E) 2 x2 = ™ E

Ei = Expected Frequency Oi = Observed Frequency

3. Correlation It is used to find out the significant relationship between two variables. ™ xy r= ¥ (™x2 ™y2)

3.7 1.

SCOPE OF THE STUDY It assesses the preference of choosing the Branded Sort Drinks by the respondents.

2. The study helps us to know about the Cons umers perception towards watching new Advertisement. 3. It helps the company to understand efficiency of advertisement provided to the consumers, so that it can create the root for further improvement. 3.8 1. LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY The study does not consider any other drinks like energy and health drinks

2. 3. 4.

The study is carried out in Trichy city alone. The study focussed on few major brands in soft drinks industry The number of respondents was limited to 120 only.

TABLE ± 4.1 Distribution of Respondents based on Gender SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 Male 77 Female 43 Total 120 64.16% 35.83% 100 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) 64% of the respondents belong to the gender category of Male. 35.83% of the respondents belong to the gender category of Female.

FIGURE ± 4.1

Distribution of Respondents based on Gender

TABLE ± 4.2 Distribution of Respondents based on Qualification SL.NO (%) 1 2 3 4 School 28 Diploma Graduate 23.3% 18 37 15% 30.83% 30.83% DESCRIPTION NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

Post graduate 37 Total 120 100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) c) d) 30.83% of the respondents fall under the category of Post Graduates. 30.83% of the respondents fall under the category of Graduates. 23.3% of the respondents fall under the category of School. 15% of the respondents fall under the category of Diploma holders.

FIGURE± 4.2 Distribution of Respondents based on Qualification

TABLE ± 4.3 Distribution of Respondents based on Occupation SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 Employee Business Student Housewife Total 120 19 15 67 19 100 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

15.83% 12.5% 55.83% 15.83%

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) c) d) 58.83% of the respondents are students. 15.83% of the respondents are Employees. 15.83% of the respondents are House wives. 12.5% of the respondents are doing Business.

FIGURE± 4.3 Distribution of Respondents based on Occupation

TABLE ± 4.4 Distribution of Respondents based on Drinking of Soft Drink SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 Yes No 110 10 91.66% 8.33% 100 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Total 120

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) 91.66% of the respondents consume soft drinks. 8.33% of the respondents do not consume soft drinks.

FIGURE ± 4.4 Distribution of Respondents based on Drinking of Soft Drink

TABLE ± 4.5 Distribution of Respondents based on Media Preference SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 5 T.V 84 70% 9.16% 11 8 4 100 9.16% 6.66% 3.33% NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Radio 11 News paper Magazines Internet Total 120

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) 70% of the respondents prefer to watch advertisements. 9.16% of the respondents prefer to listen in Radio.

c) d) e)

9.16% of the respondents prefer learn from News Paper. 6.66% of the respondents prefer learn from Magazines. 3.33% of the respondents prefer to view in Internet.

FIGURE ± 4.5 Distribution of Respondents based on Media Preference

TABLE ± 4.6 Distribution of Respondents based on Reasons for liking Advertisement SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 Celebrity Good music Appeal 13 34 52 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

28.33% 43.33%

10.83% 17.5%

Other reasons 21 Total 120 100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 43.33% of the respondents say that they like advertisements because of good music score. b) 28.33% of the respondents say that they like advertisements because of celebrity presence. c) d) 17.5%of the respondents say that they like advertisements because of other reasons. 10.83%of the respondents say that they like advertisements because of good appeal.

FIGURE± 4.6 Distribution of Respondents based on Reasons for liking Advertisement

TABLE ± 4.7 Distribution of Respondents based on Theme of Advertisement SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 Emotional Spiritual Comedy Awareness Total 120 15 26 50 29 100 12.5% 21.66% 41.66% 24.16% NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 41.66% of the respondents says that they like advertisements for their comedy themes.

b) 24.16% of the respondents says that they like advertisements for their Awareness themes. c) 21.66% of the respondents says that they like advertisements for their Spiritual themes. d) 12.5% of the respondents says that they like advertisements for their emotional themes. FIGURE ± 4.7 Distribution of Respondents based on Theme of Advertisement

TABLE ± 4.8 Distribution of Respondents based on Recommendation of advertisement SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 Always Some times Not at all 27 55 27 22.5% 45.83% 22.5% NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Total 120

100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 45.83% of the respondents say that they Sometimes recommend others to watch advertisements. b) 22.5% of the respondents say that they Always recommend others to watch advertisements. c) 22.5% of the respondents say that they Never recommend others to watch advertisements. FIGURE ± 4.8 Distribution of Respondents based on Recommendation of advertisement

TABLE ± 4.9 Distribution of Respondents based on Perception on Repetition of Advertisement SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 Create eagerness Thought provoking Quite irritable 39 Total 120 100 39 42 32.5% NO.OF RESPONDENTS 32.5% 35% PERCENTAGE (%)

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 35% of the respondents say that the advertisements Creates thought provoking sense in their minds. b) 32.5% of the respondents say that the advertisements Creates Eagerness in their minds.

c)

32.5% of the respondents say that the advertisements Creates Irritation in their minds.

FIGURE ± 4.9 Distribution of Respondents based on Perception on Repetition of Advertisement

TABLE ± 4.10 Distribution of Respondents based on Preference of Celebrity SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 Film stars Sports stars Models 34 59 15 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

28.33% 49.16% 12.5% 10%

Musicians & Dancers 12 Total 120 100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) c) d) 49.16% of the respondents prefer to watch Sports Stars as celebrity in advertisements. 28.33% of the respondents prefer to watch Film Stars as celebrity in advertisements. 12.5% of the respondents prefer to watch Models as celebrity in advertisements. 10% of the respondents prefer to watch Musicians as celebrity in advertisements

FIGURE ± 4.10 Distribution of Respondents based on Preference of Celebrity

TABLE ± 4.11 Distribution of Respondents based on Influence of Celebrity Presence SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 Always Sometimes Not at all Total 120 34 67 19 100 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

28.33% 55.83% 15.83%

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 55.83% of the respondents say that sometimes the celebrity presence on advertisements influences them. b) 28.33% of the respondents say that Always the celebrity presence on advertisements influences them. c) 15.83% of the respondents say that they have never been influenced by the presence of celebrity on advertisements.

FIGURE± 4.11 Distribution of Respondents based on Influence of Celebrity Presence

TABLE ± 4.12 Distribution of Respondents based on Information in Advertisement SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 Always Sometimes Not at all 45 62 13 37.5% 51.66% 10.83% NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Total 120

100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 51.66% of the respondents say that they sometimes gather some information from advertisements. b) 37.5% of the respondents say that they always gather some information from advertisements. c) 10.83% of the respondents say that they not at all gather any information from advertisements.

FIGURE ± 4.12 Distribution of Respondents based on Information in Advertisement

TABLE ± 4.13 Distribution of Respondents based on Consumption of Soft Drinks SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 Yes No 101 19 84.16% 15.83% 100 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Total 120

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) 84.16% of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks. 15.83% of the respondents say that they does not consume soft drinks.

FIGURE ± 4.13

Distribution of Respondents based on Consumption of Soft Drinks

TABLE ± 4.14 Distribution of Respondents based on Frequency of Consumption SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 Once In a Day 28 Once In a Week Twice a Week 27 23.3% 32 22.5% 27.5% 26.66% NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

In Regular Intervals 33 Total 120 100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) c) d) 27.5% of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks in regular intervals. 26.66% of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks once in a week. 23.3%of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks once in a day. 22.5% of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks twice a week.

FIGURE ± 4.14 Distribution of Respondents based on Frequency of Consumption

TABLE ± 4.15 Distribution of Respondents based on Occasion of Consumption SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 Family Functions Parties 41 52 NO.OF RESPONDENTS 43.3% PERCENTAGE (%)

34.16% 22.5%

Leisure Times 27 Total 120 100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) c) 43.3% of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks more in Family functions. 34.16% of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks more in Parties. 22.5% of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks more in Leisure times.

FIGURE ± 4.15 Distribution of Respondents based on Occasion of Consumption

TABLE ± 4.16 Distribution of Respondents based on Reason for Consumption SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 Thirst 29 Style 31 Trend 15 Taste 45 Total 120 24.16% 25.83% 12.5% 37.5% 100 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) c) d) 37.5% of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks because of its Taste. 25.83% of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks because of its Style. 24.16% of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks because of Thirst. 12.5% of the respondents say that they consume soft drinks because of its Trend.

FIGURE ± 4.16 Distribution of Respondents based on Reason for Consumption

TABLE ± 4.17 Distribution of Respondents based on Known Soft Drinks SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Coco Cola Pepsi Limca Fanta Thums-Up Miranda Mountain Dew Maaza 100 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

All Of These 120 Total 120 100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that,

a)

All respondents are aware of all the soft drinks available in the market.

FIGURE ± 4.17 Distribution of Respondents based on Known Soft Drinks

TABLE ± 4.18 Distribution of Respondents based on Most liked Soft Drink SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Coco Cola Pepsi 21 Limca 15 Fanta 13 Thums-Up Miranda Dew 5 11 17.5% 12.5% 10.83% 1 5 4.16% 34.16% 6.66% 100 .83% 4.16% 9.16% NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Maaza 41 Others 8 Total 120

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) 34.16% of the respondents say that they like Maaza. 17.5% of the respondents say that they like Pepsi. 12.5% of the respondents say that they like Limca. 10.83% of the respondents say that they like Fanta. 9.16% of the respondents say that they like Coco cola. 6.66% of the respondents say that they like some other soft drinks. 4.16% of the respondents say that they like Miranda. 4.16% of the respondents say that they like Mountain Dew.

i)

.83% of the respondents say that they like Thums-up.

FIGURE ± 4.18 Distribution of Respondents based on Most liked Soft Drink TABLE ± 4.19 Distribution of Respondents based on Preference of Flavor SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 5 Cola 16 13.3% 23.33% 45% 14.16% 4.16% 100 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Lemon 28 Mango 54 Orange 17 Others 5 Total 120

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) c) d) e) 45% of the respondents say that they like Mango flavour. 23.33% of the respondents say that they like Lemon flavour. 14.16% of the respondents say that they like Orange flavour. 13.3% of the respondents say that they like Cola flavour. 4.16% of the respondents say that they like some other flavours.

FIGURE ± 4.19 Distribution of Respondents based on Preference of Flavor

TABLE ± 4.20 Distribution of Respondents based on Influencing Factor

SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 Advertisement 42 Price Level Stylish 28 Total 120 50

NO.OF RESPONDENTS 35% 41.66%

PERCENTAGE (%)

23.33% 100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) b) c) 41.66%of the respondents say that they buy soft drinks based on Price level. 35% of the respondents say that buy they soft drinks based on Advertisements. 23.33% of the respondents say that they buy soft drinks based on Stylish.

FIGURE ± 4.20 Distribution of Respondents based on Influencing Factor

TABLE ± 4.21 Distribution of Respondents based on Contribution of Advertisement

SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 Yes No 98 22

NO.OF RESPONDENTS

PERCENTAGE (%)

81.66% 18.33% 100

Total 120

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that,

a)

81.66% of the respondents says that Advertisements Contribute to sale of soft drinks.

b) 18.33% of the respondents says that Advertisements does not Contribute to sale of soft drinks.

FIGURE ± 4.21 Distribution of Respondents based on Contribution of Advertisement

TABLE ± 4.22 Distribution of Respondents based on Advertisement and Consumption SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 Always 60 50% 43.33% 6.66% NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Some Times 52 Not At All Total 120 8 100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 50% of the respondents say that Advertisement always influences their consumption.

b) 43.33% of the respondents say that Advertisement sometimes influences their consumption. c) 6.66% of the respondents say that Advertisement not at all influence their consumption. FIGURE± 4.22 Distribution of Respondents based on Advertisement and Consumption

TABLE ± 4.23

Distribution of Respondents based on Media Preference for Soft Drink Advertisement SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 T.V 103 85.83% 12 1 4 100 10% .83% 3.33% NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

News Paper Magazine Internet Total 120

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 85.83% of the respondents say that T.V is ideal for viewing soft drinks Advertisements. b) c) d) 10% of the respondents say that News paper is ideal for soft drinks Advertisements. 3.33% of the respondents say that Internet is ideal for soft drinks Advertisements. .83% of the respondents say that Magazines is ideal for soft drinks Advertisements.

FIGURE ± 4.23 Distribution of Respondents based on Media Preference for Soft Drink Advertisement

TABLE ± 4.24 Distribution of Respondents based on Preferred celebrity for Soft Drink Advertisement SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 5 Film Stars Sports Stars Models 40 52 10 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

33.33% 43.33% 8.3% 6.66%

Musicians&Dancers 8 All The Above10 8.3%

Total 120

100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 43.33%of the respondents say that Sports Stars are ideal as celebrity for soft drinks Advertisements. b) 33.33% of the respondents say that Film Stars are ideal as celebrity for soft drinks Advertisements. c) 8.3%of the respondents say that Models are ideal as celebrity for soft drinks Advertisements. d) 8.3% of the respondents say that all are ideal as celebrity for soft drinks Advertisements. e) 6.66% of the respondents say that Musicians and Dancers are ideal as celebrity for soft drinks Advertisements FIGURE ± 4.24 Distribution of Respondents based on Preferred celebrity for Soft Drink Advertisement

TABLE ± 4.25 Distribution of Respondents based on Presence of Celebrity and Choice of Brand SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 Always 27 22.5% 67.5% 10% NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Some Times 81 Not At All Total 120 12 100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 67.5% of the respondents say that they Sometime change their brand after watching celebrity on soft drinks Advertisements.

b) 22.5% of the respondents say that they Always change their brand after watching celebrity on soft drinks Advertisements. c) 10% of the respondents say that they Never change their brand after watching celebrity on soft drinks Advertisements.

FIGURE ± 4.25 Distribution of Respondents based on Presence of Celebrity and Choice of Brand

TABLE ± 4.26 Distribution of Respondents based on Advertisement and Change of brand SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 Always 39 32.5% 46.66% 20.83% NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Some Times 56 Not At All Total 120 25 100

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 46.66% of the respondents say that they Sometimes change their brand after watch soft drinks Advertisements. b) 32.5% of the respondents say that they Always change their brand after watch Advertisements. c) 20.83% of the respondents say that they Never change their brand after watch Advertisements.

FIGURE ± 4.26 Distribution of Respondents based on Advertisement and Change of brand

TABLE ± 4.27 Distribution of Respondents based on Utilization of Offers SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 Yes No 87 33 72.5% 27.5% 100 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Total 120

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 72.5% of the respondents says that they utilizes all offers in soft drinks Advertisements. b) 27.5% of the respondents says that they does not utilizes all offers in soft drinks Advertisements.

FIGURE ± 4.27 Distribution of Respondents based on Utilization of Offers

TABLE ± 4.28 Distribution of Respondents based on Experience of fake Information SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 Yes No 69 51 57.5% 42.5% 100 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

Total 120

INFERENCE:

From the above, it is inferred that, a) 57.5% of the respondents say that they experiences fake information in soft drinks Advertisements. b) 42.5% of the respondents say that they do not experiences fake information in soft drinks Advertisements.

FIGURE ± 4.28 Distribution of Respondents based on Experience of fake Information

TABLE ± 4.29 Distribution of Respondents based on Theme Remembrance SL.NO DESCRIPTION 1 2 3 4 Emotional Spiritual Comedy Awareness Total 120 16 34 55 15 100 NO.OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%)

13.33% 28.33% 45.83% 12.5%

INFERENCE: From the above, it is inferred that, a) 45.83%of the respondents say that they remember more Comedy theme Soft drinks advertisements. b) 28.33% of the respondents say that they remember more Spiritual theme soft drinks advertisements. c) 13.33% of the respondents say that they remember more Emotional theme soft drinks advertisements. d) 12.5% of the respondents say that they remember more Awareness theme soft drinks advertisements.

FIGURE ± 4.29 Distribution of Respondents based on Theme Remembrance

TEST OF HYPHOTHESIS ± 1 Null Hypothesis: There is no significant association between Gender and their Preferred Theme of Advertisement. Alternative Hypothesis: There is a significant association between Gender and their Preferred Theme of Advertisement.

Gender Theme of Advertisement Total Statistical Inferences Emotional Male 6 CV = 6.659 TV = 7.815 CV<TV Not Significant 14 Spiritual 37 20 Comedy 77 Awareness

Female 9 Total 15

12 26

13 50

9 29

43 120

Degree of Freedom = (c-1)x(r-1) = (4-1)x(2-1) =3 3 at 5% level of significance = 7.815

RESULT: Here calculated value of x2 is less than tabulated value so Null Hypothesis is accepted, i.e There is no Significant Association between Gender and Theme of Advertisement.

TEST OF HYPHOTHESIS ± 2 Null Hypothesis: There is no significant association between Occupation and their Influencing Factor of Purchase of Soft Drinks. Alternative Hypothesis: There is a significant association between Occupation and their Influencing Factor of Purchase of Soft Drinks.

Occupation Total

Influencing Factor

CV =5.6118 TV = 12.592 CV<TV Not Significant Advertisements Employee Business Student 9 5 22 5 5 33 Price Level 5 5 12 19 15 67 Stylish

House Wife Total 42

6 50

7 28

6 120

19

Degree of Freedom = (c-1)x(r-1) = (3-1)x(4-1) =6 6 at 5% level of significance = 12.592

RESULT: Here calculated value of x2 is less than tabulated value so Null Hypothesis is accepted, i.e There is no Significant association between Occupation and Influencing Factor of Purchase of Soft Drinks.

FINDINGS

64% of the respondents belongs to Male category. 60.55% of the respondents falls under the category of Graduates. 55.83% of the respondents are students. 92% of the respondents watch advertisements. 70% of the respondents prefers T.V to watch advertisements. 43% of the respondents like advertisements because of good music. 41.66% of the respondents like comedy advertisements. 77.5% of the respondents agree that they recommend others to watch good advertisements. 35% of the respondents says that the repetition of advertisements creates thought provoking sense in their minds.

50% of the respondents like Sports Stars in advertisements. 84% of the respondents agrees that advertisements influence their purchase behavior. 89% of the respondents says that the advertisement gives them all information about the products. 85% of the respondents consumes soft drinks. 43% of the respondents consumes soft drinks in Family functions. 38% of the respondents consumes soft drinks because of its Taste. All respondents know all brands available in their market. 34% of the respondents like Maaza. 45% of the respondents like Mango flavour in soft drinks. 42% of the respondents says that they are influenced by price level and around 35% of the respondents are influenced by advertisements. 88% of the respondents says that advertisements contributes to sale of soft drink. 93% of the respondents agrees that advertisement influences them to buy more soft drinks. 85% of the respondents prefers T.V advertisements for soft drinks. 44% of the respondents prefers Sports Stars for soft drinks advertisements. 90% of the respondents says that they change their brand after watching their favorite celebrity in advertisements. 72.5% of respondents says that they utilize the offers mentioned in the advertisements. 58% of the respondents experiences fake information on advertisements. 46% of the respondents¶ remember comedy theme in soft drinks advertisements. Most of the respondents remember Pepsi¶s ICC World Cup advertisements.

SUGGESTIONS We reached some suggestions: Advertisement should not be too expensive, because the advertisement leads and increase the prize of the product. Media should be selected according to the choice of customers. In rural areas media should be according to the choice of the people. To give more attention in making the advertisement to make it effective for the sale of cold drink. Price should be decreased so as to attract the consumers to use product more. To give attention on the weak media of advertisement so that the consumers comes to know about the product. They may avoid so many repetitions in same advertisements, the viewer quite irritable. It should be attractive one so that people are attracted toward the advertisement.

The advertisers provide more comedy advertisements, its increases the remembrance value. They must provide Sponsors to cricket and some other sports because many of the viewer like sport stars. The advertisers provide more comedy advertisements, its increases the remembrance value. They must update advertisement, it avoids irritation on advertisements. They must make sure there is no fake information in advertisements.

CONCLUSION

As there is cut throat competition in the soft drink industry mainly between the two big giants¶ i.e Coca Cola and Pepsi, and both are striving very hard for their market share. Therefore it becomes very hard for the companies to retain their customers. It is also evident that 35 % of the total costs, these companies spend on Advertisements. Therefore Advertisements are the back bone for this Industry, they act as a glue to retain their consumers and target the prospectus. Also the consumer¶s preferences and the attitudes change with the passage of the age, occupation Mediums of Advertisements and celebrity presence also play an important role in promoting the products among them asses. Advertisements play a pivotal role in changing the consumer¶s perception. Television is an important and effective medium used for communication with the consumers. Also celebrities affect the consumer perception and buying behaviour, and celebrities are one of the most remembered aspects of the

advertisement. Companies should use those celebrities that have the greater credibility and fan following. At last we can say that there is a direct relation between Advertisements and the consumer buying behaviour.

BIBLIOGRAPHY Books: 1. Research Methodology (Methods and Techniques) ³C.R.Kothari´. 2. Marketing Management ³PHILIP KOTLER´. `

Website: www.google.com

QUESTIONNAIRE Dear Sir / Madam, I am conducting this survey as a part of my MBA programme from Pavendar Bharathidasan College of Engineering and Technology, Trichy. The purpose of this study is to study the ³Impact of Advertisements on Soft Drink Industry´, so I would be grateful if you could spend some of your precious time in filling up this questionnaire. I) II) III) IV) C.ARUNKUMAR. Name Age Gender Qualification School V) Occupation Employee 1) : Business Student Housewife : Diploma Graduate Post Graduate : : : Male Female __________________________________

Do you watch advertisements? Yes No

2)

Media preference? T.V. Radio News Paper Magazine Internet

3) I like advertisements, because

Celebrity presence Appeal

Good Music Score Other reason.

4) Which type of theme attracts you more in advertisements? Emotional Spiritual Comedy Awareness

5) Do you recommend others to watch advertisement? Always Sometimes Not at all

6) Repetitions in watching a particular advertisement makes you perceive in what way? Creates Eagerness Thought Provoking Quite Irritable

7) Which Industry¶s celebrity you like most? Film Stars Sports Stars Models Musicians and Dancers

8) Do you think that the appearance of your favorite celebrity in advertisement will change your purchase behavior? Always Sometimes Not at all

9) Do you agree that, Advertisement would provide you with, all the information about the Products? Agree Neutral Disag ree

10) Do you consume soft drinks? Yes 11) Frequency of consumption Once in a day Twice a week 12) Occasion of consumption Family functions Parties Leisure times Once in a week In regular intervals No

13) You consume soft drinks, because of Thirst Style Trend Taste

14) Amongst, list the soft drinks you are aware of? Coca Cola Mountain Dew Pepsi Maaza Limca Fanta All of these Thums -up Mirinda

15) Which soft drink you like most? Coca Cola Mountain Dew Pepsi Maaza Limca Fanta Thums -up Mirinda

16) Which flavor of soft drink you like most? Cola Lemon Mango Orange Others

17) Which factor influences you much to buy soft drinks? Advertisements Price Level Stylish

18) Does advertisements contribute much on sale of soft drinks? Yes No

19) Do you agree that advertisement influences you to consume soft drinks more? Always Sometimes Not at all

20) Which media is suitable for advertisements for soft drinks? T.V. News Paper Magazine Internet

21) Which Industry¶s celebrity you prefer to watch on soft drinks advertisements? Film Stars Sports players Models Musicians and Dancers All

22) Do you feel that celebrity¶s presence in an advertisement would influence your choice of Soft drinks Brand preference? Always Sometimes Not at all

23) Would you change your brand after watching advertisements? Always Sometimes Not at all

24) Do you utilize the offers that is been given in an advertisement? Yes No

25) Have you observed any fake information on soft drink advertisements? Yes No

26) Which type of soft drinks advertisement you remember more? Emotional 27) Spiritual Comedy Awareness

Which soft drink advertisement have retained in your mind?