Kindergarten The Jungle

By Ashley Scherle

Table of Context: General Information: a. Topic b. Grade c. Scope d. Rationale Unit Content: a. Outcomes b. Concept Web c. Essential Question d. Unit Questions e. Cross-curricular Connections Fact/Information Sheet Unit Outline Chart Professional Teaching Strategies Assessing readiness Unit Assessment and Evaluation Classroom Management Plan Adaptive Dimension Material List Professional Development plan Resource List 10 Lessons Professional Development Plans for each lesson Assessment tools and charts

General Information: A) Topic: Jungle/Rainforest B) Grade: Kindergarten C) Scope: This unit is a kindergarten themed unit on the Jungle/Rainforest. This unit has ten lessons and with room for extensions. The main focus for this unit is how and why Jungles are important to us. Throughout the ten lessons, students will learn about: what a Jungle is, what they look like (layers in the jungle), types of animals (similarities/differences), types of plants (some plants give us food and medicine), and the gifts the Jungle give us (food, medicine, clean air to breathe). This unit using a variety of resources to help inform young children about a magical, beautiful part of our Earth and how Jungles give us many different types of resources that we use on a daily bases. Throughout this unit the teacher will guide their students though a variety of diverse activities to help students gain an understanding of the importance of the Jungle. The outcomes and indicators from each lesson come from the Saskatchewan Curriculum. Furthermore, each lesson uses a variety of instructional strategies to help support the diversity in the classroom. D) Rationale: It is important for students to learn about the different aspects of the Earth. Jungles/Rainforests affect our environment and society greatly. It is important for students to learn that Jungles are not just some far away place that does not affect them, the Jungle gives us many resources that we need to live. Teaching young children about our Earth will help them become more aware of the world around them. This unit is a friendly way to begin to teach students the Jungle/Rainforest. Unit Content: A) Outcomes: Science: LTK.1 Examine observable characteristics of plants, animals, and people in the Jungle. LTK.1 Examine observable characteristics of plants in the Jungle. LTK.1 Examine observable characteristics of animals NSK.1 Explore features of their natural surroundings (weather conditions) Arts Education: CPK.3 Create sound compositions exploring the elements of music including: repeating patterns

CPK.4 Create art works that express own observations and ideas about the world. CPK.2 Explore a variety of drama strategies including: role CPK.1 Express ideas through exploration of the elements of dance including: action, body and space Language Arts: CRK.3 Listen, comprehend, and respond to gain meaning in oral texts. CRK.4 Comprehend, retell, and respond to basic ideas in stories and oral information

B) Concept Web:
TYPES ENVIRONMEN T

GIFTS OF THE JUNGLE

ANIMALS PLANTS TYPES

FOOD

THE JUNGLE

STRUCTURE

4 LAYERS

TYPES WEATHER

LOCATION RAINFORES T

HOT AND WET

C) Essential Question: How is the Jungle important to us? D) Unit/Content Questions: 1. What is a Jungle? 2. What animals live in the Jungle? 3. What are some similarities/differences between the animals? 4. What kinds of plants live in the Jungle? 5. What is the structure of the Jungle? 6. What is a Rainforest? 7. What is the weather like in the Jungle? 8. Where are Jungles located? 9. What kind of food comes from the Jungle? 10. What are the gifts that come from the Jungle? E) Cross-Curricula Connections:

Language Arts: Is integrated through out the whole unit. Language Arts is an important aspect in Kindergarten for building the foundation of learning to read and write. Through out this unit students will listen to stories, work on letters and their corresponding sounds. It is important that students have many opportunities to listen to stories and oral texts and become to understand and comprehend the English language.

Health: Many healthy foods grow in the Jungle. In this unit, one lesson discusses different plants in the Jungle and how some give as food. For example, Bananas, Pineapples, Cocoa etc.

Physical Education: Many of the lessons involve hands on activity were students are up and moving around. The students will be creating actions for a story called Over in the Jungle and also for a short story called the Weather Ride. One lesson will be in the gym where students will be making a Jungle animal dance.

Mathematics: This unit briefly touches on math. In the story Over in the Jungle it uses counting from one to ten. You could easily add in more mathematics by looking at patterns of bird feathers or count plants or animals they see in a picture or story you read to your students.

Social Studies: This unit touches on the how people are connected to the natural environment. In this unit students learn that there are many gifts that come from the Jungle that we use in our everyday life. For example, food, medicine, chairs (made out of wood), bicycle tires (rubber). The four Cross-curricular competencies are: developing thinking, developing identity, developing interdependence, developing literacies and developing social responsibility are integrated throughout this unit.

Fact Information Sheet: Jungle: Land covered with thick plants like trees, vines and ferns. There are many different jungles around the world. More than half of the plants and animals of the world live in the jungle. Jungles can also be called Rainforests. Rainforest: They are found in the tropical region. It is very hot all year and rains almost everyday. Rainforests are very wet. There are four layers in the Jungle: Forest Floor: Has very little to no sunlight Dead leaves Ferns, mosses and mushrooms grow (only shade plants that need little sunlight can grow here) Vines begin at the forest floor and grow through the layers Insects live here Tree roots Understory: From near the ground to about 18 meters Small trees Little sunlight Some birds live here about 18 meters to 40 meters Thick, green and leafy Lots of sunlight Most animals, birds and insects live in the canopy

Canopy:

Flowers grow here Fruit grows here Emergent: 40 meters to about 60-70 meters Tall trees that tower over the other trees Tall trees develop buttress roots above ground to help them from falling over These trees get the most sunlight Area/region near the equator.

Tropical: Plants:

Vines: are called lianas. They wind around trees towards the sunlight. When they get to the canopy layer the vines spread out wrap round trees. Epiphytes: These plants attach themselves to trunks and high branches of trees. They do this to reach sunlight. There are about 30, 000 species of epiphytes in the rainforests. They use the wind to spread their seeds. To get water they either send out aerial roots to get water from the air or they collect it in their leaves. Most common are orchids. Collect water in leaves that are shaped like a container. Insects lay eggs in the water. Most common is the Pineapple. Usually have bright coloured flowers (red, orange, blue, purple)

Bromeliads:

Pitcher Plants: Eat small insects. These plants have flowers that are shaped like a jug. Water is collected in the jug and when an insect goes inside a jug it snaps shut. Banana: Herb not a tree but grows tall. It takes about 3 to 4 months before a banana is ready to eat. When it breaks off more begin to grow. 10 or more bananas grow together forms a hand. Banana stems have about 150 fingers.

Big-Leaf Mahogany: Tall tree reaching 60 meters. Found in Emergent layer of the Jungle. Big-Leaf Mahogany can leave up to 350 years. Has a graybrown fruit and small white flowers. Cacao: This evergreen tree grows 4 to 8 meters tall. This tree grows pods which turn red and purple when ripe. Grows well in the wet and shade. Cocoa is used to make chocolate. Coffee: Grows to be a 9 meter bush. Coffee flowers are small and white and when then fall off small berries grow. Start as a dark green colour then turn red when ripe. It takes 6 to 8 years to be fully developed. They can live for 100 years.

Kapok:Tallest tree in the jungle reaching more then 60 meters. Many frogs and birds live in these trees. They lose there leaves in dry season. These trees have white and pink flowers with an odour that attracts bats which help pollinate. Poinsettia: The most colourful part of the bush is the leaves. The flower is the small yellow in the middle of the leaves. These are used as a decoration for Christmas.

http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/kids/species-profiles? gclid=CNi93uSyl6cCFQS7KgodDTQtew#plants 1987-2011 Rainforest Alliance

Animals: Birds: Hummingbird: Toucan: Long thin beak for sucking nectar out of flowers. Colourful Long, orange, big beak. Black and white feathers. They eat berries.

Parrot: Colourful and have a strong beak for cracking nuts. Noisy Owl: Active at night, can see in the dark, make a hooting noise.

Apes and Monkeys: Apes do not have tails. (Gorillas, chimpanzees and oranguatans) They eat fruit leaves, insects. Monkeys have long tails. Marmosets are the smallest monkeys. Live in the high trees and swing from tree to tree. Howler Monkeys make loud calls to other monkeys to tell them to stay away from their territory. Snakes: Anaconda: Usually green, one of the largest snakes in the world. Boa Constrictor: live in Understory where they eat rats, mice, lizards, fish, birds and wild pig. They squeeze their prey. Crocodiles: Hunt for prey by hiding in the water. Have a long mouth with many sharp teeth.

Fish: Piranhas: Capybaras:

They have very sharp teeth. water hog, largest rodent.

Tiger: Large Cat, meat eater. Jaguar: Large spotted cat. Ocelot:Are spotted cats. They are most active at night. They look down for prey up in the tree branches. Leaf-cutter ants: collect leaves and bring them to there colonies. Biggest spider in the world (as big as a plate)

Goliath Bird-eating spider: Butterflies: Flying lizard: Tree frogs: Honey Bears:

Morpho butterflies are blue with large wings. Drink nectar gtom rotting fruit. They can glide through the air. Can be different colours: green and black, red, blue, yellow and black. They are poisonous. Have long tails for climbing. They live in the canopy. They eat fruit, insects and honey (from bees’ nests.)

Sloth: Slow animals that live in the canopy. They have long fur and moss grows on it. They hang upside down when sleeping.

Unit Outline Chart
Content Knowledge 1. Intro to the Jungle a. What is a Jungle? b. What are the four layers of the Jungle Skills/ Processes Discussion Listening Singing Attitudes/ Values Develop an interest in learning about the Jungle. Learning Experiences a. –KWL together as a class talk them write on the chart what they know and what to know. b. Discussion around what does a Jungle look like. There are four layers in the Jungle: Forest Floor, Understory, Canopy, and Emergent. Discuss what each layer looks like. c. Sing a song about the layers in the Jungle. a. Sing a song about the layers in the Jungle. b. Hands on activity colouring a picture of each layer of the Jungle then gluing onto construction paper. With guidance use yarn to make into a mobile. a. Class discussion of what a Rainforest is and where it is located. b. Look at a globe to visually see where in the world the Rainforest is located and learn about what the weather is like. c. Interactive story where students become different types of weather while the teacher reads the story. d. Students draw a picture of their understanding of the weather in the Rainforest. a. Look at pictures and discuss simple facts about different types of plants that live in the Jungle. b. Create a Kapok Tree with paper towel rolls, leaves and glue. Students will work on their fine motor skills and following directions. a. Inside a gift bag there are many different items that come from the Jungle. Students will take turns taking an item out of the bag and discuss what it is and its importance. b. Students will draw a picture of a Jungle item that is important to them. c. The student can share their work with classmates and the teacher. a. Read a story together called Jungle Animals. Teaching Strategies Interactive -Large group discussion Direct -Explicit Teaching Indirect -Inquiry Assessment/ Evaluation Observation Oral assessment

2.

Layers in the Jungle a. What are the four layers in the Jungle? b. What is the correct order? Weather and Location a. What is a Rainfor est? b. What is the weather like?

Discussion Colouring/Gluing

Develop an interest for the Jungle habitat.

Interactive -Discussion Direct -Listening and Viewing

Checklist

3.

Discussion Interactive Story (role playing)

Develop curiosity about the weather.

Experiential -role playing Direct -listening and reviewing Interactive -discussion

Observation Quick Draw

4.

Jungle Plants a. What are some plants that live in the Jungle? b. What do you know about some of the plants? Gifts of the Jungle a. What are some gifts that come from the Jungle? b. How is the Jungle important to you?

Discussion Hand-on art activity (fine motor skills)

Develop curiosity/ Interest in plants and how they live.

Direct -structured Overview Interactive -Discussion Experiential -Project Work

Observation

5.

Discussion Fine motor skills Drawing/Writing

Students develop a respect for the Jungle.

Direct -Explicit Teaching Interactive -Discussion Independent Study -Assigned Question

Observation Quick Draw

6.

Jungle Animals a. What are some

Listening

Develop a curiosity for

Interactive -Story Discussion, Pair

Observation

animals that live in the Jungle? b. Where in the Jungle do these animals live?

Discussion Drawing

different animals.

7.

Jungle Animal Dance a. What are some animal movements?

Listening Movement Skills (coordination) Creativity

Develop an interest in dance.

b. Discuss the animals that were in the book. And give students the opportunity to ask questions. c. In pairs have students work on a matching game. d. Students will glue animal pieces in the correct layer. a. Learn the actions for the Chicken Dance then practice with the music. b. Make monkey movements to the music. c. Create a Monkey Dance to the same music as the Chicken Dance.

work

Worksheet

Experiential -Exploring movements for dance Interactive -Group Interaction

Observation Scale Assessment

8.

Jungle Animals a. What are some animal movements?

Listening Role Playing Cooperation

Develop an interest in Role Playing

a.

b. c.

9.

Diorama

Listening Creativity Fine motor Skills

Develop an overall understandin g of what a Jungle is

a.

b.

c.

10. Field Trip/
Closure

Listening Respecting

Develop an appreciation for the environment around us

Read the story Over in the Jungle By Marianne Berkes looking at the illustrations. Re-read the story added actions for each animal Paint diorama boxes for the next day. Using Over in the Jungle By Marianne Berkes to inspire model clay creations and shoe box Jungle. Create animals using model clay. Students have a choice to what they create Create a shoe box Jungle. Include Kapok Tree from previous lesson, stickers, drawings etc. a. Group circle discussion of what you learned and your favourite activity. b. Discuss field trip to the Floral Conservatory c. Discover plants and flowers in the Floral Conservatory and plant a plant.

Interactive -Story Discussion

Observation

Experiential -Project Work

Observation Oral Assessment

Indirect -Reflective Discussion

Observation

Professional Teaching Strategies Interactive -Large group discussion -Pair Work -Group Interaction -Story Direct -Explicit Teaching -Listening and Viewing -Structured Overview Experiential -role playing -Project Work -Exploring movements for dance Independent Study -Assigned Question Indirect Instruction -Inquiry -Reflective Discussion Assessing readiness: The first lesson of this unit is uses a KWL chart which will assess the student’s readiness. Students will also have the opportunity to say things they want to know about the Jungle, which will help direct the way the unit will go, where to start and which questions that will need to be addressed. Unit Assessment and Evaluation: The main assessment on a daily basis is observing the students during the lesson and recording what you see on a data collecting chart. Students will also have an oral assessment where you meet one on one with the student and write down their answer to the question asked. Students will also be assessed on quick drawings, since students are unable to write they will express what they learned through their drawing. The final assessment will be an individual project where students will be creating a diorama of the Jungle. Using a variety of materials (with guidance) students will create a mini Jungle in a shoe box. Students will then share their diorama with the teacher. The student is to share all the things they have learned about the Jungle using their diorama.

Classroom Management Plan: Classroom Management will vary depending on the lesson and activities involved. Refer to individual lessons to see management strategies being used. Some basic management that is always used in the classroom is when the students arrive in classroom they go to their lockers, get their running shoes and come sit quickly on the carpet in front of the chair and wait for instruction. To get students attention I call out Kindergarten, or eyes on me. The students already know these two strategies. A few students in my classroom are very active and call out when they are not asked to. A good strategy that works for these students is to stop, call out their name and tell them to stop and raise their hand if they have a question. Adaptive Dimension: Please refer to individual lessons as each are adapted differently depending on the activity. The main adaptive dimension is including making hands on activities that involve movement. The students in my class are very active and have a lot of energy. Also a few students in the class are easily distracted. By including many hands on activity students will do get so easily distracted. Also when students work in pairs it is important that the teacher makes the groups as some students in my class do not work well together. Also I choice pair work for one of my lessons so that students can work together. This will help some of the struggling students in the classroom. Also some students are very quiet and to themselves, when having group discussion the teacher should call out student’s names instead of always picking the same students with their hands up. This is important so that the teacher knows you is understanding the lesson and who isn’t. Material List: Each lesson has a list of materials that will be needed. Please refer to each lesson below. Professional development Plan: From my experience last semester in the classroom, I learned lot of who I am as a becoming teacher. Some areas that I feel need improvement are classroom management, having appropriate/measurable indicators, more engagement with the students, asking students more in-depth questions and assessment. I found that sometimes I was so focused on my lesson plan and following every detail that I did not take enough time to interact with the students. Building a good relationship with your students is a very important aspect of teaching. I want to also work on assessing my students on a daily basis. For each of my lessons I have appropriate targets to help improve my teaching in the classroom.

Resource List: ***Books that are bolded are used directly in my unit. Allman, Barbara. (2005) All About the Rainforest PreK-K. Evan-Moor Corp, Monterey, CA. Andreae, Giles. (2009) Rumble in the Jungle. Orchard Books, Sydney Australia. Andreae, Giles. Parker-Rees, Guy. (1999) Giraffes Can’t Dance. Orchard Books, Great Britain, London. (CD read along) Berkes, Marianne. (2007) Over in the Jungle: A Rainforest Rhyme. Dawn Publications, Nevada City, U.S. Bousman, Cindy. (2006) Put Your Left Paw In! A Jungle Hokey-Pokey. Kindermusik Inernational, Inc., North Carolina, US. (CD included) Castaldo, Nancy. (2003) Rainforests: An activity Guide for Ages 6-9. Chicago Review Press, Chicago, Illinois. Chinery, Michael. (2000) Secrets of the Rainforest: Plants and Planteaters. Crabtree Publishing Company, New York, NY. Cruxton, J. Bradley. (1998) Discovery the Amazon Rainforest. Oxford University Press, Don Mills, Ontario. Greenaway, Theresa. (2009) Jungle: Discover life in the tropical rain forest-from exotic birds to millions of species of insects. DK Publishing, New York, NY Grupper, Jonathan. (1997) Destination: Rainforest. Publishers Group West, Washington, D.C. Harter, Debbie. (1997) Walking through the Jungle. Barefoot Books Ltd., Cambridge, MA. Harter, Debbie. (2000) The Animal Boogie. Barefoot Books Ltd., Cambridge, MA. Johnson, Jinny. Palin, Nicki. (2009) Jungle Animals: Flip the Flaps. Kingfisher, New York, NY. Kalman, Bobbie. (2007) A Rainforest Habitat. Crabtree Publishing Company, Catharines, ON. Mitton, Tony. Parker, Ant. (2009) Amazing Animals: Rainforest Romp. Kingfisher, New York, NY.

Morgan, Sally. (1999) Saving The Rain Forests. A divison of Grolier Publishing, Danbury, CT. Morris, Neil. (1998) Forests. Crabtree Publishing Company, New York, NY. Pandell, Karen. (1999) Journey Through the Northern Rainforest. Dutton Children’s Books, New York, NY. Purser, Bruce. (2003) Jungle Bugs: Masters of Camouflage and Mimicry. Firefly Books, Toronto, Ontario. Osborne, Will. (2001) Magic Tree House Research Guide: Rain Forests. Random House, Inc., New York. CD: Echoes of Nature: Rainforest The Natural Sounds of the Wilderness. (1993) Delta Music Inc., Santa Monica, CA. Pictures: http://library.thinkquest.org/5087/Orchid.htm http://www.homehydroponics.info/phppmperfect/plant-advanced-nutrients/want-greatorchids http://www.flickr.com/photos/praziquantel/2370704464/ http://travel.mongabay.com/gabon/images/gabon_2190.html http://debtorby.typepad.com/connections/2008/10/rainforest-trees-trails-and-vines.html http://www.creatingcorridors.org/F&F/Mushrooms.htm http://www.moplants.com/gallery2/v/Tropicalia/bog+pitcher+plant.jpg.html http://travel.mongabay.com/pictures/0199_Nepenthes_pitcher_plant.html http://mset.rst2.edu/portfolios/d/dispenza_l/web_design/rainforests_final/emergent_layer/ emergent_layer.htm

Lesson Plan #1 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science/Arts Education: Music Content/Topic: Introduction to the Jungle: What is a Jungle? Date: Grade: Kindergarten Instructional Strategies: Direct (Explicit Teaching) and Interactive (Large group discussion) Indirect (Inquiry)

Outcomes: LTK.1 Examine observable characteristics of plants, animals, and people. CPK.3 Create sound compositions exploring the elements of music including: repeating patterns

Indicators: Students will be able to: Record with assistance observable characteristics of the Jungle. Use sources such as stories, visual images and music to inspire music making.

Cross Curricula Competencies: Language Arts: listen, comprehend oral language CCC: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Students are able to listen and share their ideas by raising their hands.

Adaptive Dimension: In this lesson there are pictures for students to look at which helps the visual learners. There is also a song we sing with actions which helps the musical and kinaesthetic learners. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: 2 pictures of the Jungle, Chart paper, markers, felt board and pieces, “Walk in the Rainforest”, Music for piano, piano, Lyrics for “Jungle has four layers” Set-up: Make sure chart paper and felt board are ready.

Set ( 10 minutes) 1. Gather students on the floor in front of the chart paper. 2. Hold up two pictures showing a jungle atmosphere. Ask students: “What is this picture of? Why do you think that?” 3. Tell the students this is a picture of a jungle. We are going to be learning about the jungle. Let’s make a chart of what we know about the jungle and what we want to learn. (KWL chart) 4. Ask students to share all the things they know about the jungle and want to learn on write it down on the chart paper. 5. Read the short story called “Walk in the Rainforest.” Jungle: Land covered with thick plants like trees, vines and shrubs and bushes. There are many different jungles around the world. More than half of the plants and animals of the world live in the jungle. Jungles can also be called Rainforests. Rainforest: They are found in the tropical region. It is very hot all year and rains almost everyday. Rainforests are very wet. Development ( 20 minutes) 1. Tell the students that since the jungle is so big and tall they divided the jungle into four layers to make it easier to learn about the different parts of the jungle. 2. Uses the felt board introduce the four layers. Forest Floor: Has very little to no sunlight Dead leaves Ferns, mosses and mushrooms grow (only shade plants that need little sunlight can grow here) Vines begin at the forest floor and grow through the layers Insects live here Tree roots Understory: From near the ground to about 18 meters Small trees Little sunlight Some birds live here Canopy: about 18 meters to 40 meters Thick, green and leafy Lots of sunlight Most animals, birds and insects live in the canopy Flowers grow here Fruit grows here

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Gather the students on the floor facing the teacher chair. If a student is having a hard time listening and paying attention move them up to sit closer to you. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have felt board ready. Ask students to raise their hands if they have a question. Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task.

“Layers of the Jungle” song: Tune: “If you’re happy and you know it” There are four layers in the Jungle. 4 LAYERS! There are four layers in the Jungle. 4 LAYERS! Forest floor, understory, canopy, emergent.

http://www.lessonplanspage.com/SSMDRainForestUnitK.htm

Lesson Plan #2 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Visual Art/Language Arts Content/Topic: Layers in the Jungle Date: Grade: Kindergarten Instructional Strategies: Interactive (class discussion), Direct (Listening and Viewing)

Outcomes: CPK.4 Create art works that express own observations and ideas about the world.

Indicators: Students will be able to: Observe and identify top, middle and bottom Work on their small motor skills

CRK.3 Listen, comprehend, and respond to gain meaning in oral texts.

Recognize letters and their corresponding sounds. Graphophonic cues Following Directions

Cross Curricula Competencies: Dance: Movement patterns to the song “Layers of the Jungle” CCC: developing thinking, developing literacies

Prerequisite Learning: Students understand what a Jungle is and what the four layers are. Students are able to colour using markers or crayons.

Adaptive Dimension: This lesson focuses on small motor skills which are important for kindergarten students you need practice in developing these skills. This lesson also is hands on learning which helps engage student learning. This lesson also focuses on letters on the alphabet and there sounds. This is good practice for students who need more practice with letters in the alphabet.

Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Pg. 71-73 in All About the Rainforest Book (20 copies), yarn, scissors, crayons/markers, glue, hole punch, Song “Jungle has four layers”, piano, piano music, chart paper and markers Set Up: Photocopy colouring pages, cut out paper and coloured paper (6 pieces/child), bring a hole punch, have piano music ready. Set ( 10 minutes) 1. Gather on the carpet on the floor. Review the four layers by writing them on the chart paper as the students tell you. 2. Ask the students to tell you the first letter of each of the words and say their sound. 3. Sing the “Layers of the Jungle” Development ( 30 minutes) 1. Move to the table area. Ask students to grab their buckets and move to the table. 2. Ask students to put the layers in the correct order. Walk around to make sure all students understand. 3. Show students my Jungle Layer Mobile and review what each layer is. 4. Then colour each layer. (using markers or crayons) 5. Then have students glue their drawings onto coloured paper. 6. Help student’s hole punch and use yarn to connect them all together. 7. Ask students to write their name on the back and collect all students work. Closure ( 5 minutes) 1. Review the first letter of each layer and its sounds. Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Gather the students on the floor facing the teacher chair. If a student is having a hard time listening and paying attention move them up to sit closer to you. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have Piano music ready. Have all students’ art supplies on the table ready to use. Ask students to repeat the directions to make sure students understand what to do.

2. Read books if students finish early.

Assessment: Checklist: Students follow directions, are able to put the pieces in the collect order, students recognize the letters and the letter sounds.

Lesson Plan #3 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science/Arts Education-Drama Content/Topic: Weather and Location Date: Grade: Kindergarten Instructional Strategies: Experiential Learning (role playing), Direct (listening and reviewing), Interactive (discussion) Indicators: Student’s will be able to: e. Listen to others and work co-operatively in dramatic contexts. h. Assume roles willingly in contextual drama. c. Describe and illustrate features of the Tropical Rainforest such as: weather conditions

Outcomes: CPK.2 Explore a variety of drama strategies including: • role NSK.1 Explore features of their natural surroundings (weather conditions)

Cross Curricula Competencies: Language Arts: listening, speaking, comprehend and gain meaning from oral texts CCC: developing thinking, developing identity, developing literacies, developing social responsibility Prerequisite Learning: Students know a few weather words (i.e. rain, sunny) Adaptive Dimension: In this lesson I adapted the science curriculum. It discusses the local environment however I adapted it to the Tropical Rainforest environment to fit with my lesson and unit theme. In this lesson students will be actively involved in the short story by having roles and actions to participate in. This works well for many of my students as they are very active and many can not sit still for long periods of time. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: chart paper, marker, globe, short story “Weather Ride” in All about the Rainforest Set-up: Photocopy and know the short story well, have chart paper, marker and globe ready to use.

Set ( 10 minutes) 1. Gather students on the carpet. 2. Review what there are many different types Jungles. Then discuss what a rainforest is and then talk about the location of a rainforest. 3. Look at a globe and show where the tropical rainforests are and then show the students on the globe where we are. Tropical: Area/region near the equator 4. Talk about what the weather is like in Rainforest. (It rains a lot, sunlight for 12 hours a day, very hot, high humidity (amount of moisture in the air, it always feels wet), weather stays mostly the same year round.) 5. Amazon is the biggest tropical rainforest. There are also large tropical rainforests in Central America, Africa, Asia, New Guinea and Australia. 6. Make a list on the chart paper of what the weather is like in the tropical rainforest.

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Gather the students on the floor facing the teacher chair. If a student is having a hard time listening and paying attention move them up to sit closer to you. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Ask students to raise their hands if they have a question. Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Look at the Globe ahead of time so it is ready to go for the lesson.

Development ( 20 minutes) 1. Read the short story called Weather Ride Have paper ready on table for on pg. 48 of All about the Rainforest to students to draw their weather the class and ask them to listen to the picture. different weather words they hear. (light rain, heavy rain, wind, thunderstorm) 2. Ask students what words they heard them write them down. 3. Ask students to make a noise with their body parts that would represent each word. 4. Then practice each movement and sound as a class. 5. Reread the short story and ask students to make the sound/movements when they hear the words. Closure ( 5 minutes) 1. Review what the Tropical Rainforest is and what is the weather like there. 2. Ask students to draw a quick picture of what the weather in the Tropical Rainforest looks like.

Assessment: Observe students to see if they are listening and working well with others in the short story drama. Are students participating in the short story drama? Collect student’s drawings of what they think the weather in the tropical rainforest looks like. (Rain, sun, thunderstorm, hot weather) Do students show a clear understanding in their drawing what the weather looks like in

Lesson Plan #4 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science/ Arts Education: Visual Art Content/Topic: Jungle Plants Date: Grade: Kindergarten Instructional Strategies: Direct (Structured Overview), Interactive (Discussion), Experiential (Project Work) Indicators: Student’s will be able to: j. Create visual representation of the characteristics of a plant share with classmates and others. a. Pose questions about observable characteristics of plants (i.e. are all plants have roots in the ground? Do all plants need water?) h. Demonstrate co-ordination and development of skills in the use of simple visual art tools and materials. a. Discuss choices made in creating art works.

Outcomes: LTK.1 Examine observable characteristics of plants in the Jungle.

CPK.4 Create art works that express own observations and ideas about the world.

Cross Curricula Competencies: Language Arts: Listening and comprehending oral texts. CCC: developing thinking, developing identity, developing literacies, developing social responsibility Prerequisite Learning: Students have already worked with markers and glue sticks. Adaptive Dimension: In this lesson students not only look at pictures and discuss different types of plants in the Jungle there is hands-on experience by creating a Tree with different types of materials. This lesson is also good practice for the student’s fine motor skills. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up)

Materials: Magic Tree House Research Guide Rain Forests By Will Osborne and Mary Pope Osborne, Paper toilet/toilet paper rolls, paper, leaves, glue, markers Set-up: Have paper toilet/toilet paper rolls cut and ready, have leaves on plates around the tables, write plant message on the chart paper before the class starts.

Set ( 15 minutes) 1. Begin by reading message off the chart paper. Paragraph from Magic Tree House Research Guide Rain Forests By Will Osborne and Mary Pope Osborne On Pg. 31 More than half of all the different kinds of plants on earth grow in the jungles. Many Jungle plants have not even been discovered yet. But some that we do know about are truly amazing. There are plants that eat insects. There are plants with fruits longer than baseball bats. There are plants with flowers bigger than bicycle tires. 2. Review that there are many different plants in the Jungle here are some pictures of a few of them. 3. Giant rafflesia flower: Biggest flower in the world, grows on the Forest floor, can weigh up to 25 pounds and it has a stinky smell. Orchids: grow up in the canopy on trees where there is a lot of sun. There are many different kinds and colours of orchids. Lianas are vines (hard, woody stems) Wind around trees towards the sunlight. Roots in ground and grow upwards (lots in the Understory and canopy. Fungi: grow on the forest floor (don’t need light to grow) Live off of dead plants and animal matter. Example mushrooms. Pitcher Plant: Eat small insets. These plants have flowers that are shaped like a jug. Water is collects in the jug and when an insect goes inside a jug it snaps shut and the plant eats it for food. Banana Herb: Banana is fruit that we eat. Takes 3 to 4 months before we can eat them. Banana stems have about 150 fingers. Cocoa tree: grows well in shade and wet areas. Understory. Cocoa is used to make chocolate. Coffee bush: grows flowers then berries which are used for making coffee. Takes 6 to 8 years to e fully ripe. They can live for 100 years. Kapok Tree: Tallest tree in the Jungle reaching more then 60 meters 150 feet. Lots of plants and animals live on these trees. Development ( 20 minutes) 1. After students look at all the plant pictures ask them if they have any questions. 2. Tell the class that we are going to make our own Kapok Tree. 3. Ask students to get their buckets and move over the tables.

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Gather the students on the floor facing the teacher chair. If a student is having a hard time listening and paying attention move them up to sit closer to you. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have art supplies on the table ready to go. Ask students to raise their hands if they have a question. Walk around the room to make sure everyone is on task and to help with any questions or troubles the students may have. Only give 3 directions at one time and ask a student to repeat directions to check for charity. When giving directions make sure students hands are free.

Extension: If there is extra time you could go over the chart paper writing and work on language skills. (Example: Letter sounds, vowels etc)

Lesson Plan #5 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science/Language Arts Content/Topic: Gifts of the Jungle Date: Grade: Kindergarten Instructional Strategies: Direct (Explicit Teaching), Interactive (discussion), Independent Study (Assigned Question) Indicators: Student’s will be able to: j. Create visual representation of the characteristics of a student-selected plant or food found in the Jungle that is important to the student. j. Relate personal experiences, and represent responses through a drawing

Outcomes: LTK.1 Examine observable characteristics of plants, animals, and people

CRK.4 Comprehend, retell, and respond to basic ideas in stories and oral information

CRK.3 Listen, comprehend, and respond to gain meaning in oral texts.

d. Follow simple directions correctly and independently (e.g., Please put away your markers away and put your picture on the shelf.) and remember instructions given earlier.

Cross Curricula Competencies: Health: Food/Healthy eating CCC: developing thinking, developing identity, developing literacies, developing social responsibility Prerequisite Learning: Students are able to trace letters and words. Adaptive Dimension: Not all students can write all of their letters, inside of students having to print each letter they can trace the letters and words instead. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: chart paper, marker, Magic Tree House Research Guide Rain Forest By Will Osborne and Mary Pope Osborne, gift bag with banana, tomato, wood, bicycle, rubber, orange, pineapple, grapefruit, black pepper, cinnamon, coffee, nuts, chicle (makes gum

chewy), cocoa beans (used for making chocolate), rosy periwinkle flower, paper for drawing “The Jungle is important to me”, markers Set-up: Write Paragraph on chart paper, have paper on the table ready for the students, have gift bag ready with all the items.

Set ( 8 minutes) 1. Gather students on the floor in front of the chart paper. 2. Read the message to the class. Paragraph from Magic Tree House Research Guide Rain Forest By Will Osborne and Mary Pope Osborne on pg. 91 Jungles can seem like magical, far away places. But many things we use every day come from Jungles around the world. 3. Bring the large gift bag full of everyday things we use. 4. Pick one student to come up and pick an item out of the bag. (Items include: banana, tomato, wood, bicycle, rubber, orange, pineapple, grapefruit, black pepper, cinnamon, coffee, nuts, chicle (makes gum chewy), cocoa beans (used for making chocolate), rosy periwinkle flower (used in medicines to help people you have cancer) 5. Talk about each item. Example questions: What is it? Do you like eating this? What is it used for? 6. Tell students that these foods where first found in the Jungle and now are grown in farms around the world. 7. Tell the students that not only is the Jungle important because it gives us food to eat it. There are many different plants that are used for medicine to help people feel better when they are sick. For example the rosy periwinkle flower this is used to treat many different kinds of cancer. Banana leaves can be cut up and used on a burn, also many plants help when you have a cold or cough. Ginger can be used as a spice for cooking but also help treat colds (boil root and drink as a tea) 8. The Jungle is also important to us because it helps give us clean air to breathe. Plants give us oxygen which we all need to live. Development ( 20 minutes) 1. After hearing about all the good things the Jungle gives us I want you to pick one thing you like that comes from the Jungle and draw a picture of it. 2. Some example are ( bananas, bicycle, cocoa bean) 3. Together as a class write done on your paper “The Jungle is important to me” 4. Have students follow each letter as I write it on the big chart paper. 5. Have students draw their picture on the

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Gather the students on the floor facing the teacher chair. If a student is having a hard time listening and paying attention move them up to sit closer to you. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Ask students to raise their hands if they have a question. Walk around the room to make sure everyone is on task and to help with any questions or troubles the students may have. Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Call out students names for your helpers instead of picking students who have their hand ups.

Lesson Plan #6 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Jungle Animals Date: Grade: Kindergarten Instructional Strategies: Interactive (story, discussion, pair groups) Indicators: Students will be able to: i. Sort and classify pictures and drawings of animals, using student-developed criteria. h. Identify similarities and differences in observable characteristics among different animals.

Outcomes: LTK.1 Examine observable characteristics of animals

Cross Curricula Competencies: Language Arts: speaking, communicating and working with others CCC: developing thinking, developing identity, developing literacies, developing social responsibility Prerequisite Learning: Students are able to work with a partner in the class. Adaptive Dimension: Students are able to work with a partner to help each other and learn together. This also helps students build their social skills. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Jungle Animals By Nicki Palin, activity sheet and pieces (one pack/child), Pages 79 to 85 in All about the Rainforest, glue and large piece of paper, fact sheet about animals Set-up: cut out all pieces for activity

Set ( 15 minutes) 1. Gather students on the carpet and tell them today we are going to learn about some different types of animals that live in the Jungle. 2. Ask students if they have any ideas of an animal they think lives in the Jungle. 3. Read the book called “Jungle Animals” By Jinny Johnson and Nicki Palin 4. Discuss that these are just a few Jungle animals there are thousands of animals that live in the Jungle. More than half of the world’s animals live in the Jungle. 5. Does anyone have any questions about the animals we have learned about so far? Development ( 20 minutes) 1. Tell students we are going to do an activity where you have to match an animal to where it lives in the Jungle. 2. Show an example as a class and check for clarity to make sure all understand. Make sure you put the layers together correctly. It should fit together like a puzzle. Review layers if students are unsure. 3. In pairs let students work around the room on the activity. 4. Once a pair is complete have them raise their hands quietly and check to see how they did. (Record answers) 5. Tell them how they can self check 6. Once they are done have them glue the pictures in the correct place. Closure ( 5 minutes) 1. Discuss what some of the animals they learned about today. 2. Put the cut out animals onto the felt board.

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Gather the students on the floor facing the teacher chair. If a student is having a hard time listening and paying attention move them up to sit closer to you. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Ask students to raise their hands if they have a question. Walk around the room to make sure everyone is on task and to help with any questions or troubles the students may have. Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Tell students to only take one piece out of the bag at a time so they do not loose the pieces for their activity.

Assessment: Observe students as they are working on the activity and record what you see: Do they know what animal it is? Do they know anything about that animal? Do they know where in the Jungle that animal might live? How is one animal different from another animal? How are they the same?

Lesson Plan #7 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Arts Education: Dance Content/Topic: Chicken Dance (Jungle Animal Dance) Date: Grade: Kindergarten Instructional Strategies: Experiential(exploring movements for dance) and Interactive (group interaction) Indicators: Students are able to: Follow along and demonstrate the movements be taught in the “Chicken Dance” Demonstrate animal movements with the use of variety of body parts Put their animal’s movements together to create a short dance phrase Students understand the connections between the “Chicken dance” and their own animal dance. Cross Curricula Competencies: Science: Learning about Jungle Animals and their movements. Physical Education: Locomotor movements and rhythmical movement CCC: developing thinking, developing identity, developing literacies, developing social responsibility Prerequisite Learning: Students are able to follow simple directions. Students have already worked in a large open space. Adaptive Dimension: If larger space is not available use classroom and modify movements so that they have to pick things they can do in on the spot. You could also have students draw the movements of the animal. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: CD player, CD: Chicken Dance Song, Large Open Space (Gym) Set-up: Plug in CD player and have music ready to play.

Outcomes: CPK.1 Express ideas through exploration of the elements of dance including: action, body and space

Set ( 8 minutes) 1. Gather students on the floor in front of CD player. 2. Ask students to quietly listen to the song. 3. Once the song is over ask students if they recognized the song and what the name of it is. 4. Go over each movement with the class and practice until most students can follow along. 5. Then turn on the music and dance to the Chicken Dance. Development ( 20 minutes) 1. Tell students to sit back down then tell them instead of doing the Chicken Dance we are going to pick an animal from the Jungle and make there movements. 2. Tell the students to move around the space like a monkey. 3. Move when the music is on and freeze when the music stops. 4. Gather students in a large circle 5. Ask what where some of the monkey movements you did. 6. Together as a class pick the different movements from the monkey dance. 7. Three separate different movements repeated four times. 8. Practice a few times till students feel comfortable and then add the music. 9. Repeat.

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Ask students to gather on the floor facing the teacher Make sure the space is big enough so the students have enough room to move around. Keep your eye on the time so you do not go over. Make sure students are choosing movements that are not too dangerous. (Provide example movements) Give clear directions and many examples so students get right on task once they are in groups If a student is are getting to loud tell them it is a silent dance. (No talking when you are dancing.)

Closure ( 2 minutes) 1. Ask students what are some other Jungle animals you could use to make a dance? 2. What did they like about the dance?

Assessment: Observe students throughout the class. Student is engaged in activity and is able to follow along with the teacher’s movement. Student is able to use their body to demonstrate animal movements. Students are able work together to create their own animal dance and are able to connect the movements into a short dance phrase. Student shows creativity and effort.

Lesson Plan #8 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science/Arts Education: Drama Content/Topic: Jungle Animals Date: Grade: Kindergarten Instructional Strategies: Interactive(Story, discussion) Indicators: Students will be able to: h. Identify similarities and differences in observable characteristics among different animals. a. Pose questions about observable characteristics of animals such as “Do all animals have four legs?”, “How do fish breathe?” h. Assume roles willingly in contextual drama. a. Use sources such as stories to initiate drama work.

Outcomes: LTK.1 Examine observable characteristics of animals

CPK.2 Explore a variety of drama strategies including: role

Cross Curricula Competencies: Mathematics: counting Language Arts: speaking, listening, comprehending oral text. CCC: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Students are able to sit and listen to a story being read to them. Students are able to use paint bushes and paint. Adaptive Dimension: In this lesson students are actively involved in the story. This will help keep students engaged and on task. Students will be moving by creating actions to the words. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Over in the Jungle: A Rainforest Rhyme By Marianne Berkes, Animal Fact sheet, Shoe box(painted), paint and paint bushes for the students (blue, green, brown), Animal movements for the story sheet. Set-up: Set up paint and bushes at the tables.

Set ( 8 minutes) 1. Gather students on the carpet in front of the chair. 2. Ask students if they know what clay is and if they have ever made anything with clay before. 3. Introduce the book called Over in the Jungle: A Rainforest Rhyme By Marianne Berkes and Illustrated by Jeanette Canyon. 4. Discuss how the pictures are made out of clay. 5. Read the story. 6. Discuss what kind of animals did you see in the book? Do you know that they are? 7. Talk about any of the animals they did not know in the book. Development ( 30 minutes) 1. Reread the book to the class and add the actions of each animal. 2. Tell the students to freeze when you want them to stop doing an action. 3. Ask the students their favourite part of the book was? 4. When students are finished asking questions about the book tell them we are going to make our own animals using modelling clay and animal cutters. 5. Show students an example including how to use the clay and cutters. 6. Ask students to repeat directions then go find a place to sit at the table. 7. Remind students to be patient if someone is using a cutter that you want to use. 8. Tell students when they are done that they should put their animal inside their shoe box and go look at a book. Closure ( 2 minutes) 1. When students finish have them read/look at books.

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Gather the students on the floor facing the teacher chair. If a student is having a hard time listening and paying attention move them up to sit closer to you. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have art supplies on the table ready to go. Ask students to raise their hands if they have a question. Walk around the room to make sure everyone is on task and to help with any questions or troubles the students may have. Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Make sure all students can see the book’s pictures while you read. Tell the students you are using the word freeze when you want their attention.

Assessment: Observe students: Are students engaged in the story? Do they ask any questions about animals? Do they see similarities/differences between animals? Can they remember some of the animals that live in the Jungle? Are students engaged in the role playing? Are they listening and working cooperatively with their classmates?

Over in the Jungle: A Rainforest Rhyme By Marianne Berkes Animal Movements to the story: Marmosets: Swing right arm across body on the word “swing”, then left arm on second “swing”. (Arms are now crossed). Raise them up high on hung and grab the air with fingers. Morphos: Slowly wave both arms at the sides for “flit”, then bringing hands together in front, flutter fingers quickly. Parrots: Stamp right foot on first “squawk”; left foot on second “squawk”. Then with tiny sideward steps walk stiffly. Leaf Clutter Ants: Get down on hands and feet and quickly scurry to the right and hurry to the left. Honey Bears: With arms at sides, raise one shoulder to ear on “scramble”; then the other. On “scrambled” and “rambled”, move both shoulders forward in a circular motion. Boa Constrictor: On the floor, curl on one side, stretching arms way out in front and pull in as if squeezing, on the words, “squeezed” and “pleased”. Poison Dart Frog: Hop on one foot then the other and quietly fall down on “plop”. Ocelot: Bending forward place hands under chin as if waiting. Then jump forward on first “pounce” and backward on second “pounce”. Then jump up and down on “bounced”. Sloth: Get on back and move shoulders backwards slowly on “creep”. On the word “slept”, raise legs as if hanging and hold without moving. Howler Monkey: Place one hand under armpit on first “hoot”, and other hand under armpit on second “hoot”. Now move both arms with hands still under armpits and “hoot and holler”.

Lesson Plan #9 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science/Arts Education: Visual Art Content/Topic: Jungle Diorama/half day Date: Grade: Kindergarten Instructional Strategies: Experiential Learning (Project Work) Indicators: Students will be able to: j. Create a visual representation of the characteristics of a student-selected plant or animal to share with classmates and others. h. Demonstrate co-ordination and development of skills in the use of simple visual art tools and materials. i. Discuss choices made in creating art works. f. Select from a variety of art materials, tools, and paper size when creating a visual art expression Cross Curricula Competencies: Language Arts: Listening and Comprehending and following directions. CCC: developing thinking, developing identity, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Students have used stickers, glue and markers before. Adaptive Dimension: Students have choice in what they create for their shoe box Jungle. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Over in the Jungle By Marianne Berkes, Shoe Boxes, Kapok Tree, moss, stickers, model clay (variety of colours), markers. Set-up: Have clay ready on tables, Have an example of the shoe box Jungle.

Outcomes: LTK.1 Examine observable characteristics of plants and animals in the Jungle CPK.4 Create art works that express own observations and ideas about the world.

Set ( 30 minutes) 1. Gather students on the carpet on the floor. 2. Begin with opening tasks. 3. Tell them today we are going to make our own mini Jungles. 4. Show students you shoe box Jungle. 5. Tell the students some things you can include. First we are all going to make a animal using clay. 6. Remind students of the story from yesterday by looking at some pictures. 7. Ask students what are some animals you want to make. 8. Show students how to use the clay. (roll it, rip a piece off, flatten it etc) 9. Tell students to think of animal in their hand then go over to the table. Development ( 125 minutes) 1. Make animal out of clay. 2. Once students are done making their animal tell students what else they can put in their shoe box. (Kapok Tree, stickers, moss etc) 3. Help guide students, remind them to think about where you put some your stickers. Example a butterfly shouldn’t go on the forest floor, it should be in the canopy layer. 4. Have students put shoe boxes on the side shelf when done. 5. (Play time and Recess will fit in here as well) Closure ( 10 minutes) 1. Tell the students that tomorrow you will share your shoe box Jungle with me. 2. Folders. 3. Home time.

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Gather the students on the floor facing the teacher chair. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have art supplies on the table ready to go. Ask students to raise their hands if they have a question. Walk around the room to make sure everyone is on task and to help with any questions or troubles the students may have. Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. When student is off task go stand beside them and ask them if they need any help.

Assessment: Observe Students as they create their shoe box Jungle. Students show an understanding of what a Jungle and looks like? Students use a variety of materials to create their Jungle? Students understand that they have choice when creating their Jungle? Students show co-ordination when using a variety of materials? Oral Assessment: one on one discussion about shoe box Jungle. Ask students to share all they know about the Jungle.

Lesson Plan #10 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Content/Topic: Field Trip /Closure Date: Grade: Kindergarten Instructional Strategies: Experiential Learning (Field Trip) Indicators: Students will be able to: c. Seek out information about the observable characteristics of plants, animals, and people from a variety of sources, such as family members, friends, Elders, knowledge keepers, and scientists. e. Show respect for the needs of other people, other living things, and the environment when observing and interacting with living things Cross Curricula Competencies: Social Studies: Students will learn how people are connected to the natural environment around them. CCC Prerequisite Learning: Students have gone on field trips before and know the bus rules. Adaptive Dimension: Going on a field trip is a good way to adaptive the environment going to a new location with guest speakers helps students learn in a different/ exciting way. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: permission slip Set-up: Book Trip, book bus, collect permission slips and bus money, review field trip rules

Outcomes: LTK.1 Examine observable characteristics of plants, animals, and people in their local environment.

Set ( 8 minutes) 1. Sit in a circle and tell students that today is our last day learning about the Jungle. Lets go around the circle and you can share something that you learned about the Jungle and what you liked the most. 2. Tell students that we are going on a Field Trip to the Floral Conservatory. A Floral Conservatory is a place where plants grow inside. These plants can live all year round because it is warm inside the building. 3. In the floral conservatory we are going to walk through and look at all the pretty plants and flowers. You might even see plants that live in the Jungle so keep an eye open for any plants you remember learning about. 4. Load the bus for the Floral Conservatory. Development ( 75 minutes) Floral Conservatory (10:00 till 11:15) Tour of Plants Plant your own plant to take home.

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Gather the students on the floor in a large circle. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Go over rules for going on a Field Trip. (What do you do on the bus and when you have a guest speaker) Ask students to raise their hands if they have a question. Split up students that do not work well together.

Closure ( 10 minutes) 1. Discuss what you saw, and connections to the Jungle/Rainforest? 2. Home time. Assessment: Observe students: Do they ask questions to the guest speakers? Show curiosity? Show respect to the environment and people around them?

Professional Development Plan Topic: Lesson #1 Intro to the Jungle Teacher: Ashley Scherle 1. Professional Goal Questioning- Distribution and incorporation of higher level thinking questions Date: Observer: Sharon Gudereit 2. Steps to Achieve Goal I will try to spread my questions around the room. I will ask some pupils even if they do not have their hand up. I will ask questions from a variety of levels I will continually scan the so that I am aware of what students are engaged in.

Management:

3. Instructions for Observer: Did I give all students the opportunity to speak? (even those without their hand up). Give students the opportunity to think (appropriate wait time). Did I try to avoid of yesno questions? How often do I scan the room and am I aware of what all students are engaged in?

4. Data Collection:

5. Other Comments:

Professional Development Plan Topic: Lesson #2 Layers in the Jungle Teacher: Ashley Scherle 1. Professional Goal Giving Directions: Date: Observer: Sharon Gudereit 2. Steps to Achieve Goal I will begin with a hook to capture the students attention/interest I will give brief, understandable directions I will check for understanding 3. Instructions for Observer: Did I have capture the students attention/ interest at the beginning of my lesson? Were my directions clear and did students understand what they were suppose to do? Did I ask a student to repeat my directions to check for understanding? 4. Data Collection:

5. Other Comments:

Professional Development Plan Topic: Lesson #3 Weather and Location Teacher: Ashley Scherle 1. Professional Goal Class/student involvement – to involve all the students in the lesson so they are engaged participants Date: Observer: Sharon Gudereit 2. Steps to Achieve Goal I will begin with a hook to capture the students attention/interest I will assign ‘jobs’ to all students so they can be active participants

3. Instructions for Observer: Did I capture the student’s attention with an appropriate ‘hook’? Were students excited to participate? Did I encourage students who were not participating to get involved? 4. Data Collection:

5. Other Comments:

Professional Development Plan Topic: Lesson #4 Jungle Plants Teacher: Ashley Scherle 1. Professional Goal Explaining Date: Observer: Sharon Gudereit 2. Steps to Achieve Goal I will use suitable language when explaining the different types of plants that live in the Jungle. I will use examples such as pictures and illustrations. I will have materials ready

Management

3. Instructions for Observer: Did I use appropriate language when teaching about the plants of the Jungle? Was my explaining clear and concise? Did I have smooth transitions from the carpet discussion to the tables for art time? Were the art materials ready to help reduce “dead” time? 4. Data Collection:

5. Other Comments:

Professional Development Plan Topic: Lesson #5 Gifts of the Jungle Teacher: Ashley Scherle 1. Professional Goal Distribution of Questions Date: Observer: Sharon Gudereit 2. Steps to Achieve Goal I will distribute questions to as many students as possible to increase involvement I will interact with the students as they engage in the learning task

Learner Engagement

3. Instructions for Observer: What students did I allow to answer more questions then others? Is there a pattern to the way I ask questions? Give examples when I demonstrate the intended group focus and evidence of learners being engaged. 4. Data Collection:

5. Other Comments:

Professional Development Plan Topic: Lesson #6 Jungle Animals Teacher: Ashley Scherle 1. Professional Goal Learner Engagement Date: Observer: Sharon Gudereit 2. Steps to Achieve Goal My activities involve hands-on experiences. I will ask students if they have any questions before beginning independent tasks. I will interact with the students as they engage in the learning task. Management I will position myself so that all students can see the book while I’m reading it.

3. Instructions for Observer: Do I ask students if they understand or have any questions before working on independent tasks? Do I walk around the room and interact with students as they are working? Are all students able to see the book and pictures as I’m reading? 4. Data Collection:

5. Other Comments:

Professional Development Plan Topic: Lesson #7 Jungle Animal Dance Teacher: Ashley Scherle 1. Professional Goal Communication Skills Date: Observer: Sharon Gudereit 2. Steps to Achieve Goal I will speak clearly and loud enough so all students can hear. I will use verbal and non-verbal cues to get students attention. I will move towards disruptive students. 3. Instructions for Observer: Are all students able to hear my directions in a larger environment like the gym? Do I tell students that I will put my hand up as a signal for students to stop what they are doing and listen? Am I aware of off task behaviour? Do I move towards disruptive students? 4. Data Collection:

Management

5. Other Comments:

Professional Development Plan Topic: Lesson #8 Jungle Animals Teacher: Ashley Scherle 1. Professional Goal Questioning- Distribution and incorporation of higher level thinking questions Date: Observer: Sharon Gudereit 2. Steps to Achieve Goal I will try to spread my questions around the room. I will ask some pupils even if they do not have their hand up. I will ask questions from a variety of levels I will involve all the students to help keep students engaged and on task. When a student if off task I will call out their name and deal with the situation before moving on. 3. Instructions for Observer: Did I give all students the opportunity to speak? (even those without their hand up). Give students the opportunity to think (appropriate wait time). Did I try to avoid of yes-no questions? Are all students involved in the lesson? Am I aware of poor behaviour and deal with it appropriately? 4. Data Collection:

Management

5. Other Comments:

Professional Development Plan Topic: Lesson #9 Diorama Teacher: Ashley Scherle 1. Professional Goal Giving Directions Date: Observer: Sharon Gudereit 2. Steps to Achieve Goal I give 3 concise directions at one time. I will check for understanding by asking a student to repeat the directions of the task. Management I will walk around the room to make sure all students know what to do and are on task.

3. Instructions for Observer: Please list ant points throughout the lesson where the pupils are really following. Please list any points throughout the lesson where pupils are not following. Do I walk around and observe students working and help students who need it? 4. Data Collection:

5. Other Comments:

Professional Development Plan Topic: Lesson #10 Field Trip Teacher: Ashley Scherle 1. Professional Goal Management Date: Observer: Sharon Gudereit 2. Steps to Achieve Goal I will make sure students understand the expectations of going on a field trip. I will assign students with a pair. I will stand and sit by disruptive students.

3. Instructions for Observer: Please mane a note of the time, student, name, and student action. What effect did my response have? 4. Data Collection:

5. Other Comments:

Assessment Chart Lesson #1 Student’s Name Students are actively participating in singing and following the actions (YES OR NO) What is a Jungle?

Checklist Assessment Lesson #2 Student’s Name Student’s are able to put the layers in the correct order Student’s demonstrate good small motor skills Student’s Student’s are are able to know the identify the correspondin correct letter g sound to the letter Students are able to follow directions

Checklist Assessment Lesson #3 Student’s Name Students listen and work well with other students in the short story drama Student’s are actively participating in the lesson Student’s show a clear understanding of the weather in the tropical rainforest through their drawing

Observation Assessment Lesson #4 Student’s Name Student’s are listening and asking questions about different plants Student’s are able to express their thoughts about the Kapok Tree through their art work Student’s show co-ordination with the art materials Student’s are able to list two or more facts about of the trees they learned about

Checklist Assessment Lesson #5 Student’s Name Student’s can explain what they drew came from the Jungle and how it is important to them Student’s remember directions and follow them correctly Students are able to trace the letters and words with little trouble.

Scale Assessment Lesson #6 Rubric Level 4- Exceeds expectations Level 3-Meets expectations Level 2-Miniamlly meets expectations Level 1-Needs improvement *Circle the number necessary* • Student is engaged in activity and is able to follow along with the teacher’s movement.

1 •

Student is able to use their body to demonstrate animal movements.

1 •

Students are able work together to create their own animal dance and are able to connect the movements into a short dance phrase.

1 •

Student shows creativity and effort.

Observation Checklist Assessment Lesson #7 Student’s Name Do they know what animal it is? Do they know anything about that animal? Do they have a god idea where that animal might live in the Jungle? How is one animal different/same from one another?

Observation Checklist Assessment Lesson #8 Student’s Name Student’s are engaged and ask questions about animals in Jungle Students are able to remember two or more Jungle Animals Students are engaged in role playing Students are working cooperatively with their classmates

Assessment Chart Lesson #9 Student’s Name Students show a good understanding of what a Jungle is Students use a variety of materials Students show good coordination using a variety of materials Students understand that they have choice

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