the output voltage V is proportional to ^cos(J).

However, in an
(infinite) diffusive conductor the diffusion time t from Co1 to Co2
has a broad distribution P(t) = [1=
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
4pDt

] exp[2L
2
=(4Dt], where
P(t) is proportional to the number of electrons that, once injected at
the Co1 electrode (x = 0), arrive at the Co2 electrode (x = L) after a
diffusion time t. The output voltage Vat the Co2 detector electrode
as a function of B

is calculated by summing all contributions of the
electron spins over all diffusion times t. We obtain:
V(B

) = ^I
P
2
e
2
N
Al
A
ð
1
0
P(t) cos(q
L
t) exp(-t=t
sf
)dt (2)
The exponential factor in equation (2) describes the effect of the
spin flip scattering. For q
L
= 0, equation (2) reduces to equation
(1). We note that equation (2) can be evaluated analytically, and we
have verified that it yields the same result as obtained by Johnson
and Silsbee, who explicitly solved the Bloch equations with the
appropriate boundary conditions
21,22
.
At large B

, the magnetization direction of the Co electrodes is
tilted out of the substrate plane with an angle c. When we include
this effect we calculate:
V(B

; c) = V(B

) cos
2
(c) - íV(B

= 0)í sin
2
(c) (3)
Equation (3) shows that with increasing c (from zero), the
precession signal is reduced and a positive background output
signal appears. For c = 0 equation (3) reduces to equation (2). In
the limit that c = p=2, the magnetization of the Co electrodes is
perpendicular to the substrate plane and parallel to B

. No preces-
sion now occurs, and the full output signal íV(B

= 0)í is recov-
ered. The angle c has been determined independently as a function
of B

by measuring the anisotropic magnetoresistance of the Co
electrodes
23
.
In Fig. 3 we plot the measured output signal V/I at 4.2 K, as a
function of B

for L = 650 nm, L = 1,100 nm and L = 1,350 nm.
Before the measurement an in-plane magnetic field B directed
parallel to the long axes of Co electrodes is used to prepare the
magnetization configuration of the Co electrodes. For a parallel
(antiparallel) configuration we observe an initial positive (negative)
signal, which drops in amplitude as B

is increased from zero field.
This is called the Hanle effect in ref. 3. The two curves cross where
the average angle of precession is about 908 and the output signal is
close to zero. As B

is increased beyond this field, we observe that
the output signal changes sign and reaches a minimum (maximum)
when the average angle of precession is about 1808, thereby
effectively converting the injected spin-up population into a spin-
down and vice versa. We have fitted the data with equations (2)
and (3), as shown in Fig. 3. We find for all measured samples that
the best-fit parameters P, l
sf
and D are very close to those
independently obtained from the length dependence measurements
(Fig. 2).
As already visible in Fig. 3, for B . 200 mT an asymmetry is
observed between the parallel and antiparallel curves. This is due to
the fact that magnetization of the Co electrodes does not remain in
the substrate plane. In Fig. 4 we plot the measured output signal V/I
at T = 4:2 K for L=1,100 nm up to B

= 3 T, together with the
calculated curve, using P, l
sf
and D as obtained from the best fit
in Fig. 3. The data are in close agreement with equation (3), and
show a suppression of the precessional motion of the electron spin.
The full magnitude of the output signal is recovered at large B

,
when c = p=2 and no precession takes place. Preliminary results
show that precession effects similar to those shown in Fig. 3 can also
be obtained at room temperature.
We believe that the system we report here, with its unique
sensitivity to the spin degree of freedom, will make possible detailed
studies of a variety of spin-dependent transport phenomena. A
Received 18 January; accepted 21 February 2002.
1. Prinz, G. A. Magnetoelectronics. Science 282, 1660–1663 (1998).
2. Wolf, S. A. et al. Spintronics: A spin-based electronics vision for the future. Science 294, 1488–1495
(2001).
3. Johnson, M. & Silsbee, R. H. Interfacial charge-spin coupling: Injection and detection of spin
magnetization in metals. Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 1790–1793 (1985).
4. Jedema, F. J., Filip, A. T. & van Wees, B. J. Electrical spin injection and accumulation at room
temperature in an all-metal mesoscopic spin valve. Nature 410, 345–348 (2001).
5. Hernando, D. H., Nazarov, Yu. V., Brataas, V. & Bauer, G. E. W. Conductance modulation by spin
precession in noncollinear ferromagnet normal-metal ferromagnet systems. Phys. Rev. B 62,
5700–5712 (2000).
6. Salis, G. et al. Electrical control of spin coherence in semiconductor nanostructures. Nature 414,
619–622 (2001).
7. Kikkawa, J. M. & Awschalom, D. D. Lateral drag of spin coherence in gallium arsenide. Nature 397,
139–141 (1999).
8. Schmidt, G. et al. Fundamental obstacle for electrical spin injection froma ferromagnetic metal into a
diffusive semiconductor. Phys. Rev. B 62, R4790–R4793 (2000).
9. Rashba, E. I. Theory of electrical spin injection: Tunnel contacts as a solution of the conductivity
mismatch problem. Phys. Rev. B 62, R16267–R16270 (2000).
10. Fert, A. & Jaffre`s, H. Conditions for efficient spin injection from a ferromagnetic metal into a
semiconductor. Phys. Rev. B 64, 184420–184428 (2001).
11. Jackel, L. D., Howard, R. E., Hu, E. L., Tennant, D. M. & Grabbe, P. 50-nmsilicon structures fabricated
with trilevel electron beam resist and reactive-ion etching. Appl. Phys. Lett. 39, 268–270 (1981).
12. Julliere, M. Tunneling between ferromagnetic films. Phys. Lett. A 54, 224–227 (1975).
13. Van Son, P., van Kempen, H. &Wyder, P. Boundary resistance of the ferromagnetic-nonferromagnetic
metal interface. Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2271–2273 (1987).
14. Jedema, F. J., Nijboer, M. S., Filip, A. T. & van Wees, B. J. Spin injection and spin accumulation in
permalloy-copper mesoscopic spin valves.Preprint cond-mat/0111092 at khttp://xxx.lanl.govl (2002);
Phys. Rev. B (submitted).
15. Johnson, M. Spin accumulation in gold films. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 2142–2145 (1993).
16. Papaconstantopoulos, D. A. Handbook of the Band Structure of Elemental Solids (Plenum, New York,
1986).
17. Meservey, R. & Tedrow, P. M. Surface relaxation times of conduction-electron spins in
superconductors and normal metals. Phys. Rev. Lett. 41, 805–808 (1978).
18. Monod, P. & Beneu, F. Conduction-electron spin flip by phonons in metals: Analysis of experimental
data. Phys. Rev. B 19, 911–916 (1979).
19. Grimaldi, C. & Fulde, P. Spin-orbit scattering effects on the phonon emission and absorption in
superconducting tunneling junctions. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2550–2553 (1996).
20. Fabian, J. & Das Sarma, S. Phonon-induced spin relaxation of conduction electrons in aluminium.
Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1211–1214 (1999).
21. Johnson, M. & Silsbee, R. H. Coupling of electronic charge and spin at a ferromagnetic-paramagnetic
metal interface. Phys. Rev. B 37, 5312–5325 (1988).
22. Johnson, M. & Silsbee, R. H. Spin-injection experiment. Phys. Rev. B 73, 5326–5335 (1988).
23. Rijks, Th. G. S. M., Coehoorn, R., de Jong, M. J. M. & de Jonge, W. J. M. Semiclassical calculations of
the anisotropic magnetoresistance of NiFe-based thin films, wires, and multilayers. Phys. Rev. B 51,
283–291 (1995).
Acknowledgements
We thank the Stichting Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM) and NEDO (project
‘nano-scale control of magnetoelectronics for device applications’) for support.
Competing interests statement
The authors declare that they have no competing financial interests.
Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to F.J.J.
(e-mail: jedema@phys.rug.nl).
..............................................................
Rapid electroplating of insulators
Vincent Fleury*, Wesley A. Watters*, Levy Allam† & Thierry Devers†
* Laboratoire de Physique de la Matie `re Condense ´e, Ecole Polytechnique/CNRS,
91128 Palaiseau cedex, France
† Laboratoire de Physique Electronique, IUT de Chartres, 1 Place Mende `s-France,
28000 Chartres, France
.............................................................................................................................................................................
Electrochemical techniques for depositing metal films and coat-
ings
1
have a long history
2–5
. Such techniques essentially fall into
two categories, with different advantages and disadvantages. The
first, and oldest, makes use of spontaneous redox reactions to
deposit a metal fromsolution, and can be used on both insulating
and metallic substrates. But the deposition conditions of these
processes are difficult to control in situ, in part because of the
letters to nature
NATURE| VOL 416 | 18 APRIL 2002 | www.nature.com 716 © 2002 Macmillan Magazines Ltd
variety of salts and additives present in the solution. The second
approach—electroplating—uses an electric current to reduce
metal ions in solution, and offers control over the quantity
(and, to some extent, grain size) of deposited metal. But appli-
cation of this technique has hitherto been restricted to conduct-
ing substrates. Here we describe an electroplating technique that
permits coating of insulating substrates with metals having
controlled grain size, thickness and growth speed. The basis of
our approach is the progressive outward growth of the metal
from an electrode in contact with the substrate, with the cell
geometry chosen so that the electron current providing the
reduction passes through the growing deposit. Such an approach
would normally form dendritic or powdery deposits, but we
identify a range of conditions in which uniform films rapidly
form.
Here we describe an electrochemical cell and a set of conditions
that enable electrodeposition of a metal coating on insulating
substrates
6
. This process allows deposition of a covering film of
controlled grain size, thickness and growth speed. This process is
based on recent progress in out-of-equilibrium physics, and it
makes possible the deposition of a uniform coating in what is
regarded as the least useful regime of electrochemical growth.
Deposition of metals by electroplating is known to produce
compact metal at low current densities
7,8
. Then, as the deposition
current is raised, the deposit becomes (as a function of current, and
in the absence of levelling or grain refining additives) rough,
dendritic, and eventually powdery. This is a limiting factor in
industry
1
. In the context of out-of-equilibrium physics, much
attention has been paid to dendrites: the interest is in pattern
formation
9–11
. The specific case of electrochemical growth from
binary electrolytes has been extensively studied over the past 15
years
12–18
. Anewtheory has been put forward by Chazalviel
16
, which
correctly predicts the growth speed, deposition rates and concen-
tration fields in the electrolyte, around a growing dendritic deposit.
The theory predicts the existence of a large electric field at the tip of
the deposit, and a steady-state growth speed equal to the recession
speed of the anions. We have verified these predictions in the case of
free-floating, almost two-dimensional dendrites
14,17
, and it was
independently found by Melrose et al.
14
. But one problem with
these experiments is that the deposit cannot be taken out of the cell.
This is why one of us has proposed a new way of depositing
dendrites
18
which adhere to a glass substrate. The growth regime
of these dendrites is given by Chazalviel’s model too
19
, which relates
deposition rates and growth speeds.
The growth speed of the deposit is given by -m
a
E, where m
a
is the
mobility of the anion, and E the electric field. The thickness t
d
of the
deposit is predicted to be:
t
d
= [t
cell
(z
a
m
a
- z
c
m
c
)=z
a
m
a
](C
solution
=C
bulkmetal
)
where z
a
and z
c
are respectively the anionic and cationic charge,
C
solution
is the concentration of salt in the solution and C
bulkmetal
the
concentration of a bulk piece of metal. That it, as all the incoming
cations get deposited, they will make a thickness proportional to the
ratio C
solution
/C
bulkmetal
(C
bulkmetal
= 97 mol l
21
for Ag, 141 for Cu,
49 for Sn). In terms of Faraday’s law, the total reaction rate for
complete metal deposition is I/z
c
F. Because, in the binary electro-
lyte, metal and counterion transport are dominant in the bulk over
other processes:
I = (z
a
C
solution
m
a
E - z
c
C
solution
m
c
E)S
where S is the cell cross-section area (t
cell
W). The cationic deposition
rate i
C
of a thin film of thickness t
d
and front width Wadvancing at a
constant speed V = m
a
E is i
C
= z
c
m
a
E(t
d
W)C
bulkmetal
. Therefore,
equating this to the deposition rate in Faraday’s law gives the
expected thickness if the current efficiency is 100%. These predic-
tions have been verified for surface deposition of copper dendrites
19
in thin cells.
Now we report the result that this set-up makes it possible to
deposit a continuous covering film, growing with the same charac-
teristics (thickness, growth speed). There exists a window of
conditions, inside the regime of powdery deposition, in which the
deposit makes a covering film. This results in a metallization
technique, allowing the coating of insulators. Moreover, the work-
ing conditions correspond to very rapid deposition, because the
coating progresses at speeds up to hundreds of micrometres per
second, much quicker than the dendritic regime. As a consequence,
we estimate that roughly one linear metre per hour could be
deposited.
The set-up has been described in part in ref. 19 (see Fig. 1). The
key feature is to start deposition at one end of the surface, at a
cathode that is in contact with it. Then, a metal film progressively
Figure 1 Cell for deposition on a flat surface. A thin layer of electrolyte is squeezed
between two glass plates, one of which will be metallized. A gold edge that will serve as
the starting point for the metallization is deposited on the glass plate to be metallized. An
anode is put at the other end, which also serves as a separator. An additional flash of gold,
20 A
˚
thick and non-conducting, is deposited on the surface (this is not truly necessary, but
it helps in rendering the deposition reproducible). The deposition starts fromthe edge, and
invades progressively the entire surface to be metallized.
Figure 2 The different overall morphologies for the specific case of copper. For the higher
currents (at the start of the deposit), the copper covers the entire substrate. As the current
is decreased (in steps), the deposit becomes more and more dendritic, and less space-
filling. For very low currents, the voids between dendrites are very large and the deposit is
not at all covering. The successive currents are 20 mA, 10 mA, 8 mA, 6 mA: the cell was
15 mm thick only, and the solution is 0.02 M copper sulphate. For the sake of clarity, we
did this series of experiments in the same cell (hence the same electrolyte and the same
geometry). When doing several growth speeds in the same cell, it is necessary to go from
the more uniform to the more dendritic morphology to form a good sample. The other way
around implies that the smoother deposit will start at the tips of the very irregular
dendrites, which is not favourable.
letters to nature
NATURE | VOL 416 | 18 APRIL 2002 | www.nature.com 717 © 2002 Macmillan Magazines Ltd
invades the surface, until it is fully coated. This film wets the surface
and adheres to it. This makes it possible to use electroplating to coat
an insulator, as the edge of the invading film serves as a cathode for
further growth of the film itself. If too low a current density is used,
the film is dendritic
19
(Fig. 2). However, above a critical current
density, the deposit is uniform, and exhibits a stable flat front on
scales of the order of at least a few hundred micrometres, and up to
centimetres in width. This critical current density is of the order of
10 mAcm
22
for silver, copper and tin.
But even in the regime of covering deposition, the front is
destabilized by buoyancy. It is known that gravity currents form
in thin cells
21
. These gravity currents have been modelled quanti-
tatively
22
. The models and the experiments show that the buoyancy
effect can be reduced by growing vertically
21
. Therefore, we per-
formed the growth vertically downwards. In this orientation,
stability of the fronts can be improved up to two centimetres in
width (at present, and especially for silver; Fig. 3).
We also prepared a cylindrical cell composed of a capillary tube
1 mm in diameter in the centre of which we put a glass fibre 100 mm
in diameter. The fibre had no conducting coating on it. The fibre
was then coated with silver paint at one end only, to serve as the
starting point. At the other end of the cell, a silver wire was used as
the anode. The solution was 0.05 M silver nitrate. Again, we were
able to silver-coat the fibre all around its perimeter in this regime of
ultrafast deposition (data not shown); the current passing through
the fibre coating was 160 mA, which gives a current density again of
the order of 20 mAcm
22
(ref. 6).
The process also works well with copper on glass (Fig. 2), and
with copper on raw Teflon (Fig. 4), without any gold coating, from
either copper chloride or copper sulphate solution (0.01–0.05 M).
We also checked the technique with tin, from tin chloride solutions
in the same range of concentrations, and were able to obtain tin
films of the same morphology—although the range of currents is
more limited, because of hydrogen evolution. Also, unlike copper
and silver, in the case of tin an extremely thin film precedes the
Figure 4 Different samples, as observed by atomic force microscopy ex situ (Molecular
Imaging, acoustic mode). For each sample, a topographic image (colour) and a horizontal
cross-section (black and white graph) is shown. First row, silver deposits. They show a
regular covering layer of grains, rather monodisperse in size. Columns 1 and 2: the
solution is 0.05 M silver nitrate, currents 1 mA and 0.5 mA. Column 3: same solution but
with small amounts of PVA (1 g l
-1
) as additive, I = 0:5 mA. Bottomrow, columns 1 and 2.
Tin films, from tin chloride. The thinnest deposits (column 1), obtained with tin on glass at
lower currents (I = 0:07 mA) are only 100 A
˚
thick. The grains appear to be about 20–
50 nm in radius. A hole in the deposit shows that its thickness is spanned by one or just a
few grains. The thicker tin deposits (column 2) were obtained in a regime similar to the
other metals (C = 0:04 M, I = 0:1 mA). Column 3 (bottom right), copper film deposited
on Teflon, from copper sulphate solution. In this case, no activation of the surface was
done. The copper was deposited directly on the Teflon. The image shows the edge—the
deposit is to the left, the Teflon substrate to the right.
Figure 3 A deposit of silver metal on a cover glass. The cover glass has been metallized
over its entire width up to the distance when the current was interrupted. The deposit
shows a reflection, indicating that it is of optical quality. I = 600 mA, C = 0:05 M silver
nitrate.
letters to nature
NATURE| VOL 416 | 18 APRIL 2002 | www.nature.com 718 © 2002 Macmillan Magazines Ltd
formation of the main deposit. At lower current densities, it is
possible to deposit only this extremely thin tin film: it is 5 nm thick
(Fig. 4), and composed of a carpet of small grains side by side.
Whereas the 200-nm copper and 300-nm tin films in Fig. 4 have a
thickness close to that predicted by theory, the 5-nm film is much
thinner.
We expect that the deposition reported here will be possible with
any metal that is known to deposit in the powdery regime of growth,
in the shape of rounded crystals. We propose the following mechan-
istic explanation of this effect. First, in thin cells, and with a binary
electrolyte, very high fields are generated at the tips of the deposits
17
.
These very high fields induce nucleation and growth of a poly-
crystalline deposit
19
. As it is observed that growth is much more
rapid in scratches
5,20
, it is clear that the dangling bonds of glass have
catalytic properties, under the action of the large electric field. We
now consider why the deposit should be covering for higher
currents. As seen in Fig. 2, this surprising stability is not due to
an increase in the size of deposit features up to the sample size, but
to a progressive closing of voids between ever-smaller branches, in
which individual grains become themselves ever smaller
19
. This
proves that, as the growth speed is increased, the capillary length of
individual branches is decreased (as expected from theory
9,23
). But
so is the typical size l of gradients ahead of the deposit, because
16
l ¼ ðÿkT=eE
0
Þðz
c
þz
a
Þðz
c
z
a
Þð1 þm
a
=m
c
Þ, where E
0
is the electric
field in the bulk, and z
c
, z
a
, m
c
and m
a
are the charges and mobilities
of the cations and anions. When l becomes smaller than the grain
size, instabilities cannot develop, and the front is stable (‘absolute
stability’ in the context of pattern formation). This stability makes it
possible to electroplate insulators in conditions very far from
equilibrium. The coating of fibres, ribbons and plates seems
possible. Many applications of this process may be considered,
such as replacing the vapour seeding process in the electronics
industry, tailoring mirrors of unusual metals or shapes, and direct
coating of organic materials. In general terms, the process proposed
here has some advantages over conventional electroless deposition
on insulators, in that the film progression and grain size are
controlled externally, the process can be interrupted at any time,
and it should work with many simple salts, even without additives.
But it should be acknowledged that, as the deposition process starts
from one end of the sample and progresses towards the other end at
speeds of the order of 1 mh
21
at most, the overall production output
would be much smaller than existing electroless techniques, which
coat in approximately 5 minutes glass plates of size 4 m £ 4 m.
We note that using this very rapid plating technique with Li, as
reported here for Ag, Cu and Sn, might eliminate the cycling
problems of Li rechargeable batteries. Indeed, cycling efficiency of
Li batteries is drastically reduced by dendritic growth. This is
ascribed, in part, to the poor cyclability of a powdery tree. In
present designs, dendrites are always seen to grow perpendicularly
to the electrodes. A set-up similar to ours would in principle
generate a thin film whose morphology is easier to cycle. A
Received 30 April 2001; accepted 25 February 2002.
1. Dini, J. Electrodeposition (Noyes Publication, Park Ridge, New Jersey, 1992).
2. Kircher, A. Mundus Subterraneus, Caput VI, liber duodecimus part I, Ars Chymurgica (Apud
Janssonium et Weyerstraten, Amsterdam, 1664).
3. Kircher, A. China Monumentis qua Sacris qua Profanis, nec non Variis Naturae et Artis Spectaculis
Aliarumque Rerim Meomriabilium Argumentis Illustrata (Apud Janssonium et Weyerstraten,
Amsterdam, 1667).
4. Needham, J. & Peng Yoke, H. Science and Civilization in China Vol. 5(2) (Cambridge Univ. Press,
Cambridge, 1984).
5. Fleury, V. Arbres de Pierre, La Croissance Fractale de la Matie`re (Flammarion, Paris, 1998).
6. Fleury, V. Patent PCT/FR00/02757 (2000).
7. Bergstrasser, T. R. & Merchant, H. D. in Defect Structure, Morphology and Properties of Deposits
Proceedings of the Materials Week Rosemont 1994 (ed. Merchant, H. D.) 115–168 (Minerals Metals
Materials Society, Warrendale, Pennsylvania, 1995).
8. Despic, A. R. & Popov, K. I. in Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry Vol. 7 (eds Conway, B. E. & Bockris,
J. O’M.) 199–313 (Butterworths, London, 1972).
9. Pelce´, P. Dynamics of Curved Fronts (Academic, London, 1991).
10. Meakin, P. Fractals, Scaling and Growth far fromEquilibrium(Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, 1988).
11. Vicsek, T. Fractal Growth Phenomena 2nd edn (World Scientific, Singapore, 1992).
12. Matsushita, M., Sano, M., Hayakawa, Y., Honjo, H. & Sawada, Y. Fractal structure of zinc metal leaves
grown by electrodeposition. Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 286–289 (1984).
13. Fleury, V., Chazalviel, J. N., Rosso, M. & Sapoval, B. The role of the anions in the growth speed of
electrochemical deposits. J. Electroanal. Chem. 290, 249–255 (1990).
14. Melrose, J. R., Hibbert, D. B. & Ball, R. C. Interfacial velocity in electrochemical deposition and the
Hecker effect. Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 3009–3012 (1990).
15. Garik, P. et al. Laplace and diffusion controlled growth in electrochemical deposition. Phys. Rev. Lett.
62, 2703–2706 (1989).
16. Chazalviel, J. N. Electrochemical aspects of the generation of ramified metallic deposits. Phys. Rev. A
42, 7355–7367 (1990).
17. Fleury, V., Chazalviel, J. N., Rosso, M. & Sapoval, B. Experimental aspects of dense morphology in
copper electrodeposition. Phys. Rev. A 44, 6693–6705 (1991).
18. Fleury, V. On a new kind of ramified electrodeposits. J. Mater. Res. Soc. 6, 1169–1174 (1991).
19. Fleury, V. Branched fractal patterns in non-equilibrium electrochemical deposition from oscillatory
nucleation and growth. Nature 390, 145–148 (1997).
20. Fleury, V. & Barkey, D. Runaway growth in two-dimensional electrodeposition. Europhys. Lett. 36,
253–258 (1996).
21. Rosso, M., Chazalviel, J. N., Fleury, V. & Chassaing, E. Experimental evidence for gravity induced
motion in the vicinity of ramified electrodeposits. Electrochim. Acta 39, 507–515 (1994).
22. Chazalviel, J. N., Rosso, M., Chassaing, E. & Fleury, V. A quantitative study of gravity-induced
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Acknowledgements
W.A.W. acknowledges the financial support of Saint-Gobain.
Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to V.F.
(e-mail: vincent.fleury@polytechnique.fr).
..............................................................
Constraints on radiative forcing
and future climate change from
observations and climate model
ensembles
Reto Knutti, Thomas F. Stocker, Fortunat Joos & Gian-Kasper Plattner
Climate and Environmental Physics, Physics Institute, University of Bern,
Sidlerstr. 5, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
.............................................................................................................................................................................
The assessment of uncertainties in global warming projections is
often based on expert judgement, because a number of key
variables in climate change are poorly quantified. In particular,
the sensitivity of climate to changing greenhouse-gas concen-
trations in the atmosphere and the radiative forcing effects by
aerosols are not well constrained, leading to large uncertainties
in global warming simulations
1
. Here we present a Monte Carlo
approach to produce probabilistic climate projections, using a
climate model of reduced complexity. The uncertainties in the
input parameters and in the model itself are taken into account,
and past observations of oceanic and atmospheric warming are
used to constrain the range of realistic model responses. We
obtain a probability density function for the present-day total
radiative forcing, giving 1.4 to 2.4 Wm
22
for the 5–95 per cent
confidence range, narrowing the global-mean indirect aerosol
effect to the range of 0 to –1.2 Wm
22
. Ensemble simulations for
two illustrative emission scenarios suggest a 40 per cent prob-
ability that global-mean surface temperature increase will exceed
the range predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate
Change (IPCC), but only a 5 per cent probability that warming
will fall below that range.
The expected future warming of the climate system and its
potential consequences increase the need for climate projections
with clearly defined uncertainties and likelihood estimates
2
. The
IPCC provides these probabilities for most of their findings in the
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The growth regime of these dendrites is given by Chazalviel’s model too19. The other way around implies that the smoother deposit will start at the tips of the very irregular dendrites. it is necessary to go from the more uniform to the more dendritic morphology to form a good sample. the voids between dendrites are very large and the deposit is not at all covering. in which the deposit makes a covering film. The key feature is to start deposition at one end of the surface. But one problem with these experiments is that the deposit cannot be taken out of the cell. deposition rates and concentration fields in the electrolyte. The growth speed of the deposit is given by -m aE. we did this series of experiments in the same cell (hence the same electrolyte and the same geometry). but we identify a range of conditions in which uniform films rapidly form. This process allows deposition of a covering film of controlled grain size. The cationic deposition rate i C of a thin film of thickness t d and front width W advancing at a constant speed V ¼ ma E is iC ¼ zc ma Eðt d WÞC bulkmetal . Then. Such an approach would normally form dendritic or powdery deposits. we estimate that roughly one linear metre per hour could be deposited. Here we describe an electroplating technique that permits coating of insulating substrates with metals having controlled grain size. 141 for Cu.nature. In terms of Faraday’s law. and it makes possible the deposition of a uniform coating in what is regarded as the least useful regime of electrochemical growth. with the cell geometry chosen so that the electron current providing the reduction passes through the growing deposit. ˚ 20 A thick and non-conducting. The successive currents are 20 mA. as all the incoming cations get deposited. We have verified these predictions in the case of free-floating. For the sake of clarity. Because. A thin layer of electrolyte is squeezed between two glass plates. The second approach—electroplating—uses an electric current to reduce metal ions in solution. Then. to some extent. and E the electric field. and a steady-state growth speed equal to the recession speed of the anions.17. growth speed). 717 © 2002 Macmillan Magazines Ltd . because the coating progresses at speeds up to hundreds of micrometres per second. Here we describe an electrochemical cell and a set of conditions that enable electrodeposition of a metal coating on insulating substrates6. An anode is put at the other end. C solution is the concentration of salt in the solution and C bulkmetal the concentration of a bulk piece of metal. The basis of our approach is the progressive outward growth of the metal from an electrode in contact with the substrate. is deposited on the surface (this is not truly necessary. equating this to the deposition rate in Faraday’s law gives the expected thickness if the current efficiency is 100%. The specific case of electrochemical growth from binary electrolytes has been extensively studied over the past 15 years12–18. Deposition of metals by electroplating is known to produce compact metal at low current densities7. grain size) of deposited metal. The thickness t d of the deposit is predicted to be: t d ¼ ½t cell ðz a ma þ z c mc Þ=z a ma ŠðCsolution =Cbulkmetal Þ where z a and z c are respectively the anionic and cationic charge. These predictions have been verified for surface deposition of copper dendrites19 in thin cells. This results in a metallization technique. as the deposition current is raised. 6 mA: the cell was 15 mm thick only. almost two-dimensional dendrites14. and less spacefilling. As a consequence. at a cathode that is in contact with it. around a growing dendritic deposit. Therefore. the deposit becomes more and more dendritic. and in the absence of levelling or grain refining additives) rough. metal and counterion transport are dominant in the bulk over other processes: I ¼ ðza C solution ma E þ z c Csolution mc EÞS where S is the cell cross-section area (t cellW). A gold edge that will serve as the starting point for the metallization is deposited on the glass plate to be metallized. This is why one of us has proposed a new way of depositing dendrites18 which adhere to a glass substrate. dendritic. But application of this technique has hitherto been restricted to conducting substrates. 14. 19 (see Fig. the total reaction rate for complete metal deposition is I/z cF. which correctly predicts the growth speed. where m a is the mobility of the anion. There exists a window of conditions. The deposition starts from the edge. the deposit becomes (as a function of current. An additional flash of gold.8. the copper covers the entire substrate. much quicker than the dendritic regime. which also serves as a separator.02 M copper sulphate. Now we report the result that this set-up makes it possible to deposit a continuous covering film. When doing several growth speeds in the same cell. a metal film progressively Figure 1 Cell for deposition on a flat surface. which is not favourable. As the current is decreased (in steps). For the higher currents (at the start of the deposit). and offers control over the quantity (and. and it was independently found by Melrose et al. much attention has been paid to dendrites: the interest is in pattern formation9–11. This is a limiting factor in industry1. NATURE | VOL 416 | 18 APRIL 2002 | www. which relates deposition rates and growth speeds. 1). A new theory has been put forward by Chazalviel16. The set-up has been described in part in ref. 10 mA. inside the regime of powdery deposition. In the context of out-of-equilibrium physics. 8 mA. That it. Moreover. one of which will be metallized. thickness and growth speed. allowing the coating of insulators.com Figure 2 The different overall morphologies for the specific case of copper. in the binary electrolyte.letters to nature variety of salts and additives present in the solution. and invades progressively the entire surface to be metallized. and the solution is 0. This process is based on recent progress in out-of-equilibrium physics. The theory predicts the existence of a large electric field at the tip of the deposit. the working conditions correspond to very rapid deposition. growing with the same characteristics (thickness. they will make a thickness proportional to the ratio C solution/C bulkmetal (Cbulkmetal ¼ 97 mol l21 for Ag. but it helps in rendering the deposition reproducible). 49 for Sn). and eventually powdery. thickness and growth speed. For very low currents.

2). Columns 1 and 2: the solution is 0.letters to nature invades the surface. the Teflon substrate to the right. currents 1 mA and 0. C ¼ 0:05 M silver nitrate. and with copper on raw Teflon (Fig. we were able to silver-coat the fibre all around its perimeter in this regime of ultrafast deposition (data not shown). and up to centimetres in width. Bottom row. The solution was 0. It is known that gravity currents form in thin cells21. a silver wire was used as the anode. indicating that it is of optical quality. In this orientation. Fig. from either copper chloride or copper sulphate solution (0. However. without any gold coating.01–0. from tin chloride. The grains appear to be about 20– 50 nm in radius. The image shows the edge—the deposit is to the left. I ¼ 0:1 mA). 6). acoustic mode). no activation of the surface was done. copper film deposited on Teflon. stability of the fronts can be improved up to two centimetres in width (at present. as observed by atomic force microscopy ex situ (Molecular Imaging. the deposit is uniform. For each sample. as the edge of the invading film serves as a cathode for further growth of the film itself.com © 2002 Macmillan Magazines Ltd . The deposit shows a reflection. Figure 4 Different samples. because of hydrogen evolution. We also prepared a cylindrical cell composed of a capillary tube 1 mm in diameter in the centre of which we put a glass fibre 100 mm in diameter. The cover glass has been metallized over its entire width up to the distance when the current was interrupted. But even in the regime of covering deposition. the film is dendritic19 (Fig. copper and tin. and especially for silver. rather monodisperse in size. 4). from tin chloride solutions in the same range of concentrations. in the case of tin an extremely thin film precedes the Figure 3 A deposit of silver metal on a cover glass. I ¼ 0:5 mA. In this case. which gives a current density again of the order of 20 mA cm22 (ref. If too low a current density is used. The process also works well with copper on glass (Fig. 3). This film wets the surface and adheres to it. At the other end of the cell. to serve as the starting point. The copper was deposited directly on the Teflon. Column 3 (bottom right). The fibre had no conducting coating on it. First row. from copper sulphate solution.nature. They show a regular covering layer of grains. the current passing through the fibre coating was 160 mA. We also checked the technique with tin. The thicker tin deposits (column 2) were obtained in a regime similar to the other metals (C ¼ 0:04 M. The thinnest deposits (column 1).05 M). Therefore. This makes it possible to use electroplating to coat an insulator. we performed the growth vertically downwards.05 M silver nitrate. and were able to obtain tin films of the same morphology—although the range of currents is more limited. The fibre was then coated with silver paint at one end only. obtained with tin on glass at 718 ˚ lower currents (I ¼ 0:07 mA) are only 100 A thick. above a critical current density. a topographic image (colour) and a horizontal cross-section (black and white graph) is shown. Also. and exhibits a stable flat front on scales of the order of at least a few hundred micrometres. the front is destabilized by buoyancy. until it is fully coated. 2). NATURE | VOL 416 | 18 APRIL 2002 | www.5 mA. Tin films. A hole in the deposit shows that its thickness is spanned by one or just a few grains. Column 3: same solution but with small amounts of PVA (1 g l-1) as additive. silver deposits. Again. This critical current density is of the order of 10 mA cm22 for silver.05 M silver nitrate. unlike copper and silver. I ¼ 600 mA. columns 1 and 2. These gravity currents have been modelled quantitatively22. The models and the experiments show that the buoyancy effect can be reduced by growing vertically21.

A..... using a climate model of reduced complexity. (e-mail: vincent... Rosso. We note that using this very rapid plating technique with Li. because a number of key variables in climate change are poorly quantified.F. Soc. & Peng Yoke... & Barkey. Electrochemical aspects of the generation of ramified metallic deposits. New Jersey. A 42. This stability makes it possible to electroplate insulators in conditions very far from equilibrium. B. the 5-nm film is much thinner. leading to large uncertainties in global warming simulations1. N. We expect that the deposition reported here will be possible with any metal that is known to deposit in the powdery regime of growth. the overall production output would be much smaller than existing electroless techniques..2 Wm22.. At lower current densities.. C.. Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to V.... 14. Despic. Nature 343... Y.. Ars Chymurgica (Apud Janssonium et Weyerstraten. Fleury. 1992). Fortunat Joos & Gian-Kasper Plattner Climate and Environmental Physics. Phys. E.. Cambridge. Chazalviel. 1998). 20... Cu and Sn.. 253–258 (1996)... Phys.... Garik.. 1984). Fleury.. 6. M. J.. The role of the anions in the growth speed of electrochemical deposits.. Rosso.. Chazalviel. Fleury...) 115–168 (Minerals Metals Materials Society. In particular.com © 2002 Macmillan Magazines Ltd . We propose the following mechanistic explanation of this effect. 19.. Fractal structure of zinc metal leaves grown by electrodeposition.. in the shape of rounded crystals. Acknowledgements W. Hayakawa.... 4.. Rosso. D. Electrochim. & Merchant.. nec non Variis Naturae et Artis Spectaculis Aliarumque Rerim Meomriabilium Argumentis Illustrata (Apud Janssonium et Weyerstraten.. Fleury. Rev. V. 507–515 (1994).. M.. 65. Honjo... M.. Rev. in that the film progression and grain size are controlled externally. the capillary length of individual branches is decreased (as expected from theory9.. Science and Civilization in China Vol.... London. J. giving 1.. P.nature.... Arbres de Pierre. dendrites are always seen to grow perpendicularly to the electrodes. The formation of patterns in non-equilibrium growth... where E 0 is the electric field in the bulk. First.. J. Mundus Subterraneus. H... The assessment of uncertainties in global warming projections is often based on expert judgement.. R... Bergstrasser... Mater. 286–289 (1984). Rosso. P... 13. R... In present designs. Acta 39. & Ball. 21.. such as replacing the vapour seeding process in the electronics industry.. 2... acknowledges the financial support of Saint-Gobain.... Phys. Melrose.. J... Stocker.letters to nature formation of the main deposit. 18.... Pennsylvania. and z c. Chassaing.. & Fleury..... 407.. Branched fractal patterns in non-equilibrium electrochemical deposition from oscillatory nucleation and growth. 53. 7355–7367 (1990). Merchant. 62.. 1988). University of Bern... Electroanal. Paris. A Received 30 April 2001. 1667).... Lett. Meakin.. The expected future warming of the climate system and its potential consequences increase the need for climate projections with clearly defined uncertainties and likelihood estimates2. J. 2703–2706 (1989). V. T. 8. 17.. Thomas F.. 1991)..... & Garik.. Chem. The IPCC provides these probabilities for most of their findings in the 719 NATURE | VOL 416 | 18 APRIL 2002 | www. Morphology and Properties of Deposits Proceedings of the Materials Week Rosemont 1994 (ed.. very high fields are generated at the tips of the deposits17... J..4 Wm22 for the 5–95 per cent confidence range.. & Sawada.. Pelce. Fleury. Singapore... the process can be interrupted at any time. Amsterdam..... Cambridge. B. Electroanal.. V. Chazalviel.. 61–73 (1996). Matsushita. We obtain a probability density function for the present-day total radiative forcing. This proves that.. and direct coating of organic materials. Scaling and Growth far from Equilibrium (Cambridge Univ. 2.. A. Sidlerstr. Chem....4 to 2. to the poor cyclability of a powdery tree. A. as the growth speed is increased. 3.. J. 5(2) (Cambridge Univ. 5.. Experimental evidence for gravity induced motion in the vicinity of ramified electrodeposits. Caput VI. O’M. B. 523–530 (1990). China Monumentis qua Sacris qua Profanis.. Europhys.. D. even without additives. z a.. 16. it is clear that the dangling bonds of glass have catalytic properties. as the deposition process starts from one end of the sample and progresses towards the other end at speeds of the order of 1 m h21 at most.. Dynamics of Curved Fronts (Academic.. it is possible to deposit only this extremely thin tin film: it is 5 nm thick (Fig... E. K. & Bockris. but to a progressive closing of voids between ever-smaller branches... 22. accepted 25 February 2002.... P. The uncertainties in the input parameters and in the model itself are taken into account. narrowing the global-mean indirect aerosol effect to the range of 0 to –1. & Sapoval.. V.. 3009–3012 (1990).. 10. Amsterdam. 1664). & Popov... Physics Institute. Res. Laplace and diffusion controlled growth in electrochemical deposition. 7....... N. As it is observed that growth is much more rapid in scratches5. N.. The coating of fibres. et al. and past observations of oceanic and atmospheric warming are used to constrain the range of realistic model responses. 6693–6705 (1991). Runaway growth in two-dimensional electrodeposition... in Defect Structure. These very high fields induce nucleation and growth of a polycrystalline deposit19.. Indeed.. On a new kind of ramified electrodeposits. Interfacial velocity in electrochemical deposition and the Hecker effect. J. liber duodecimus part I.. 6.. in thin cells. M. 1.. H.. V. H... Press. Chazalviel. Rev. This is ascribed.. cycling efficiency of Li batteries is drastically reduced by dendritic growth.. A. & Sapoval. Warrendale... 15.. 290.fr). because16 l ¼ ðÿkT=eE0 Þðzc þ z a Þðzc za Þð1 þ ma =mc Þ....) 199–313 (Butterworths.... Experimental aspects of dense morphology in copper electrodeposition. 7 (eds Conway. 11. ´ 9.. under the action of the large electric field... Fleury. might eliminate the cycling problems of Li rechargeable batteries. Patent PCT/FR00/02757 (2000)...... instabilities cannot develop. the sensitivity of climate to changing greenhouse-gas concentrations in the atmosphere and the radiative forcing effects by aerosols are not well constrained.... A set-up similar to ours would in principle generate a thin film whose morphology is easier to cycle. 4 have a thickness close to that predicted by theory. But so is the typical size l of gradients ahead of the deposit... Lett... P. I. Press. Needham. B.23). 4)... But it should be acknowledged that.. Fractals.. J. V.. as reported here for Ag. Constraints on radiative forcing and future climate change from observations and climate model ensembles Reto Knutti. D.. Y. which coat in approximately 5 minutes glass plates of size 4 m £ 4 m.... but only a 5 per cent probability that warming will fall below that range.. Many applications of this process may be considered. R. Kircher... V. Nature 390. T.. E. Phys. Kircher. the process proposed here has some advantages over conventional electroless deposition on insulators. Switzerland ..... .... tailoring mirrors of unusual metals or shapes. M.. N. As seen in Fig.. Whereas the 200-nm copper and 300-nm tin films in Fig... and with a binary electrolyte.. A 44... & Chassaing. in part. and composed of a carpet of small grains side by side. Electrodeposition (Noyes Publication. J.fleury@polytechnique.. J. 1992). D... Ensemble simulations for two illustrative emission scenarios suggest a 40 per cent probability that global-mean surface temperature increase will exceed the range predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In general terms... E. 3012 Bern. this surprising stability is not due to an increase in the size of deposit features up to the sample size. Chazalviel. H. R.. Fleury.. Rev. Lett... and it should work with many simple salts.. Dini..20. Here we present a Monte Carlo approach to produce probabilistic climate projections... 36. in Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry Vol. ` 5. La Croissance Fractale de la Matiere (Flammarion. V. Fleury... When l becomes smaller than the grain size. Phys..W. and the front is stable (‘absolute stability’ in the context of pattern formation). in which individual grains become themselves ever smaller19. London.. Sano. 12. 23. Hibbert. 1972).... A quantitative study of gravity-induced convection in two-dimensional parallel electrodeposition cells. N.... J. Park Ridge.. m c and m a are the charges and mobilities of the cations and anions. 145–148 (1997)...... V. ribbons and plates seems possible.. 249–255 (1990)... 1169–1174 (1991).. Ben-Jacob. Rev.. We now consider why the deposit should be covering for higher currents. 1995). M. Fractal Growth Phenomena 2nd edn (World Scientific. Lett. Vicsek..

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