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ALTERNATIVE ROUTES TO CERTIFICATION PROGRAM PROPOSAL FORM 2A Section 1-Program Information

Program Name: Secondary Teacher Alternative Route (STAR) Saint Martin’s University

Institution or Organization Name:

Type of certificate program x Residency Teacher Certificate

Routes Offered  Route 1: Alternative Route programs for classified staff with one year of instructional experience that hold a transferable Associate of Arts or Sciences degree. x Route 2: Alternative Route programs for currently employed classified staff with one year of instructional experience that hold a minimum of a Bachelor of Arts or Sciences degree from a regionally accredited college or university. x Route 3: Alternative Route for individuals with subject-matter expertise in shortage areas, currently employed outside the school system, that hold a minimum of a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree from a regionally accredited college or university. x Route 4: Alternative Route for individuals teaching with conditional or emergency certificates.

Endorsement(s) for Teacher Preparation. Alternative Route Applicants must hold PESB approval to offer endorsements. For PESB guidelines related to endorsement approval go to http://sites.google.com/a/pesb.wa.gov/home/prepprogram/prep_programs/approval/endorseme nt-approval. Early Childhood  Early Childhood Special Education (Birth-3)

Elementary & Middle Level (For Alternative Routes: all K-8 endorsement candidates must be pursuing at least one of the following shortage area endorsements along with the K-8 endorsement: Mathematics, Middle Level Math, any Secondary Science, Middle Level Science, English Language Learner, Bilingual Education, Special Education or a locally identified shortage area). Elementary (K-8) with: Mathematics x Middle Level Math (With Secondary) Bilingual Education x Middle Level Science Special Education
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English Language Learner
FORM 2A

Alternative Routes to Certification Program Proposal August 2010

Science

Biology

Chemistry

Earth & Space Science

Physics

Locally identified shortage area:

Secondary (5-12):

x x

Science

x Biology

x Chemistry

Earth & Space Science

Physics

Mathematics

Locally Identified Shortage area:

All-level (P-12) Endorsements for Alternative Routes are restricted to the following shortage areas: x Special Education (Birth-12)* x Bilingual x English Language Learners *Special education usually requires special education coursework prior to beginning the program Locally Identified Shortage area:

Organization type Four-year public college or university x Four-year independent college or university Community College Private non-profit organization Other public agency (ESD, School District) Private for-profit organization

Section 2 -Proposal Contents
Applicants through this program shall specify the following: A. Need for program
Content Shortage Areas- The degree to which a district, or consortia of districts, are currently experiencing teacher shortages in math, science, special education and/or bilingual education/ELL. Other locally identified shortage areas may be documented.

Endorsement Shortage Areas by County/ School District Demographics (alphabetical order) King County: The OSPI most recently published Educator Supply and Demand in Washington State 2006 Report indicates geographical teaching shortage areas with forecasted increasing or considerable need in the teaching areas of: Special Education, Mathematics, Middle Level Math/Science, Science –Earth, Physics, Chemistry, Biology; English as a Second Language; Early Childhood Special Education (areas in bold indicate shortage areas to be served by this program).  Highline School District: Highline School district serves 17,531 students and includes eighteen elementary schools, four middle schools, two comprehensive high schools, and ten special emphasis academies serving secondary students. The District includes 43.8 square miles and has 1010 certificated employees, and approximately 900 classified employees. Students are
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diverse with 36% minority students in 2009-10 and 21% ELL students with 70 different languages spoken in our students’ homes. Mason County: The OSPI most recently published Educator Supply and Demand in Washington State 2006 Report indicates geographical teaching shortage areas with forecasted increasing or considerable need in the teaching areas of: Mathematics; Middle Level Math/Science, Special Education; Science Earth Science, Physics, Biology, Chemistry, (areas in bold indicate shortage areas to be served by this program).  Shelton School District: Shelton School District serves 4246 students who attend three elementary schools, one middle school, one junior high school, one high school, and one alternative school. Several of Shelton’s 273 teachers have been awarded Regional Teacher of the Year from Education Service District 113. Greater than 50% of the students in Shelton receive free/reduced-price meals. Pierce County: : The OSPI most recently published Educator Supply and Demand in Washington State 2006 Report indicates geographical teaching shortage areas with forecasted increasing or considerable need in the teaching areas of: Mathematics; Middle Level Math/Science, Special Education; Science Earth Science, Physics, Biology, Chemistry, (areas in bold indicate shortage areas to be served by this program).  Clover Park School District: Clover Park School District is the 21st largest public school district in Washington State and fourth largest of 15 in Pierce County. The district, located immediately south of Tacoma, encompasses 26 square miles including the city of Lakewood, Fort Lewis Army Post and McChord Air Force Base. With an enrollment nearing 12,000 students, more than 40 percent of the district’s students come from military or federally connected families. Clover Park has 26 schools, including 17 elementary schools, four middle schools, two high schools, one alternative high school, and four special schools including two at Western State Hospital. With well over a thousand ELL students and 60 languages spoken at home, linguistic diversity is prominent.  Tacoma School District: Tacoma Public Schools is the state’s second largest school district in the State and encompasses 56 square miles. There are 28,890 students attending Tacoma’s five high schools, nine middle schools, 37 elementary schools and 14 alternative programs. Staff members, full and part time exceed 3500 including 2033 teachers. The city of Tacoma is located on Puget Sound and has a population of 196,300. Thurston County: The OSPI most recently published Educator Supply and Demand in Washington State 2006 Report indicates geographical teaching shortage areas with forecasted increasing or considerable need in the teaching areas of: Mathematics; Middle Level Math/Science, Special Education; Science Earth Science, Physics, Biology, Chemistry, (areas in bold indicate shortage areas to be served by this program).  Olympia School District: Olympia School District enrolls 9381 students for the 2009-2010 school year. Olympia School District employs approximately 1200 classified and certificated staff, including 524 teachers, to provide education in 18 schools. Founded in 1852, OSD is one of the oldest districts in the state. Our approach to educational excellence is a holistic one, with strong programs in IB and AP, fine arts, technology, basic education, and athletics.  Tumwater School District: Tumwater School District encompasses 117 square miles. In addition to its ten schools the district operates attendant support facilities consisting of transportation, maintenance, food services, and the district office. The district owns just over 247 acres. It is
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situated at the southern end of Puget Sound in Thurston County, and incorporates a majority of the city of Tumwater, which is located approximately 65 miles southwest of Seattle, and a small portion of the City of Olympia. Schools are situated on both rural and urban sites. Yelm Community Schools: Yelm Community Schools is located in southeast Thurston County in the Puget Sound region. Currently we serve more than 5,400 students in six elementary, two middle, one high and one special school. Among our approximately 650 staff are 286 teachers. Many of our students are from military families and represent diverse cultural backgrounds.

It is apparent the economic challenges facing the state and its school districts have created an air of uncertainty among the districts in the consortium regarding specific hiring needs. They expect to do significant hiring in high needs areas, but are cautious about stating numbers. As a result of the potential restraint in hiring in the short term, there is a concern among district administrators that when economic conditions recover, there will be a spike in retirements as well as the need to fill temporarily unfilled positions, causing a substantial shortage of teachers in these high needs areas. As financial conditions improve, the number of positions needing to be filled is expected to exceed the average number during the past ten years. In a recent year, two weeks after the opening of school in most of those districts, our partnership districts had the following open positions: Math – 14, Science – 4.5, Bilingual Education/ESL – 2, Special Education – 21. Other interested districts that were not formal partners had the following openings: Math – 11.5, Science – 8, Bilingual Education/ESL – 2.5, Special Education – 15. This number of unfilled positions provides dramatic testimony for the need of the program in the partner, and similar, districts. Minority Teacher Shortage: Minority information for the partner districts indicate a need for increased minority teachers. As seen in the chart below, the percent of minority students in the districts ranges from 17.4% to 80.6%. With the state average of minority teachers reported by various sources as 8% to 14%, this indicates a serious need to increase minority teachers to serve as role models for minority students in these districts. Saint Martin’s University has an overall student minority average of 27%; the Education Division an overall student minority average of 18%; and the Alternative Route STAR program a cumulative average of 17% minority candidates since 2002. The current enrollment of STAR candidates for 2010-2011 indicate 11% minority status.

Table: Enrollment and Percentage of students by ethnicity and special programs CPSD Highline NTSD Olympia Shelton Tacoma Comparison 11,947 17,531 13,952 9,381 4,246 28,890 Enrollment 1.6 1.8 2.8 1.2 7.7 1.9 % A Ind /Alas N 10.2 19.5 13.7 9.5 2.1 13.7 % Asian/Pac.Isl. 18.0 12.1 9.2 2.4 1.2 22.9 % Black 19.2 31.6 11.3 4.9 16.3 14.2 % Hispanic 43.5 29.4 60.1 75.0 70.2 47.2 % White 63.9 63.4 38.6 25.3 57.7 57.0 % Free/Reduced 14.7 13.1 13.4 13.4 17.1 7.9 % Special Educ. 9.8 21.3 3.3 2.2 6.8 7.3 % Bilingual Source: http://reportcard.ospi.k12.wa.us October 2009 information available

Tumwater 6,287 1.9 4.2 2.6 5.0 82.6 29.0 12.7 0.5

Yelm 5,470 3.3 3.3 2.4 7.0 77.7 38.8 12.8 0.7

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B. Market Analysis
1. Evidence of regional need for the program -The institution or organization will identify other college of education programs operating in the region and describe how the proposal addresses areas of the state that are experiencing a shortage of certification programs to serve school districts within the region. Address specific information related to critical needs of regional school districts, the degree to which those needs are (or are not) currently being met, and the demographics of the region. Also include the geographic location, the identification of the major decision-makers, and any seasonal or cyclical trends which may impact the program.

Saint Martin’s University proposes to serve Candidates from the south Puget Sound area, with particular emphasis on Pierce, Thurston, Lewis and Grays Harbor Counties, as well as sections of South King County. Because the service areas of programs are not clearly delineated, which existing programs serve the area is subject to interpretation. In addition to Saint Martin’s University, primary programs are The Evergreen State College, the University of Washington-Tacoma, Pacific Lutheran University, University of Puget Sound, City University and the Lesley University/TCC program. The Saint Martin’s Alternate Route Program has been in operation since 2002 and has successfully prepared candidates for positions in the service area. Saint Martin’s University is located in Lacey, WA providing ready access via Interstate 5, US Highway 101, and State Route 8. Although most of the candidates have come from the Olympia to Tacoma corridor, we recruit from the sparsely populated areas of the region such as Lewis, Grays Harbor, Pacific and Cowlitz counties. The intense summer institute makes it feasible for candidates from outlying areas to participate in the program. They can then be placed in more distant locations for their year-long internship. Historically, the program has received from 25 to 40 applications each year, with enrollments of from 14 to 25. Enrollments the past three years have been the highest in the program’s history. For the 2011-2012 cohort, interest has been strong although some individuals have cited the uncertainties about educational funding and have expressed concern that there may not be positions available when they complete the program. The program is intended to serve particular needs of the partnership districts as well as other districts based upon their needs. Key decision-makers from the university are the STAR Program Director, The Dean and the Associate Dean of the College of Education and Professional Psychology. Within the districts, key decision-makers are the Superintendents, Human Resources Directors/Teacher Employment Coordinators, as well as the individuals charged with placing Student Teachers. The STAR Program has a long history of working successfully with the various district personnel to meet their needs.

2. Describe the unique features of the program design. The program is designed to meet the requirements of the RFP. Therefore many of the features of the program are held in common with other alternate route programs. However, some features do distinguish the STAR program from similar programs.  It is possible to earn an MIT through participation in the STAR program. The first year is spent in the coursework and year-long internship leading to certification before the end of the first year. The second year is devoted to other MIT requirements including four classes for the Graduate Core and the exit requirement.
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   

Candidates in the STAR program are required to earn two endorsements, thus increasing their value to employing school districts. With a second endorsement they have greater versatility of assignment as a HQ teacher. Candidates are engaged in activities that extend beyond minimum requirements, thus ensuring that they are especially well prepared. This is done by creative and flexible scheduling and course design that takes advantage of the extended field placement. High level of personal attention and mentoring from Saint Martin’s University faculty and staff to ensure a successful integration into the education environment - especially beneficial for candidates who are entering the program from other professions. Flexibility to adjust the program to meet the needs of students while ensuring a quality educational experience and meeting grant requirements.

3. Describe the size and growth projections for the program. The program is designed to accommodate 25 candidates per year. If a minimum of 32 candidates qualified for admission are identified, there are contingency plans to break the group into two cohorts and to increase the maximum number of candidates to 50.

Section 3- Commitment of Partners
Applicants through this program shall provide a narrative for sections (A-H) that detail the role of teacher preparation program partners and any district and/or ESD partners related to the following: A. District Need
Districts participating in the Alternative Route programs shall provide verification by attaching a letter on district letterhead that they are currently experiencing, anticipate experiencing or are planning for addressing teacher shortages in endorsement areas for which the Alternative Route program is preparing interns.

Districts participating in the Alternative Route programs have experienced difficulties in filling positions in the high needs areas targeted by the grant. While this shortage has been ameliorated to some extent, there still remains a challenge in developing an adequate pool of applicants who are qualified for high needs positions, and in some instances, having any highly qualified applicants for positions in these high needs areas. In a typical hiring year, the partnership districts must aggressively recruit in order to fill these positions. As stated in the Need for the Program section, in a recent year, two weeks after the opening of school in most of those districts, our partnership districts had the following open positions: Math – 14, Science – 4.5, Bilingual Education/ESL – 2, Special Education – 21. Other interested districts that were not formal partners had the following openings: Math – 11.5, Science – 8, Bilingual Education/ESL – 2.5, Special Education – 15. Partners believe there will continue to be a need for highly qualified teachers in these areas.

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B. Classroom Placement
District partners and Alternative Route programs will describe how interns in the Alternative Route program will be placed in K-12 classroom(s) with a trained mentor teacher(s) all day, every day for the duration of their mentored internship. Alternative Route programs and district partnerships must verify that they will provide each candidate with intensive classroom mentoring until such time as the intern demonstrates the competency necessary to manage the classroom with less intensive supervision and guidance from the mentor teacher.

All partnership members are committed to developing and maintaining a supportive and ongoing mentoring program. In addition to participating in the Washington State Mentor Training Academy, the coalition will develop a district mentor program as well as participate in the Mentor Training Program. These “certified” mentors will be called upon to ensure the success of new teachers; and identify, recruit and develop additional mentor teachers within the ranks of the coalition’s teaching staffs. Development programs for the Mentor Training will include instruction in the following: 1) Techniques for teachers working with adult learners; 2) Teaching “strategies” – (cognitive coaching, learning in focused conversations); 3) Skills and technical needs; 4) Recognition of “best practices”; 5) Communication and interpersonal skills; 6) How to observe and evaluate a new teacher; 7) Developmental growth of a teacher – what to expect; 8) Certification standards; 9) Assessment – how do you know if there is learning; 10) Knowing and using all teacher support systems. The partnership will assign one mentor teacher to each teacher intern. The mentor teacher will provide the teacher intern with intensive classroom mentoring. The intent will be to provide the alternate route teacher candidate more responsibility and independence as the alternate route teacher candidate demonstrates increased competency. The mentor teacher will not be assigned another classroom or other duties, therefore, there will not be competition for the mentor teacher’s time and attention (with the exception of mentors for contracted Route 4 candidates). During the later part of the intern period, the mentor teacher will be asked to develop a written assessment of the alternate route teacher candidate’s strengths and weaknesses. This written assessment will be for the exclusive use of the alternate route teacher candidate. The written assessment will also focus on suggested courses or training that will assist the professional development of the “new teacher”. Examples of Individual District Commitment to Mentoring Clover Park School District: CPSD recognizes that new and even seasoned teachers require help, guidance and mentoring to achieve great success in the classroom. CPSD also recognizes that a single approach to providing assistance and help to teachers is insufficient to the task of ensuring the success of our teachers. Too much rests on the quality of teachers to put anything less than a quality support system in place to assist teachers in the mission of teaching our children what they need to know to succeed and contribute to their community. The CPSD Teacher Support System includes:  Mentor Teacher Program Manager: The Mentor Teacher Program Manager works with an advisory team (representatives from the teacher’s association and several local colleges and universities) to ensure that only the best teachers are selected to mentor student teachers or new first-year teachers.  New Teacher Mentor Program: This program is designed to help first-year teachers succeed during a critical period in their professional development. The program involves intense mentoring, requires monthly meetings and classroom observations and
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a variety of support for mentor teachers and their first-year teachers. Monthly training classes are conducted for new teachers and their mentors. In-Building Instructional Facilitators: CPSD historically has funded at least one "Instructional Facilitator" in every school (two in every high school, one full time and one half time in every middle school and one in every elementary school). There are 31 master teachers working as Instructional Facilitators. The Instructional Facilitator is the resident "mentor teacher" in each school.

Tacoma School District: Tacoma Public Schools believes that new and veteran teachers require help, guidance and mentoring to achieve great success in the classroom. The Teacher Support System includes:  New teacher orientation and seminars: These sessions provide information concerning district programs, curriculum, as well as district policies and procedures.  New Teacher Mentor Program: This program is designed to help first and second year teachers succeed during a critical time in the professional development. This program involves intense mentoring, monthly meetings, classroom observations and a variety of support for mentor teachers and the beginning teachers. Funding is available to support the program through stipends; professional development sessions are a part of the program framework and include school principals. A district program facilitator supervises the program under the leadership of the Director of Professional and Organizational Development.  Instructional facilitators, in some buildings, are assigned to provide continuous improvement in classroom instruction by providing instructional support to teachers in areas of lesson design, classroom assessment and classroom management.  Alternative Route interns will be assigned to a specific mentor teacher for intense classroom mentoring until such time that the candidate demonstrates competency necessary to lead the classroom with less intensive supervision from the mentor. C. Route 1 and Route 2 Placements
Route 1 and 2 candidates are defined as follows: Route 1: Alternative Route programs for classified staff (i.e. paraprofessionals) that hold a transferable Associate of Arts or Science degree. Route 2: Alternative Route programs for currently employed classified staff (i.e. paraprofessionals) that hold a minimum of a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree from a regionally accredited college or university. For programs offering Route 1 and 2, the Alternative Route programs and district partners will provide verification that they actively pursue means and make every effort to ensure that paraprofessionals enrolled as interns in the alternative route program retain their employment during their mentored internship. (For example, para-professionals may take on increased teaching responsibility in the classroom in which they are assigned while the mentor teacher serves in a supervisory/supportive role).

The STAR program is designed to enroll candidates for Routes 2, 3, and 4. For the Route 2 candidates, the Director of the program works with the appropriate individuals within the district, usually involving the Director of Human Resources and building administrators, to ensure that paraprofessionals are able to continue their employment while placed in their yearlong internship. This has been successfully implemented with previous Route 2 candidates.
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Typically, the process involves a written letter of understanding that specifies the commitments of the district and the university. Items contained in the agreement include such things as the identification of the classroom in which the candidate is to be placed, the number of hours weekly for which the paraprofessional salary will be paid (often, the individual is less than full time), the support from the mentor, the support from university supervisor, and any related items. As we move toward more internship experiences involving the co-teaching model, we believe the Route 2 candidates are excellent prospects for this type of agreement. The co-teaching model enables the candidate to have varying levels of engagement in instruction with the mentor involved in a variety of ways that support the candidate’s learning of how to implements teaching strategies and support student learning at a high level. D. Selection of a Mentor teacher
The Mentor teacher(s) shall be defined as the teacher(s) of record in the classroom(s) where the Alternative Route candidate is placed. The program and district may also assign a content teacher in addition to the classroom Mentor teacher(s) to address candidate needs in specific content areas. Selection of mentor teachers will be conducted to ensure that the requirements of the RFP are met. Where possible, procedures established by the university and the participating districts for the selection of mentor teachers will be honored. However, if a conflict with grant requirements arises, the grant requirements will take precedence. The districts and the program provider provide the following assurances that the district supports and agrees to the following criteria for a teacher to be selected as a Mentor teacher: 1. Evidence that the Mentor teacher has had a minimum of three years teaching experience and holds a continuing or professional certificate;

The University will verify that the mentor teacher has the requisite certificate. Should an occasion arise in which this is not possible (such as the rare case in a small school with no teacher in the subject with such qualifications) the university will arrange for another teacher who meets the qualifications to serve as a second mentor. This would only be expected to occur with Route 2 or Route 4 candidates.
2. Evidence that the Mentor teacher has completed formalized Mentor training either through district, private organizations or institutions, university, OSPI mentor academies, or through online modules;

The university will verify that the mentor teacher has completed formalized mentor training. If the mentor teacher has not, then we will ensure that the mentor participates in such training including making provisions for mentor training to be offered by the university. The university has provided mentor training to mentors in past cohorts, basing the training on the training provided by OSPI mentor academies.
3. A letter of recommendation from the Mentor teacher’s Principal or other District designee that nominates them for Mentor teacher designation for a yearlong Alternative Route candidate placement;

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Standard placement procedures for candidates involve the principal in the selection process. As a part of this process, we will formalize that practice by ensuring that the principal writes a letter recommending the mentor teacher for the mentorship position, and that the letter will also specify the mentor meets the eligibility requirements.

4.

District plan for providing significant time for Mentor teachers to spend with alternative route teacher candidates throughout their internship. Partnerships must provide each candidate with intensive classroom mentoring until such time that the candidate demonstrates competency necessary to manage the classroom with less intensive supervision from the Mentor teacher;

As referenced in the Classroom Placement section of the proposal, extensive mentoring support will be provided to each candidate. Examples of Individual District Commitment to Mentoring Clover Park School District: CPSD recognizes that new and even seasoned teachers require help, guidance and mentoring to achieve great success in the classroom. CPSD also recognizes that a single approach to providing assistance and help to teachers is insufficient to the task of ensuring the success of our teachers. Too much rests on the quality of teachers to put anything less than a quality support system in place to assist teachers in the mission of teaching our children what they need to know to succeed and contribute to their community. The CPSD Teacher Support System includes:  Mentor Teacher Program Manager: The Mentor Teacher Program Manager works with an advisory team (representatives from the teacher’s association and several local colleges and universities) to ensure that only the best teachers are selected to mentor student teachers or new first-year teachers.  New Teacher Mentor Program: This program is designed to help first-year teachers succeed during a critical period in their professional development. The program involves intense mentoring, requires monthly meetings and classroom observations and a variety of support for mentor teachers and their first-year teachers. Monthly training classes are conducted for new teachers and their mentors.  In-Building Instructional Facilitators: CPSD historically has funded at least one "Instructional Facilitator" in every school (two in every high school, one full time and one half time in every middle school and one in every elementary school). There are 31 master teachers working as Instructional Facilitators. The Instructional Facilitator is the resident "mentor teacher" in each school. Tacoma School District: Tacoma Public Schools believes that new and veteran teachers require help, guidance and mentoring to achieve great success in the classroom. The Teacher Support System includes:  New teacher orientation and seminars: These sessions provide information concerning district programs, curriculum, as well as district policies and procedures.  New Teacher Mentor Program: This program is designed to help first and second year teachers succeed during a critical time in the professional development. This program involves intense mentoring, monthly meetings, classroom observations and a variety of support for mentor teachers and the beginning teachers. Funding is available to support the program through stipends; professional development sessions are a part of the program framework and include school principals. A district program facilitator
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 

supervises the program under the leadership of the Director of Professional and Organizational Development. Instructional facilitators, in some buildings, are assigned to provide continuous improvement in classroom instruction by providing instructional support to teachers in areas of lesson design, classroom assessment and classroom management. Alternative Route interns will be assigned to a specific mentor teacher for intense classroom mentoring until such time that the candidate demonstrates competency necessary to lead the classroom with less intensive supervision from the mentor.
District acknowledgement that Alternative Route 4 candidates are eligible to be hired as the teacher of record and are considered Highly Qualified Teachers (HQT) under Federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) regulations. (See Appendix C for Teacher Candidates Enrolled in Alternative Route to Certification Programs and Highly Qualified Teachers (HQT) Requirements). As a HQT, the Alternative Route 4 candidate will be assigned to their own classroom and a mentor teacher from the district will be assigned to the candidate. The district shall assure that the mentor teacher and the candidate have adequate time to meet during the course of the school year and that all requirements for the selection of the Mentor teacher for Alternative Route 4 candidates will be the same as any other Alternative Route candidate.

5.

District commitment letters are included in the Appendix. E. Field Experience Placements 1. Determining Placements: The applicant shall describe the process by which placements
will be made. Program personnel who are authorized to request a placement and the district personnel to whom the requests should be made shall be clearly identified. The agreement should also specify that candidates will not be placed in situations in which personal relationships or previous experiences could interfere with objective evaluation. Alternative Route candidates shall be placed with a Mentor teacher who meets the criteria as defined in Section D above, titled “Selection of a Mentor teacher”.

Internship Application: For Route 2-4 alternative route programs, candidates would need to complete the internship application along with their application to the program. The internship application provides information for the school districts to make an appropriate placement. As part of the internship application, all candidates will submit a portfolio of evidence/application materials indicating they have sufficient knowledge/skills to begin the internship year experience. The portfolio includes, but is not limited to: academic preparation page, letter of introduction to principal and cooperating teacher, video tape of a previous teaching presentation (required in various methods course practicum), current WSP/FBI Fingerprint background check with OSPI on file, passed WEST-E exams, completed endorsement paperwork, cumulative 3.0 or better GPA, with core classes each with a 2.0 or better. The program Director, Dr. Ann Gentle, will make placement requests with the assistance of the SMU Placement Officer, Faye Barnes. Among the stipulations regarding placement in the personal affidavit signed on the student teaching application are the following requirements.
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“I understand that I am not guaranteed placement in a particular school district, school building; or with a particular mentor teacher, university supervisor; and that final acceptance of a student teacher is the prerogative of the school district. I understand that I am not to make arrangements with any school district or school personnel regarding my placement, and in accordance to WAC code, not be placed for Teacher Candidate Internship in the school or district where I graduated from. I understand I may not intern in the same building where a spouse/family member/friend is employed. . . . I will be prepared to go where Saint Martin’s University is able to secure a Teacher Candidate Internship position.

2.

Background check and fingerprinting: Prior to the beginning of all field experiences
the program will verify that candidates have cleared fingerprint and background checks conducted through the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and that the program is responsible for assuring that the appropriate clearance remains in effect throughout the completion of any assigned field experience.

Prior to a candidate being allowed to be placed into a school for any internship or practicum experience, the university requires that the candidate has cleared fingerprint and background checks conducted through the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Candidate records are monitored to ensure that the clearance is up to date throughout the program until the application for certification is submitted.
3.

Brief description of the field experiences covered by the agreement: This
section should outline the nature of the field experiences being requested and covered by the agreement. For Alternative Route candidates the basic premise is that they will be in a yearlong mentored internship with the open exit option after one half school year if the candidate has demonstrated that they have met competencies for certification.

Each candidate is placed in a full-year field experience. Approximately the first eight to twelve weeks of the experience is considered to be practicum experience. This is an important concept for the candidate and the mentor to adhere to. The practicum experience allows for the application of concepts included in the intensive summer academy. The faculty members from the university can monitor those activities to ensure that the concepts are being applied appropriately, and to ensure that adjustments are made as needed. This process is critical to the success of the condensed format for the summer academy, which assumes the early stages of the field experience will be utilized for those experiences. During this phase, the candidate begins with acclimation to the classroom and school and engages in a variety of activities. The candidate begins with observations, but rather quickly transitions into a role of assisting the teacher with individual students and small groups of students, as well as providing limited instruction under the mentor’s direct supervision. Since the grant requires a minimum of one half year of internship, the candidate does not take full responsibility for the classroom until after this period is completed. Once the candidate has been involved in the classroom for the initial period she or he enters into the formal period traditionally associated with student teaching. This is done after the mentor teacher and university supervisor have completed formal observations of the candidate and are in agreement that the candidate is ready to assume full responsibility for the classroom with the appropriate oversight by the mentor and university supervisor (soloing).
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During the period of soloing, the mentor provides support to the candidate, often reviewing lesson plans, providing suggestions and other feedback. Generally the candidate assumes the responsibility for the class for a minimum of 8 weeks, but the mentor and the university supervisor are available as resources and periodically observe to make sure all is going well and to provide that support that is needed for success.
4.

Roles, responsibilities, and expectations: A description of the roles, responsibilities,
and expectations for: (1) candidates (2) supervisors and (3) mentor teachers shall be developed and shared between partners. In cases where programs have developed handbooks or other materials containing this information, those materials shall be reviewed by the program and the district. The program shall provide evidence that they have communicated the expectations to district Mentor teachers.

Roles, responsibilities and expectations have been established and are included in the Student teacher handbook. Each Candidate, mentor teacher, responsible building administrator, and university supervisor is provided with a copy of the Student Teaching Handbook. http://www.stmartin.edu/education/Documents/StudentTeachingHandbook/2010/TeacherCan didateHandbook-Dec2010.pdf Those roles, responsibilities and expectations are discussed in the initial team meetings and reviewed as appropriate throughout the experience.
5.

Other provisions: Districts and programs may mutually agree to include other provisions in
addition to those listed above governing field experiences. For PESB guidelines for field placement agreements go to http://sites.google.com/a/pesb.wa.gov/home/prepprogram.

Agreements include no other provisions not already addressed in other sections. F. Program Design
Provide program design information for each alternative route(s) the partnership program intends to offer including: 1. A detailed description of how the routes will be structured and operated by the partnership.

The program is designed to enroll students through three of the four identified routes. Those routes are: Route 2: currently employed classified staff with a baccalaureate degree, or higher, seeking residency certification in subject matter shortage areas, and areas with shortages due to geographic location. Interns will complete a year-long or less mentored internship. Candidates in this route will earn a minimum of two endorsements with at least one in a subject matter shortage area, and/or geographic location shortage area. Interns will attend an intensive summer teaching academy followed by the yearlong or less mentored internship. Route 3: individuals who are not currently employed in the district, who hold a baccalaureate degree or higher and can document a minimum of one year of professional experience. Candidates in this route will earn a minimum of two endorsements with at least one in a subject matter shortage area, and/or geographic location shortage area. Interns will attend an intensive summer teaching academy followed by the year-long or less mentored internship.
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Route 4: individuals teaching with conditional or emergency substitute certificates, who hold a baccalaureate degree or higher. Candidates in this route will earn a minimum of two endorsements with at least one in a subject matter shortage area, and/or geographic location shortage area. Interns will attend an intensive summer teaching academy followed by the year-long or less mentored internship. For all routes candidates will be expected to pursue endorsement in one or more of the state identified shortage areas: Special Education, English as a Second Language, Chemistry, Science, Mathematics, Middle Level Math/Science, Early Childhood Special Education, Biology, (Physics, or Earth Science with cooperative arrangements with another recommending institution).

2.

Description of the screening process for applicants to alternative route programs, including entry requirements specific to each route, advising and assessment of candidates’ previous work experience. (Appendix A contains a detailed description of the eligibility criteria and entry requirements for each of the four routes).

Eligibility and entry requirements: Saint Martin’s University will ensure compliance with the eligibility criteria and entry requirements, as established at Appendix A of the RFP and this application. All eligibility and entry requirements will be part of the application procedure established for all candidates. Districts have committed to providing a well qualified mentor teacher for each candidate. Specific criteria for acceptance/placement of candidates, as well as any additional district funding/support will be determined by the districts, in consultation with the STAR Program Director to ensure that all requirements of the grant are met. In addition to the eligibility and entry requirements specified in the RFP, Saint Martin’s University Education Division will also utilize the same application standards currently in effect for all students: Application requirements for Saint Martin’s University education programs:  Earned “C” or better in a series of pre-professional courses, including: English I, English II, speech or theater, college level mathematics, introduction to psychology, human development, computer literacy, intercultural communication, introduction to education.  All students must complete an on-site essay to assess basic writing and communication skills, as well as content.  State, University, and Division forms – including the Character and Fitness form  Three Letters of Recommendation  Cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale – or a recent full semester of an earned 3.0 or better GPA. The 3.0 GPA must be maintained to qualify for student teaching.  Successful passing of all three sections (reading, writing, math) of the WEST-B exam  Successful passing of all WEST-E exams  An interview with program personnel  For those wishing to also earn the Masters in Teaching degree, the GRE or MAT is required. The screening process for applicants will include the entry requirements for the STAR Program, as detailed in Appendix A of the Request for Proposal (see appendices).
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Initial Screening: The Partnership will utilize several screening opportunities: Saint Martin’s University will provide initial screening to determine eligibility of the candidate for the program (e.g., Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college/university for Routes 2-4; a minimum of one year of work experience, etc.). Saint Martin’s will then provide application materials for each candidate and review all applications for completeness. A Selection Committee representing Saint Martin’s University faculty and staff and school district personnel will then rank order the candidates based on potential for success, endorsement areas, and long and short range goals. Saint Martin’s University faculty members believe that screening also needs to be a continuous process throughout the candidates’ programs. Screening, therefore, will also include the following: Final Acceptance Interview: All applicants must attend a Final Acceptance Interview, where they are evaluated for the program. The evaluation covers all the application materials, including on-site essay and program planning. In addition, the evaluation rates the applicants on the following: clear goals, professional impression, logical responses, voice and speech, punctuality, and listening skills. Test scores, recommendations, personal statement, past grades and an overall rating are also used to determine acceptance to the program. Staffing: Staffing is a screening process throughout the student’s educational program. The purpose of Staffing is to determine appropriate advising, if any, with regards to the student’s grades and/or professional dispositions. Any faculty member of the education division may recommend Staffing for an individual student and any faculty who has had contact with the particular student may give input. As appropriate, a faculty representative discusses the situation with the student and advises remedial actions. It is the desire of the education division faculty to promote and encourage the professional growth of all its students. However, if needed, the Staffing Advisor will counsel the student into a different career choice. The student is asked to sign the Staffing Record, indicating they were informed of the Staffing and the results. Internship Application: For Route 2-4 alternative route programs, candidates would need to complete the internship application along with their application to the program. The internship application provides information for the school districts to make an appropriate placement. As part of the internship application, all candidates will submit a portfolio of evidence/application materials indicating they have sufficient knowledge/skills to begin the internship year experience. The portfolio includes, but is not limited to: academic preparation page, letter of introduction to principal and cooperating teacher, video tape of a previous teaching presentation (required in various methods course practicum), current WSP/FBI Fingerprint background check with OSPI on file, passed WEST-E exams, completed endorsement paperwork, cumulative 3.0 or better GPA, with core classes each with a 2.0 or better. Internship Experience: The university supervisor, classroom mentor teacher and (frequently) the building principal evaluate the candidate throughout the experience. If, at any time, this team assesses the candidate as not meeting expectations/standards, the Chair of Field Experience is notified of the situation. The Chair then conducts an Intervention (problem solving, one-on-one mentoring/tutoring). If needed, the student is “pulled” from the program and is typically placed in an intensive directed practicum for the remainder of the semester. The student may re-apply for a second internship experience the following semester in one of our regular programs.
3. FORM 2A Teacher Development Plans- - Each Alternative Route program will provide a detailed description of how they will specify the alternative route coursework and training required of each candidate by Alternative Routes to Certification Program Proposal PAGE 15 of 39 August 2010

comparing the candidate's prior experience and coursework with the state's new performance-based standards for residency certification and adjusting any requirements accordingly. The program will also provide a description of the open exit option available to candidates in Routes 2, 3 and 4 (Appendix B contains desired components of a teacher development plan).

Identification of Endorsements to be earned: All candidates will receive intensive, one-on-one transcript analysis to determine and identify the endorsements to be earned. According to Saint Martin’s policy, all candidates will be required to earn a minimum of 2 performance-based endorsements –the first endorsement (usually in the area of the candidate’s Bachelor’s degree), and a second endorsement. All candidates will have the opportunity to earn a Middle Level endorsement – either the Middle Level Math, Middle Level Science, or Middle Level Humanities. All candidates will earn at least one endorsement in a subject or geographic shortage area. All candidates will receive counseling as to the supply and demand needs for endorsements in the state. Candidates, as part of the application process, write an essay on their career goals. Advisors will use this as an additional tool to discuss possible future “add-on” endorsements to be earned by the candidates. Endorsements in Special Education, Teaching English Language Learners, Bilingual Education, Math, Chemistry, and/or Science are endorsements which will be specifically encouraged. Change of career candidates: The Partnership will also actively recruit individuals seeking a change of career. These individuals (many rich in backgrounds in science, math, and/or computer skills) will be retiring and/or “let go” from businesses/government offices/military in the process of downsizing. The Partnership, located in the South Sound area, is geographically located close to the homes of many of these individuals – thus encouraging participation in the program. Performance-based format: Candidates will incorporate all learning opportunities as performancebased knowledge/skills experiences. All learning opportunities for this internship year will be provided during the late afternoons after school, evenings, and Saturdays (as needed) and/or during the summer (intensive foundations academy). Students will receive individualized assessment of required knowledge/skills prior to the start of the program. Waivers and substitutions, based on appropriate documentation, will be awarded for previous coursework and life experiences. Remaining required knowledge/skills will be obtained through seminars and modules of formalized learning opportunities in field-based settings. Candidates will earn credits in three ways: 1) through regular course enrollment during the summer, fall, and spring, 2) through modular learning opportunities throughout the program year, and 3) through credit earned by evaluation of documentation of previous life or work experience. On-site Formalized Learning Opportunities: Learning experiences will be offered at locations within driving distance to the candidates. The university and/or Partner districts will provide location(s) for the learning opportunities. Specific location of the learning opportunities will be determined by program and student needs/classroom locations. Candidates and instructors will meet on a prescheduled basis to capitalize on the opportunity for discussion/development of the classroom application of knowledge and skills. Those students who have already had the particular knowledge/skills waived for the scheduled learning opportunity will not be required to attend that seminar/module. Individual academic counseling: All candidates accepted to the program will have one-on-one transcript and life experience counseling with a Saint Martin’s University faculty member. The
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counseling will include a detailed program planning for the duration of the candidates program. The counseling will also include an evaluation of transcripts for options for additional optional endorsements. Candidates will be informed as to the procedure and requirements for course waivers (based on previous life/work experiences) and for course substitutions (for courses transferred for other colleges/universities). Waivers for courses based on previous life/work experiences will be granted upon approval of appropriate documentation, including, but not limited to:  Letters of support from principals, teachers, faculty  Samples of work products documenting appropriate knowledge/skills (e.g., lesson plans, samples of student work, samples of candidate responses to student work, etc. – for paraprofessionals; samples of computer applications; etc.)  Samples of work evaluations pertaining to other appropriate knowledge/skills (e.g., leadership, ability to communicate in writing, ability to get along with others, etc.)  Video-tape of candidate teaching K-12 students Partial waivers are also possible. Candidates may waive a portion of a course based on appropriate documentation, but may still need to complete a portion of the knowledge/skills. The formalized learning opportunities will be designed to allow candidates to attend only those seminars/modules needed in order to complete the required knowledge/skills. Early (Open) Exit: The candidate may request an Early Exit from Student Teaching at any point after ½ year of internship. Approval will be granted upon positive evaluation of the Performance-based Pedagogy Assessment Rubric (TPA if implemented) by the classroom mentor teacher and university supervisor. All criteria must have been evaluated at the “Met” level; documentation for Positive Impact on Student Learning, the Comprehensive Instructional Plan portfolio, the Family involvement Plan, Professional Growth plan, and all other portfolio requirements must be completed and approved; and the candidate’s Final Reflection must be submitted to the supervisor. For all alternative routes, candidates would be able to complete the internship once the benchmarks have all been “Met” on the Performance-based Pedagogy Assessment Rubric. The classroom mentor teacher, university supervisor, and internship seminar instructor would all need to approve the Early (Open) Exit.

4.

Strategies for recruiting candidates from under represented populations.

Marketing and recruitment efforts for the STAR program will include encouragement for candidates of color to apply. Evening information sessions will allow candidates of color to attend and learn about the program. Saint Martin’s University currently enrolls 38% students of color and the Education Division enrolls 18% – well above the national average of 12% minority teachers and also above the state average of 14% minority teachers. The Saint Martin’s alternative route program has averaged 13.5% minority candidates to complete the program from 2002-2003 to the current year. Participants in the current (2010-2011) program include 14.3% minorities.

Completed Candidates in the Alternative Route Program Saint Martin’s University (includes those receiving the conditional loan scholarships:
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Year 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 20102011* Total 2002-2011

# White Candidates 13 14 13 13 13 17 18 22 12 135

# Other Ethnic Candidates 5 0 3 0 2 3 3 3 2 21

Total # Candidates 18 14 16 13 15 20 21 25 14 156

% Minority Candidates 27.8% 0.0% 18.75% 0.0% 13.3% 15.0% 14.3% 12.0% 14.3% 13.5%

*Currently enrolled students expected to complete.

Specific recruitment and retention strategies include: A. Minority teachers/alumni will be requested to be on the PEAB. The alumni will help us market, recruit, and retain minority students. Alternative route minority alumni will be specifically recruited for the PEAB. B. Alternative route minority alumni will be also be recruited as additional support mentor/”buddies” for current minority candidates. Alumni who have been successful in the alternative route program will share their wisdom and success strategies to current candidates. C. Minority alternative route students will be asked to participate in Saint Martin’s recruiting events, D. Financial Aid, Student Accounts, Registrar and other University offices are well attuned to the needs of individual students. With all application materials otherwise considered “equal”, candidates of color will be given preference for acceptance to the program. E. Districts in the partnership will, in particular, encourage classified staff and

conditional/emergency substitute teachers of color to apply to the program.
5. The number of interns the partnership intends to enroll in each route.

Of the total of 25 anticipated candidates in the program per year, it is anticipated that 3 will be Route 2, 20 will be Route 3, and 2 will be Route 4 candidates. These numbers do not represent allocation of slots to the Routes, but rather an estimate of the distribution that will occur.
FORM 2A Alternative Routes to Certification Program Proposal August 2010 PAGE 18 of 39

6.

Include a description of the components of the formal mentored internship leading to the Residency Certificate.

A. Full-time classroom assignment: candidates will be placed in a full-time internship position, starting with full-time mentoring and progressing to increasingly less intensive monitoring and assistance as the intern demonstrates the skills necessary to take over the classroom with less intensive support. The intensive mentorship will be scheduled for a full year with a minimum of one-half of a school year, with the additional time as necessary. B. Identification of performance indicators: Performance indicators based on the knowledge and skills standards required for residency certification by the state board of education are included on the university web site at http://www.stmartin.edu/education/Documents/WACProgramAlignmentCharts.pdf . Each student will also be provided with charts indicating the alignment of their courses and the Washington Administrative Codes and program Best Practices. An evaluation rubric will be used to assess both. The student will also be provided a chart of performance-based items he/she will need to prepare prior to certification. This portfolio is prepared/finalized during student teaching/internship. C. Identification of benchmarks: Benchmarks will indicate when the standard is met for all performance indicators. The Performance-based Pedagogy Assessment Rubric (TPA, if implemented) will be used to determine that the “Met” benchmark has been attained. Criterion assessed as “met”, but still indicating possible improvement in the Professional Growth Plan are the areas the candidate should work on for additional knowledge/skills during the Professional Certification program. D. Description of strategies for assessing candidate performance on the benchmarks will indicate when the standard is met for each/all performance indicators: Candidates will be evaluated against the Pedagogy Assessment Rubric (TPA, if implemented)on a regular basis during their internship (at least once during the first half-year, and at least two more times the second half-year) by the classroom mentor teacher and the university supervisor. All Standards must be assessed at the “Met” level for the intern to be deemed eligible for Early Exit. Students may apply for Early Exit at any time after a half-year internship has been completed. All Standards, endorsement competencies, and coursework knowledge/skills must be evaluated as being met/completed/on target. E. Identification of one or more tools to be used to assess a candidate’s performance after about one-half year: All candidates will be evaluated against the Pedagogy Assessment Rubric (TPA, if implemented); all endorsement competencies will need to have been “Met”; WEST-B and WEST-E tests taken and passed. The Classroom Learning Instructional Plan, Positive Impact Plan, Family Involvement Plan, Professional Growth Plan, and Personal Reflective paper must all be in at least draft stage. The Pedagogical Assessment Observation will be completed by both the mentor teacher and university supervisor at least once. F. Prior to recommendation for certification, the following will also need to be complete and approved by the certification officer, the placement officer, and/or the Dean: a) all final certification paperwork, including endorsement forms; b) development of a Placement File, including all pertinent components; c) payment of certification/placement file fees.

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7.

Evidence of a program plan for open exit option for candidates as regulated by RCW 28A.020: A minimum of one-half of a school year, and an additional significant amount of time if necessary, of intensive mentorship, starting with full-time mentoring and progressing to increasingly less intensive monitoring and assistance as the intern demonstrates the skills necessary to take over the classroom with less intensive support.

Description of the criteria that would result in residency certification after about one-half of a school year but before the end of the program: All the following must be complete and approved as Satisfactory or Excellent by the classroom mentor teacher and the university supervisor: a)All items on the Pedagogy Assessment Rubric (TPA if implemented) at the “Met” level; b)All endorsement competencies at the “Met” level; c) WEST-E tests taken and passed (at least one required upon entry to internship); d) Classroom Learning Instructional Plan; e) Positive Impact Plan; f) Family Involvement Plan; g) Professional Growth Plan; h) Personal Reflective paper; i) Performance-based Pedagogy Assessment (PPA) Observations (at least three observations by both the classroom mentor teacher and the university supervisor). The experience with the STAR program has been that each year for the past several years, there have typically been two or three candidates who have been eligible for early certification at or near the end of one-half year of internship, and have been placed in positions in one or more high needs areas. Additionally, several other candidates typically are eligible for certification later than one-half year but prior to the end of the full-year internship.

G. Organizational Capacity Identify the following:
1. Key personnel (faculty, administration, support)

Administration Ann Gentle, Ph.D, Program Director Ph.D., Columbia Pacific University Maureen Siera, Ed.D., Co-Director Ed.D., Oklahoma State University Joyce Westgard, Dean, CEPP Ed.D., Montana State University Steve Siera, Ph.D., Director MIT Program PhD., New Mexico State University Support Staff Faye Barnes, Placement Officer Mary Foust, Certification Officer

Faculty Ann Gentle, Ph.D, Program Director Ph.D., Columbia Pacific University Rebecca Campeau ABD, Walden University Huabin Chen Ph.D., Indiana University Cynthia Petersen Ed.D., University of San Francisco Eileen Reilich Ph.D., Washington State University Maureen Siera, Ed.D. Ed.D., Oklahoma State University Steve Siera, Ph.D. PhD., New Mexico State University Juli Stewart M.S., Washington State University Josephine Yung ABD., University of Washington

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2. Anticipated student-faculty ratio: Each class will be limited to 25 students. The maximum FTE student to faculty ratio is 13.3. 3. Describe previous experience in offering programs of this type Saint Martin’s University has been offering the program since 2002. Program evaluations have been quite positive and employment rates for graduates of the program have been very high. Administrators of the schools in which interns have been placed have provided favorable evaluations of the candidates, frequently complimenting them as having been particularly wellprepared, and successful. Additionally, administrators hiring the graduates have consistently report satisfaction, citing the extent of the content knowledge, maturity, and teaching skill of the graduates. However, the words of one of the STAR program candidates from 2003-2004 tells it so much more emphatically. In writing about his recent completion of his principal’s credential, he provided the following observation to our great pleasure: “Most importantly however, I would like you to know that my achievements have been built upon the solid educational foundations found at Saint Martin's University. More succinctly, the program courses involving lesson planning, classroom management, instructional practices, observations, practicums, etc. were in my opinion so closely related to my employment experience that the gap between theory and actual practice was virtually non-existent. I have since had the opportunity to officially mentor many new and experienced teachers in the improvement of classroom instructional practices, and have found that my certification experience is somewhat dissimilar to that of mentees and colleagues from other educational institutions across the nation. As such, it is to your credit that I write this note of acknowledgment for the positive impact you are having with students and schools in the field of education, and with deep appreciation to have experienced such an enriching, valuable, and worthwhile program found at Saint Martin's University.”
4. Signed Memorandum of Understanding (see Attachment A) outlining assurance of WEST-B and WEST-E testing requirements for candidates entering the Alternative Route program and Alternative Routes Enrollment Table and recruitment website commitments (required for PESB approval).

The signed Memorandum of Understanding is attached to the proposal. H. Program Delivery
1. Cost for candidates (Alternative Route programs must be packaged priced to reflect lower cost per candidate price than traditional programs)

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The program is provided at a substantial reduction to the basic tuition rate charged to students enrolled in the regular program. The table following this outlines the comparative costs. For those candidates pursuing the MIT degree, the costs are broken down into the cost for the first year which leads to certification as well as for the total cost to earn the MIT at the end of the second year. Certification Only a. Cost for Alternative Route b. If applicable: Cost for
Traditional Route

MIT $13,040 to cert $21,410 to MIT $27, 436 to cert $38,406 to MIT

$16,230 $32,937

2. Length of program 11 Months to certification, MIT typically takes about 24 months total 3. Projected start date June 20, 2011

4. Projected enrollment 25 per year 5. Location(s) Saint Martin’s University 5300 Pacific Avenue Lacey, WA 98503 And Selected school district schools

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Section 4- Contact Information
Name: Roy Heynderickx, Ph.D. Title: President Address: 5300 Pacific Avenue, SE Lacey, WA 98503 Telephone: 360-438-4307 Fax: 360-438-4340 Email: rfh@stmartin.edu March 10, 2011 Date

Chief Academic Officer, ESD Superintendent, Organization President or equivalent official

Name: Joyce Westgard, Ed.D. Title: Dean, College of Education and Professional Psychology Address: 5300 Pacific Avenue, SE Lacey, WA 98503 Telephone: 360-438-4333 Fax: 360-438-4486 Email: westgard@stmartin.edu

Dean, Director of Degree/Certification Unit or equivalent official

Date

Name: See attached letters Title: Address: Telephone: Fax: Email: Endorsement by Superintendent of School District or equivalent official Name: Title: Address: Telephone: Fax: Email: Endorsement by Superintendent of School District or equivalent official Date Date

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Name: Title: Address: Telephone: Fax: Email: Endorsement by Superintendent of School District or equivalent official Date

Name: Title: Address: Telephone: Fax: Email: Endorsement by Superintendent of School District or equivalent official Date

Name: Title: Address: Telephone: Fax: Email: Endorsement by Superintendent of School District or equivalent official Date

Resources: Educational Benchmarking EBI; Teacher Education Exit Study; SMC Alternative Route; 2003 Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction; Washington State; Educator Supply and Demand in Washington State 2006 Report; Spring 2007 Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction; Washington State; http://reportcard.ospi.k12.wa.us 2009 information Washington State Institute for Public Policy, Marna Miller; Alternative Routes to Teacher Certification in Washington State: Final Report and Appendices; December 2004

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MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING Between PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR STANDARDS BOARD And
Name of Organization: Organization type Four-year public college or university X Four-year independent college or university Community College Private non-profit organization Other public agency (ESD, School District) Private for-profit organization Saint Martin’s University

Memorandum of Understanding: Agreement between the Professional Educator Standards Board (PESB) and Saint Martin’s University regarding the exchange of information required by the Alternative Routes to Certification Program Approval. Purpose of Agreement: The purpose of this agreement is to specify reporting requirements of Alternative Routes programs approved by PESB to offer teacher and or principal preparation programs. Period of Performance: The Agreement becomes effective the date of signature and remains in effect until modified or cancelled by either party. Confidential Information: The term “confidential information” as used in this Agreement means any and all information provided by Saint Martin’s University to PESB, staff, officers, and independent contractors which is exempt from mandatory disclosure under the terms of the state public disclosure laws codified at chapter 42.56 RCW. The term “confidential information” includes, but is not limited to: 1. Any personally identifiable student or staff-related information, including, but not limited to (a) staff/student names, (b) the name of a staff/student’s parent or other family members, (c) staff/student addresses, (d) the address of a staff/student’s family, (e) personal identifiers such as a social security number or student number or staff/certification number, (f) personal characteristics that would make a staff/student’s identity easily traceable, (g) any combination of information that would make a staff/student’s identity easily traceable, (h) test results for schools and districts which test fewer than ten students in a grade level, and (i) any other personally identifiable information, or portrayal of staff/student related information in a personally identifiable manner. (See, specifically, RCW 42.56.230(1) which exempts personal information in files maintained for students in public schools from mandatory public disclosure; RCW 42.56.070 (1) which exempts from mandatory public disclosure information specified in certain RCWs and “other statute which … exempts or prohibits disclosure …” such as the federal FERPA statute at 20 U.S.C. section 1332g and its implementing regulations at 34 CFR Part 99, which prohibit the unauthorized public disclosure and redisclosure of “personally identifiable student information” in or from student “education records”; the state ethics law at RCW 42.52.050(2) which prohibits state officers and employees from disclosing confidential information as defined above; and RCW 28A.655.090(7), the fewer than 10 students rule.) Description of Data: By reference, the information coded below is the complete list of data required by the PESB:
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As a requirement for recommendation of approval of an Alternative Route to Certification program by the Professional Educator Standards Board (PESB), the program applicant agrees to provide the PESB with the following data and comply with the following requirements for operating an Alternative Route to Certification program. 1) Ensure that all candidates accepted into an approved Alternative Routes program have passed required WEST-B and WEST-E assessments as a requirement for admission to program. 2) Provide PESB with all program information in a guided format suitable for inclusion on the PESB recruitment website www.pathways.wa.gov. 3) Provide the PESB with all candidate and Mentor teacher information in a guided format suitable for inclusion in the Alternative Routes Enrollment Table. Note: Information and guided formats are provided as an addendum to this Memorandum of Understanding. Data will be made available to PESB in a manner agreed to by both parties on a schedule agreed to by both parties. The PESB may amend this agreement by annually negotiating additional items of information to be included in this memorandum of understanding. Such amendment will be in writing and signed by both parties. Amendments will specify the data, the convention for entering the data, and the date of execution of the amendment. Unless amended to include confidential information, data provided under this agreement shall be available per state public disclosure laws codified in chapter 42.56 RCW. Confidential information shall only be requested for use in specific projects requiring that information to conduct research or analysis. An amendment for including confidential information shall specify safeguards for information and redisclosure in compliance with all relevant federal and state laws. Unless specified by amendment, information received by PESB from Saint Martin’s University shall be analyzed by PESB solely for the purpose of developing policy guidance for the board and information for the general public. Each party to this Agreement is entitled to display and share information and analysis from this exchange. Parties to this agreement may request and receive publicly available data held by PESB, so long as the data has been determined as re-disclosable by the source of the data. PESB is not a data source, but negotiates release of other, publicly produced data. Redisclosure: Except as amended for confidential information, all data exchanged through this agreement may be redisclosed by either party. No Guarantee of Accuracy and Non-Liability: Neither OSPI or PESB guarantee the accuracy of the data provided. All risk and liabilities of use and misuse of information by either party provided pursuant to this Agreement are understood and assumed. Termination: Either party may at its discretion disqualify at any time any person authorized access to information by or pursuant to this Agreement. Notice of disqualification shall be in writing and shall terminate a disqualified person’s access to any information provided by either party pursuant to this Agreement immediately upon delivery of the notice. Disqualification of one or more persons by either party does not affect other persons authorized by or pursuant to this Agreement.
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Nondiscrimination: No individual shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, subjected to discrimination under, or denied employment in the administration of or in connection with any program provided by this Agreement because of race, color, creed, marital status, religion, sex, national origin, Vietnam era or disabled veteran’s status, age, the presence of any sensory, mental or physical disability, or political affiliation or belief, provided that the prohibition against discrimination in employment because of disability shall not apply if the particular disability prevents the individual from performing the essential functions of her or her employment position, even with reasonable accommodation. The parties agree to abide by the standards of responsibility toward the disabled as specified by the Americans with Disabilities Act and applicable state law. In the event that one of the parties hereto refuses to comply with the above provision, this Agreement may be canceled, terminated, or suspended in whole or in part by the other party. Records Maintenance: The parties to this Agreement shall each maintain books, records, documents and other evidence which sufficiently and properly reflect all work activity These records shall be subject to inspection, review or audit by personnel of both parties, other personnel duly authorized by either party, the Office of the State Auditor, and federal officials so authorized by law. All books, records, documents, and other material relevant to this Agreement will be retained for six years after expiration and the Office of the State Auditor, federal auditors, and any persons duly authorized by the parties shall have full access and the right to examine any of these materials during this period. Records and other documents, in any medium, furnished by one party to this Agreement to the other party, will remain the property of the furnishing party, unless otherwise agreed. The receiving party will not disclose or make available this material to any third parties without first giving notice to the furnishing party and giving it a reasonable opportunity to respond. Each party will utilize reasonable security procedures and protections to assure that records and documents provided by the other party are not erroneously disclosed to third parties. Responsibility for Acts and Omissions: Each party to this Agreement shall be responsible for any and all acts and omissions of its own staff, employees, officers, and agents acting within the score of their responsibilities. Contact information and signatures: Name: Roy Heynderickx, Ph.D. Title: President Address: 5300 Pacific Avenue, SE Lacey, WA 98503 Telephone: 360-438-4307 Fax: 360-438-4340 Email: rfh@stmartin.edu March 10, 2011 Date

Chief Academic Officer, ESD Superintendent, Organization President or equivalent official

Name: Title:
FORM 2A

Joyce Westgard, Ed.D. Dean, College of Education and Professional Psychology
Alternative Routes to Certification Program Proposal August 2010 PAGE 27 of 39

Address: 5300 Pacific Avenue, SE Lacey, WA 98503 Telephone: 360-438-4333 Fax: 360-438-4486 Email: westgard@stmartin.edu

Dean, Director of Degree/Certification Unit or equivalent official Name: Title: Address: Telephone: Fax: Email: PESB Signature Authority

Date

Date

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Addendum: Memorandum of Understanding- Alternative Routes to Certification Application
The following guided formats and information is provided: 1) Ensure that all candidates accepted into an approved Alternative Routes program have passed required WEST-B and WEST-E assessments as a requirement for admission to program. Required by RCW 28A.660.040 2) Provide PESB with the following program information in a guided format suitable for inclusion on the PESB recruitment website www.pathways.wa.gov:          Name of Institution Institution Logo Main Address Site Address Description of Program by Site Routes and Endorsements offered by site Web page url for site Candidate Quote Coordinator information for each site o Name o Phone Number o Email

3) Provide PESB with all candidate and Mentor teacher information in a guided format suitable for inclusion in the Alternative Route Enrollment Table. All PESB approved Alternative Route program(s) shall use the directions below for completing the MOU requirement of entering candidates into the Alternative Routes Enrollment Table. Directions for completing the Alternative Route Enrollment Table The PESB Alternative Route Enrollment table is essentially an Excel Spreadsheet that you fill out online. It saves, backs up, and shares the data with the appropriate people. There is more than one tab in the workbook, but we only need the first filled out, the other tabs populate by themselves. The key for this project is to be exact about how the data is keyed into the table (computers are very literal, and will see Science and science differently)

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Security/Sharing - Your work on this page is automatically saved and can been seen by PESB and anyone on in your department that you would like to grant access. Permissions are granted to your school email address and will require you creating a Google login and password using your school email. This allows us to quickly and efficiently manage permissions. Your Google account is yours, it can be used for PESB projects, or anything other project with any other people. Information Type Name Name Contact Contact Field Definition First name of the enrolled student Last name of the enrolled student Contact Email for the enrolled student Contact phone number for the enrolled student use "20XX-20XX" (yes, this will be the same for all students) Program Academic Year This will be the current academic year for the cohort you are entering Program Institution The institution name (also the same for all your students) Program Site Use the city address, i.e. "Olympia" or "Seattle" Program Route Number Use only "1" "2" "3" or "4" Program Scholarship Use only "Y" or "N" Demographic DOB use MM/DD/YYYY format Demographic Gender use only "Female" or "Male" or "Not Reported" Demographic Ethnicity (new) This is the new Federal ethnicity codes (don't need for now) Demographic Race (new) This is the new Federal race codes (again, don't need for now) Use only the letters A, B, H, I, W, M, or N "A" Asian/Pacific Islander, "B" Black/African American Demographic Race (old) "H" Hispanic, "I" Native American/Alaskan, "W" White "M" Multiracial, "N" Not Reported Mentor and Training (1-4) Mentor Teacher Cert Number The mentor teacher's WA teaching cert number (123456A) Did this person have the proper Alternative Route Mentor Training? Mentor and Training (1-4) Y/N If the student has only one mentor for the year, leave the rest of the columns blank Add the expected endorsement that this student will receive upon completion. Select your answers from the Endorsement Table below Expected Endorsement (1-4) Endorsement If only one, leave the other columns blank Completion Completed (Y/N/D) Has this student completed/dropped the program? Completion Date Completed Use MM/DD/YYYY For our purposes, a student will not be considered completed until they have Completion WA Cert Number Awarded received a WA state certificate number (123456A)
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Field Name First Last Email Phone

Endorsement Table Answer Options Art Bilingual Biology Chemistry Dance Deaf Education Earth and Space Early Childhood Early Childhood Special Ed Elementary Education English Language Arts English Language Learners Environmental Gifted Health and Fitness History Mathematics Middle Level Humanities Middle Level Mathematics Middle Level Science Choral Music General Music Instrumental Music Physics Reading Science
FORM 2A

Category Arts Specialty Science Science Arts Specialty Science Early Childhood Elementary Secondary K-12 Specialty Specialty K-12 Secondary Secondary Middle Level Middle Level Middle Level Arts Arts Arts Science K-12 Science

Answer Definition Visual Bilingual Education Biology Chemistry Dance Deaf Education Earth and Space Early Childhood Education Early Childhood Special Education Elementary Education English Language Arts English Language Learners Environmental and Sustainability Education Gifted Education Health and Fitness History Mathematics Humanities Middle Level Mathematics Those that a Math/Science endorsement, add to both categories Middle Level Science Choral Music For those that have "All Music," place once in each music endorsement Designated Arts: General Music For those that have "All Music," place once in each music endorsement Designated Arts: Instrumental Music For those that have "All Music," place once in each music endorsement Designated Science: Physics Reading All Science
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Alternative Routes to Certification Program Proposal August 2010

Endorsement Table Answer Options Social Studies Special Education Theatre Agricultural Business Family Technology World Language N/A

Category Secondary K-12 Arts CTE CTE CTE CTE K-12

Answer Definition Social Studies Special Education Designated Arts: Theatre Agricultural Education (CTE) Business and Marketing Education (CTE) Family and Consumer Science Education (CTE) Technology Education (CTE) Designated Foreign Language Not applicable (i.e. Principal, Superintendent, ESA)

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APPENDIX A Eligibility Criteria and Entry Requirements (from ESSSB 6696) Alternative Routes to Teacher Certification Alternative routes for classified staff -Route 1: Alternative route programs operating route one programs shall enroll currently employed classified instructional employees with transferable associate degrees seeking residency teacher certification with endorsements in special education, bilingual education, or English as a second language. It is anticipated that candidates enrolled in this route will complete both their baccalaureate degree and requirements for residency certification in two years or less, including a mentored internship to be completed in the final year. In addition, partnership programs shall uphold entry requirements for candidates that include:    District or building validation of qualifications, including one year of successful student interaction and leadership as a classified instructional employee; Successful passage of the statewide basic skills exam and, Meeting the age, good moral character, and personal fitness requirements adopted by rule for teachers.

Alternative routes for currently employed classified staff with baccalaureate degrees-Route 2: Alternative route programs operating route two programs shall enroll currently employed classified staff with baccalaureate degrees seeking residency teacher certification in subject matter shortage areas and areas with shortages due to geographic location. Candidates enrolled in this route must complete a mentored internship complemented by flexibly scheduled training and coursework offered at a local site, such as a school or educational service district, or online or via videoconference over the K-20 network, in collaboration with the partnership program's higher education partner. In addition, partnership grant programs shall uphold entry requirements for candidates that include:      District or building validation of qualifications, including one year of successful student interaction and leadership as classified staff; A baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education. The individual's college or university grade point average may be considered as a selection factor; Successful completion of the subject matter assessment required by RCW 28A.410.220 (3); Meeting the age, good moral character, and personal fitness requirements adopted by rule for teachers; and Successful passage of the statewide basic skills exam.

Alternative route for individuals with subject-matter expertise in shortage areas currently employed outside the school system -Route 3: Alternative route programs seeking funds to operate route three programs shall enroll individuals with baccalaureate degrees, who are not employed in the district at the time of application. When selecting candidates for certification through route three, districts and approved preparation program providers shall give priority to individuals who are seeking residency teacher certification in subject matter shortage areas or shortages due to geographic locations. Cohorts of candidates for this route shall attend an intensive summer teaching academy, followed by a full year employed by a district in a mentored internship, followed, if necessary, by a second summer teaching academy. In addition, partnership programs shall uphold entry requirements for candidates that include:
FORM 2A Alternative Routes to Certification Program Proposal June 2010 PAGE 33 of 39

    

A baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education. The individual's grade point average may be considered as a selection factor; Successful completion of the subject matter assessment required by RCW 28A.410.220 (3); External validation of qualifications, including demonstrated successful experience with students or children, such as reference letters and letters of support from previous employers; Meeting the age, good moral character, and personal fitness requirements adopted by rule for teachers; and Successful passage of statewide basic skills exam. (required by RCW 28A.660.040)

Alternative route for individuals teaching with conditional or emergency certificates-Route 4: Alternative route programs operating route four programs shall enroll individuals with baccalaureate degrees, who are employed in the district at the time of application, or who hold conditional teaching certificates or emergency substitute certificates. Cohorts of candidates for this route shall attend an intensive summer teaching academy, followed by a full year employed by a district in a mentored internship. If employed on a conditional certificate, the intern may serve as the teacher of record, supported by a well-trained mentor. In addition, partnership programs shall uphold entry requirements for candidates that include:      A baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education. The individual's grade point average may be considered as a selection factor; Successful completion of the subject matter assessment required by RCW 28A.410.220 (3); External validation of qualifications, including demonstrated successful experience with students or children, such as reference letters and letters of support from previous employers; Meeting the age, good moral character, and personal fitness requirements adopted by rule for teachers; and Successful passage of statewide basic skills exam (required by RCW 28A.660.040)

Applicants for alternative route programs who are eligible veterans or national guard members and who meet the entry requirements for the alternative route program for which application is made shall be given preference in admission. Note, as referenced above: The statewide basic skills assessment required is typically the WEST-B and the subject matter assessment required is typically the WEST-E.

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APPENDIX B Formalized Learning Opportunities and Components of the Teacher Development Plan Alternative Route Programs are Performance-Based: Washington’s Administrative Code outlines standards for the knowledge and skills a prospective teacher must successfully demonstrate before receiving residency certification. According to state law, teacher interns can satisfy these standards either through a sequence of courses or through experiences in which they acquire and apply necessary knowledge and skills. Alternative Route programs are intended to allow performancebased preparation where successful interns demonstrate evidence of appropriate knowledge and skills for each state standard. Performance-based Alternative Route programs typically use one or more of the following strategies: Previous Experience and/or Knowledge is Recognized: Programs shall allow interns to use past professional and educational experience as evidence of competency. All approved programs shall conduct an initial assessment of each intern’s competency based on a transcript review, past professional experience, and/or an entry portfolio as evidence of proficiency to satisfy teaching standards. Based on this initial assessment, interns, faculty supervisors, and, in some cases, mentors create a teacher development plan outlining remaining competencies and appropriate evidence or coursework needed to complete residency certification standards. Programs must demonstrate that they have a way to recognize past experience as evidence of competency and adapt coursework/evidence requirements accordingly. A waiver for past experience may be used for coursework. The Teacher Development Plan: The teacher development plan shall specify the alternative route coursework and training required of each candidate and shall be developed by comparing the candidate's prior experience and coursework with the state's new performance-based standards for residency certification and adjusting any requirements accordingly. Competency is based on evidence of proficiency rather than hours of instruction. The plan shall include the following components: 1. A minimum of one-half of a school year, and an additional significant amount of time if necessary, of intensive mentorship, starting with full-time mentoring and progressing to increasingly less intensive monitoring and assistance as the intern demonstrates the skills necessary to take over the classroom with less intensive support. Also include the description of the criteria that would result in residency certification after one-half of a school year but before the end of the program; 2. Identification of one or more tools to be used to assess a candidate's performance once the candidate has been in the classroom for one-half of a school year; 3. Development of a standards framework identifying state teaching standards, learner outcomes, and field-based performance indicators. These performance indicators or evidences are used in addition to, or in place of, traditional courses; 4. Identification of performance indicators based on the knowledge and skills standards required for residency certification by the Professional Educator Standards Board. Development of a series of detailed performance tasks or field-based assignments coinciding with each standard; 5. Identification of benchmarks that will indicate when the standard is met for all performance indicators.

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APPENDIX C Teacher Candidates Enrolled in Alternative Route to Certification Programs and Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) Requirements

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January 25, 2010

( ) Action Requested (X) Informational

MEMORANDUM NO.008-10M SPECIAL PROGRAMS & FEDERAL ACCOUNTABILITY TO: Educational Service District Superintendents School District Superintendents School Building Principals School District HR Directors and Staff Educational Service District Certification Specialists Higher Education Schools of Education Deans Higher Education Schools of Education Directors of Teacher Certification Higher Education Certification Officers Randy I. Dorn, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jennifer Wallace, Executive Director, Professional Educator Standards Board Teacher Candidates Enrolled in Alternative Route to Certification Programs and Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) Requirements

FROM:

RE:

CONTACT: Mea Moore, Alternative Route to Certification Programs, PESB (360) 725-6276, Mea.Moore@k12.wa.us Mary Jo Johnson, Highly Qualified Teachers (360) 725-6340, MaryJo.Johnson@k12.wa.us, David Kinnunen, Certification (360) 725-6406, David.Kinnunen@k12.wa.us Agency TTY number (360) 664-3631 The Professional Educator Standards Board (PESB) along with the Title II and Certification offices of the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) seek to clarify communication related to the highly qualified teacher (HQT) status of a teacher candidate enrolled in a PESB approved alternative route to certification program.
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MEMORANDUM No.008-10M SP & FA Page 2 January 25, 2010

DESCRIPTION: Teacher candidates enrolled in alternative route to certification programs and who are actively seeking employment meet HQT requirements when fulfilling four specific conditions. One of these conditions includes holding a “conditional” certificate. Therefore, the answer to the question, “Are teacher candidates on a conditional certificate considered highly qualified while enrolled in a state approved program?” applies. The answer follows:  Teachers with conditional certificates, who are assigned to teach core academic subjects, meet the HQT requirements when they fulfill all four of the following conditions: 1. Have at least a bachelor’s degree. 2. Are enrolled in a residency teacher preparation program, including alternative route to certification programs. 3. Demonstrate knowledge of the subject assigned to teach through the appropriate HQT pathway. 4. Scheduled to complete the teacher preparation program (including Alternative Route to Certification program) within three years while holding a conditional certificate.

WHO DOES THIS AFFECT? School districts may consider candidates for employment on a conditional certificate who meet the four conditions outlined above. This includes the following candidates:     “Route Two” paraprofessionals in an alternative route to certification. “Route Three” career changers in an alternative route to certification. “Route Four” teachers enrolled in an alternative route to certification. Other teachers of record on a conditional certificate enrolled in a teacher preparation program.

PLEASE NOTE: Route One candidates are paraprofessionals who hold a transferable Associate of Arts degree. Route One candidates are not eligible for a conditional certificate as they do not hold a Bachelor of Arts or Sciences degree. Questions about alternative route to certification programs, highly qualified teachers and certification can be directed to the following:

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MEMORANDUM No.008-10M SP & FA Page 3 January 25, 2010

Alternative Route to Certification Programs HQT Requirements Teacher Certification

Mea Moore Title II Staff Certification Staff

Mea.Moore@k12.wa.us TitleIIQuality@k12.wa.us Cert@k12.wa.us

(360) 725-6276 (360) 725-6340 (360) 725-6400

The OSPI TTY number is (360) 664-3631.

K-12 EDUCATION Alan Burke, Ed.D. Deputy Superintendent SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FEDERAL ACCOUNTABILITY Bob Harmon Assistant Superintendent Mary Jo Johnson Director, Title II Part A

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR STANDARDS BOARD Jennifer Wallace Executive Director EXTERNAL RELATIONS Robert Harkins Deputy Superintendent PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION David Kinnunen Associate Director

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