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Fibrinogen - An important contributor to blood clotting, fibrinogen levels increase in response to tissue inflammation.

Since atherosclerosis and heart disease are essentially inflammatory processes, increased fibrinogen levels can help predict the risk of heart disease and stroke. High fibrinogen levels not only are associated with an increased risk of heart attack, but also are seen in other inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammation of the kidney. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) - C-Reactive protein is a substance in the blood that indicates the presence of inflammation and could warn of a heart attack in advance. Elevated amounts of the protein in men may triple their risk for heart attack and double their risk for stroke, whereas elevated amounts in women can increase their heart attack risk up to seven times. Cardio (also specific or high sensitivity) C-Reactive Protein is a marker of inflammation to the blood vessels and a strong predictor of risk for future myocardial infarctions. Cardiovascular tests ordered vary based on patient symptoms as well as family history. Homocysteine - The amino acid, Homocysteine, plays a role in destroying the lining of your artery walls, promoting the formation of blood clots, and also accelerates the buildup of scar tissue. High levels may increase the chance of heart disease and stroke, especially if you have other risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, or family history. Hemoglobin A1C - One of the best ways to assess your glucose status is testing for hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c). It measures a person¶s blood sugar over the last two to three months and is an independent predictor of heart disease risk in persons with or without diabetes. Maintaining a healthy hemoglobin A1C level may also help those with diabetes prevent some of the complications of the disease. DHEA,s - Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a hormone produced by the adrenal glands, and is a precursor to the sex hormones estrogen and testosterone. DHEA levels peak in one¶s twenties and then decline dramatically with age. DHEA is frequently referred to as an ³anti-aging´ hormone. DHEAS and several other androgens are used to evaluate adrenal function and to distinguish between androgen secreting adrenal conditions from those that originate in the ovary or testes. DHEAS can be measured to help diagnose adrenocortical tumors (tumor in the cortex of the adrenal gland), adrenal cancers, and adrenal hyperplasia (which may be congenital or adult onset) and to separate them from ovarian tumors and cancers. Testosterone, Total & Free - Testosterone is produced in the testes in men, in the ovaries in women, and in the adrenal glands of both men and women. Men and women alike can be dramatically affected by the decline in testosterone levels that occurs with aging. Unlike bound testosterone, the free form of the hormone can circulate in the brain and affect nerve cells. Testosterone plays different roles in men and women, including the regulation of fertility, libido, and muscle mass. In men, free testosterone levels may be used to evaluate whether sufficient bioactive testosterone is available to protect against abdominal obesity, mental depression, osteoporosis, and heart disease. In women, low levels of testosterone have been associated with decreased libido and well-being, while high levels of free testosterone may indicate hirsuitism (a condition of excessive hair growth on the face and chest) or polycystic ovarian syndrome. Increased testosterone in women may also indicate low estrogen levels.

this panel is useful in the evaluation of conditions such as urinary tract infection. Unlike bound testosterone. including the regulation of fertility. . and in the adrenal glands of both men and women. carcinoma of lung. and Alzheimer's disease.Over 15 different items. Total & Free . low levels of testosterone have been associated with decreased libido and well-being. libido. blood estradiol levels help evaluate menopausal status and sexual maturity. Estradiol . Parkinson's. and ACTH-producing pituitary tumors. most estradiol is produced from testosterone and adrenal steroid hormones. Estradiol is the primary circulating form of estrogen in men and women. Low levels are associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis and bone fracture as well. In women. Levels of estradiol vary throughout the menstrual cycle. and heart disease.Testosterone is produced in the testes in men. It also has other roles in the body. and is an indicator of hypothalamic and pituitary function. and difficulty with urination. constant levels after menopause. including modulation of cell growth. Elevated levels of estradiol in men may accompany gynecomastia (breast enlargement). rheumatoid arthritis. certain cancers. Increased testosterone in women may also indicate low estrogen levels Vitamin D. and muscle mass. and reduction of inflammation. Addison disease. mental depression. In women. adrenal glands. diminished sex drive. in the ovaries in women.Both men and women need estrogen for physiological functions. islet cell tumors. juvenile diabetes. medullary carcinoma of thyroid). In men. free testosterone levels may be used to evaluate whether sufficient bioactive testosterone is available to protect against abdominal obesity. Needed for strong bones and teeth. and peripheral tissues. dehydration. Men and women alike can be dramatically affected by the decline in testosterone levels that occurs with aging. estradiol is produced in the ovaries. Testosterone plays different roles in men and women. hypopituitarism. neuromuscular and immune function. multiple sclerosis. the free form of the hormone can circulate in the brain and affect nerve cells. Testosterone. and drop to low. Ten to 15 minutes of sunshine 3 times weekly is enough to produce the body's requirement of vitamin D. There are associations between low Vitamin D levels and peripheral vascular disease.Urinalysis. 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D is also known as the "sunshine vitamin" because the body manufactures the vitamin after being exposed to sunshine. Vitamin D helps your body absorb the amount of calcium it needs. In women. ectopic ACTH syndrome (eg. complete . Estradiol plays a role in support of healthy bone density in both men and women. Men produce estradiol in smaller amounts than do women. and kidney stones. carcinoid tumors. while high levels of free testosterone may indicate hirsuitism (a condition of excessive hair growth on the face and chest) or polycystic ovarian syndrome. Adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) Pituitary function test useful in the differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome. Increased levels in women may indicate an increased risk for breast or endometrial cancer. osteoporosis. and some is produced directly by the testes.

Physical stress. an enlarged spleen. Serum Alpha-1 antitrypsin testing may be ordered when a newborn or infant has jaundice that lasts for more than a week or two.AFP Tetra Profile AFP Tetra is a blood test used to help your doctor identify pregnancies that may be at increased risk for open spina bifida. It may be ordered when a person under 40 years of age develops wheezing. It is found throughout the body but is primarily found in high levels in muscle tissue. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Use: Support a diagnosis of congestive heart failure (CHF) . has not been exposed to known lung irritants. or trisomy 18. ascites. Aldolase An enzyme that helps convert glucose into energy. and other signs of liver injury. surgery. It does not diagnose birth defects. is short of breath after exertion and/or shows other signs of emphysema. AAT testing may also be done when you have a close relative with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. and high levels of anxiety can also stimulate ADH. but can help identify those people with a higher risk who might benefit from additional testing. Down syndrome. pruritus. and when the lung damage appears to be located low in the lungs. ADH antidiuretic hormone profile ADH release helps maintain the optimum amount of water in the body when there is an increase in the concentration of the blood serum or a decrease in blood volume. This is especially true when the patient is not a smoker. a chronic cough or bronchitis. It is elevated in the bloodstream when a patient has muscle or liver damage or disease Alpha 1-Antitrypsin.