Upfront

Sports
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6
Church 7
Classifieds 8
Television 9
World briefs 10
Index
Friday, June 3, 2011
50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Forecast
DELPHOS HERALD
The
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
St. John’s baseball team falls in
State Semifinals, p6
Anti-smoking group fears budget
cuts, p3
www.delphosherald.com
2011
State
Qualifier
High Jump
TRAVIS EICKHOLT
Partly cloudy
Saturday
with 30 per-
cent chance
of showers,
storms. High
in upper 80s. See page 2.
Stacy Taff photo
Farmers finally get in fields
Area farmers are taking advantage of dry weather over the past several days
to prepare and plant their fields. May’s nearly 8 inches of rain prevented many
farmers from getting in the fields during normal planting time.
Staff photos
St. John’s students on summer break
Above: St. John’s Elementary School students stream out of the school Thursday
afternoon ready for summer break. St. John’s students added an extra day to their
schedule after taking a day in December for state tournament. Below: St. John’s
eighth-graders file into St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church Thursday evening for
their graduation Mass.
Schmit prepares for
first Senior Olympics
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Persons get
involved in new ventures for
many reasons. One may need
to “spice things up” or per-
haps the added adventure is
embarked upon because some-
one might have threatened to
hold them under water.
A new competitive swim-
mer to this year’s Lima Area
Senior Olympics is Delphos’
own Dr. Nicholas Schmit. He
says he’s diving in because of
another local competitor.
“This is my first year of
competitive swimming and
I’m doing it because of Frank
Vasquez. He always encour-
ages others to get active; I
run into him from time to
time and he has been working
on me for a year and a half
to enter. So, I finally broke
down and will do it because
of him — not because of any
skill I have,” he said. “I used
to swim once a week with
my dad but I’m not ready for
competition. Frank is making
me do it; he needs someone
to swim laps around. I swim
for exercise and am having
fun with it. Frank’s a good
teacher — I’m picking up
pointers and will continue
to improve but I wouldn’t
enter the competition if Frank
weren’t making me. He’s just
so enthusiastic — he’d prob-
ably hold me under water
until I said yes if it came to
that.”
The doctor encourages
seniors to get out and get
active.
“The senior center in Lima
is a great place with the pool
and the gym. They have great
programs and great facilities
that are under-utilized. It’s a
really great thing for seniors;
there aren’t many people out
there who wouldn’t benefit
from some form of exercise
their doctor finds permissible.
There are all kinds of things
available and anything helps.
It’s good for the body and
good for the mind,” he con-
cluded.
Schmit
Stacy Taff photo
Landeck lets out for summer
Landeck Elementary School students spent an extra day in the classroom this year
due to a flooded basement earlier this spring. Students were eager to start their summer
break on Thursday.
Lawrence to make
15th Olympic try
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delphosherald.com
ELIDA — Many seniors
experience achy joints and mus-
cles. For those who compete in
the Lima Area Senior Olympics,
though, keeping joints limber is
the name of the game.
One such competitor is Paul
Lawrence of rural Elida. In his
15th year of competition, he
competes in table tennis, race
walking, bocci and shuffleboard.
He jokes that he competes just to
hold death at bay.
“I started when I was 62 and
I’m 76 now. My main thing is
table tennis and race walking.
“I used to swim
once a week
with my dad but
I’m not ready
for competition.
Frank (Vasquez)
is making me do
it; he needs some-
one to swim laps
around. ... He’s
just so enthu-
siastic — he’d
probably hold
me under water
until I said yes if
it came to that.”
— Dr. Nicholas Schmit
See OLYMPICS, page 2
Basketball camps still
taking aps
The St. John’s and
Jefferson June basketball
camps remain open.
Applications for the St.
John’s girls/boys camps, run-
ning June 13-16 under the
direction of Aaron Elwer, are
available in the high school
(419-692-5371)/grade school
(419-692-8561) offices and
must be returned by Tuesday.
Aps for the 7th annual
Wildcat Summer Basketball
Camp under the direction of
Marc Smith (419 615-7233)
are available at Franklin
and Landeck elementaries
and the middle school.
Last call for DSA regis-
trations
On-line registrations
for the Delphos Soccer
Association’s fall season
continue through this week at
www.delphosohsoccer.com
Lawrence
John Edwards
charged in
felony indictment
By MIKE BAKER
and NEDRA PICKLER
The Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. — A
federal grand jury charged
two-time presidential candi-
date John Edwards today with
soliciting and covering up
the secret spending of more
than $925,000 to hide his
mistress and their baby dur-
ing the peak of his 2008 cam-
paign for the White House.
The grand jury’s indict-
ment in the case of USA
v. Johnny Reid Edwards
contained six counts, includ-
ing conspiracy, four counts
of receiving illegal cam-
paign contributions and one
count of false statements.
The indictment said the
payments were a scheme
to protect Edwards’ White
House ambitions. “A
centerpiece of Edwards’
candidacy was his public
image as a devoted family
man,” the indictment said.
“Edwards knew that public
revelation of the affair and
the pregnancy would destroy
his candidacy by, among
other things, undermining
Edwards’ presentation of
himself as a family man and
by forcing his campaign to
divert personnel and resourc-
es away from other cam-
paign activities to respond to
criticism and media scrutiny
regarding the affair and preg-
nancy,” the indictment added.
The indictment and an
arrest warrant were filed in
Greensboro, N.C., which is
in the district where his cam-
paign was headquartered.
Edwards, 58, was sched-
uled to make an initial
appearance this afternoon
before U.S. Magistrate
Judge Patrick Auld in
Winston-Salem, N.C.
2
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Come join us....
Organization of Delphos Baptist Church
Sunday, June 12 at 11am
Public Invited
Contact Pastor Terry McKissack
at Delphos Baptist Church
302 North Main St, Delphos, 419-692-0061
or 419-302-6423
WHY PAY
MORE FOR
YOUR DVDs?
RED BOX
AT
CHIEF &
McDonald’s
Thinking of you always
and loving you forever.
In
Loving Memory of
SHELLY SMITH
12-14-72 6-3-05
Mom, Dad, Billy, Jenny, Amanda,
Chad, Grandma Martin, Kobe,
Kaden, Kayla, Kylee, Emma,
Beau, Aunts, Uncles
& & friends
Happy
50th
Birthday
WES!
June 3, 2011
Love, Kate,
Michelle, & Matt
2 – The Herald Friday, June 3, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARY
FUNERAL
BIRTH
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
TODAY IN HISTORY
POLICE REPORT
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 141 No. 299
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Van Wert Cinemas
www.vanwertcinemas.com
419-238-2100
June 3 thru June 9
All shows before 6 pm $4.50
Adults $7.00 • Kids & Seniors $4.50
VAN-DEL DRIVE-IN
Friday June 3rd
thru Tuesday June 7th
SCREEN 1:
X-Men:First Class-PG13
Pirates 4-PG13
SCREEN 2: Hangover 2-R
Bridesmaids-R
SCREEN 3:
Kung Fu Panda 2-PG
Thor - PG13
Adults: $7.00 Kids 5-11: $4.00
Kids Under 5: Free
Gates Open 8:00 - Showtime at Dark
Coming Soon: Cars 2
- Green Lantern -
Transformers
ST. RITA’S
A boy was born June 1 to
Matthew and Trista Crouse of
Delphos.
(Continued from page 1)
That has been my main thing
ever since I started. Basically,
I do it to keep myself alive.
That’s why I started to begin
with and that’s basically, my
reason, although, I do like table
tennis and race walking,” he
said. “The other things are just
for fun — bocci, horseshoes
and shuffleboard. In my first
year, I just did table tennis and
race walking. Then, I sat in on
other things like shuffleboard;
I sat in and watched them for
a few years and got into it,”
he said.
This year’s competition is
not a qualifying year for state.
However, Lawrence has been
to the state games in the past.
“I competed at state in table
tennis and race walking. I
earned gold and silver but I’m
not the greatest — I’m in about
the middle. There aren’t a lot of
people who race walk, so I have
those medals there,” he said.
Lawrence qualified for
nationals once but doesn’t
expect to return.
“Marshal Carman and I
doubled as a team and went
to Nationals in 2001 in Baton
Rouge; we took third place. It
was a good time but I didn’t like
Louisiana because the humidity
is terrible down there,” he said.
The Lima Area Senior
Olympics will be held June
4-10 at the senior center in
Lima. Events include table ten-
nis, shuffleboard, darts, a home
run derby, golf, volleyball,
bowling, swimming, bocce,
horseshoes, pickleball, racquet
ball, water volleyball and a 5K
walk/run.
Dec. 14, 1942-May 31, 2011
Ruth Ann H. Schuller, 68,
of Ottawa died Tuesday at her
residence.
She was born Dec. 14,
1942, in Ottoville to George
and Gertrude (Fischer) Miller,
who preceded her in death.
She had been married to
Arthur J. Schuller of Arcadia.
Survivors include chil-
dren Brad (Kristie) Schuller
of Crystal Lake, Ill., and
Jennifer (John Jr.) Yankanich
of Ambler, Pa.; 5 grandchil-
dren Nicholas Schuller, Sharry
Schuller, Katerina Yankanich,
John Yankanich III and
Alexandra Yankanich; a broth-
er, Kenneth (Dorothy) Miller
of Ottoville; three sisters,
Elizabeth Knott of Columbus
Grove, June (Donald) Korte
of Delphos and Vivian (Bob)
Schimmoeller of Oak Harbor;
and a sister-in-law: Jill Miller
of Ottoville.
She was also preceded in
death by a brother, Walter
Miller; and a brother-in-law,
Arthur Knott.
Mrs. Schuller was a home-
maker. She was a member of
Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic
Church, Ottawa, Catholic
Ladies of Columbia and
Ottawa VFW Auxiliary. She
enjoyed baking cookies and
making chicken noodles. She
always touched the lives of
everyone she met.
Mass of Christian Burial
will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday
at Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic
Church, the Rev. Matt Jozefiak
officiating. Burial will fol-
low in St. Mary’s Cemetery,
Ottoville.
Friends may call from 2-8
p.m. today at Love Funeral
Home, Ottawa, where there
will be a CL of C Rosary at
7 p.m. and a VFW Auxiliary
service will begin at 7:30
p.m.
Memorials can be made
to a charity of the donor’s
choice.
Condolences can be made to:
www.lovefuneralhome.com.
At 9:55 a.m. on Thursday,
Delphos police came into con-
tact with Joshua Foster, 33, of
Delphos, at which time offi-
cers approached Foster and he
gave false information as to
his identity.
As a result, Foster was
arrested on an outstanding
warrant issued out of Allen
County Common Pleas Court.
He will also face charges of
obstructing official business.
Foster was transported to
the Allen County Jail.
At 10:32 a.m. on Thursday,
Delphos police served notice
on William Estle, 24, of
Delphos, that he was not
allowed to be on the property
located at 111 North Main
Street.
At 11:12 a.m., police were
dispatched to that location in
reference to Estle being there.
Upon officers’ arrival, they
located Estle inside the build-
ing.
As a result, Estle was arrest-
ed on charges of criminal tres-
passing and was transported
to the Allen County Jail. He
will appear in Lima Municipal
Court on the charge.
At 10:51 a.m. on Thursday,
Delphos police were contact-
ed by a subject in reference to
a telephone harassment com-
plaint.
Upon speaking with the
subject, it was found that a
family or household member
was sending text messages
to the complainant and they
wished them to stop.
At 9:03 a.m. on Thursday,
Delphos police were called
to the 600 block of Wayne
Street in reference to a crimi-
nal damaging complaint.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated that sometime
overnight someone had cut
holes in all four of the vic-
tim’s car tires.
By The Associated Press
Today is Friday, June 3, the
154th day of 2011. There are
211 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On June 3, 1861, Illinois
Sen. Stephen A. Douglas, the
Democratic presidential nomi-
nee in the 1860 election, died
in Chicago of typhoid fever; he
was 48.
On this date:
In 1621, the Dutch West
India Co. received its charter
for a trade monopoly in parts of
the Americas and Africa.
In 1808, Confederate
President Jefferson Davis was
born in Christian County, Ky.
In 1888, the poem “Casey at
the Bat,” by Ernest Lawrence
Thayer, was first published
in the San Francisco Daily
Examiner.
In 1948, the 200-inch
reflecting Hale Telescope at the
Palomar Mountain Observatory
in California was dedicated.
In 1961, President John F.
Kennedy and Soviet Premier
Nikita Khrushchev opened two
days of summit talks in Vienna.
In 1963, Pope John XXIII
died at age 81; he was suc-
ceeded by Pope Paul VI.
In 1965, astronaut Edward
White became the first American
to “walk” in space, during the
flight of Gemini 4.
In 1981, Pope John Paul
II left a Rome hospital and
returned to the Vatican three
weeks after the attempt on his
life.
Ten years ago: Alejandro
Toledo (al-ay-HAHN’-droh
toh-LAY’-doh) defeated ex-
president Alan Garcia in Peru’s
presidential election. Actor
Anthony Quinn died in Boston
at age 86. Mel Brooks’ musical
comedy “The Producers” won a
record 12 Tony Awards. Golfer
Karrie Webb won the U.S.
Women’s Open in a runaway
for the second year in a row.
Five years ago: Defense
Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld,
attending a security conference
in Singapore, branded Iran the
world’s leading terrorist nation
yet hoped that Tehran would seri-
ously consider incentives from
the West in exchange for sus-
pending suspect nuclear activities.
Gunmen attacked a car belong-
ing to the Russian Embassy in
Baghdad, killing one diplomat
and kidnapping four employees
who were later slain.
One year ago: BP sliced off
a pipe with giant shears to make
way for a cap in the latest bid to
curtail the worst oil spill in U.S.
history. During an Oval Office
face-off over illegal immigra-
tion, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer
told President Barack Obama
Americans “want our border
secured” while Obama under-
scored his objections over the
tough immigration law Brewer
had signed, calling it discrimi-
natory. Joran van der Sloot
(YOHR’-uhn VAN’-dur-sloht),
long suspected in the 2005 dis-
appearance of Alabama teen
Natalee Holloway in Aruba, was
arrested in Chile following the
slaying of 21-year-old Stephany
Flores in Peru. Emmy-winning
actress Rue McClanahan, 76,
died in New York.
GEHRES, Richard W.,
85, of Van Wert, funeral
services will begin at 10:30
a.m. Saturday at St. Paul’s
Reformed Church in America,
Harrison Township, the Rev.
Chad Strabbing officiating.
Burial will be in Evangelical
Protestant Cemetery, Harrison
Township, with military
graveside rites conducted
by the Willshire American
Legion. Friends may call
from 2-8 p.m. today at
Cowan & Son Funeral Home,
Van Wert, and one hour
prior to services Saturday at
the Church. In lieu of flow-
ers, preferred memorials are
to the Riley’s Children’s
Hospital, Indianapolis, or St.
Paul’s Reformed Church in
America.
FISCHER, Gertrude P., 82,
of Delphos, Mass of Christian
burial will begin at 10:30
a.m. Saturday at St. John the
Evangelist Catholic Church,
the Rev. Melvin Verhoff offi-
ciating. Burial will be in St.
John’s Cemetery. Friends may
call from 2 to 8 p.m. today
at Harter and Schier Funeral
Home in Delphos, where a
parish wake will be observed
at 7:30 p.m. Memorial con-
tributions may be made to
the Delphos St. John’s Tuition
Assistance Fund or donor’s
choice.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Thursday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $15
million
Pick 3 Evening
4-3-0
Pick 4 Evening
1-9-7-3
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $20
million
Rolling Cash 5
09-17-18-29-34
Estimated jackpot:
$140,000
Ten OH Evening
04-06-11-13-14-20-21-23-
26-31-32-35-40-43-50-51-56-
75-78-80
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy.
Lows in the lower 60s. South
winds 5 to 10 mph.
SATURDAY: Partly
cloudy with a chance of show-
ers and thunderstorms. Highs
in the upper 80s. Southwest
winds 10 to 15 mph. Chance
of rain 30 percent.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly cloudy with a chance
of showers and thunderstorms.
Lows in the mid 60s. Northwest
winds around 10 mph. Chance
of rain 30 percent.
EXTENDED FORECAST
SUNDAY- WEDNES-
DAY: Partly cloudy. Highs
in the lower 80s. Lows in the
lower 60s.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT,
THURSDAY: Partly cloudy.
Lows in the mid 60s. Highs in
the upper 80s.
Lawrence
Ruth Ann H. Schuller
Police arrest
man on warrant Man faces tres-
passing charge
Resident reports
phone harassment
Resident reports
tires cut
Corn: $7.77
Wheat: $7.10
Beans: $14.20
Mladic calls genocide
charges ‘obnoxious’
THE HAGUE, Netherlands
(AP) — Ratko Mladic, frail
but defiant after 16 years on
the run, made his first appear-
ance before U.N. judges and
his victims Friday, dismiss-
ing a long list of charges of
genocide, mass murder and
persecution as “obnoxious”
and “monstrous words” that
had nothing to do with what
he called the defense of his
nation.
The capture and trial of the
Bosnian Serb wartime com-
mander closes the bloodiest
chapter in European history
since World War II and is near-
ly the final act of the Yugoslav
tribunal, a court that launched
a renewed era of international
justice after the Nuremberg tri-
als of Nazis war criminals.
Together with his for-
mer political boss Radovan
Karadzic, Mladic is accused
of orchestrating a four-year
war for Serbian domination
in Bosnia that cost 100,000
lives and climaxed with the
July 1995 massacre of 8,000
Muslim men and boys in the
U.N.-declared safe zone of
Srebrenica.
Karadzic’s 18-month-
old trial continued just a few
steps away from the court-
room where Mladic was seen
in public for the first time in
more than a decade.
Mladic declined to enter
formal pleas to the 11-count
indictment, but admitted no
culpability. “I defended my
country and my people,” he
said before he was cut short by
president judge Alphons Orie.
“Monster man. Butcher,”
rape victim Bakira Hasecic
shouted from the public gal-
lery as the hearing ended and
Mladic struggled to his feet.
She was few feets away from
him but separated by a sound-
proof glass partition.
Mladic told the three-judge
panel he was “a gravely ill
man,” but he remained alert
throughout the hearing, nod-
ding or shaking his head as
the Orie spoke. But at times
he seemed confused by the
proceedings, and said he had
been unable to read the thick
file of legal documents he was
handed after his extradition to
U.N. custody in The Hague
from Serbia on Tuesday.
“I would like to read these
obnoxious charges leveled
against me,” he said after Orie
read a summary of the 38-page
indictment. “I need more than
a month for these monstrous
words. I have never heard such
words.”
Orie scheduled a new hear-
ing for July 4. If Mladic again
refuses to plead to the charges,
judges will file “not guilty”
pleas on his behalf.
Mladic’s trial, which is
likely to last several years,
is one of the most important
since the tribunal was formed
in 1993 while the war was still
in progress. Since Karadzic’s
arrest in 2008, the former mili-
tary leader of Bosnia’s Serbs
stood alone as the most want-
ed man in Europe. One fugi-
tive remains at large, Goran
Hadzic, leader of the rebel
Serbs in Croatia.
Wearing a peaked cap, he
saluted with his left hand to
the gallery as a curtain obscur-
ing the courtroom was raised.
Two U.N. guards lifted him
to his feet when the judges
entered the courtroom, and he
saluted them as well. With his
right arm apparently impaired,
a guard had to help him put
earphones over his head to
hear the Serbian translation.
His speech was slow and
slightly slurred.
“I don’t want to be helped
to walk as if I were some blind
cripple. If I want help, I’ll ask
for it,” he said.
His family said after his
arrest last week that he had
suffered two strokes during his
years in hiding. He was given
a medical examination after
his transfer to the U.N. deten-
tion unit at the seaside suburb
of Scheveningen, and doctors
declared him healthy enough
to appear for his arraignment.
GOT A SPORTS
STORY?
CALL JIM
METCALFE,
Sports Editor,
419-695-0015
“I would like
to read these
obnoxious charg-
es leveled against
me. I need more
than a month
for these mon-
strous words. I
have never heard
such words.”
— Ratko Mladic
1
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E
V
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N
Concrete leveling of floors, sidewalks, patios,
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Friday, June 3, 2011 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
Briefs
www.delphosherald.com
419-238-9000
Come
Celebrate
our
anniversary!
Friday,June 3 - sunday,June 5,2011
209 S. Washington St., Van Wert
Specials For The Weekend:
1. One 16” Two Topping Pizza $12.00
2. Large Stromboli or Cowzone with Longhorns
or Cinnamon Stix $12.00
3. Two 14” Specialty Pizzas $20.00
4. Choice of Small Cowzone or Stromboli
14” Pizza with Choice of 3 Toppings
Choice of One Menu Dessert $20.00
Friday & Saturday
LATE NIGHT SPECIAL 9-11pm
18” One Topping Pizza $12.00
16” One Topping Pizza $10.00
14” One Topping Pizza $8.00
12” One Topping Pizza $6.00
DELIVERY AVAILABLE WITH MINIMUM ORDER
Delivery Fee Applies To Your Location
FREE BREADSTICKS
WHEN YOU DINE-IN
Buffet: 11am-2pm & 4:30 - 7:30pm
FRIDAY & SATURDAY BUFFET $7.49 w/beverage
SUNDAY BUFFET $8.49 w/beverage
AGES 6-10 $4.99 w/beverage
AGES 3-5 $2.99 w/beverage
Cutting Edge Art! Award Winning Sculptor,
Jason Emmons will be performing
FRIDAY, JUNE 3 at 11:00 am, 2:00, 4:00 & 6:00 pm
SATURDAY, JUNE 4 at 10:00 am, 12:00, 2:00 & 4:00 pm
at Wild Willy’s Parking Lot - 209 S. Washington Street
The carved art pieces will be auctioned off on location, Saturday,
June 4th - following the Peony Parade at approximately 6:30 pm
www.wildwillyspizza.com • www.bearhollowwoodcarvers.com

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 12,248.55 -41.59
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,773.31 +4.12
S&P 500 INDEX 1,312.94 -1.61
AUTOZONE INC. 289.65 -3.46
BUNGE LTD 73.89 +0.73
EATON CORP. 50.04 +0.82
BP PLC ADR 45.00 -0.34
DOMINION RES INC 47.27 +0.15
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 37.97 -0.05
CVS CAREMARK CRP 38.53 +0.15
CITIGROUP INC 40.01 +0.36
FIRST DEFIANCE 14.12 +0.13
FST FIN BNCP 15.31 0
FORD MOTOR CO 14.18 -0.05
GENERAL DYNAMICS 71.42 -0.38
GENERAL MOTORS 29.60 -0.63
GOODYEAR TIRE 16.73 -0.15
HEALTHCARE REIT 51.59 -0.55
HOME DEPOT INC. 35.09 -0.31
HONDA MOTOR CO 37.53 -0.36
HUNTGTN BKSHR 6.24 -0.11
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 66.48 0
JPMORGAN CHASE 41.61 -0.15
KOHLS CORP. 51.39 -1.53
LOWES COMPANIES 23.59 -0.13
MCDONALDS CORP. 80.75 -0.23
MICROSOFT CP 24.22 -0.21
PEPSICO INC. 69.51 -0.78
PROCTER & GAMBLE 66.01 -0.39
RITE AID CORP. 1.10 +0.04
SPRINT NEXTEL 5.93 -+0.10
TIME WARNER INC. 35.71 +0.36
US BANCORP 24.73 +0.03
UTD BANKSHARES 9.00 +0.06
VERIZON COMMS 36.17 -0.10
WAL-MART STORES 53.55 -0.75
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business June 2, 2011
Anti-smoking
group fears
budget cuts
TOLEDO (AP) — Anti-
tobacco advocates say cuts to
the Ohio Department of Health
could jeopardize enforcement
of the state’s four-year-old
ban on smoking in indoor
public places.
The $56 billion spending
plan currently under consid-
eration in the Ohio Senate
eliminated $1 million that the
Health Department used last
year to follow up on alleged
violations of the ban.
The Blade reported Friday
that the proposed state budget
would also phase out fund-
ing for a state “quit line” that
smokers seeking to kick the
habit can call for help.
Marianne Farmer, senior
policy director for the
American Cancer Society,
says businesses may have no
incentive to follow the law
without the threat of fines or
penalties.
TOLEDO (AP) —
President Barack Obama is
aiming to get a little more
mileage out of Chrysler’s
announcement that it’s repay-
ing its government loans
ahead of schedule.
The president will be at
a Chrysler plant in Toledo
today to talk about the resur-
gence of the U.S. auto indus-
try and say that it wouldn’t
have happened without the
government’s decision to
bailout Chrysler and GM.
It’s no coincidence that
Obama is bringing that mes-
sage to Toledo, a city that
straddles Ohio and Michigan.
Both states will be important
to his re-election bid.
Republicans are pointing
out that the government will
still lose about $14 billion
from the bailout and say it’s
no time for a victory lap.
The White House said this
week that the losses are far
less than originally expected.
Saving the auto industry
was critical to saving Ohio
jobs.
The auto rescue was not
solely about stabilizing the
“Big 3” auto companies –
Chrysler, GM, and Ford –
it was intended to provide
a vital life-line to workers
in Defiance who manufac-
ture engine blocks and Tiffin
workers who build transmis-
sions.
Ohio is second only to
Michigan when it comes to
supplying auto companies
with the tools needed to build
cars and trucks. Cars like
General Motors’ Chevy Cruze
and Chrysler’s Jeep Wrangler
aren’t just assembled in Ohio;
they’re also made with parts
manufactured in Ohio.
That’s why I refused to
give up on the auto suppli-
ers in Akron, car dealers in
Canton, and machinists in
Medina when faced with
the choice to either save
America’s auto industry or
allow it to sputter to a stop.
While some Washington
politicians maligned hard-
working auto workers
as “overpaid fat cats” just
months after passing a bail-
out for Wall Street executives
without so much as flinch-
ing, forward-looking lead-
ers were working to prevent
an economic depression in
strong manufacturing states
like Ohio.
We were determined not
to let this industry run into a
ditch, because it would have
caused an economic crash
across the manufacturing sec-
tor.
The auto rescue was an
unpopular choice, but it was
the right decision.
With some 792,000 jobs
in Ohio associated
with the auto indus-
try – including parts
suppliers, automak-
ers, and indirect and
spin-off jobs – it was
imperative to inter-
vene. Saving Chrysler
and the other auto
companies meant
saving workers in
Parma, Holland, and
Sidney.
Had GM and
Chrysler collapsed,
the next fall would have been
the supply chain that also sup-
ports other industries besides
auto. Since Ohio is one of the
country’s largest manufactur-
ing states, this collapse would
have been for devastating for
middle class families in our
state and across the United
States. The threat of depres-
sion was real.
But thanks to the auto res-
cue, the Big 3 are back on
track – and ordering parts
made by manufacturers
across Ohio.
In November 2008, 1,000
workers at GM’s Lordstown
plant were laid off. Today,
nearly 5,000 people – and
another shift of workers –
build the Chevy Cruze, one
of the best selling cars in
the nation. But more than
that – the Cruze is an Ohio-
made car supporting Ohio’s
economy.
The Cruze’s tires are
manufactured in Akron, its
wheels in Cleveland, its seats
in Warren, engine blocks in
Defiance, metal from Parma,
the transmission in Toledo,
the speakers in Springboro.
Out in Toledo, where
President Obama and I recent-
ly visited, Chrysler
is also hiring more
workers and stamp-
ing the “Made in
Ohio” label on its
Jeep Wrangler.
The auto rescue
also ensures that
American-made cars
are made with more
Amer i can- made
parts.
Prior to the auto
rescue, only 55 per-
cent of the parts
in Chrysler’s Jeep Wrangler
were made in America.
Today, 70 percent of the
Jeep Wrangler is American-
made.
The glass is made in
Crestline, Ohio, the steering
column in Perrysburg, the
seats in Northwood, the hard
top in Carey, and cargo com-
ponents in Holmesville.
So in many ways, invest-
ing in the auto industry was
an investment in Ohio’s sup-
ply chain.
When things looked bleak
– and when no one wanted to
stand with workers or auto
companies – we didn’t give
up on American auto compa-
nies or American manufac-
turing.
And that’s because we
know– throughout our history
– that a strong manufactur-
ing sector is essential to our
nation’s economic strength
and prosperity.
The American auto indus-
try is back, and Ohio facilities
are on the frontlines of this
resurgence. We knew it could
be done.
We’re on the right road.
Beyond the Big Three
Sen. Sherrod
Brown
GAHANNA — AEP Ohio,
a unit of American Electric
Power (NYSE: AEP), recent-
ly introduced two new appli-
ance rebate offers as part of
its Residential ENERGY
STAR® Appliance Rebate
Program.
In an effort to increase
consumer awareness and
encourage the purchase of
ENERGY STAR® products,
AEP Ohio is offering mail-in
rebates as a way of reducing
the price of ENERGY STAR
qualified products for its cus-
tomers.
“AEP Ohio is offering a
$15 mail-in rebate to resi-
dential customers who pur-
chase an ENERGY STAR
dehumidifier and a $25
mail-in rebate for customers
who purchase an ENERGY
STAR room air conditioner
and recycle their old, work-
ing unit,” said Jon Williams,
AEP Ohio manager energy
efficiency and peak demand
response. “We encourage
current AEP Ohio residential
customers to take advantage
of these rebates for qualified
dehumidifier and room air
conditioner purchases made
May 1 through Aug. 31.”
Room air conditioners may
even be recycled along with a
refrigerator or freezer sched-
uled for pick up through AEP
Ohio’s Appliance Recycling
Program or they can be taken
to alternative drop off sites,
found on the Ohio EPA web-
site at www.epa.ohio.gov/
ocapp/recycle.aspx. Rebates
are available at participating
retailers or online at www.
gridSMARTOhio.com and
must be submitted no later
than September 15, 2011. In
order to take advantage of
this opportunity, an individ-
ual must be a current AEP
Ohio residential service cus-
tomer residing in Ohio.
The AEP Ohio Residential
ENERGY STAR Appliance
Rebate Program is part of
the company’s gridSMART®
initiative to help customers
use less energy, manage their
bills and protect the environ-
ment. For additional informa-
tion about AEP Ohio’s energy
efficiency program portfolio,
visit www.gridSMARTOhio.
com
ENERGY STAR®
(www.energystar.gov) is
a joint program of the U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency and the U.S.
Department of Energy work-
ing with manufacturers to
help consumers throughout
the United States identify,
purchase and use energy effi-
cient appliances, lighting,
electronics and other prod-
ucts. The goals are to save
energy, save money and
reduce pollution.
AEP Ohio offers new ENERGY
STAR
®
appliance rebates
Obama to
celebrate auto
recovery in Ohio
SANDUSKY (AP) — The
U.S. Coast Guard rescued
four people from Lake Erie
after boaters saw a vessel
that had capsized and called
for help.
Coast Guard crews
received a call for help
Thursday morning after boat-
ers saw a 20-foot recreational
vessel capsize and four peo-
ple fall into the water.
Petty Officer 2nd Class
Lauren Jorgensen told the
Sandusky Register for a story
Friday that the boat’s bilge
pumps couldn’t keep up with
the water, causing the boat to
start sinking.
Jorgensen said boaters
were able to rescue three of
the people and a Coast Guard
vessel pulled a fourth person
from the lake.
Waves were about two feet
high when the boat capsized,
while the water temperature
was about 68 degrees.
Four rescued
from Lake Erie
WARREN (AP) —
Officials in an Ohio city are
debating the best approach
to regulating massage parlors
believed to be fronts for pros-
titution.
The legislation before city
council in Warren in north-
eastern Ohio would increase
fees charged to massage par-
lors and increase the number
of inspections from one per
month to two.
The Vindicator reported
Friday that the bill would also
make it easier for the city
to revoke a massage parlor’s
license.
City Law Director Greg
Hicks says lawmakers must
be careful to enact a bill that
is not unconstitutional.
Hicks says it’s not enough
to pass legislation based on
an unproved assumption that
prostitution takes place at the
parlors.
City debates law
to regulate
massage parlors
“It is best to act with confidence, no matter how little right you have to it.”
—Lillian Hellman, American playwright (1905-1984)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Friday, June 3, 2011
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• Several commercial properties in downtown Delphos
are being renovated by John Lehmkuhle, who is in the
process of acquiring several of the buildings. His inten-
tion is to restore the facilities and lease them out for addi-
tional local businesses. Details are yet to be finalized but
Lehmkuhle is interested in turning one of the areas into
a rental space for private gatherings or for jazz and blues
performances.
25 Years Ago — 1986
• Construction continues on facilities for an auto-
matic teller machine at Toledo Trust, 202 N. Main St.
The National Cash Register machine called a Vistabanc
will offer 24-hour service and can be operated with a
Vistabanc card of Visa and Mastercard. Bank branch
manager William Kill said the automatic teller should be
operational by the end of June.
• Delphos Bass Club held its second tournament of the
year at Indian Lake. The winners were first place, Arnold
Osting with 153 points; second place, Rick Baker with 93
points; and third place, Kevin Osting with 49 points. Baker
also had a big bass weighing two pounds.
• The Lincolnview High School awards program was
held recently in the high school gym. Awards were pre-
sented by the high school faculty and administration. Top
senior honor students were Maureen Blankemeyer and
Kelly Ainsworth.
50 Years Ago — 1961
• Rev. Don R. Yocum, pastor of Trinity Methodist
Church, Ralph Mericle, lay delegate, their wives and
Mrs. And Mrs. Fred Allemeier of Delphos will attend
the twenty-third session of the Ohio Annual Conference
of the Methodist Church which will convene in Hoover
Auditorium Lakeside, Ohio on June 6.
• Arthur J. Mueller, son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard C.
Mueller, and Richard L. Vogt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leon
Vogt, will be among the 156 seniors who will receive
degrees June 4 at St. Joseph’s College, Rensselaer,
Indiana. Mueller will receive a degree in sociology and
Vogt a degree in marketing. Both are graduates of St.
John’s High School.
• Men’s Night was observed at the meeting of Delphos
Chapter, No. 26, Order of the Eastern Star June 1 in the
Masonic Temple. Following the business session a wel-
come was extended by Mrs. Don May. This was followed
by a program in which Mrs. Carl Ramsey, Mrs. Kenneth
Fronk, Mrs. Charles Daulbaugh, Mrs. Fred Kiggins, Mrs.
Norman Jones, Mrs. Ray John and Robert McDonald par-
ticipates.
75 Years Ago — 1936
• A substantial improvement has been effected in the
interior of the city building. This is now nearing comple-
tion unless a government for additional material can be
secured. A force of men, under the direction of Max
Planer, has been working for some time past there, repaint-
ing the walls and re-varnishing the woodwork.
• The annual Jefferson High School Alumni recep-
tion and banquet will be held at the Jefferson auditorium
this evening. The members of the Class of 1936 will be
received into the organization at this time. Dancing will be
a feature of the later part of the evening. Music for this will
be furnished by Frankie Schenk and his orchestra.
• An interesting account of the “Making of a Hat”
was given by E. O. Steinle at a weekly meeting of the
Delphos Kiwanis Club which was held Tuesday night at
the Beckman Hotel. Steinle told of visits which he had
made to hat factories and described in detail the process of
hat manufacture.
By DAVID ESPO and
LAURIE KELLMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Facing
a dire warning from a credit
rating agency, the Obama
administration lobbied some
of Congress’ most conserva-
tive members today for an
increase in the nation’s debt
limit. Republicans responded
that the surest way to reas-
sure financial markets was to
enact deep deficit cuts.
At the White House,
President Barack Obama told
Democrats he expected talks
led by Vice President Joe
Biden to achieve only about
60 to 70 percent of the reduc-
tions required as part of the
deal, officials said, leaving
him and top lawmakers to
agree on the rest. The Biden
talks are aimed at produc-
ing a bipartisan debt-cutting
package that could accom-
pany a boost in the govern-
ment’s ability to borrow more
money.
Treasury Secretary Tim
Geithner has told Congress
that without an increase in
the $14.3 trillion debt limit
by Aug. 2, the government
will be forced into its first-
ever default, with potentially
catastrophic results for the
economy.
Geithner spent part of his
day meeting privately with
freshmen House members,
mostly Republicans elected
last fall with tea party support
and among the most commit-
ted to cutting spending.
“I’m confident two things
are going to happen this
summer,” he said afterward.
“One is we’re going to avoid
a default crisis, and we’re
going to reach agreement on
our long-term fiscal plan.”
GOP freshmen leaving
that meeting said that though
the session with Geithner was
cordial, they were mystified
that he emerged expressing
optimism because no new
ground was broken.
“That’s what this admin-
istration does,” said Rep. Jeff
Landry, R-La. “They dream
it, so they believe it.”
Geithner’s meeting with
the freshmen had been
planned in advance but
occurred after Moody’s
Investors Service said that
if the parties fail to make
progress soon, it would put
the U.S. rating under review
for a possible downgrade. It
cited a “very small but rising
risk” that the government will
default on its debts.
Standard & Poor’s, anoth-
er major credit rating agency,
issued a similar warning in
April.
Moody’s also warned the
government could face a
downgrade if it fails to come
up with a long-term plan to
reduce the country’s deficit.
The federal budget deficit is
on pace to exceed $1 trillion
for the third straight year.
Republicans seized
instantly on the statement.
“If we don’t get our fiscal
house in order, the markets
will do it for us,” Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio, said
at a news conference, a point
that other Republicans echoed
as the day went on.
One freshman who attend-
ed the meeting with Geithner
said the treasury secretary
tried citing the Moody’s
report to put pressure on
Republicans.
“He used that to say,
‘Guys, we’ve got to do some-
thing about the debt ceiling
crisis,”’ said Rep. Joe Walsh,
R-Ill. “The feeling in the
room was, ‘No, we’ve got to
do something about the debt
crisis”’ — a reference to the
GOP’s belief that the more
important issue is reducing
the debt.
A lower credit rating could
ripple through the U.S. econ-
omy in the form of higher
interest rates, hurting con-
sumers still trying to recover
from the worst recession in
decades.
Earlier today, House
Democrats emerged from a
White House meeting with
Obama sounding as if they
were at loggerheads with the
GOP over debt reduction.
Democrats and the presi-
dent agreed that higher rev-
enues need to be part of a bal-
anced debt-reduction pack-
age, said Democratic officials
with knowledge of the meet-
ing. Officials spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity to discuss
the private meeting.
Republicans oppose tax
increases. Some GOP fresh-
man who attended the meet-
ing with Geithner said he
stated that the administration
wants higher taxes on the rich
as part of a debt-cutting plan.
House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said.
House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.,
pressed Obama to avoid any
deal that would result in reduc-
tions in Medicare benefits,
according to a Democratic
official familiar with today’s
White House meeting.
Debt fight continues
despite Wall St. warning
By JIM ABRAMS
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — More
than a year after the Gulf of
Mexico oil spill, House mem-
bers traded political recrimi-
nations anew Thursday over
the Obama administration’s
response to the environmen-
tal and economic disaster.
Republicans on the House
Oversight and Government
Reform Committee charged
that President Barack Obama
added to the woes of the Gulf
region by giving BP PLC, the
owner of the well, the lead
role in responding to the cri-
sis. They also said the admin-
istration erred in imposing
a moratorium on deep water
drilling.
Democrats countered that
the spill spurred new safety
regulations that ensure there
will never be a repeat of the
April 20, 2010, Deepwater
Horizon oil rig explosion that
killed 11 workers.
Mississippi Gov. Haley
Barbour, until recently con-
sidered a possible contender
for the Republican presiden-
tial nomination, questioned
the administration’s decision
to rely on the Oil Pollution
Act, enacted in 1990 in the
wake of the Exxon Valdez
disaster, for guidance on how
to respond to the crisis.
The OPA holds the respon-
sible party, in this case BP,
accountable for all costs and
gives them a central role in
response to an oil spill. The
federal government directs
the effort. Barbour said
Obama should have gone
with the Stafford Act, under
which the federal government
aids states in responding to
hurricanes and other natural
disasters.
The OPA was a “usur-
pation of state authority,”
Barbour said, noting that he
“sent people to Walmart to
buy radios” because of the
lack of communication with
the Coast Guard on efforts
to keep oil off the state’s
coastline.
“At times,” said commit-
tee chairman Darrell Issa,
R-Calif., “the administration
actively hindered the efforts
of local officials and others
with expertise in protecting
the region’s fragile ecosys-
tem.”
The other main point of
contention was Obama’s deci-
sion to impose a six-month
moratorium on exploratory
drilling in waters deeper than
500 feet. The moratorium was
lifted in October, but critics
say the granting of drilling
permits has been too slow
because of tough new safety
regulations. Shallow water
exploration and production
and deep water production
were never halted.
“The administration wast-
ed no time in effectively shut-
ting offshore drilling in the
Gulf of Mexico, the conse-
quence of which has been a
paralyzing loss of jobs in an
already weak economy,” Issa
said.
Interior Department offi-
cial Michael Bromwich dis-
puted GOP claims the mora-
torium had interrupted pro-
duction in the Gulf and led
to higher gas prices, saying
it “has had no impact on pro-
duction because production
was not stopped or delayed.”
A report prepared by
Republicans for the hearing
cited an internal memo from
Interior Secretary Ken Salazar
last July in which he said he
was aware that suspension of
deep water drilling “over the
next few months will have a
serious negative impact on
rig workers and those who
support them.”
Republicans still wrangling over oil spill
By BETH FOUHY
Associated Press
NEW YORK — Even as
Democratic lawmakers vowed
to move beyond the contro-
versy surrounding a lewd
photo sent from Rep. Anthony
Weiner’s Twitter account, resi-
dents of his New York dis-
trict expressed mixed feelings
over the incident and the media
furor surrounding it.
Weiner stayed out of the
limelight Thursday after spend-
ing Wednesday doing a round
of interviews trying to explain
how a waist down photo of
a man’s bulging underpants
had been transmitted from his
Twitter account. The media
blitz raised more questions
than it answered, as Weiner
insisted the photo had been set
by a prankster but couldn’t rule
out the possibility that it was a
photo of him.
Outside Weiner’s district
in the Kew Gardens section
of Queens, constituent Evelyn
Carson said she had voted for
Weiner but regretted doing so
now. “That’s an embarrass-
ment for children to see some-
thing like that, especially from
a big-time figure.”
Another constituent, Ronald
Tirino, said the incident had
been blown out of proportion
by the press.
“I thought it was a joke,”
Tirino said. “The way media
has been going it’s hardly news
anymore.”
The uproar began over
the weekend when conserva-
tive activist Andrew Breitbart
reported on his website that
Weiner had sent the photo to a
21-year-old female college stu-
dent in Seattle who was one of
the New York congressman’s
Twitter followers. Weiner has
insisted he did not send the
photo. He says he saw it online
before deleting it.
Though generally mum in
public, Democrats privately
fumed at the forced detour in
their arguments about Medicare
and spending, leaving the sev-
en-term congressman from
Brooklyn and Queens largely
to fend for himself for a third
day in a row. Most Republicans
seemed content to let the con-
troversy simmer.
On Thursday, Weiner joined
Democratic lawmakers at the
White House where the cau-
cus met with President Barack
Obama. As they walked from
buses on Pennsylvania Avenue,
Democrats stonewalled when
they were asked about their
colleague.
“I will have nothing to say
about that,” said fellow New
Yorker, Rep. Louise Slaughter.
“I’m here to put people to
work.”
“We’re not distracted by
that,” said Rep. Rob Andrews,
D-N.J.
The House’s top Democrat,
Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California,
earlier told ABC News that
she was “a late-comer to the
issue” — one that cable TV
and the Capitol press corps
have been fixated on for most
of the week.
Still, Pelosi added, “I have
confidence in Anthony Weiner
that if an investigation is in
order that will take place.”
Other top Democrats
expressed a desire for the issue
to disappear. Longtime Rep.
John Conyers of Michigan said
Weiner was a valuable member
of the Democratic caucus, and
he called the issue a distrac-
tion.
“The public mostly likes
entertainment and excitement
and that’s what the Weiner
issue provides,” he said.
“That’s human nature.”
Silence, vagueness from Dems on Weiner photo
WASHINGTON (AP) —
As the Obama administration
awaits the Pentagon’s recom-
mendation on troop cuts in
Afghanistan, military leaders
said Thursday that the reduc-
tion must not jeopardize the
progress made in securing
the country in the past year.
The top commander in
Afghanistan, Gen. David
Petraeus, has not yet made
his recommendation on the
widely expected withdrawal
of troops from Afghanistan.
But it will come in the next
few weeks and move rapidly
after that, the chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff said
Thursday.
Adm. Mike Mullen
warned that while no one
knows yet how deep the ini-
tial cut will be, it must not
erode the gains troops have
made.
The No. 2 U.S. command-
er in Afghanistan, Lt. Gen.
David Rodriguez, said there
should not be a drawdown
so rapid that it outpaces the
abilities of Afghan soldiers
and police to handle secu-
rity.
If that happens, the
Taliban could regain a foot-
hold, Rodriguez said.
Some lawmakers have
suggested that the killing of
Osama bin Laden last month
should result in a more rapid
end to the U.S. involvement
in the protracted war.
President Barack Obama
has said that the drawdown
of troops will begin in July.
Obama is likely to announce
his decision late this month
about the size of that initial
withdrawal. Military offi-
cials also expect a forecast
for further drawdowns over
the next several months.
Rodriguez said Afghan
forces must be pushed into
the lead in more regions
across the country.
“We have to start taking
more risk and have more trust
in them,” Rodriguez told a
conference Thursday at the
Center for a New American
Security.
The comments come as
House Democrats met with
Obama at the White House
Thursday, pressing for an
end to the war.
Rep. Jim McGovern,
D-Mass., said he told the
president “we need to get out
of Afghanistan.”
“I told him we’re broke,”
McGovern told reporters after
the meeting. “The American
people want an end to it.”
McGovern said Obama
was sympathetic but gave no
assurances.
Rep. Dennis Kucinich,
D-Ohio, said Obama told
lawmakers he was com-
mitted to a withdrawal but
offered no indication to how
many troops he would start
drawing down.
Rodriguez said he expects
Afghan leaders to decide
in August which additional
regions in the country can be
shifted from U.S. to Afghan
military control.
Herat , west ern
Afghanistan’s largest city, is
one of seven areas sched-
uled to be handed over to
Afghan control in July as the
first step of the transition of
nationwide security respon-
sibility to the Afghan troops.
There are roughly 100,000
U.S. troops in Afghanistan.
Afghanistan
withdrawal must
not risk progress
1
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A Salute to Your
“Little All-Star”
Just send us your picture
of your
“Little All-Star”,
their name and parents
name and we’ll do the rest.
* Dance
* Gymnastics
* Other Activities




Pictures will be published in color on our
“Little All-Star” page Monday, June 13.
Picture size is 2” W x 3” H. with 1” for name and
parents name of the “All-Star”.
Cost is only $13.95. Send picture
information and check to:
Delphos Herald
c/o Little All-Star
405 N. Main Street, Delphos. Ohio 45833
Check payable to: Delphos Herald.
Digital pictures can be emailed to sbohn@delphosherald.com
Name
Parent’s Names
City
Name of Studio
Ph. (will not be published - used only if we need to contact you)
DEADLINE EXTENDED!!
Deadline is Wednesday June 8.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Create and implement a
strategy designed to help
you achieve your long-term
fnancial goals.
Do something positive for
yourself. Call today for a
no-cost, no-obligation portfolio
review. Together, we can create
a strategy that’s right for you
based on your current situation,
objectives and risk tolerance.
TAKE CHARGE
OF YOUR FUTURE.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Friday, June 3, 2011 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Delphos Canal
Commission Museum
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos Parks
and Recreation board meets
at the recreation building at
Stadium Park.
Washington Township
trustees meet at the township
house.
7:30 p.m. — Spencerville
village council meets at the
mayor’s office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 Fifth St.
8 p.m. — The Veterans
of Foreign Wars meet at the
hall.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
6 p.m. — Weight Watchers
meets at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 211 E.
Third St.
7 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club meets.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
June 4
Katie Etgen
Heather Camper
Andy Kohorst
Trevor Kill
Eric Wallace
Garion Fuerst
At the movies . . .
Van Wert Cinemas
10709 Lincoln Hwy. Van Wert
X-Men: First Class (PG-13) Fri.-
Sat.: 2:00/4:30/7:00/9:30 Sun.-Thurs.:
2:00/5:007:30
The Hangover 2 (R) Fri.-Thurs.: 2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00
Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger
Tides (PG-13) Fri.-Sat.: 2:00/4:30/7:00/9:30
Sun.-Thurs.: 2:00/5:007:30
Bridesmaids (R) Fri.-Sat.: 2:00/4:30/7:00/9:30
Sun.-Thurs.: 2:00/5:007:30
Kung Fu Panda 2 (PG) Fri.- Thurs.:
2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00
Van-Del Drive-in
19986 Lincoln Hwy. Middle Point
Friday - Tuesday
Screen 1
X-Men: First Class (PG-13)
Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger
Tides (PG-13)
Screen 2
The Hangover 2 (R)
Bridesmaids (R)
Screen 3
Kung Fu Panda 2 (PG0
Thor (PG-13)
Gates open 8 p.m. Showtime at dark.
American Mall Stadium 12
2830 W. Elm St., Lima
Saturday and Sunday
X-Men: First Class (PG-13) 12:00/12:30
/1:15/3:10/3:50/4:20/6:30/7:00/7:30/9:25/10:
00/10:30
The Hangover Part II (R) 12:20/1:30/2:1
0/2:40/4:00/4:30/5:00/6:40/7:10/7:40/9:35/10
:10
Kung Fu Panda 2 (PG) 12:10/2:30/4:40/
6:50/9:15
Kung Fu Panda 2 (PG) 3D
12:40/3:00/5:10/7:20/9:45
Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger
Tides (PG-13) 1:304:15/7:15/10:20
Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger
Tides (PG-13) 3D 12:50/3:45/6:45/9:50
Bridesmaids (R) 1:05/4:25/7:25/10:15
Thor (PG-13) 3:55/9:20
Thor (PG-13) 3D 12:55/6:35
Fast Five (PG-13) 9:30
Eastgate Dollar Movies
2100 Harding Hwy. Lima
Saturday and Sunday
Water for Elephants (PG-13) 1:00/6:50
Rio The Movie (G) 1:10/3:10/5:10/7:10/
(9:10 Sat. only)
Source Code (PG-13)
1:15/3:15/5:15/7:15/(9:15 Sat. only)
Limitless (PG-13) 4:30/(9:10 Sat. only)
Rango (PG) 1:00/3:05/5:10/7:20/
(9:25 Sat. only)
Shannon Theatre
119 S. Main St., Bluffton
Kung Fu Panda 2 (PG) is playing every eve-
ning at 7 p.m. with 1:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
matinees. 3D shows are every evening at 9:30 p.m
with 4 p.m. matinees on Saturday and Sunday.
Photo submitted
Stechschulte Optimist guest
Kevin Stechschulte, left, golf course manager at
the Delphos Country Club, was the guest speaker at a
recent Delphos Optimist Club meeting. The upcoming
Junior Golf Clinic was the topic of his presentation. In
the past, the Delphos Optimist Club was a supporter
of the Junior Golf Clinic. He is thanked for coming by
Optimist club president Michael Friedrich.
MECCA to host an
American Hiking Society
National Trails Day event
The Miami and Erie
Canal Corridor Association
(MECCA) will host a Trail
Dedication and Hike event
on Saturday in celebration of
American Hiking Society’s
19th annual National Trails
Day.
The ceremony will be
held at the trail-head in
Spencerville at 10 a.m. The
ceremony will dedicate the
recently enhanced Towpath
Trail that extends 1.6 miles
from Deep Cut Historical
Park into the Village of
Spencerville. A hike on this
trail section will be conducted
after the dedication ceremo-
ny. A long-standing celebra-
tion of America’s magnificent
trail system and its countless
supporters and volunteers,
National Trails Day (NTD) is
celebrated in all 50 states and
Puerto Rico.
The slogan for NTD
2011, Made With All Natural
Ingredients, is an open invi-
tation to all Americans to
get outside and connect with
local hiking clubs, outdoor
retailers, local parks and rec-
reation departments or fed-
eral land managing agencies
to experience everything the
great outdoors has to offer.
“Trails are vital for the
health of a community”
said Neal Brady, MECCA
Executive Director.
For more information on
2011 NTD event, contact
Neal Brady at meccadirec-
tor@nktelco.net or call 419-
733-6451.
Since 1993, National Trails
Day has inspired thousands of
people to enjoy trails on the
same day nationwide, taking
part in hikes, bike and horse
rides, trail maintenance, pad-
dle trips and other activities.
Event hosts include local hik-
ing clubs, federal agencies,
municipal parks, retailers,
land trusts and many other
businesses and organizations.
For more information about
National Trails Day, visit
AmericanHiking.org.
Founded in 1976,
American Hiking Society is
the only national, recreation-
based nonprofit organization
dedicated to promoting and
protecting America’s hiking
trails, their surrounding natu-
ral areas and the hiking expe-
rience.
Carey shrine
set upcoming
events
The upcoming events of the
Basilica and National Shrine
of Our Lady of Consolation in
Carey are as follows:
Fifth Indian Heritage Day-
June 12 (confessions begin at
10:30 a.m. until 12, mass at
noon in Upper Basilica, other
masses at 8 and 10 a.m.)
Filipino Heritage Day- July
9
Novena of the Assumption-
Aug. 6-14
Solemnity of the
Assumption- Aug. 15
Latino Heritage Day- Sept.
18
Family Day- September 25
Mass for Hope and Healing
(breast cancer)- Oct. 11
Feast of St. Gerard Majella
(expectant parents)- Oct. 16
Call 419-396-7107 for
more information.
Story idea...
Comments...
News release...
email Nancy Spencer
editor...
nspencer@delphosherald.com
EVERYBODY’S
SHOPPING HERALD
CLASSIFIEDS
CALL 419-695-0015
to place an ad
6 – The Herald Friday, June 3, 2011
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Stadium Park will be filled with the sounds of the sea-
son this weekend as the boys of summer come to Delphos.
Sixteen-plus area baseball teams with players age 10-12
will be participating in the second annual Nathan Miller
Memorial Baseball Tournament tonight through Sunday.
Presale only tickets are still available for a fajita dinner,
including rice, beans and dessert from Lisa Hays (419-
236-9890) or Brent Binkley (419-235-7919) to be held 3-6
p.m. Saturday. Raffle tickets will be sold for a chance to
win a Corey Luebke autographed baseball glove. Corey
is a Marion Local product and was named Big Ten
pitcher of the year while at Ohio State. He was a first-
round pick of the San Diego Padres and is currently on
the big-league squad. First-round games will begin 6 p.m.
tonight and also at 8 p.m. Ten more games are on tap
to begin 10 a.m. Saturday and wrapping up on Sunday
with the championship game first pitch at 5 p.m. Food
tent will also be available all weekend. In the picture
are Nathan Miller’s family: his dad, Sam, left; his sister,
Sarah; and mom, Angie.
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

COLUMBUS — St.
John’s had a great start in
its first-ever trip to the state
baseball semifinals Thursday
afternoon.
They got a run in the top of
the first inning at Huntington
Park in Columbus, the home
of the Columbus Clippers
Triple A baseball team.
After that, it was all New
Middletown Springfield.
The Tigers scored three
times in the bottom of the
inning and rode the strong
starting pitching of Nick
Russell to a 9-2 Division IV
victory.
The Tigers (18-6), run-
ners-up in 2009 and making
their fifth trip to the state
tournament, advance to take
on Minster, who was a win-
ner over Newark Catholic, at
1 p.m. Saturday in the finals.
“We had a nice start but
we couldn’t sustain it. We had
chances there and through-
out the game but couldn’t
capitalize,” Jays coach Dan
Metzger noted. “That’s the
game of baseball; we hit the
ball pretty well but couldn’t
find the gaps. It seemed when
we hit the ball hard, it was
right to them and they made
the defensive plays they had
to.”
The Blue Jays (17-5)
got that first salvo. Junior
Tanner Calvelage walked to
lead it off against junior ace
right-hander Russell (8-0;
7 innings, 6 hits, 2 earned
runs, 1 walk, 6 strikeouts;
89 pitches, 59 strikes) and
stole second. Senior Tyler
Bergfeld’s bouncer to short
moved him to third, from
where he scored on a solid
single up the gut by senior
Jordan Leininger. He swiped
second but the next two bat-
ters were fanned to keep the
damage at one run.
“We have built this team
around offense; this is what
we work on all off-season.
We are patient and this
mature team is not afraid to
take pitches and hit with two
strikes,” Springfield first-year
coach Matt Weymer noted.
“Our whole approach is to
put the ball in play; we don’t
strike out much. We want
to make the other team get
us out, even on a bunt. We
want to have 21 tough outs
for our opponent. We figure
it’s tough for a high school
pitcher to have two good con-
sistent pitches.”
The patient Tigers
answered immediately
against Blue Jay sophomore
Curtis Geise (5-1; 4 innings,
7 hits, 6 earned runs, 2 hit
batters, 2 free passes, 4 Ks;
88 pitches, 47 strikes). With
one out, Joe Ohlin rocked
a double to left and scored
on Ronnie Bovo’s choppper
to center. He advanced on
Russell’s bounceout to sec-
ond. After Brad Ferraro was
hit by a pitch, both scored as
Jake Noble cracked as double
to the fence in right for a 3-1
edge.
“Curtis fell behind in the
count early and struggled
throwing his curve ball for
strikes, especially early.
When a team that hits like
Springfield does and you
have to come in with your
fast ball — and they know
it — you’re going to get hit
hard,” Metzger continued.
“Curtis couldn’t hit the cor-
ners and that forced him to
put the ball down the middle.
You have to tip your hat to
them for their ability to find
those gaps and hit the ball
hard.”
The Tigers loaded the
bases with two down in the
home second on a 1-out
infield hit (Anthony Yoder)
and a 2-out walk (Ohlin) and
hit batter (Bovo) but Geise
fanned the next batter to leave
them loaded.
Geise got on via an error
to lead off the visitor third
and advanced on a wild
pitch and a bounceout by
Calvelage. However, he was
left stranded.
The Jays had a chance in
the fourth when senior Austin
Vogt slapped a double to the
left-field corner. However,
he was hit by senior Chris
Pohlman’s bouncer to short
for the first out. Pohlman
moved to second on a 2-out
wild pitch but could get no
farther.
Facing Geise for the third
time, Springfield got three
more tallies in the fourth.
With one gone, Yoder
walked on four pitches and
Cody Ritzo blooped a single
between three Blue Jays to
right center. Ohlin sacrificed
them both up and both scored
as Bovo smacked a double
to deep left. In turn, he came
home via a triple off the fence
in right by Russell to make
it 6-1.
Middletown got three
unearned tallies in the
fifth against senior reliever
Leininger (2 innings, 3 hits).
With one down, Jason Horn
singled to left and Mike
Buchenic followed with
another hit up the middle.
Yoder laid down a sacrifice
bunt to move both up; an
error on the play allowed
pinch-runner Joe Caraballo
to touch the dish and move
Buchenic to third, with
Yoder at second. Ritzo flied
out deep enough to right to
get Buchenic home, pushing
Yoder to third, from where he
scored Springfield’s final run
on a wild pitch.
That was easily enough
support for Russell.
“He had a similar stat in the
regional semifinals. We went
with him again tonight and
when they scored in the first,
we had to wonder,” Weymer
added. “However, he really
settled in. He worked the ball
inside and out, up and down,
and located both of his two
major pitches well.”
The Jays wasted a 1-out
ground-rule double to the
405-foot mark in center in
the sixth by Leininger. Vogt
lined out hard to third sacker
Buchenic and the next batter
was retired to end the threat.
Russell singled with one
down in the Middletown sixth
but Leininger picked off.
pinch-runner Chris Bishard.
The Jays kept trying in the
seventh. Senior Tyler Ditto
got aboard on an infield hit
between the mound and sec-
ond base and then scored as
sophomore Troy Warnecke
waxed a double to left center.
However, Russell then set
down the next three hitters to
end the contest.
“I told the guys after that it
will hurt but that will go away;
when you come so close and
don’t finish, it does hurt,”
Metzger added. “However,
I told them that before they
left the field to look back
at what they accomplished,
especially the eight seniors.
In their four years, we won
our first-ever MAC title this
year, three district titles, a
regional runner-up last year,
our first-ever regional title
and first time ever at state
baseball this year. I am so
proud of what this team did.”
ST. JOHN’S (2)
ab-r-h-rbi
Tanner Calvelage cf 3-1-0-0, Tyler
Bergfeld ss 3-0-0-0, Jordan Leininger rf/p
3-0-2-1, Austin Vogt 1b 3-0-1-0, Chris
Pohlman dh 3-0-1-0, Tyler Ditto lf/rf 3-1-
1-0, Troy Warnecke 3b/2b 3-0-1-1, Ryan
Edelbrock 2b 2-0-0-0, Ryan Densel lf
1-0-0-0, Curtis Geise p/3b 3-0-0-0. Totals
27-2-6-2.
NEW MIDDLETOWN SPRINGFIELD
ab-r-h-rbi
Cory Ritzo ss 3-1-1-1, Joe Ohlin 2b
2-1-1-0, Ronnie Bovo c 3-2-2-3, Nick
Russell p 4-0-2-1, Chris Bishard pr 0-0-
0-0, Brad Ferraro cf 3-1-0-0, Jake Noble
1b 3-0-1-2, Jason Horn lf 3-0-1-0, Joe
Caraballo pr 0-1-0-0, Mike Buchenic 3b
3-1-1-0, Anthony Yoder rf 1-2-1-0. Totals
25-9-10-7.
Score by Innings:
St. John’s 1 0 0 0 0 01 - 2
Springfield 3 0 0 3 3 0 x - 9
E: Leininger, Noble; LOB: St. John’s
5, New Middletown Springfield 5; 2B:
Leininger, Vogt, Warnecke, Ohlin, Bovo,
Noble; 3B: Russell; Sac: Ohlin; SF: Ritzo;
SB: Calvelage, Leininger; POB: Bishard
(by Leininger).
IP H R ER BB SO
ST. JOHN’S
Geise (L, 5-1) 4.0 7 6 6 2 4
Leininger 2.0 3 3 0 0 0
NEW MIDDLETOWN SPRINGFIELD
Russell (W, 8-0) 7.0 6 2 2 1 6
WP: Russell 2, Leininger; HBP: Bovo (by
Geise), Ferraro (by Geise).
Nathan Miller Memorial Baseball
Tournament starts tonight
Blue Jays fall in state semis
Senior first baseman, Austin Vogt, stretches out to
secure the throw from SS Ty Bergfeld to end the first
inning.
Senior Jordan Leininger sends a shot to deep center for
a ground-rule double in the 6th inning.
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
There aren’t many Tri-
County track and field perform-
ers in the Division II and I ranks
heading to the 2011 State Track
and Field Championships.
On the boys side, Van
Wert’s Jared Fleming enters
the Division II 1,600-meter run
(app. 1:55 Saturday) ranked 4th
(4:20.92), while Sam Prakel of
Versailles is 15th (4:29.16).
Among other area entrants
running in the 4x8 final at 1:30
p.m. today, the Versailles crew
(Tyler Knapke, Sam Prakel,
Sam Subler, Damian Winner)
crew stands 10th coming in
(8:06.35), while Bath (Tommy
Mault, Colin Bishop, Cory
Lee, Ryan Schadewald) is last
(8:14.37).
In the field event finals
(9 a.m.) are Derron Prichett
of Defiance, 4th in the long
jump (22-3.50); Tim Weaver
of Versailles, fifth in the pole
vault (14-0); and Kenton’s
Maty Mauk, 7th in the long
jump (21-11.50).
In the prelims (2 p.m.
today) are the Kenton foursome
(Dustin Howell, Mauk, Max
Morrison, Andrew Tillman),
12th (43.68) in the 4x100;
and a number of Versailles
performers: Damian Winner,
1st (49.00) in the 400-meter
dash; the 400 relay (Knapke,
Chad Winner, Prakel, Damian
Winner), 3rd (3:22.63); Prakel
7th (1:56.17) in the 800 run and
teammate James Wilker 15th in
the 300 hurdles (40.26).
On the girls side, Van
Wert’s Sydney Riethman
will be in long jump finals 9
a.m. Saturday — the lone Tri-
County girl at state in Division
II — ranked tied for sixth (17-
4.50), while Lakesha Young of
Defiance is 10th (17-1).
Young is also in Friday’s
100-meter dash prelims ranked
4th (12.28) and the 200 dash
8th (25.85), Jocelyn Ayers of
Bath is 11th in the 200 (26.08)
and Alonda Benton of Shawnee
is 9th (12.50).
Benton is part of the Lady
Indians’ 400-meter relay in
the prelims (Maegan Redick,
Morgan Redick, Asher Roberts)
rated 8th (49.78). Those three,
with leadoff Victoria Beverly,
are 8th in the 800-meter relay
(1:44.14).
Shawnee’s 1,600 relay
(Beverly, Mo. Redick, Roberts,
Emily Wolery) is 8th (4:00.26),
while Asher is 8th in the 400
dash (58.46) — Defiance’s
Samantha Murray is 3rd (57.11)
— and Beverly 7th in the 300
hurdles (44.76). Celina’s Lexi
Mills is 11th in that event
(45.33).
Mills is the second leg of
the Lady Bulldog 1,600 relay
(Hannah Fleck, Gina Strable,
Michaela Wenning) that is 5th
(3:59.58), while Fleck is 4th in
the 800 (2:16.44) and anchors
the 7th-rated 4x800 (Michaela
Wenning, Andrea Bell, Ashley
Coon) that is in Friday’s 1:30
p.m. finals (9:33.84).
Teammate Liz Carr is tied
for 3rd with 2 others at 5-3 in
the high jump (Friday final).
St. Marys Memorial’s
Mekayla Breland is fifth in the
shot pout (41-0) and 12th in the
discus (118-10).
Defiance has two more in
the meet: Sonya Yarnell, tied
for 2nd with 2 others at 10-10
in the pole vault; and Brooke
Lime, 6th in the 100 hurdles
(14.77).
Coldwater’s Christina Seas
stands 8th in the 3,200-meter
run (11:17.56).
There is one Lima Senior
entrant in the Division I event,
the boys high jump: Adrian
Hutchins, whose 6-5 mark
stands tied for fifth with three
others.
Two Cougars at State
Track and Field meet
Tom Morris photos
BY JAIME ARON
The Associated Press
MIAMI — Down by 15.
Only 7:14 left. On the road.
Headed toward an 0-2 deficit
in the NBA finals against a
Miami Heat team ready to
be crowned NBA champi-
ons since LeBron James and
Chris Bosh joined Dwyane
Wade last summer.
It’s pretty remarkable that
the Mavericks overcame it
all to win the game and even
the series.
It’s also pretty typical of
what they’ve done this post-
season.
“If you’re going to win a
championship, you’ve got to
have the wherewithal to hang
in when things are tough,”
Mavs coach Rick Carlisle
said. “You have to keep
believing. All year our guys
have believed. And tonight
was another good example.”
Annoyed by Wade cele-
brating a 3-pointer in front of
the Dallas bench, Jason Terry
scored six straight points to
get the Mavericks going.
They wound up outscor-
ing the Heat 22-5 down the
stretch, with Dirk Nowitzki
scoring their final nine points.
The winner came on a layup
using his injured left hand,
giving Dallas a 95-93 victory
that will grow in lore should
the Mavs wind up winning
their first NBA title.
“You have to be a lit-
tle lucky, but we kept on
plugging,” Nowitzki said.
“We kept believing,
kept playing off each
other.”
Dallas pulled off
the biggest comeback
win in an NBA finals
since Michael Jordan
and the Bulls wiped
out a similar 15-point
deficit in Game 6 of
the 1992 series, beat-
ing Portland to close
out their second title.
For the Mavericks,
this was their biggest
comeback win in ...
10 days.
That was the night the
Mavs wiped out a 15-point
deficit with 5:06 left to beat
the Thunder in Oklahoma
City in Game 4 of the confer-
ence finals.
Three weeks before that,
they’d erased a 16-point,
third-quarter deficit to beat
the Lakers in Los Angeles.
A few days before that,
they bounced back from a
12-point deficit to beat the
Trail Blazers in Portland to
close out their first-round
series.
So during a timeout fol-
lowing Wade’s 3, the Mavs
sloughed off the first 7½
quarters they’d played in
the NBA finals and thought
back to how they got this far.
Carlisle specifically brought
up Oklahoma City, pointing
out that there were an extra
2 minutes to polish off this
comeback.
“We continued to keep
faith in ourselves, grinded it
out and got it done,”
Terry said.
Without the
spectacular finish,
the story for Dallas
would’ve been
squandering a nine-
point lead with 3:22
left in the first half
and James on the
bench with three
fouls.
The Mavs repeat-
edly sent the Heat to
the foul line, wound
up tied at halftime,
then provided turnover after
turnover to fuel a Miami
rally early in the third quar-
ter. Dallas hung tough for a
while, then found itself trail-
ing 88-73 when Wade made
the 3 in front of the Dallas
bench.
Fans anticipated some-
thing big happening on that
play because they already
were on their feet before
Wade even got the ball. As
they erupted in cheers, he
stayed in the corner holding
his hand in a follow-through
pose a little longer than the
Mavericks thought he should
have.
Some guys didn’t see it
— or said they didn’t. Those
that did made it clear that the
play sparked them.
“We were definitely
frustrated,” center Tyson
Chandler said. “When you’ve
got a guy celebrating in front
of your bench, when you’re
down 15 with 7 minutes to
go, you’re like, ‘The game
isn’t over.’ That’s all we said
on the bench. ‘Listen, I don’t
care what they think, the
game isn’t over.’”
Terry went scoreless in
the second half of the open-
er, and was a miserable 4
of 16 for the series. Being
covered by James was part
of his problem. Terry also
was fighting a wrist injury
sustained when James fouled
him on a dunk attempt early
in Game 1.
Down the stretch, Terry
made an adjustment suggest-
ed by Jason Kidd that helped
free him for some open space.
He started the winning rally
with a jumper, a layup and a
pair of free throws, all com-
ing in less than a minute. He
made another jumper with
3:11 left to put Dallas within
90-86.
Terry finished with 16
points, five assists, two steals
and a huge smile. It was
especially sweet for him to
stick it to the Heat, their fans
and Wade because he and
Nowitzki are the only play-
ers left from the 2006 Mavs
who blew the finals by los-
ing three straight games in
Miami — a meltdown that
began with Dallas blowing
a 13-point lead in the fourth
quarter of Game 3.
There’s no telling what
this result might do.
“Each finals, there’s
going to be a turning point,
a moment, so to speak,”
Terry said. “And tonight the
moment was ours.”
Mavericks erase double-digit road deficit — again
BY DAVE CAMPBELL
The Associated Press
The summer has begun, and
the NFL and its locked-out play-
ers still lack an agreement to
guarantee games will be played
in 2011.
Urgency is apparent, but just
how close the situation can or
will get to the delay, alteration or
cancellation of the preseason —
or more — remains to be seen.
Both sides finished three
straight days of not-so-secret
negotiations Thursday near
Chicago, before the contingents
made their way to St. Louis. The
8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
is holding a pivotal hearing tody
in the nearly three-month work
stoppage, determining whether
the lockout itself is legal after
U.S. District Judge Susan
Richard Nelson in Minnesota
ruled April 25 it wasn’t.
Lawyer Paul Clement will
argue the case in court for the
NFL. Several players are expect-
ed to attend the hearing in sup-
port of the other side.
As the three-judge panel takes
today’s arguments under advise-
ment, having already ruled 2-1
to put a stay on Nelson’s order
and keep the lockout in place
through the appeal process, the
start of training camps is creep-
ing closer.
“We can’t just go from
where we are now and jump into
games. There has to at least be
an abbreviated training camp to
get us somewhat prepared for
the season. If not, there are going
to be a lot of injuries,” said free
agent offensive tackle Damien
Woody, who last played for the
New York Jets.
After NFL, players meet,
both sides back in court
PITSENBARGER
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234 N. Canal St.
Delphos, O.
Ph. 692-1010
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11260 Elida Road
DELPHOS, OH 45833
Ph. 692-0055
Toll Free 1-800-589-7876
HARTER
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HOME
209 W. 3rd St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
419-692-8055
130 N. MAIN ST.
DELPHOS
PHONE
419-692-0861
•CARPET
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Daily 9-5:30
Sat. 9-4, Sun. 12-4
Vanamatic
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AUTOMATIC
AND HAND
SCREW MACHINE
PRODUCTS
701 Ambrose Drive
Delphos, O.
A.C.T.S.
NEW TESTAMENT FELLOWSHIP
Rev. Linda Wannemacher-Pastor
Jaye Wannemacher-Worship Leader
Contact: 419-695-3566
Sunday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study with
worship @ ACTS Chapel-8277 German
Rd., Delphos
Thursday - 7:00 p.m. “For Such A
Time As This” All & Non Denominational
Tri-County Community Intercessory
Prayer Meeting @ Presbyterian Church
(Basement), 310 W. 2nd St. Delphos -
Everyone Welcome.
DELPHOS BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Terry McKissack
302 N Main, Delphos
Contact: 419-692-0061 or 419-302-6423
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School
(All Ages) , 11:00 a.m. Sunday Service,
6:00 p.m Sunday Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study,
Youth Study
Nursery available for all services.
FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN
310 W. Second St.
419-692-5737
Pastor Harry Tolhurst
Sermon: “Gone--But Not Forgotten”
Scripture: I Peter 4:12-14; 5:6-11
and John 17:1-11
Sunday - 11:00 Worship Service
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
422 North Pierce St., Delphos
Phone 419-695-2616
Rev. Angela Khabeb
7th SUNDAY OF EASTER
Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship Service
with Holy Communion
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Mid-Week
Worship Service
Thursday - 4:30 p.m. Supper’s on
Us at Trinity United Methodist Church
(workers - 3:30 pm)
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
“Where Jesus is Healing
Hurting Hearts!”
808 Metbliss Ave., Delphos
One block south of Stadium Park.
419-692-6741
Senior Pastor - Dan Eaton
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. - Sunday wor-
ship Celebration @10:30am with Kids
Chruch & Nursery provided; 6:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry at The ROC
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Prayer
Other ministries take place at vari-
ous times. Check out www.delphos-
firstassemblyofgod.com.
DELPHOS CHRISTIAN UNION
Pastor: Rev. Gary Fish
470 S. Franklin St., (419) 692-9940
9:30 Sunday School
10:30 Sunday morning service.
Youth ministry every Wednesday
from 6-8 p.m.
Children’s ministry every third
Saturday from 11 to 1:30.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED METHODIST
335 S. Main St. Delphos
Pastor - Rev. David Howell
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship Service.
DELPHOS WESLEYAN CHURCH
11720 Delphos Southworth Rd.
Delphos - Phone 419-695-1723
Pastor Wayne Prater
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Worship; 9:15
a.m. Sunday School for all ages.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Service and
prayer meeting.
TRINITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
211 E. Third St., Delphos
Rev. David Howell, Pastor
Week of June 5, 2011
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. Worship Service;
9:15 a.m. Adult Sunday School Class;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service/Communion;
11:30 a.m. Radio Worship on WDOH;
Conference at Lakeside
Monday - 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm Speech
Therapy; Conference at Lakeside
Tuesday- 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm Speech
Therapy; 6:00 p.m Weight Watchers
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible
Study
HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Independent Fundamental)
Rt. 81 and Defiance Trial
Rt. 2, Box 11550
Spencerville 45887
Rev. Robert King, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday school;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 7:00 p.m.
Evening worship and Teens Alive
(grades 7-12).
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible ser-
vice.
Tuesday & Thursday– 7- 9 p.m.
Have you ever wanted to preach the
“Word of God?” This is your time to
do it. Come share your love of Christ
with us.
IMMANUEL UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
699 Sunnydale, Elida, Ohio 454807
Pastor Gary Rode
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. traditional; 10:45
a.m. contemporary
LIGHT OF LIFE CHAPEL
4680 North Kemp Rd., Elida
Pastor Kimberly R. Pope-Seiberling
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Service; 6:30 p.m. Service.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Midweek
Service.
NEW HOPE CHRISTIAN CENTER
2240 Baty Road, Elida Ph. 339-5673
Rev. James F. Menke, Pastor
Sunday – 10 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday – 7 p.m. Evening ser-
vice.
CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
2701 Dutch Hollow Rd. Elida
Phone: 339-3339
Rev. Frank Hartman
Sunday - 10 a.m. Sunday School (all
ages); 11 a.m. Morning Service; 6 p.m.
Evening Service.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer
Meeting.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday,
8-noon, 1-4- p.m.
ZION UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Corner of Zion Church & Conant Rd.,
Elida
Pastors: Mark and D.J. Fuerstenau
Sunday - Service - 9:00 a.m.
PIKE MENNONITE CHURCH
3995 McBride Rd., Elida
Phone 419-339-3961
LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH OF GOD
Elida - Ph. 222-8054
Rev. Larry Ayers, Pastor
Service schedule: Sunday– 10 a.m.
School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 6
p.m. Sunday evening.
FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH
4750 East Road, Elida
Pastor - Brian McManus
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship, nursery avail-
able.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Youth
Prayer, Bible Study; 7:00 p.m. Adult
Prayer and Bible Study; 8:00 p.m. -
Choir.
GOMER UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
7350 Gomer Road, Gomer, Ohio
419-642-2681
gomererucc@bright.net
Rev. Brian Knoderer
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship
CALVARY EVANGELICAL CHURCH
10686 Van Wert-Decatur Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio
419-238-9426
Rev. Clark Williman. Pastor
Sunday, June 5, 2011
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Sunday School
LIVE; 9:55 a.m. 5 til 10 meet you at
the Altar; 10:00 a.m. Worship LIVE-
Graduation
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Calvary
YOUTH

SALEM UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
15240 Main St. Venedocia
Rev. Wendy S. Pratt, Pastor
Church Phone: 419-667-4142
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. - Adult Bell
Choir; 8:45 a.m. Jr. Choir; 9:30
a.m. - Worship; 10:45 a.m. - Sunday
school; 6:30 p.m. - Capital Funds
Committee.
Monday - 6 p.m. Senior Choir.
ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
601 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Sunday 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.;
Monday 8:30 a.m.; Tuesday 7 p.m.;
Wednesday 8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30
a.m. - Communion Service; Friday
8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.
VAN WERT VICTORY
CHURCH OF GOD
10698 US 127S., Van Wert
(Next to Tracy’s Auction Service)
Darryl Ramey, Lead Pastor
Chuck Brantley, Executive Pastor
Bryce Cadawallader, Youth
& Assimilations Director
Sunday - 10:00 am Worship Service
& Children’s Ministry
www.vanwertvictorychurch.com
www.acoolchurch.com
419-232-HOPE
TRINITY LUTHERAN
303 S. Adams, Middle Point
Rev. Tom Cover
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship service.
GRACE FAMILY CHURCH
634 N. Washington St., Van Wert
Pastor: Rev. Ron Prewitt
Sunday - 9:15 a.m. Morning wor-
ship with Pulpit Supply.
KINGSLEY UNITED METHODIST
15482 Mendon Rd., Van Wert
Phone: 419-965-2771
Pastor Chuck Glover
Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.; Worship
- 10:25 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Prayer and
Bible Study - 6:30 p.m.
Adult Prayer meeting - 7:00 p.m.
Choir practice - 8:00 p.m.
TRINITY FRIENDS CHURCH
605 N. Franklin St., Van Wert 45891
Ph: (419) 238-2788
Sr. Pastor Stephen Savage
Outreach Pastor Neil Hammons
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. - Prayer time;
9:00 a.m. Worship, Sunday School,
SWAT, Nursery; Single; 10:30 a.m.
Worship, Nursery, Children’s Church,
Discipleship class; Noon - Lunch
Break; 2:00 p.m. Service for men
at Van Wert Correctional Fac.; 3:00
p.m. Service for women at Van Wert
Correctional Fac., Service at Paulding
jail
Tuesday - 1:00 p.m. - Share, Care,
Prayer Group in Fireside Room;
10-noon - Banquet Table Food
Pantry; 6:30 p.m. Quilting Friends
in Fellowship Hall; 7 p.m. B.R.E.A.L.
Women’s group in Room 108.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Small
groups, Discipleship Series in sanc-
tuary, Christian Life Club, Nursery,
Preschool; 7 p.m. R.O.C.K. Youth; 8
p.m. Worship Team rehearsal.
Thursday - 4-5:30 p.m. Banquet
Table Food Pantry.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
13887 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Ph. 419-238-0333
Children’s Storyline: 419-238-2201
Email: fbaptvw@bright.net
Pastor Steven A. Robinson
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Family Worship
Hour; 6:30 p.m. Evening Bible Hour.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Word of Life
Student Ministries; 6:45 p.m. AWANA;
7:00 p.m. Prayer and Bible Study.
MANDALE CHURCH OF CHRIST
IN CHRISTIAN UNION
Rev. Don Rogers, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
all ages. 10:30 a.m. Worship
Services; 7:00 p.m Worship.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer meet-
ing.
PENTECOSTAL WAY CHURCH
Pastors: Bill Watson
Rev. Ronald Defore
1213 Leeson Ave., Van Wert 45891
Phone (419) 238-5813
Head Usher: Ted Kelly
10:00 a.m. - Sunday School 11:10
a.m. - Worship 10:00 a.m. until 11:30
a.m. - Wednesday Morning Bible Class
6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. - Wednesday
Evening Prayer Meeting
7:00 p.m. - Wed. Night Bible
Study.
Thursday - Choir Rehearsal
Anchored in Jesus Prayer Line -
(419) 238-4427 or (419) 232-4379.
Emergency - (419) 993-5855
ZION CHRISTIAN UNION CHURCH
3025 Converse-Roselm Rd,
Grover Hill
Rev. Mark McKay, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service;
10:30 a.m. Junior Church.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Bible Study,
Prayer Service; 7 p.m. Youth
Meeting.
FAITH MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Road U, Rushmore
Pastor Robert Morrison
Sunday – 10 am Church School;
11:00 Church Service; 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Evening
Service
ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA
CATHOLIC CHURCH
512 W. Sycamore, Col. Grove
Office 419-659-2263
Fax: 419-659-5202
Fr. Tom Oedy
Masses: Tuesday-Friday - 8:00 a.m.;
First Friday of the month - 7 p.m.;
Saturday - 4:30 p.m.; Sunday - 8:30
a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Confessions - Saturday 3:30 p.m.,
anytime by appointment.
CHURCH OF GOD
18906 Rd. 18R, Rimer
419-642-5264 Fax: 419-642-3061
Rev. Mark Walls
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Rev. Robert DeSloover, Pastor
7359 St. Rt. 109 New Cleveland
Saturday Mass - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass - 8:30 a.m.
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Ottoville
Rev. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday - 4 p.m.;
Sunday - 10:30 a.m.

ST. BARBARA CHURCH
160 Main St., Cloverdale 45827
419-488-2391
Fr. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday 5:30 p.m.,
Sunday 8:00 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH
135 N. Water St., Ft. Jennings
Rev. Joe Przybysz
Phone: 419-286-2132
Mass schedule: Saturday 5 p.m.;
Sunday 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL CHURCH
Kalida
Fr. Mark Hoying
Saturday – 4:30 p.m. Mass.
Sunday – 8:00 a.m. & 10:00 a.m.
Masses.
Weekdays: Masses on Mon., Tues.,
Wed. and Friday at 8:00 am; Thurs.
7:30 p.m.
Meeting; 7:00 p.m. Outreach Committee;
Conference at Lakeside
Wednesday-Conference at Lakeside
Thursday - Conference at Lakeside;
4:30 p.m-6:30 p.m. Suppers on Us
Friday-6:00 p.m. Wedding Rehearsal
Saturday - 1:30 p.m. Kylee Looser/Joe
Harrmann Wedding
MARION BAPTIST CHURCH
2998 Defiance Trail, Delphos
Pastor Jay Lobach 419-339-6319
Services: Sunday - 11:00 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.; Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
331 E. Second St., Delphos
419-695-4050
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Rev. Jacob Gordon, Asst. Pastor
Fred Lisk and Dave Ricker, Deacons
Mary Beth Will, Liturgical
Coordinator; Mrs. Trina Shultz, Pastoral
Associate. Mel Rode, Parish Council
President
Celebration of the Sacraments
Eucharist – Lord’s Day Observance;
Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 7:30, 9:15,
11:30 a.m.; Weekdays as announced on
Sunday bulletin.
Baptism – Celebrated first Sunday
of month at 1:30 p.m. Call rectory to
schedule Pre-Baptismal instructions.
Reconciliation – Tuesday and
Friday 7:30-7:50 a.m.; Saturday 3:30-
4:00 p.m. Anytime by request.
Matrimony – Arrangements must be
made through the rectory six months
in advance.
Anointing of the Sick – Communal
celebration in May and October.
Administered upon request.
ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH
Landeck - Phone: 419-692-0636
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Administrative aide: Rita Suever
Masses: 8:30 a.m. Sunday.
Sacrament of Reconciliation:
Saturday.
Newcomers register at parish.
Marriages: Please call the parish
house six months in advance.
Baptism: Please call the parish.
ST. PATRICK’S CHURCH
500 S. Canal, Spencerville
419-647-6202
Saturday - 4:30 p.m. Reconciliation;
5 p.m. Mass, May 1 - Oct. 30. Sunday -
10:30 a.m. Mass.
SPENCERVILLE FULL GOSPEL
107 Broadway St., Spencerville
Pastor Charles Muter
Home Ph. 419-657-6019
Sunday: Morning Services - 10:00
a.m. Evening Services - 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday: 7:00 p.m. Worship ser-
vice.
AMANDA BAPTIST CHURCH
Back to Christ’s Ministry
Conant Road & SR. 117
Ph. 647-5100 - Rev. Mike Decker
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship &
Fellowship. Wednesday – 6-9 p.m.
Bible Study.
SPENCERVILLE CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
317 West North St. - 419-296-2561
Pastor Tom Shobe
9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30
a.m. Morning Worship; 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST
Corner of Fourth & Main, Spencerville
Phone 419-647-5321
Rev. Jan Johnson, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship service.
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
Spencerville
Rev. Ron Shifley, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Church School;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
AGAPE FELLOWSHIP MINISTRIES
9250 Armstrong Road, Spencerville
Pastors Phil & Deb Lee
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Worship ser-
vice.
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sPEnCErVillE
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www.delphosherald.com The Herald —7 Friday, June 3, 2011
Moral Bravery and Wisdom
B
ravery is knowing the right thing to do and
doing it willingly in the face of considerable
risk, and even fear, with the full knowledge
of the risk. It is not fearlessness; being fearless in the
face of danger is reckless or foolhardy and a man who
does what he knows to be the right thing despite his
fear is undoubtedly braver than the man who feels no
fear. Many a brave soldier or firefighter has faced a hail
of bullets or gone in to a burning building with great
fear in his or her heart, but knowing it was the right
thing to do. We usually think of bravery as involving
physical risk such as injury or death, but there is also
moral bravery, where we risk humiliation or the nega-
tive judgement of our friends, family or colleagues.
For example, speaking an unpleasant but necessary
truth, such as telling someone that what they are doing
is wrong, as in blowing the whistle on illegal prac-
tices in the workplace. Doing the right thing frequently
requires courage, because we are not always rewarded,
and may even be punished or ostracized for doing so.
St. Thomas Aquinas considered bravery to be crucial
for the virtuous life precisely because a kind of moral
or psychological courage is often necessary to carry
out the other virtues. The good life requires fortitude
and endurance because it is sometimes a long and hard
journey, and one brave act does not make one brave.
W
isdom is a quality that is hard to define,
though we usually know it when we
see it, and almost always recognize its
absence, which is folly. While it is often associated in
literature with bearded, white-haired gurus who give
sage advice, wisdom is essentially about having good
judgement and perspective. Older people seem to have
it simply because they have had more experiences,
and they have been through the trials and tribulations
of a long life. We sometimes say that young people
are “wise beyond their years,” but in reality no one
who has not weathered the storms of time can truly
be wise. But is it necessary to have suffered through
sickness or the deaths of loved ones and various
misfortunes to gain a deeper perspective on life, or
do the ordinary stresses of a challenging career and
relationships suffice to give one the necessary per-
spective that is considered wisdom? It is reported that
Freud was once asked what a normal healthy person
should be able to do, and he answered “to love and to
work.” Perhaps the growth and maturity that comes
from a life of loving and working is enough for most
of us to develop that intangible quality we call wisdom.
Happy is the man who finds wisdom,
and the man who gains understanding.
New K.J.V. Proverbs 3:13
I have fought the good fight,
I have finished the race,
I have kept the faith.
New K.J.V. 2 Timothy 4:7
8 – The Herald Friday, June 3, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
ElwerLawnCare.com
Visit website for photos
and details of services
(419) 235-3708
❍ Lawn Maintenance
❍ Lawn Treatments
❍ Mulch Installation
❍ Shrub Trimming
❍ New Landscapes
❍ New Lawn Installs
❍ Retaining Walls
❍ Bulk Compost
❍ Bulk Mulch
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
21 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•FALL CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
950 Tree Service
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Joe Wickey
Construction
• Pole Barns • Siding • Windows
• Roof Replaements
• Foundations
• Barn Restoration • Additions
• Remodel Old Houses
• Basements • New Houses
260-849-1749
6861 S. 300 E.
Berne, IN 46711
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Electricians
RETIRED LICENSED
ELECTRICIAN NEEDS
TO STAY BUSY
RESIDENTAL &
COMMERCIAL
WIRING
WELDING
ED PAXTON
419-230-0155
950 Lawn Care
TOP SOIL
COMPOST
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
Delivery Available
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
JR Construction
Amish Crew
260-580-5289
Will do siding, roofing,
garages, pole barns,
foundations,
replacement windows
redo old barns
419-733-6309
AMISH CREW
31 years experience • reference
• Framing • Siding • Roofing
• Remodeling • Garages
Attention Farmers
• Pole Barns
• Painting • New Barns
• Repair Work
• Clean Fence Rows
• Ditch Banks
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
Hohlbein’s
Ph. 419-339-4938
or 419-230-8128
30%
TAX REBATE
ON WINDOWS
Windows, Doors,
Siding, Roofing,
Sunrooms,
Kitchens & Bathroom
Remodeling,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
Home
Improvement
New & Used
Notebook & Tower
COMPUTERS
Computer repair
since 1993
GERDEMAN’S TV
207 S. Main St.
Delphos 419-692-5831
email: dangerd@wcoil.com
950 Miscellaneous
TNT
ASPHALT
PAVING &
SEAL COATING
567-825-2157
Commercial-Residential
FREE ESTIMATES
SENIOR DISCOUNTS
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
GOLD
CANYON
CANDLES
Gina Fox
419-236-4134
www.candlesbygina.com
The world’s finest candles,
candle scents, home decor.
Ask how to earn for FREE
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
Service
AT YOUR
Advertise
Your
Business
DAILY
For a low,
low price!
To advertise call
419-695-0015
IS YOUR
AD HERE?
Call today
419-695-0015
CNC LATHE/MILL
OPERATORS
Unverferth Manufacturing, an established agricultural
equipment manufacturer, located in Kalida, Ohio, is expanding
operations and has immediate 2nd shift openings for experi-
enced CNC Lathe and Mill Operators.
Requirements include:
• High School Diploma or equivalent
• 2 years of prior manufacturing experience with solid atten-
dance record
• Fanuc or Mazak control experience
• Ability to work flexible assignments, shifts and overtime
Unverferth Mfg. provides an industry leading benefit pack-
age and wages that are commensurate with an individual’s
skills and previous work experience. For consideration please
forward a copy of your resume, wage and benefit require-
ments, and references to:
An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/H/V
Drug Screening Required
E-mail: careers@unverferth.com
www.unverferth.com
Unverferth Mfg. Co., Inc.
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box 357 • Kalida, OH 45853
MANUFACTURING ENGINEER
With continuing growth, Unverferth Manufacturing is
seeking an experienced engineering professional for this new
position. This individual will be responsible for assisting in the
coordination of product design and development as it pertains to
overall manufacturability. Daily duties and functions will include
process and product design, review of tooling, fixtures and
process flow. In addition, this person will also be responsible for
implementation and maintenance of quality assurance programs
and procedures.
Qualified candidates will have a BS degree in Manufactur-
ing, Mechanical, Industrial Engineering, or a related discipline
and have prior experience working with manufacturing and
quality control processes, preferably with agricultural or heavy
equipment.
Unverferth Manufacturing is a family owned agricultural
equipment manufacturer based in Kalida, Ohio, and provides an
industry-leading benefit package and competitive salary com-
mensurate with an individual’s skills and previous work experi-
ence. For consideration, please forward a copy of your resume,
wage and benefit requirements and references to:
An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/H/V
Drug Screening Required
E-mail: careers@unverferth.com
www.unverferth.com
Unverferth Mfg. Co., Inc.
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box 357 • Kalida, OH 45853
NOTICE OF EXAMINATION
The Delphos Civil Service Commission will be
conducting an open examination for the position of
DISPATCHER in the Delphos Police Department. The
examination will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday,
June 22, 2011. It will take place in the Jefferson High
School library. A grade of 70% is required to success-
fully pass the examination. The passing scores will
also serve as an eligibility list. This eligibility list shall
be valid for a period of one year.
CLASSIFICATION
POSITION: Dispatcher, Delphos Police Depart-
ment
STARTING SALARY: $16.67/Hour
HOURS: 40 hours per week, 2nd Shift (4p.m.-
Midnight)
BENEFITS: Sick leave, vacation, health insurance
BENEFICIAL QUALIFICATIONS: Office skills,
communication skills, computer skills.
You may be required to pass a physical examina-
tion, psychological examination, a background check,
drug screening examination and any other examina-
tion that would be required by the City of Delphos Po-
lice Department. The candidate must reside in Allen
or Van Wert County or a county contiguous to Allen or
Van Wert.
Applications and job descriptions can be obtained
at the Municipal Building between the hours of 9:00
a.m. and 3:00 p.m., Monday through Friday beginning
June 6 through June 10, 2011.
All applications must be mailed to: The Delphos
Civil Service Commission, P.O. Box 45, Delphos, Ohio
45833. All applications must have a postmark of no
later than Friday, June 17, 2011. Any applications
which are postmarked after this date shall be consid-
ered invalid and will not be accepted.
Applicants, on the night of the examination, you
must bring a valid Ohio Driver’s license and proof of
military service, if applicable. must bring a valid Ohio
Driver’s license and proof of military service, if appli-
cable.
SCHRADER
REALTY LLC
“Put your dreams in our hands”
www.schraderrealty.net
202 N. Washington Street
Delphos, OH 45833
Office: 419-692-2249
Fax: 419-692-2205
DELPHOS. Beautiful
newer ranch home
with open floor plan,
3 BR, 2 BA, large
kitchen, 2 car garage,
961 Southridge Dr.
basement. Call Stephanie Clemons for an appt. 419-234-0940
NEW
LISTING
in print & online www.delphosherald.com
Call 419-695-0015
out with the old.
in with the new.
Sell it in The Delphos Herald’s
CLASSIFIEDS
Cash in on your collectibles with the Classifieds.
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
LOOKING FOR a con-
crete laborer who has ex-
perience with concrete
construction as well as
forming and finishing con-
crete, clean drivers license
and CDL a plus. Pay de-
pending on experience.
Benefits. Send resume to:
Friedrich Concrete Con-
tracting
20701 St. Rt. 697
Delphos, OH 45833
or Call 419-968-2095 and
leave a message.
SUMMER HELP for bail-
ing hay & straw. Call
(419)692-9830
Would you like to be an
in-home child care pro -
vider? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
NEW, QUEEN pillow-top
mattress, never used, still
sealed in original wrapper.
$75. Call (260)749-6100.
340

Garage Sales
279 WAYNE St., Ottoville
Thurs., Fri., Sat.
9am-6pm
WII games, game con-
soles, adult clothing, boys
clothes 18mo.- 5-6, baby
items, corn hole games, &
misc.
333 S. Pierce St.
Fri. 9-6
Sat. 9-?
Baby clothes, car seat,
stroller, clothes, sax, gui -
tar, 43”TV, student desk,
paint ball guns, lots of
misc.
406 N. Scott St.
Thurs. 3-7
Fri. 9-5
Sat. 9-11
Boys clothes 0-3T, toys,
cradle, microwave stand,
Singer sewing machine,
plus size maternity,
scrubs & misc.
340

Garage Sales
433 S. Pierce St., Delphos
Saturday 8am-?
Huge garage sale. Piano,
couch, TV’s, Queen size
bed, playpen, highchair,
stroller, lots of toys and
clothes of all ages!!
509 CAROLYN Dr.
Fri. 9-5
Sat. 9-?
Bathroom vanity, sink,
medicine cabinet, banquet
table, clothes, lots of misc.
904 S. Erie St., Delphos
Thurs. 12:30- 4:30
Fri. 8-4, Sat. 10-2
Boys & girls clothes,
shoes, adul t cl othes,
dresses, washing ma -
chine, electric treadmill,
toy’s sweeper’s stroloer,
high chair, low prices.
925 FT. Jennings Rd.
Friday only 8am-8pm
Household items, furni-
ture, toddler boys clothes.
9845 HARRIS Rd.
(off Dogleg or Conant Rd)
Thurs.-Sat. 9am-5pm
Living room set, roll-top
desk, vanity, many house-
hold craft and holidy
items, girl’s 4-6, boy’s 2-4
clothes.
BIG 3 Family Sale
1300 S. Bredeick St.,
(back lane)
Thurs., Fri. 8:30- 7:30pm
Sat. 8:30-1:00pm
2004 Coleman “model
Utah” fold down camper.
3-foot controlled electric
trolling motors, fishing
lures and other equip -
ment. Treadmill, furniture,
and much, much more.
LARGE SALE
2255 N. Kemp Rd.
Friday & Sat. 9-?
Tools, bikes, weights &
bench, furniture, guns,
camping equipment, an-
tiques, railroad stuff, nice
adult clothes. Lots of misc.
and household items.
MOVING SALE!
627 N. Scott
June 3 & 4
9am-5pm
Furniture, girls clothes, an-
tiques, knick-knacks, lots
of misc.
340

Garage Sales
MULTI FAMILY Sale
Fri. & Sat. June 3-4,
9am-5pm
615 Jennings St.,
alley behind house.
Recliners, couch, futon,
TVs and stands, baby
items, boys 0-3T, exercise
equip., headboards and
bed frame, apple and sea-
shell decor fridge, micro-
wave. Many misc. items
and decor.
590

House For Rent
2 OR 3 BR House
with attached garage.
Available immediately!
Call 419-692-3951.
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BR Apt. for Rent
Stove & Refrigerator in-
cluded. $330/mo. Includes
water. Call (419)203-6810.
1BR APT for rent, appli-
ances, electric heat, laun-
dry room, No pets.
$400/month, plus deposit,
water included. 320 N.
Jefferson. 419-852-0833.
2 BR, 1 BA, Apt. at Ka-
lida Golf Course. Garage.
W/D Hook-up. No pets.
419-302-7724
620

Duplex For Rent
413 E. 8th, brick 2BDRM,
appliances, curtains, lawn
care, no pets. Lease opp-
t i onal 419-236-9301,
419-692-7441
800

House For Sale
502 S Pearl,
Spencerville
“0” down, “0” closing cost,
home warranty, and free
appl i ances. Sever al
homes to choose from in
Van Wert, Lima, Ohio City
areas. Pictures and ad-
dress’s at: www.creative-
hombuyingsolutions.com.
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8,
T.-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
$
64
95
4 WHEEL
ALIGNMENT
Includes check
and adjust camber
& toe front and rear.
Additional parts & labor
may be required
on some vehicles.
See Service Advisor
for details.
plus parts
& tax
Over
85 years
serving
you
1999 GMC Jimmy 4WD,
137,000 miles. Great
shape, new tires, $3,000
OBO 567-712-3366
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
FREE KITTENS. Box
trained. (419)302-5971
REAL ESTATE
TRANSFERS
Van Wert County
Corey Anne Brown
and Larry Brown to
Amy Jo Foust, inlot 352,
Delphos.
Roberta B. Matthews
to Jeffrey C. Matthews
and Robert Todd
Matthews, portion of
sections 10, 17, Liberty
Township.
Estate of Franklin
Oscar Mox (Franklin O.
Mox) to Imogene Mox,
portion of sections 14, 11,
26, 23, 24, Washington
Township.
Robert A. Ladd and
Deana D. Ladd to Tracy
B. Trisel and Stephanie
K. Trisel, inlot 3481,
portion of inlot 3480, Van
Wert.
Donald W. Collins and
Vivian G. Collins to Brian
W. Collins and Tracy L.
Collins, portion of section
21, Jackson Township.
Secretary of Veterans
Affairs and BAC Home
Loans Servicing to
Michael A. Rossfeld and
Sherry Rossfeld, inlot
874, Delphos.
Michael R. Zedaker
and Carole J. Zedaker
to Clark A. Roberts and
Cindy Roberts, inlot 65,
portion of inlot 66, Scott.
Federal Home Loan
Mortgage to Tyler L.
Johnson and Brooke L.
Gamble, portion of inlot
965, Van Wert.
Thomas R. Odenweller
Trust and Kathy McKenzie
Trust to Brenneman
Brothers, lot 484, Van
Wert subdivision.
William D.
Benschneider and Linda
J. Benschneider to
George M. Pierce and
Lola Maye Pierce, inlot
3711, Van Wert.
Mary L. Rose to John
J. Brincefield, portion
of section 23, Ridge
Township.
Anthony D. Brincefield
to John J. Brincefield,
portion of sections 14,
23, Ridge Township.
Federal Home Loan
Mortgage to Jerome
P. Fortman, inlot 2266,
Portion of inlot 2267, Van
Wert.
Sharon M.
Wannemacher and
Richard L. Wannemacher
to Gilda F. Trobridge,
potion of section 18,
Hoaglin Township.
Estate of Wilbur Carl
Shaw to Alice A. Shaw,
inlot 3321, Van Wert.
Jason M. Krugh to
Jeneane M. Casebere
and Jeneane M. Krugh,
inlot 2291, Van Wert.
Estate of Ramiro
Romie Lozano to Louise
L. Lozano, portion of inlot
145, Delphos.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Friday Evening June 3, 2011
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WHIO/CBS Flashpoint CSI: NY Blue Bloods Local Late Show Letterman Late
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WOHL/FOX Bones Lie to Me Local
ION Without a Trace Without a Trace Criminal Minds Criminal Minds One Flew Over
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AMC Texas Rangers Marked for Death Deep Blue Sea
ANIM Whale Wars: ShowdownWhale Wars Whale Wars Whale Wars Whale Wars
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CMT The Singing Bee CMT's Next Superstar The Singing Bee CMT's Next Superstar The Singing Bee
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COMEDY Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Sinbad: Where U Been? Comedy Wyatt Cenac South Pk South Pk
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©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Friday, June 3, 2011 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Writer kept in
dark about birth
Dear Annie: I have two
daughters, “Kathy” and her
younger sister, “Carly,” both
in their late 20s. Carly and I
have always had a rocky rela-
tionship, stemming from my
being the disciplinarian since
my wife refused to do it.
Kathy always seemed more
understanding and forgiving.
After Carly graduated and
I no longer sent her monthly
checks, she stopped speak-
ing to me. She only con-
tacted me when she needed
something. Last
fall, she had my
first grandchild. I
didn’t even know
she was pregnant
until I got a card
from her a few
months after the
baby was born. I
still don’t know
the baby’s name,
sex or birth date
or if Carly married
the father. I don’t
even know who
the father is.
I’m heartbroken, not only
because Carly kept it a secret,
but because Kathy also kept
it from me. Kathy says she
didn’t want to get involved
because it was between
Carly and me. How do I deal
with this? -- Need Help in
Kentucky
Dear Kentucky: You
must forgive Kathy. She was
between a rock and a hard
place, but she was right that
the decision to inform you
belonged to her sister.
Instead of focusing on
how much this hurt, try to
look for ways to mend your
relationship with both of your
daughters, especially Carly.
You might even ask Kathy
for help and suggestions.
And sometimes a new grand-
child can provide a reason to
repair an estrangement. We
hope so.
Dear Annie: I’ve been
married for 19 years. We
have a blended family with
four children still at home.
“Joe” is an alcoholic and a
heavy smoker. When I was
ready to leave him over the
drinking, he begged me to
stay and is now two months
sober. We quit smoking
together 11 years ago, but
after four years, Joe started
up again. He’s now smoking
three packs a day, often in
the house.
My father had four broth-
ers who smoked. Three of
them died of lung cancer, as
did my father. Given my fam-
ily history, I do not want my
children or myself exposed
to cigarette smoke. I hate the
smell on my hair and clothes.
Kids at school have asked
my 16-year-old if she started
smoking because they can
smell it on her.
Joe does not believe sec-
ondhand smoke is a health
risk. I begged him, in tears,
to stop smoking in the house.
I do not want to give up on a
19-year marriage, but I want
to live to see my grandchil-
dren. Should I walk? -- Not
So Lucky in Kentucky
Dear Not Lucky: The
dangers of secondhand smoke
are well documented, and
anyone who refuses to admit
the risks is in deep denial.
Your husband is addicted to
tobacco and may be unable
to give it up without assis-
tance. Suggest he speak to
his doctor and also look into
smokefree.gov for tips. Until
then, insist he smoke outside
the home. If he is unwilling
to make the effort to protect
your health and that
of your children,
you should ask him
to leave.
Dear Annie:
Why do you try to
find a reason (sleep
apnea, low testos-
terone, etc.) for a
man’s low sex
drive? Let’s be hon-
est. It’s called get-
ting older. Do you
seriously expect
men who are 50, 60
and older to have
the same sex drive they did
when they were in their 20s?
You are denying the facts
of life. As we get older, our
reproductive years are behind
us. Quit trying to pump a
sex drive into this guy with
shots, pills or counseling. It’s
unnatural. -- Realist
Dear Realist: While tes-
tosterone levels decline as
men age, there is nothing nat-
ural about a 50-year-old man
losing his sex drive entirely.
Low testosterone can cause
depression, infertility, hair
loss, osteoporosis, decreased
muscle mass, fatigue and
sleep disturbances. These are
medical issues that can be
helped with appropriate treat-
ment.
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
Saturday, June 4, 2011
Your competitiveness is likely
to be accentuated in the year ahead,
whether it is applied toward social or
business endeavors. Once you know
what you want, you’ll find the way to
make things happen as you envision.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
The company you keep will influence
your attitude and outlook in a big way.
You’ll be surprised at the people who
wear their welcome the best.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
If you find yourself in a competitive
game of one-upsmanship, accentuate
your humility instead of your ego and
you’ll come out way ahead of your
challenger
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Your
awareness of the subtler aspects of the
conditions under which you work will
increase your effectiveness. What you
accomplish will stand the test of time.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) -- Financial conditions look
encouraging, mostly because you
won’t be indifferent to the profitable
circumstances surrounding you. You’ll
utilize everything at your disposal.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Your judgment is likely to be much
keener and wiser than that of those
with whom you associate, so when it
comes to anything important, stick by
your guns.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
Because you won’t treat any of your
responsibilities or obligations lightly,
those who work at your side will
abide by your example and handle
their duties as well as they can.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Socializing could turn out to
be not only an excellent source of
relaxation and amusement, but also
produce some useful information as
well. Be attentive to what’s being
said.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- If you want to get into the action
on a new endeavor, timing will be a
critical factor. You must know when
it’s right to quit shilly-shallying and
take action.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- It behooves you to ask as many
questions as you need in order to
understand something important about
your future that’s being explained to
you. Seeking clarification is not only
smart, it’s essential.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Try to do something different if
you can, and leave plenty of room
for spontaneity. It won’t hurt to start
out in one direction but end up doing
something entirely unplanned.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
You’ll be surprised at who possesses
the information you’re looking for, so
don’t show indifference to anybody,
even the low man on the totem pole.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- It
might surprise you as to how much
you are able to accomplish. Don’t put
any limitations on your plans; just
keep plugging ahead until you run out
of time or energy.
Copyright 2011, United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Dist. By Universal Uclick for UFS
10 – The Herald Friday, June 3, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Thursday’s questions:
U.S. airlines lose or misdirect 30,000 pieces of
checked luggage every year.
Gordie Howe lost 5 teeth in his first NHL game.
Today’s questions:
How thick is the blubber layer on most whales?
What is the most expensive college in the U.S.?
Answers in Saturday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Oryzivorous: rice-eating
Zendikite: an Arab atheist or non-believer
The Outstanding National Debt as of 9:45 a.m. today
was $14,352,227,605,942.
The estimated population of the United States is
310,680,940, so each citizen’s share of this debt is
$46,196.
The National Debt has continued to increase an aver-
age of
$3.98 billion per day since Sept. 28, 2007.
30 years of fighting AIDS brings hope for cure
By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
Associated Press
Sunday marks 30 years since the first AIDS
cases were reported in the United States. The
anniversary brings fresh hope for something
many had come to think was impossible: find-
ing a cure.
The example is Timothy Ray Brown of
San Francisco, the first person in the world
apparently cured of AIDS. His treatment isn’t
practical for wide use, but there are encourag-
ing signs that other approaches might someday
lead to a cure, or at least allow some people
to control HIV without needing medication
every day.
“I want to pull out all the stops to go for it,”
though cure is still a very difficult goal, said
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National
Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
For now, the focus remains on preventing
new infections. With recent progress on novel
ways to do that and a partially effective vac-
cine, “we’re starting to get the feel that we
can really get our arms around this pandemic,”
Fauci said.
More than 25 million people have died of
AIDS since the first five cases were recognized
in Los Angeles in 1981.
More than 33 million people have HIV
now, including more than 1 million in the
United States.
About 2 million people die of the disease
each year, mostly in poor countries that lack
treatment. In the U.S. though, newly diag-
nosed patients have a life expectancy only a
few months shorter than people without HIV.
Modern drugs are much easier to take, and
many patients get by on a single pill a day.
But it wasn’t that way in 1995, when Brown,
an American working as a translator in Berlin,
learned he had HIV. He went on and off medi-
cines because of side effects but was holding
his own until 2006, when he was diagnosed
with leukemia, a problem unrelated to HIV.
Chemotherapy left him so sick he had to be put
into a coma to allow his body to recover.
Dr. Gero Huetter, a blood cancer expert at
the University of Berlin, knew that a transplant
of blood stem cells (doctors used to use bone
marrow) was the best hope for curing Brown’s
cancer. But he aimed even higher.
These people had gene mutations that pro-
vide natural resistance to the virus. About
1 percent of whites have them, and Huetter
proposed searching for a person who also was
a tissue match for Brown.
But transplants are grueling. Huetter would
have to destroy Brown’s diseased immune sys-
tem with chemo and radiation, then transplant
the donor’s cells and hope they would take
hold and grow. Many cancer patients die from
such attempts and Brown wasn’t willing to risk
it. Several months later, the return of leukemia
changed their minds.
Brown discussed the transplant with his
boss “and she said, ‘wow, this is amazing.
Because you have leukemia, you could be
cured of HIV.”’
A registry turned up more than 200 possible
donors and Huetter started testing them for the
HIV resistance gene. He hit pay dirt at No. 61
— a German man living in the United States,
around 25 years old.
Brown had the transplant in February 2007.
A year later, his leukemia returned but HIV did
not. He had a second transplant in March 2008
from the same donor.
Now 45, Brown needs no medicines, and
his only health problems are from the mug-
ging he suffered two years ago as he returned
home one night in Berlin. Brown was knocked
unconscious, required brain surgery and thera-
py to walk and talk again, and doesn’t have full
use of one arm. He moved back to the United
States in December.
“He’s now four years off his antiretroviral
therapy and we have no evidence of HIV in
any tissue or blood that we have tested,” even
places where the virus can lie dormant for
many years, Huetter said.
Brown’s success inspired scientists to try a
similar but less harsh tactic: modifying some
of a patient’s infection-fighting blood cells to
contain the mutation and resist HIV. In theory,
this would strengthen the immune system
enough that people would no longer need to
take HIV drugs to keep the virus suppressed.
Scientists recently tried this gene therapy
in a couple dozen patients, including Matthew
Sharp of suburban San Francisco. More than
six months later, the number of his infection-
fighting blood cells is “still significantly higher
than baseline,” he said.
It will take more time to know if gene
therapy works and is safe. Experiments on doz-
ens of patients are under way, including some
where patients go off their HIV medicines and
doctors watch to see if the modified cells con-
trol the virus.
The results so far on the cell counts “are all
wonderful findings but they could all amount
to nothing” unless HIV stays suppressed, said
Dr. Jacob Lalezari, director of Quest Clinical
Research in San Francisco who is leading one
of the studies.
The approach also is not practical for poor
countries.
“I wouldn’t want people to think that gene
therapy is going to be something you can do on
33 million people,” said Fauci.
Other promising approaches to a cure try
new ways to attack the dormant virus problem,
he said. They hinge on getting people tested
and into care as soon as they become infected.
Fauci’s institute has boosted money for cure
research, and the International AIDS Society, a
professional organization for those who work
in the field, has added finding a cure to its
strategic plan.
“There are paths forward now” to a day
when people with AIDS might be cured, said
Dr. Michael Horberg, president of President
Obama’s HIV/AIDS council and of the HIV
Medicine Association, doctors who treat the dis-
ease. “But it’s not tomorrow, and it’s not today.”
Flood-threatened residents evac.
NJ gov. reimburses state for fights
Gates: US, China more positive
Man kills 5 before taking own life Unabomber auction nets $190K
By CHET BROKAW
Associated Press
PIERRE, S.D. — Flood-threatened neighborhoods of the
South Dakota capital and its sister city across the swollen
Missouri River largely emptied on Thursday as residents heeded
calls to leave for higher ground ahead of the planned release of
water from upstream dams.
Most of the approximately 3,000 people living in low-lying
areas of Pierre and Fort Pierre had left homes, and others loading
their belongings onto pickup trucks said they’d be gone by Gov.
Dennis Daugaard’s unofficial deadline of 8 p.m. No one was
ordered to leave home ahead of today’s planned dam releases, but
it appeared few were willing to take their chances.
Water releases from the Oahe Dam were expected to increase
slightly starting today morning and gradually rise until Tuesday,
when water levels were projected to crest four feet higher, or
about two feet below the levee top. Officials have kept the releases
steady for nearly a week as people moved possessions to higher
ground, placed sandbags around their homes and arranged for
other places to live.
A similar release schedule was planned starting Saturday at
Gavin’s Point Dam upstream of Dakota Dunes, where the water
level is expected to eventually rise another seven feet by June 14,
again cresting about two feet below the tops of levees.
Daugaard and other officials said emergency earthen levees
being built to protect the threatened areas should be completed in
time to stop the rising water, but the governor warned people not
to assume the levees would hold.
“While we hope the levees will provide protection for proper-
ty, we urge that people not place themselves in danger or become
complacent because a levee that is holding today is just holding
today,” Daugaard said.
In North Dakota, the Souris River at Minot crested Thursday
after about 10,000 residents had been evacuated two days earlier.
In Montana, which has been by widespread flooding from
heavy rains in the past couple of weeks, federal officials started
ramping up water releases Thursday from Fort Peck Dam.
Officials warned dozens of residents downstream their homes
could flood when the peak is released in the next two weeks.
And in Missouri, Gov. Jay Nixon warned that the river there
would rise to “unprecedented” levels. Residents in the northwest-
ern part of the state, who have plenty experience dealing with
floods, were preparing Thursday to either evacuate or help fill
more than 75,000 sandbags.
Back in South Dakota, Ed Stutesman of Pierre said it was a sad
day Thursday as he finished moving things out of his house.
“When you leave your own place, it’s a different life. Thirty-
five years I’ve lived here. Now I’ve got to go live someplace
else,” Stutesman said.
Steve Ellwein said he worked hard to develop a business and
build a nice house on the river near Fort Pierre, but now he and
his wife had to move out.
“I moved back in my old bedroom in my parents’ house. I’m
saying what’s wrong with that picture,” Ellwein said.
The mayors of Pierre and Fort Pierre said they have mostly
finished protecting water, electrical and other utilities against the
rising water. Law officers will soon start patrolling the emergency
levees to make sure they do not leak.
“I think we’re about as prepared as we can be,” Fort Pierre
Mayor Sam Tidball said.
Tidball urged people to stay away from the fast-flowing water
in the river, noting that no lives have been lost yet.
By BETH DeFALCO
Associated Press
TRENTON, N.J. — After taking a beating for more than
a day, Gov. Chris Christie agreed Thursday to reimburse the
state for personal use of a police helicopter to fly to two of his
son’s high school baseball games and a political dinner with
GOP donors.
But the governor, revered among Republicans for his
hard-charging, budget-cutting ways and reviled among many
Democrats for the same traits, made no apologies for what he
called an effort to be a good father.
Christie, often mentioned as a potential 2012 presidential
candidate, said he paid $2,100 and asked the state Republican
Party to pay $1,200 to cover the costs — not because he
believed he was in the wrong but because the furor had become
a distraction from serious matters.
“I want to make sure the public understands that I’m doing
this because of the duty I feel to them to have my attention
and everyone else’s attention focused 100 percent on the real
problems of this state,” he said, “not the political theater and
media theater that people enjoy at times.”
“I also understand this is a really fun media story for all of
you,” he told reporters at a bill signing ceremony in Denville.
He said he had been assured by the state police that he did
not have to reimburse the state for the personal flights because
the pilots needed to log the flying hours anyway to keep their
skills sharp. And he said he chose to fly to his son’s ballgames
as a way of balancing his role as governor because there was
no other way to get there in time.
“We tried to balance me being governor, and my demands
on that, with my responsibility as a father,” Christie said. “I’m
governor 24-7, every single day, but I’m also a father. And the
fact of the matter is, sometimes when you are governor, you do
not control your schedule.”
Christie’s reversal came a day after a spokesman defended
the trips as appropriate and said the governor does not reim-
burse for security and travel.
By ROBERT BURNS
Associated Press
SINGAPORE — Military relations between the U.S. and
China are now on “a more positive trajectory” after recent set-
backs, but the two countries should do more to strengthen ties and
work together to solve regional problems, U.S. Defense Secretary
Robert Gates said today.
In opening remarks at a meeting with his Chinese counterpart,
Gen. Liang Guanglie, Gates said the two governments agree that
the military aspect of their overall relationship is “underdevel-
oped.” Some progress toward correcting that imbalance has been
made in recent months, Gates said, noting his own visit to Beijing
in January and other high-level defense exchanges.
“As I leave office at the end of this month, I believe that our
military relationship is on a more positive trajectory,” Gates said.
He noted that Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, has accepted an invitation to visit China in July.
In response, Liang told Gates that he, too, believes the relation-
ship is improving.
Reporters were escorted from the defense chiefs’ meeting
room before Liang finished his opening remarks. They met on the
opening day of the Shangri-La Dialogue, the pre-eminent annual
Asian security conference, where Gates will deliver a policy
speech Saturday.
In what Gates and others see as an encouraging sign, China for
the first time chose to send its defense minister to the conference,
now in its 10th year. Guanglie is scheduled to deliver a keynote
address on Sunday, one day after Gates departs.
Geoff Morrell, the Pentagon press secretary, said Gates’ meet-
ing with Liang lasted nearly an hour — about twice as long as
scheduled, and that the two men agreed it is the responsibility of
their respective defense establishments to push for further prog-
ress. Morrell said Gates told Liang he is confident that his desig-
nated successor, Leon Panetta, will carry on Gates’ efforts.
A central theme of Gates’ message in Singapore is that Asian
nations should not believe that impending U.S. defense budget
cuts will lead to a smaller U.S. military presence in Asia. U.S.
officials are concerned that some in the region could tilt toward
China if they believe they are being abandoned by the U.S. or per-
ceive less-sturdy assurances of American support in the long run.
The main U.S. military presence in Asia is in Japan and
South Korea, but Washington also has close military ties to the
Philippines, Thailand, Taiwan and Singapore. The Pentagon is
in the midst of an internal review of its force alignment in the
region, with the outcome expected to call for a wider range of
military exchanges, exercises and ship, aircraft and troop rotations
in Southeast Asia.
How that is achieved will depend to a large degree on how
deeply the Pentagon cuts its budget in coming years.
President Barack Obama on April 13 announced a plan to
reduce defense spending by $400 billion over the next 12 years,
and some in Congress — as well as some independent analysts
— are calling for far deeper reductions. With an end in sight for
the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, defense savings are central to a
broader effort to shrink government deficits.
By BOB CHRISTIE and AMANDA LEE MYERS
Associated Press
YUMA, Ariz. — A 73-year-old man’s shooting rampage in
towns near the Arizona border left six people dead Thursday,
including the suspect and the attorney who represented his ex-
wife in their divorce.
Police said Carey Hal Dyess also wounded one person in
the shootings around Yuma, a city of about 91,000, before he
was found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound
nearly six hours after the first shots were fired.
The lawyer was killed while packing up his office on his
last day of work.
“This is not a random act,” Yuma Police Chief Jerry Geier
said. “These victims were targeted.”
Yuma County Sheriff Ralph Ogden said the first shoot-
ing was reported shortly after 5 a.m. in Wellton, about 25
miles east of Yuma. The woman was in critical condition at a
Phoenix hospital.
He said Dyess then fatally shot four people around town
before driving to Yuma and killing prominent attorney Jerrold
Shelley at about 9:20 a.m. The bodies in Wellton were found
between 8:20 and 9:45 a.m.
Police believe Dyess drove back toward Wellton, pulled
over and fatally shot himself. His body was found at 10:47 a.m.
inside a vehicle.
Neither police nor the sheriff would identify the other four
dead.
Shelley was killed in his downtown law office. Shelley
represented Dyess’ ex-wife in their 2006 divorce, which was
Dyess’ fifth.
Vida Florez, a Yuma attorney who knew Shelley, said she
learned of the shooting after leaving court. She said she heard
from a witness who spoke to the police about what happened
inside the office.
“They said the shooter came in and told the secretary to
‘Get out of here,”’ Florez said. “She did, and he shot Jerry
Shelley and he left.”
Shelley also was one of the lawyers representing seven
young men — three sets of brothers — who sued the Roman
Catholic Diocese of Tucson after accusing a priest of repeat-
edly raping them when they were children.
A man and woman were found dead in a small farm house
outside the nearby town of Wellton, said Yuma police Sgt.
John Otero. The tree-shaded home was set back about 100 feet
from a highway, with a cow pasture in front.
The downtown shooting prompted officials to block off a
street and to lock down the nearby county courthouse and some
schools. Those buildings were later reopened.
Court records show Dyess was involved in two civil court
cases, one in Yuma and one in Wellton. A judge issued an
order of protection against Dyess in one of the cases in 2006,
and a court clerk said it stemmed from Dyess’ divorce. No
information was immediately available on those cases.
Court records also show the 2006 divorce was Dyess’ fifth,
with the previous four divorces all in Washington state.
The divorce file showed that Theresa and Carey Dyess
were married in Tombstone in May 2002 and the couple filed
for divorce in 2006. Theresa Dyess alleged there had been
domestic violence and she asked for and received an order of
protection. No details of that incident were immediately avail-
able in the court file.
Carey Dyess later took out a protection order against
Theresa Dyess, records showed.
The divorce was granted and the couple later agreed on a
property split that gave Theresa Dyess the couple’s home in
Wellton once she bought out her former husband’s share.
A lawyer for Carey Dyess filed a brief in October 2008 that
said Carey Dyess had not been paid more than a year after the
divorce became final.
“Mr. Dyess is sick and believes (his ex-wife) is ‘holding
out,’ waiting for him to die, Yuma attorney Gregory Torok
wrote in a court petition. The file shows the issue led to a final
settlement two months later.
Dyess also took out an order of protection against a man
he identified as ‘my wife’s boyfriend,” who he alleged was
harassing him by driving by his home every day.
By PAUL ELIAS
Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO — The very technology that the Unabomber
railed against during his murderous spree was used Thursday to
help some of his victims.
An unusual online auction of Ted Kaczynski’s personal items
that ended Thursday garnered about $190,000 for his victims and
their family members. They want the so-called Unabomber to pay
for the 16 explosions he set off that killed three and injured 23 oth-
ers across the country.
Kaczynski’s personal journals fetched $40,676; the iconic hood-
ed sweatshirt and sunglasses depicted in police sketch artist render-
ings accounted for $20,025; and his handwritten “manifesto” sold
for $20,053. Other popular items included $22,003 for the Smith
Corona typewriter used to write manifestos sent to newspapers and
later seized from the cabin and $17,780 for his autobiography.
The manifesto laid out Kaczynski’s belief that modern technology
was eroding human freedoms and that his bombings were necessary
to spark a large-scale revolution. The pursuit of Kaczynski became
one of the longest and costliest investigations in the FBI’s history.
The auction was a culmination of a seven-year legal battle
designed to block Kaczynski from regaining ownership of the prop-
erty seized from his remote Montana cabin during a 1996 raid.
Kaczynski, representing himself in court, demanded return of
the property so he could donate it to the University of Michigan,
his alma mater. But because Kaczynski was ordered to pay his
victims $15 million, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ordered
the property auctioned.
“He wanted his stuff back, and this way he doesn’t get it back,”
said Susan Mosser, whose advertising executive husband Thomas
was killed by a parcel bomb in 1994. “He also hasn’t paid a cent
of restitution.”
Mosser said she hoped that some of the 40,000 pages of docu-
ments would end up in academia.
The museum in Washington, D.C., includes a crime lab, the
filming studios for the show “America’s Most Wanted” and hun-
dreds of interactives and artifacts.
In all, collectors snatched up 58 items seized during the raid
of Kaczynski’s remote Montana cabin in 1996. Those bidders
remained anonymous.
Some victims and others opposed the auction as unseemly. They
feared the publicity surrounding the event would add to Kaczynski’s
renown at a time when they want him to languish quietly in the so-
called supermax federal prison in Florence, Colo.

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