Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model

in the Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Environment
Ricardo Balbino dos Santos Pereira
Master Thesis on
Aerospace Engineering
Jury
President: Prof. Fernando José Parracho Lau
Supervisor: Prof. João Manuel Melo de Sousa
Examiner: Prof. Luís Rego da Cunha de Eça
September 2010
0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
Cn vs Azimuth
Model
Model_noDS
MEXICO
Azimuth angle [deg]
C
n

Acknowledgements
I am sincerely grateful to everyone who made this master thesis possible. My formation as an engineering
student started almost eight years ago at Lisbon's Instituto Superior Técnico. I have learned so much in this university ,
and I have many fond memories from the good teachers and colleagues I have had.
In 2007 I went to the Netherlands, to study at the TUDelft. This was a great experience, which gave me a
different perspective and the opportunity to learn a lot about wind energy engineering. Also, I was lucky enough to do
my internship at the Energy Center of the Netherlands. This institute does research in wind energy, which allowed me
to get in contact with scientists who work in this field for decades. I am especially thankful to my internship
supervisor, Ir. Gerard Schepers, for his insightful advise and fruitful discussions.
I must also thank my master thesis coordinator, Prof. João Melo de Sousa, for allowing me to be his
graduation student and for the help and good advice he gave me. Also, he was my Aerodynamics professor and
contributed to my decision of studying this difficult but very interesting field of science.
Last, but definitely not least, I must thank my family and friends for their everlasting patience and support.
iii
iv
Abstract
Keywords: Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine, Dynamic Stall, Beddoes-Leishman, MEXICO
Less expensive design solutions are sought in the wind energy industry, nevertheless any structure that is put
forward must be robust. The dynamic stall (DS) phenomenon imposes large amplitude loading on airfoil sections and
since it occurs in horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) operating envelope, accurate load prediction when DS is
present becomes essential. The European Union developed a project named MEXICO, providing a database of
aerodynamic data for a HAWT.
The aim of this master thesis was to choose and implement a DS model and to compare it with the MEXICO
data obtained at high wind speeds in the presence of yaw misalignment.
It was chosen to implement the DS model in a Blade-Element Momentum (BEM) code, and consequentially
two BEM approaches were compared with MEXICO data obtained at moderately high wind speeds.
Posteriorly the Beddoes-Leishman DS model was tailored to the HAWT environment, and validated against
unsteady airfoil wind tunnel data. Different leading edge stall criteria were tested and good agreement was found. The
rotational augmentation of the aerodynamic coefficients was also investigated using an inverse BEM method and
empirical rotational corrections have been applied.
Finally the rotational corrections and the DS model were implemented in the BEM code, and the results were
compared with high wind speed yawed flow MEXICO data. Reasonable to good agreement was found, and it was
clear that including the dynamic stall model improved the computational results. The experimental trends observed
were not always captured by the model, but the magnitude of the loads occurring over a revolution was well predicted.
For future research it is suggested to test the performance of other DS models, as well as to validate these
models under higher excitation frequencies.
v
vi
Resumo
Palavras-chave: turbina eólica de eixo horizontal, perda dinâmica, Beddoes-Leishman, MEXICO
A indústria de Energia Eólica procura designs menos dispendiosos, no entanto a integridade estrutural das
turbinas eólicas deve necessariamente ser assegurada. A perda dinâmica (DS) é um fenómeno que provoca grandes
amplitudes no carregamento a que um perfil alar está sujeito, e dado que ocorre frequentemente em turbinas eólicas de
eixo horizontal (HAWT), é essencial prever com precisão o impacto deste fenómeno. A União Europeia desenvolveu
um projecto denominado MEXICO, no âmbito do qual foi criada uma extensa base de dados duma HAWT.
O objectivo desta tese de mestrado foi seleccionar e implementar um modelo de DS, e compará-lo com os
resultados experimentais do MEXICO obtidos a velocidades de vento elevadas e com a HAWT desalinhada.
Optou-se por conjugar o modelo de DS com a modelação Blade-Element Momentum (BEM), tendo sido
validados dois códigos BEM utilizando dados do MEXICO obtidos a velocidades de vento moderadas.
Posteriormente o modelo de DS Beddoes-Leishman foi adaptado ao ambiente das HAWT e validado
utilizando dados experimentais de perfis aerodinâmicos em regime não-estacionário. Foram testados dois critérios de
perda de bordo de ataque, tendo-se obtido bons resultados. A influência que a rotação das pás tem na característica dos
coeficientes aerodinâmicos dos perfis alares foi também investigada utilizando um método de BEM invertido.
Finalmente as correcções devidas à rotação das pás e o modelo de DS foram implementados no código BEM,
e utilizaram-se para comparação os dados experimentais do MEXICO a velocidades de vento elevados e com a
HAWT desalinhada. A concordância obtida entre os resultados do modelo e os dados experimentais foi razoavelmente
boa, e a inclusão do modelo de DS melhorou os resultados computacionais. Embora os resultados do modelo não
tenham correspondido aos dados experimentais em todas as posições azimutais, a magnitude do carregamento a que as
secções da pá estão sujeitas numa revolução foi calculada correctamente.
Sugere-se para futuras investigações que outros modelos de DS sejam implementados, e também que estes
modelos sejam validados a frequências de excitação mais elevadas.
vii
List of Symbols
A - Area swept by the rotor [m2]
A
1,2
- Function used in the induced velocities empirical model [-]
A
1,2
- Constants used in the empirical approximation to the indicial response [-]
B - Number of blades [-]
C
d
- Drag force coefficient [-]
C
l
- Lift force coefficient [-]
C
N
- Normal force coefficient [-]
C
N0
- Normal force coefficient at an angle of attack of 0 deg [-]
C
N
f
- Normal force coefficient including the pressure lag and viscous lag [-]
C
N
o
- Derivative of the normal force coefficient with respect to the angle of attack [/deg]
C
N
'
- Normal force coefficient including the pressure lag [-]
C
N , I
- Critical normal force coefficient [-]
C
N
V
- Vortex contribution to the normal coefficient [-]
C
P
- Pressure coefficient [-]
C
T
- Thrust coefficient [-]
C
tg
- Tangential force coefficient [-]
C
V
- Vortex lift [-]
D - Rotor diameter [m]
D - Deficiency function used in the Beddoes-Leishman dynamic stall model [-]
F - Force [N]
F - Flow expansion function [-]
F
1
- Correction factor for tip-loss [-]
K - Wake shape function [-]
K
o
- Non-circulatory factor [-]
P - Pressure [Pa]
P
1,2
- Function used in the induced velocities empirical model [-]
R - Radius of the rotor disk [m]
viii
Re - Reynolds number [-]
S - Semi-chords of an airfoil [-]
T
I
- Non-circulatory time constant [-]
T
P
- Pressure lag time constant [-]
T
f
- Viscous lag time constant [-]
T
v
- Vortex lag time constant [-]
T
vl
- Vortex position time constant [-]
U - Wind speed [m/s]
V - Velocity [m/s]
X -Deficiency function used in the Beddoes-Leishman dynamic stall model [-]
Y - Deficiency function used in the Beddoes-Leishman dynamic stall model [-]
a - Axial induction factor [-]
a' - Tangential induction factor [-]
b
1,2
- Constants used in the empirical approximation to the indicial response [-]
c - Airfoil chord [m]
f - Frequency [Hz]
f - Non-dimensional separation point [-]
f ' - Non-dimensional separation point including the pressure lag [-]
f ' ' - Non-dimensional separation point including the pressure lag and the viscous lag [-]
g - Function of number of blades and tip loss ratio [-]
k - Reduced frequency [-]
r - Local radius [m]
t - Time [s]
t - Airfoil thickness [m]
u - Axial induced velocity [m/s]
Greek Symbols
o – angle of attack [deg]
o
f
- Equivalent leading edge pressure angle of attack [deg]
ix
ß - Yaw-misalignment angle [deg]
! - Inflow angle [deg]
0 - Pitch angle [deg]
m - Azimuth angle [deg]
u - Fraction radius [-]
X - Wake skew angle [deg]
\ – Tip speed ratio [-]
A – Increment in quantity [-]
t
v
- Non-dimensional vortex time parameter [-]
D - Rotor's angular velocity [rad/s] or [rpm]
o - Frequency [rad/s]
Indices
C – Circulatory
Eff - Effective
I – Impulsive
OSC – Oscillation
Press – Pressure
P – Unsteady attached
Tot- Total
n – Time sample
p – Pitch
r – Rotating
sep - Separation
visc – Viscous
tw – Twist
x
Abbreviations
2D – Two dimensional
3D – Three dimensional
AOA – Angle of attack
BEM – Blade Element-Momentum
BL – Beddoes-Leishman
CFD – Computational Fluid Dynamics
DS – Dynamic stall
DNW – German Dutch wind tunnel
ECN – Energy Research Center of the Netherlands
FFA - Flygtekniska Forsoksanatalten (Swedish Aeronautical Research Institute)
HAWT – Horizontal axis wind turbine
LE – Leading edge
LLF – Large scale low speed facility
MEXICO - Model rotor experiments under controlled conditions
OSU – Ohio state university
PIV – Particle image velocimetry
RPM – Revolutions per minute
TE – Trailing edge
TSR - Tip-speed-ratio
List of Figures
Figure 2.1 1: Dynamic Stall stages from [2]....................................................................................................................19
Figure 2.1 2: Classical rotational corrections from [6]....................................................................................................23
Figure 2.2 1: Rotating Blade Airfoil Section Convention................................................................................................25
Figure 2.2 2: Convention for a Wind Turbine in Yaw......................................................................................................27
Figure 2.3 1: The MEXICO experiment..........................................................................................................................31
Figure 2.3 2: Airfoil section distribution over the MEXICO blades................................................................................33
Figure 3.2 1: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324.5 rpm) at the 25% spanwise station ...36
Figure 3.2 2: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424.5 rpm) at the 25% spanwise station . 36
Figure 3.2 3: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324.5 rpm) at the 35% spanwise station...37
xi
Figure 3.2 4: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424.5 rpm) at the 35% spanwise station . 37
Figure 3.2 5: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424.5 rpm) at the 60% spanwise station . 37
Figure 3.2 6: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324.5 rpm) at the 60% spanwise station ...37
Figure 3.2 7: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324.5 rpm) at the 82% spanwise station ...38
Figure 3.2 8: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424.5 rpm) at the 82% spanwise station . 38
Figure 3.2 9: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324.5 rpm) at the 92% spanwise station ..39
Figure 3.2 10: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424.5 rpm) at the 92% spanwise station 39
Figure 4.1 1: BEM method Calculation Procedure..........................................................................................................41
Figure 4.5 1: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 25% spanwise station.............................................................47
Figure 4.5 2: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 25% spanwise station ............................................................47
Figure 4.5 3: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 35% spanwise station.............................................................48
Figure 4.5 4: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60% spanwise station.............................................................49
Figure 4.5 5: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 60% spanwise station.............................................................49
Figure 4.5 6: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 82% spanwise station............................................................49
Figure 4.5 7: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 82% spanwise station ............................................................49
Figure 4.5 8: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 92% spanwise station............................................................50
Figure 4.5 9: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 92% spanwise station.............................................................50
Figure 4.5 10: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60% spanwise station and yaw angle of 45 deg ..................51
Figure 4.5 11: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60% spanwise station and yaw angle of 15 deg...................51
Figure 5.3 1: Flowchart of the Beddoes-Leishman DS model.........................................................................................62
Figure 5.4 1: Normal force coefficient characteristic of the NACA64418 at Re=700 000............................................63
Figure 5.4 2: Pitching moment coefficient characteristic of the NACA64418 at Re=700 000.......................................63
Figure 5.7 1: Geometry of airfoil sections used in the DS model validation...................................................................68
Figure 5.8 1: Tip region airfoil section at a low reduced frequency................................................................................69
Figure 5.8 2: Mid-span region airfoil section at moderate reduced frequency...............................................................69
Figure 5.8 3: Root region airfoil section at high reduced frequency...............................................................................70
Figure 5.8 4: Root region airfoil section at moderately high reduced frequency............................................................70
Figure 6.1 1: The rotational augmentation phenomenon.................................................................................................73
Figure 6.3 1: Cl2D and Cl3D obtained with the inverse BEM........................................................................................76
Figure 6.3 2: Cm2D and Ct3D obtained with the inverse BEM......................................................................................77
Figure 6.4 1: Implemented Cl dependency of angle of attack at different spanwise positions ......................................79
Figure 6.4 2: Implemented Cd dependency of angle of attack at different spanwise positions.......................................81
Figure 7.1 1: Cn variation with spanwise number of elements at 0 deg azimuth............................................................84
Figure 7.1 2: Cn variation with azimuthal increment at 120 deg azimuth.......................................................................84
Figure 7.1 3: Cn variation with azimuth angle.................................................................................................................85
Figure 7.3 1: Cn variation with azimuth for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span........................................................87
Figure 7.3 2: Cn variation with alpha for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span.............................................................87
Figure 7.3 3: Cn variation with alpha for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span.............................................................88
Figure 7.3 4: Cn variation with azimuth for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span........................................................88
Figure 7.3 5: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span........................................................88
Figure 7.3 6: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span.............................................................88
Figure 7.3 7: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span........................................................89
Figure 7.3 8: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span.............................................................89
Figure 7.3 9: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 25% span.............................................................90
Figure 7.3 10: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 25% span......................................................90
Figure 7.3 11: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 35% span.......................................................90
Figure 7.3 12: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 35% span...........................................................90
Figure 7.3 13: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 25% span......................................................91
Figure 7.3 14: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 25% span...........................................................91
Figure 7.3 15: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 35% span...........................................................91
Figure 7.3 16: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 35% span.....................................................91
Figure 7.3 17: Cn variation with Azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 60% span......................................................92
Figure 7.3 18: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 60% span...........................................................92
Figure 7.3 19: Cn variation with Azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 82% span......................................................93
xii
Figure 7.3 20: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 82% span...........................................................93
List of Tables
Table 2.2.1- Typical reduced frequencies found in wind turbine's operation...................................................................29
Table 2.3.1: MEXICO model main specifications...........................................................................................................32
Table 2.3.2 - Range of parameters considered in MEXICO trials...................................................................................33
Table 3.1.1 - Data points considered in the preliminary data analysis.............................................................................35
Table 4.4.1 - MEXICO data points considered in the BEM codes' validation................................................................45
Table 4.4.2: Preliminary analysis of the yawed flow trials..............................................................................................46
Table 4.5.1 - Average Normal Force coefficient relative error for U=15 m/s..................................................................52
Table 4.5.2 - Average Normal Force coefficient relative error for U=18 m/s..................................................................52
Table 5.6.1 - Empirical constants for attached flow........................................................................................................65
Table 5.6.2 - Values of the empirical time constants for separated flow..........................................................................66
Table 5.7.1: Characteristics of the airfoil sections used in the DS model validation.......................................................68
Table 5.7.2: Validation Cases of the Beddoes-Leishman DS model................................................................................69
Table 6.2.1: Trials Considered in the Rotational Augmentation Investigation................................................................75
Table 7.2.1 - MEXICO data points and spanwise positions used to compare the model against ...................................87
Table 7.3.1: Relative error in Cn averaged over a revolution..........................................................................................94
Table 7.3.2: Relative error in Maximum Cn over a revolution........................................................................................94
xiii
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements ......................................................................................................................................... iii
Abstract ........................................................................................................................................................... v
Resumo ….............................................................................….................................................................... vii
List of Symbols ............................................................................................................................................. viii
List of Figures .............................................................................................................................................. xi
List of Tables …........................................................................................................................................... xiii
1) Introduction........................................................................................................16
1.1)Project Goals & Methodology........................................................................................................................16
1.2)Report Layout.................................................................................................................................................17
2) Theoretical Framework......................................................................................18
2.1)The Dynamic Stall Phenomenon....................................................................................................................19
2.2)Dynamic Stall on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines.........................................................................................25
2.3)The MEXICO project.....................................................................................................................................31
3) Preliminary Analysis of MEXICO Pressure Data..............................................34
3.1)Data Processing..............................................................................................................................................34
3.2)Results and Discussion...................................................................................................................................35
3.3)Conclusions and Recommendations ..............................................................................................................39
4) Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes...................40
4.1)The Blade Element-Momentum Method .......................................................................................................40
4.2)Why use the BEM method?............................................................................................................................41
4.3)Description of the BEM models considered...................................................................................................42
4.4)MEXICO data used for validation ................................................................................................................45
4.5)Results and Discussion...................................................................................................................................47
4.6)Conclusions and Recommendations...............................................................................................................52
5) Selection, Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model............54
5.1)The choice of a Dynamic Stall Model............................................................................................................54
5.2)The Assumption of Incompressibility ............................................................................................................55
xiv
5.3)The Model Explained.....................................................................................................................................56
5.4)The influence of thick airfoils........................................................................................................................63
5.5)Leading Edge Stall occurrence Criteria..........................................................................................................64
5.6)Choosing the Empirical time constants .........................................................................................................65
5.7)Validation Cases.............................................................................................................................................66
5.8)Results and Discussion...................................................................................................................................68
5.9)Conclusions and Recommendations...............................................................................................................70
6) The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on Aerodynamic Coefficients........71
6.1)Physical Description.......................................................................................................................................71
6.2)Three Dimensional Force Coefficients Experimental Determination............................................................72
6.3)Results............................................................................................................................................................74
6.4)Implemented Aerodynamic Coefficients........................................................................................................77
6.5)Conclusions and Recommendations...............................................................................................................80
7) Results of the BEM code including the DS model and rotational effects..........82
7.1)Model Convergence........................................................................................................................................82
7.2)Comparison with MEXICO data ...................................................................................................................84
7.3)Results and Discussion ..................................................................................................................................86
7.4)General Remarks and Conclusions.................................................................................................................94
8) Conclusions and Recommendations...................................................................95
8.1)Conclusions....................................................................................................................................................95
8.2)Recommendations..........................................................................................................................................96
9) References..........................................................................................................98
Appendices........................................................................................................102
xv
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
1) Introduction
One can not deny the growing concern in decreasing the cost of energy in recent years, which has naturally
also had an impact in the wind energy community. It is also true that it is common engineering practice to opt for
conservative designs, which in the wind energy industry usually brings about heavier, more expensive rotor blades. In
order to be able to push through cheaper, lighter structures it is necessary to ensure that such designs are able to
withstand the loads expected to occur over the life time of a wind turbine.
One of the main requirements which must be met when certifying a wind turbine's structural integrity is that
of fatigue damage resistance; a material's fatigue damage is especially related with the cyclic loading it is subjected to,
and consequentially it is very important to accurately estimate the load variation a component will undertake.
For the same angle of attack range, the phenomenon of dynamic stall (DS) is characterized by imposing a
very large load amplitude on the airfoil section, when compared to the static loading characteristic. This brings about
significant hysteresis, which also affects the aerodynamic damping of a wind turbine. Since one expects dynamic stall
to occur in wind turbine operation, especially when yaw misalignment is present at high wind speeds, it is clear that it
is crucial to be able to predict the magnitude of the aerodynamic loads taking place when this phenomenon is present.
In the last decades several models have been proposed to predict the aerodynamic loads occurring during DS in rotary
wings, with a wide range of complexity and using distinct approaches.
The European Union developed a project with the main goal of providing a database of aerodynamic
measurements of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT), so that computational models could be validated. This
project was named MEXICO, which stands for Model Rotor Experiments under Controlled Conditions. For this
purpose, an extensively instrumented 4.5m diameter HAWT model was tested in December 2006 in the German-Dutch
Wind Tunnel, under several flow conditions. The Energy Center of the Netherlands (ECN) was the coordinator of this
project, even though several international entities participated, and the calculation rounds are still taking place.
1.1) Project Goals & Methodology
Based on a literature study conducted, the main goal of this master thesis is to select a dynamic stall model
and to assess the load predicting capabilities of the method in a real HAWT environment. Data from the MEXICO
project is especially suited to conduct a validation of the implemented model, and consequentially these
measurements will be used to evaluate the performance of the model's predictions. It is thus also an objective of this
master thesis to process and analyse the MEXICO data, namely the one used in the model's validation, to ensure
that the comparison with the implemented model is trustworthy.
To assess the performance of the DS model, it was chosen to implement the model in a Blade-Element
Momentum (BEM) code. Accordingly, it was necessary to firstly validate the BEM model in attached flow
conditions. Posteriorly the DS model was tailored to the HAWT environment and validated against wind tunnel test
16
Introduction
data from the Ohio State University (OSU) database. Finally the DS model was included in the BEM code so that a
comparison with the MEXICO data could be carried out.
1.2) Report Layout
The body of this report is divided in 7 chapters. After this introduction, the theoretical background of the
work carried out is given in chapter 2. The phenomenon of Dynamic Stall is addressed, explaining its relevance
within the HAWT's environment, and the MEXICO experiment is also introduced. In chapter 3 a preliminary analysis
of the MEXICO data is carried out, with the objective of identifying possible incoherences in the pressure data.
Chapter 4 describes the implementation of two distinct BEM codes for yaw-misaligned HAWTs, and validates these
models against MEXICO data obtained at moderately high wind tunnel speeds. In chapter 5 the Beddoes-Leishman
DS model is explained, and validated against wind tunnel test data from oscillating airfoils. The model is tailored for
HAWT application with different leading edge (LE) stall criteria being assessed. Chapter 6 discusses the influence of
rotational augmentation on the static aerodynamic force coefficients; three dimensional (3D) corrections are
implemented and compared with the MEXICO data using an inverse BEM method. In chapter 7 the results obtained
implementing the DS model and the rotational corrections in the BEM code are presented, and compared with the
MEXICO data obtained at high wind tunnel speeds. Finally chapter 8 states the most important conclusions drawn in
this assignment and suggests topics of possible future investigation.
17
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
2) Theoretical Framework
Increasing concern in reducing the costs associated with energy production in recent years has naturally
impacted the wind energy community, and consequentially cheaper design solutions are strived for. However, less
expensive designs usually also mean lighter and less resistant structures, which nevertheless must be able to withstand
the loads expected to occur over the life time of a wind turbine.
Fatigue resistance is a main requirement when certifying a wind turbine's structural integrity, and it is known
that unsteady aerodynamic loading has a considerable impact on the total fatigue damage a wind turbine will
undertake. It is thus clear that accurate unsteady aerodynamic load prediction is crucial if more cost-effective design
solutions are to be achieved.
Usually the unsteady effects taking place in wind turbine aerodynamics can be divided in three
“contributions”[1]:
1. Dynamic inflow is an inviscid effect on the induced velocity, and it is usually caused by a change in blade
pitch angle or in rotor speed. It has a time scale in the order of D/ U , where D stands for the diameter of
the rotor and U represents the incoming wind velocity.
2. The Theodorsen effect is also of non-viscous nature, and it refers to the change on the airfoil characteristics
while in fully attached flow conditions, namely the delay of the airloads with respect to the angle of attack
when it varies rapidly. This effect has a time scale in the order of c/ V
Eff
, where c stands for the airfoil’s
chord and
V
Eff
represents the effective local velocity, which is the velocity the airfoil experiences.
3. Dynamic stall is a viscous effect on the airfoil characteristics at stalled conditions which is known to yield
transient force coefficients of much larger magnitude than experienced in the static case. This effect involves
a rather complex set of interlinked phenomena and it is also characterized by a time scale in the order of
c/ V
Eff
.
In HAWT's normal operating regimes the two time scales of the unsteady effects mentioned above will have
very different orders of magnitude, and consequentially, it is usual to study the effects of dynamic inflow and of the
airfoil unsteady aerodynamics separately. One can also understand that, if dynamic stall is expected to occur, the
Theodorsen effect must also be taken into consideration, since these phenomena are intrinsically related and describe
the airfoil unsteady aerodynamics.
This chapter will start by describing the dynamic stall phenomenon and the several aspects which it is
influenced by, together with an overview of some “engineering” models which have been developed, in section 2.1.
Section 2.2 frames the occurrence of dynamic stall within the HAWT environment and normal operating envelope,
from a qualitative point of view. Finally in section 2.3 the MEXICO project itself is addressed, by mentioning its
main characteristics and relevant data for the present assignment.
18
Theoretical Framework
2.1) The Dynamic Stall Phenomenon
When an airfoil undergoes a flow regime in which its angle of attack (AOA) changes rapidly the aerodynamic
resulting forces and moments will differ from their static value, since obviously the flow regime and consequent
pressure distribution do not adapt instantaneously.
As long as the flow remains attached and the airfoil is not very thick, the aerodynamic loading can be computed with
the “elegant” Theodorsen’s theory, which was developed considering a 2D oscillating flat plate. However, when the
flow initiates separation, a complex set of interlinked phenomena occur, usually referred to as dynamic stall ..
Physical Description
If the airfoil experiences an oscillation in angle of attack in which it goes beyond the static stall angle DS may
be present. This means that several subsequent different phenomena take place, with a fairly complex overall
behaviour of the airfoil loading, yielding aerodynamic forces very different from those obtained in static conditions.
Dynamic stall is characterized by an accumulation of vorticity near the leading edge of the airfoil as the angle
of attack is increasing, causing an overshoot in lift. This is followed by an abrupt decrease in the normal force when
the built up vortex is convected downstream of the airfoil as the angle of attack is decreasing, together with very large
pitching moment variations due to centre of pressure movements. To better grasp this sequence of events it is useful to
divide the DS phenomenon in 5 stages, illustrated in the figure below from [2].
19
Figure 2.1 1: Dynamic Stall stages from [2]
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
As the value of angle of attack increases rapidly in stage 1 there is a reduction in adverse pressure gradients
along the chord, compared to what one would obtain in the quasi-steady case for the same angle of attack, and the
onset of separation is delayed. Further augmenting the angle of attack, and as the separation point approaches the
leading edge, there is a build up of vorticity in that region of the airfoil, which brings us to stage 2. At some point, the
vortex disturbance will be cast off from the leading edge and swept downstream across the chord, which will cause an
aft movement of the centre of pressure and consequently a very large nose-down pitching moment, usually referred to
as moment stall. Still, as long as the vortex disturbance stays over the upper surface it will provide additional lift.
Stage 3 is characterized by a sudden break in the lift coefficient, which will take place at a higher angle of
attack than the abrupt decrease in the pitching moment. That is to say, the moment stall will occur at the onset of
vortex shedding, while the lift stall will happen only when the vortex passes into the wake.
The flow on the upper surface then becomes fully separated, as the vortex disturbance passes the trailing edge of the
airfoil, which is common to designate by stage 4. Afterwards, the reattachment of the flow is significantly lagged, and
full reattachment is postponed to configurations in which the airfoil is well below its normal static stall angle, as
denoted by stage 5.
The concept of Reduced Frequency
Previously it was mentioned that dynamic effects can be noticeable in the aerodynamic loading when the
angle of attack changes “rapidly”, but how exactly can one quantify this? The response of an airfoil to changes in the
local flow, as well as many other systems, is not solely dependent on the frequency of the excitation, ω. It is also
related with the local velocity, V, and chord, c, since, obviously, the speed of propagation of a perturbation is finite.
Thus, it is common to characterize the response of an airfoil undergoing oscillations by the reduced frequency, k,
defined as

(2.1.1)
since this quantity is indeed representative of the system’s dynamics. We should notice that the factor 2 in the
expression above was introduced by historical reasons
1
.
According to Leishman [2], one can consider that if k<0.05 the problem is quasi-steady, i.e. the unsteady
effects are generally small and can be neglected; if a problem is characterized by a reduced frequency k> 0.05 it is
considered unsteady, and the unsteady terms in the equations cannot be neglected if a realistic analysis is to be
conducted. Moreover, if we have k>0.2, the unsteady terms will begin to dominate the behaviour of the airloads, and
consequentially the problem is highly unsteady.
Effect of forcing conditions on Dynamic Stall
It is clear that dynamic stall involves a complex set of phenomena which may be extremely sensitive even to
small perturbations, since turbulence and flow separation are most likely present, and so it is easy to understand that
by changing the forcing conditions the aerodynamic loading may have large variations. A qualitative description of
1
The original work of Theodorsen on airfoil unsteady aerodynamics used the profile's semi-chord as length scale, and
subsequently nearly all investigation conducted in the same topic adopted his convention
20
k=
oc
2V
Theoretical Framework
what changes can be expected in the airloads when different forcing parameters are varied will be given now as:
• Mean angle of attack ,
α
- when considering an oscillating airfoil, and assuming the other parameters
remain constant, the mean AOA of the periodic motion can dictate the degree of stall penetration in a cycle. If
the mean angle of attack is small (considerably smaller than the static stall angle), it is expected that the
airfoil will undergo “light” dynamic stall, meaning that the
C
l
vs o
curve will resemble the ellipses
characteristic of attached flow, and that the oscillations of the moment coefficient,
C
m
will have a small
amplitude. On the other hand, when the mean angle of attack of the oscillation is large (as large as the static
stall angle or greater), one usually will encounter “deep” dynamic stall, where there will be a larger lift
overshoot relatively to the static behaviour. In this case, it is also verified that a very significant nose-down
pitching moment occurs, indicative of larger vortex shedding. However, the angle of attack at which the flow
over the airfoil reattaches seems insensitive to changes in the mean angle of attack of the oscillation.
• Reduced Frequency , k – As mentioned before, the reduced frequency can be interpreted as the degree of
unsteadiness of an oscillation; it is thus easy to understand that as one increases the reduced frequency, the
system will have “less time” to adapt to the changes, or in other words, it takes longer until it “becomes
aware” of the changes in angle of attack, and thus the vortex shedding is delayed, as well as the
reattachment. By further increasing the reduced frequency, it is even possible to prevent flow separation from
initiating in any point of the cycle, according to [2].
• Mach Number, M – Analogously to what happens in the static case, the effects of compressibility cause the
stall angle to be decreased, meaning that there will be more stall penetration and a larger amount of
hysteresis in the whole cycle. If the free stream velocity is large enough that the local Mach number
approaches the sound barrier, dynamic stall onset may involve a shock wave, and there will be complex
centre of pressure movements.
3 Dimensional Effects on Dynamic Stall
The brief qualitative explanation of the features of the dynamic stall process given above, as well of most of
the experimental data available, refers to oscillating airfoils, either pitching or heaving
2
, tested on wind tunnels in 2D
flows. However it is clear that real-life engineering situations are usually not completely described simply by
considering 2 dimensions of a problem, and consequentially typical 3D situations will now be addressed:
• Sweep – If one imposes high sweep angles on a 2D airfoil on a steady regime the onset of stall will be
delayed and the maximum lift coefficient will be larger than the one obtained at an aligned configuration,
because of the favourable effects of the spanwise development of the boundary layer. However, according to
[2], when pitch oscillations are imposed in a swept airfoil, it appears that the maximum normal force
coefficient is not increased when compared with the unswept dynamic case. Still, it is clear that the sweep
angle has an influence, since the dynamic stall lift is delayed to a higher angle of attack, and also since the lift
curve shows less hysteresis, because it is narrower. Now minding the pitching moment behaviour,
experiments [2] show that the moment stall occurs approximately at the same angle of attack, but that its
slope is smaller. This is possible to understand if one admits that the shed vorticity will be convected in the
direction of the flow, and thus it will take more time to reach the trailing edge since the local chord is at an
2
A heaving airfoil by definition has a forcing normal cyclic velocity, and it is not pitching, thus there is a periodic angle of attack
variation imposed on the airfoil. It is also referred to as “plunging”.
21
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
angle with the flow, since the wing is swept.
• Finite Wing – Since all the wings are finite, there will necessarily be a vortex at the tip, with intensity
comparable to the circulation of the wing sections in its vicinity. This concentrated vorticity induces a
downward velocity on the wing’s sections near the tip, thus decreasing the actual angle of attack they are
operating at. According to [3], the influence of the finiteness of the wing does not greatly affect the
dynamics of the stall occurring when angle of attack oscillations are imposed. The tip vortex will indeed
have an influence on the more outboard wing sections, but it is identical to the one obtained when the mean
angle of attack of the oscillation is decreased, which was discussed previously. We can thus expect a
reduction in the average lift-curve-slope when moving outboard towards the tip, but this is a quasi-steady
effect. However, when one is considering sections extremely close to the tip the results are less transient,
which suggest that leading edge vortex shedding does not occur because the tip-vortex alone dominates the
flow field.
Rotational Effects
Besides the 3D effects mentioned above, the fact that a blade is rotating will bring about noticeable changes,
and since it is necessarily the case in helicopters and wind turbines, it is relevant to consider it.
Blade rotation will originate a centrifugal force which, together with the radial pressure gradient , provokes
an outwards spanwise flow component. Because this velocity is in a rotating reference frame, there will be a Coriolis
force which acts to accelerate the fluid from the leading edge to the trailing edge of the airfoil, thus postponing
separation.
Because the separation is delayed to higher angles of attack, the maximum lift the airfoil will experience may
be significantly increased, which is why this effect is usually termed as rotational augmentation. It has also been
verified [4] that the amount of lift added depends on the value of the chord to radius ratio ( c/r), thus increasing at the
blade's root.
The effect described above, even though it necessarily implies movement since the blade is rotating, is
usually regarded as steady phenomenon; when an unsteady regime is imposed in a rotationally augmented blade
section, according to [5], [6] the average lift coefficient in a cycle is somewhat larger, but the hysteresis is of a smaller
magnitude, when compared to the 2D case. A figure of this effect is shown below:
22
Theoretical Framework
From the brief discussion above, it is clear that rotational effects play an important role in the blade sections
where dynamic stall is expected to occur, and consequentially this matter will be posteriorly addressed in greater
depth.

Modelling Dynamic Stall
From the explained above, it is obvious that dynamic stall encompasses a complex set of phenomena, and
thus attempting to model its effects is not straight forward at all. Aerodynamicists, especially people involved in
helicopter design and analysis have been working on this task since the 1960’s, and currently the models that try to
predict the effects of dynamic stall range from fairly simple empirical or semi-empirical models to complex
computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods.
Proper CFD simulation can only be obtained using the full Navier-Stokes equations with an adequate
turbulence model, given the nature of the phenomena present in Dynamic stall; according to [7], [8], these models
show some promise in predicting 2D and 3D dynamic stall events, however the quantitative predictions of the airloads
are not yet satisfactory. Also because the computational resources for these CFD solutions are prohibitive, and will not
be further addressed to in this assignment, we will now concentrate on more approximate models of the dynamic stall
phenomenon.
Engineering Models
Some of the “Engineering Models” developed to predict the effects of dynamic stall are a form of resynthesis
of the measured unsteady airfoil airloads, i.e. they simply try to “rebuild” the trends observed experimentally. On the
other hand, the so-called “Semi-Empirical” models contain simplified representations of the physical processes taking
place, by using sets of linear and non-linear equations to simulate the aerodynamic loads. Still, these models always
require a significant number of empirical parameters, usually both from steady and unsteady experiments, and their
application is limited to the airfoil and Mach number they were developed for. Some of these models will now be
23
Figure 2.1 2: Classical rotational corrections from [6]
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
considered:
• UTRC α, A, B Method: This is a resynthesis method developed around 1970, and its approach is described
in [9], [10] ; It tries to isolate the dynamic contributions to the airloads by subtracting the static coefficients,
and it has known some success, but it has the inconvenient that extensive data tables must be generated for
each airfoil and Mach Number.
• Boeing-Vertol ‘gamma’ Function Method: In this method the influence of the airfoil motion is taken into
account by computing an effective angle of attack The influence of the pitching and plunging effects is
determined from the forcing conditions, and a second correction is applied from an empirical function
dependent on airfoil and Mach Number. This final value is then used to obtain values from the static airload
curves. This methods yields good predictions of the unsteady airloads, but it is not so accurate predicting
situations with little stall penetration. More details are available in [11].
• Time Delay Method: This is a semi-empirical model developed in 1978, which is based in the time domain,
and it is described in [12],[13]. This method actually tries to simulate, even though in a simplified manner,
the basic physics of the dynamic process; the behaviour of the airloads in the attached flow regime are
obtained using the Wagner indicial response function, and then two non-dimensional time delays are used, the
first representing the delay in the onset of separation, and the second accounting for the time during which
leading-edge vorticity shedding takes place. These time delays were obtained from a large amount of airfoil
tests at different Mach numbers, and the method has given good predictions, and also has the advantage that
it requires relatively few empirical coefficients.
• Gangwani’s Method: It is a synthesized method, also time-based, where the airloads in attached flow are
modelled in a very similar way as the time-delay method mentioned above. For the non-linear part of the
model, a large set of equations with several empirical coefficients are used to represent the forces produced
by the airflow. This model has shown credible predictions of the unsteady airloads, even though it seems to
have some difficulties predicting flow reattachment. More details are available in [14].
• Johnson’s Method: This is a fairly simple method, further developed in [15], where the static stall lift and
pitching moment are corrected as a function of the pitch rate, and where vortex shedding is assumed to occur
just above the static stall angle. In this model, vortex shedding produces increments in lift and nose-down
pitching moments to a peak value, which then decay back to the static loads. This model yields reasonable
predictions for the normal force coefficient, although less satisfactory estimates are obtained for the moment
oscillations.
• Leishman-Beddoes Method: This method is capable of assessing the unsteady lift, pitching moment and
drag, and it characterized by having a more complete physical representation of the unsteady aerodynamic
problem, having been extensively validated with experimental data. It is comprised of three subsystems,
namely, an attached flow model for the unsteady linear airloads, also referred to as the Theodorsen effect, a
separated flow model for the non-linear airloads, and a dynamic stall model for the airloads induced by the
leading edge vortex. The loads in the attached flow regime are obtained through indicial functions, where
compressibility is taken into account; for the aerodynamic effects associated with separated flow, this method
calculates an equivalent point of separation based on the angle of attack history, according to
Kirchhoff/Helmholtz theory, which is then used to reconstruct the non linear loads; finally, to represent the
24
Theoretical Framework
effects of dynamic stall, the dynamic effects of a concentrated leading-edge vortex passing across the upper
surface and being convected downstream are taken into account. This method assumes that the dynamic stall
process is initiated when an equivalent leading-edge pressure parameter reaches a critical value. This
method yields indeed quite good results, and it has the important advantage that it requires relatively few
empirical coefficients, most of which derived from static airfoil data, and this explains why it is so popular
and has been extensively used in helicopter rotor loads prediction. It can be found in [16].
• ONERA Method : This model uses a set of nonlinear differential equations to describe the unsteady airfoil
behaviour in both attached flow and during dynamic stall, and the coefficients in the equations are
exclusively determined by comparison with experiments on oscillating airfoils. Being so, the later version of
the model, described in [17], uses 18 empirical coefficients, and it also adapts the trailing-edge separation
approach from Kirchhoff/Helmholtz theory. With this model one generally obtains reasonable predictions of
the unsteady airloads, even though it behaves less satisfactorily predicting flow reattachment.
2.2) Dynamic Stall on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines
In the current work aerodynamic data obtained from an instrumented wind turbine rotor model tested in a
wind tunnel section will be analysed, and consequentially it becomes important to frame the occurrence of dynamic
stall in the HAWT's envelope of normal operating regimes.
However, firstly it is necessary to describe the geometry convention normally used in wind engineering as far as airfoil
aerodynamics is concerned.
HAWT Airfoil Aerodynamics
When in presence of a rotating blade it becomes easier to grasp the characteristic flow a local airfoil section is
subjected to by considering the following representation :
This sort of analysis is usually termed blade element method, and the entities represented in the figure above
are thus:

¯
U
is the incoming wind speed

¯
D represents the blade's angular velocity

¯
V
eff is the effective velocity the airfoil experiences
25
Figure 2.2 1: Rotating Blade Airfoil Section Convention
U(1-a)
Ωr(1+a´)
Φ
θ
α
U eff
V
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
• a is the axial induction factor
• a´ represents the tangential induction factor
• Φ is the inflow angle
• θ is the pitch angle
• α represents the angle of attack
• r is the radius of the considered section
In figure 2.2 1 one can see that the effective velocity the airfoil section is working at will have a component
in the rotor plane
3
and in the direction orthogonal to the rotor plane. These velocity components are influenced
respectively by the tangential induction factor , a', and axial induction factor, a. These induction factors are
introduced to compensate for the fact that the air stream is “aware” of the rotating blades before the rotor plane is
reached, and consequentially the effective flow velocity at the rotor plane is substantially different from the
unperturbed conditions.
Still minding figure 2.2 1 it is clear that increasing wind speed while keeping the angular velocity constant
will increase the angle of attack the airfoil section is working at, since the incidence is proportional to the ratio of the
wind speed to the angular velocity. From geometric considerations, one can see that the angle of attack is thus given
by

(2.2.1)
One should also notice that the pitch angle illustrated above refers to the total pitch angle, which is a
combination of both the blade's local twist and the pitch angle the blade is working at, according to
0=0
p
+0
tw
(2.2.2)
Thorougher characterizations of typical wind turbine airfoil section aerodynamics can be found in wind
engineering manuals, such as [18], together with expected trends for the induction factors as different wind turbine
operating regimes are considered. Still, it is clear that these induction factors will have a large impact on the angle of
attack experienced by the blade element, and thus may define whether DS phenomena are present in a given airfoil
section. Consequentially, the determination of these factors will posteriorly be addressed in more depth.
Dynamic Stall occurrence
Almost every process occurring in a real wind turbine will have a dynamic nature; the wind is stochastic, and
especially considering the trend to increase the size of wind turbine rotors, a wind gust may not be felt evenly
throughout the rotor; since the blades are spinning, this wind speed spatial gradient will obviously cause a local angle
of attack variation.
3
Following common practice in wind engineering literature, in this report the expression “rotor plane” refers to the plane
perpendicular to the HAWT's axis. Moreover, since the blades of the MEXICO rotor had no cone angle and no pre-bend, this
designation leaves no room for ambiguity.
26
o=!−0=atan
¦
U ¦1−a)
Dr ¦1+a´ )
)
−0
Theoretical Framework
Also, and again minding the very large size of modern wind turbines, simply considering the atmospheric
boundary layer, there will be angle of attack variations over a complete rotation, between the lower and higher
azimuthal positions due to wind shear.
One should also keep in mind that in recent years attempts to actively control tower and blade vibrations
has led to very large pitch velocities of up to 20 °/s, according to [19], which obviously may also bring about
unsteady airfoil aerodynamic effects
However, and more importantly, a rotor yaw-misalignment, frequently present in real life operating regimes,
can yield very significant cyclic angle of attack variations, and is often the main “responsible” for the occurrence of
DS phenomena. It is also a configuration which can be easily simulated in a wind tunnel, and for which experimental
results are available and will be used for comparison, and so we will concentrate on it further in the next section. It is
noted that such measurements are done at a constant and known yaw angle where the tunnel flow is without
turbulence and wind shear, which makes the excitation precisely known, opposite to the situation in the field.
From the considered above, one can thus see it is interesting and useful to study the problem of dynamic stall
and to consider it in the Wind Turbine framework.
Wind Turbine in Yawed Flow
To gain a greater understanding of the problem at hand it is firstly necessary to define the working reference
frame, and the geometric parameters which are important when a HAWT is operating under yawed conditions. The
convention shown in the figure below will be adopted throughout the whole text:
27
Figure 2.2 2: Convention for a Wind Turbine in Yaw
U Wind
β
ψ
Ω
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
In figure 2.2 2 the following variables are represented:
•X is the axis perpendicular to the rotor plane, and pointing in the downstream direction.
•Y is the horizontal axis in the rotor plane, and is defined such that the third axis of the right hand Cartesian reference
frame is pointing vertically upwards.
•Z is the vertical axis in the rotor plane, considered to be positive in the vertically upward direction.
•Ψ is the blade azimuth angle, measured from the vertical upward position, and in clockwise manner, when looking
in line with the wind.
•β is the yaw angle, i.e. the angle the incoming wind is at with the vector normal to the rotor plane, assume to be
positive if, when seen from upstream, the wind blows from the left-hand side.

¯
U
Wind is the incoming wind speed, assumed in this case to have no vertical component.

¯
D is the angular velocity, which vector in this case coincides with the X axis.
It is not straight-forward to predict the loads a wind turbine blade will experience over a whole revolution
when it is yawed, but according to [20] it is possible to identify two more or less distinct characteristic phenomena:
1. The so-called Advancing/Retreating Blade Effect can be understood simply from considering the geometry
of the problem; if the wind is not blowing perpendicular to the rotor plane, we will necessarily have an extra
in-plane velocity component, which will be even throughout the rotor plane. However this component will
have a positive/negative contribution to the total in-plane velocity when the rotor blades are in the
downward/upward position, depending on the convention. Taking figure 2.2 2 as reference, if β > 0 , we will
have a minimum in-plane velocity, and thus a maximum angle of attack, at the vertically upward position, i.e.
Ψ =0º, and a maximum in-plane velocity and thus a minimum angle of attack at the vertically downward
position, i.e. Ψ =180º. The expression to quantify the inflow angle as a function of the azimuth angle,
keeping the convention defined above, is given by

(2.2.3)
Considering the expression above, and also minding that the axial induction factor's magnitude decreases
with decreasing tip-speed-ratio [18], it is also understandable that this effect is mainly 'felt' at high wind
speeds and low tip-speed-ratios
4
. This means that at these conditions the angle of attack becomes large, and
so one often encounters dynamic stall phenomena. Being so, it is clear that the load variation from the
advancing/retreating blade effect is very important for accurately predicting the damping characteristics and
fatigue loads of wind turbine blades.
2. The fact that the wake is not being convected perpendicularly to the rotor's plane brings about an azimuthal
variation of the induced velocities and consequentially of the aerodynamic loads, which is usually referred to
as the Skewed Wake Effect. A correct prediction of this type of loads is very important, not only for fatigue
4
The tip-speed-ratio (TSR) characterizes the regime the wind turbine is working at, and it is given by the ratio between the
velocity due to blade rotation at the tip and the undisturbed wind speed, TSR=ΩR/U
28
!=atan
¦
| U
Wind
cos¦ ß)¦¦1−a)
|Dr−U
Wind
sin¦ ß) cos¦m)¦ ¦1+a´ )
)
Theoretical Framework
calculation but also because this effect induces a load unbalance between the 'upwind' and 'downwind' side of
the turbine, and thus causes yawing moments. Naturally, it is desirable that the overall yawing moment tends
to align the turbine with the incoming wind, and thus has stabilizing character.
It is easy to understand that this effect is mostly relevant when there are large induced velocities, which
happens when the wind turbine is working at relatively high tip speed ratios and low wind speeds. It is also
important to mention that this effect yields more complex load variations over the rotor plane than the
advancing-retreating blade effect, since usually the induced velocities greatly change both with the azimuthal
position and with the radial station. For example, again taking the convention of figure 2.2 2 and assuming β
>0, the downwind side of the turbine would be for Ψ ∈ [0,180], and the upwind side would correspond to Ψ
∈ [180,360], and at the spanwise positions near the tip the influence of the convected tip vortices would be
greater at the downwind side of the rotor than at the upwind side. This means that at Ψ =90º the induced
velocity would be larger than at Ψ =180º , and thus the local angle of attack will be greater at the upwind side
of the rotor than at the downwind side. However, for spanwise positions near the root it is the root vorticity
which has a greater influence on the induced velocities, and so we have the opposite trend, that is, at the
downwind side of the rotor plane the angles of attack are larger than at the upwind side.
Reduced frequencies of operation
Based on the previously introduced concept of reduced frequency, it is now possible to have an idea of the
unsteadiness of the flow one may encounter in a yaw-misaligned wind turbine.
Naturally, one expects that the flow in a given rotating blade section will have a periodic behaviour over time,
with identical characteristics obtained for similar azimuthal positions. In other words, this means that one can assume
that the frequency of excitation of this problem matches the angular frequency of the blade's rotation, which is
usually also termed 1P .
Now noticing that the incoming wind speed is of small magnitude when compared to the rotational speed,
one can assume that the magnitude of the local effective velocity a blade element will experience is given by the in-
plane velocity component.
Introducing these two approximations in (2.1.1), we come to:

(2.2.4)
In the expression above, as in the influence of rotational effects, one can see again the term of the local chord to
radius ratio, which is usually also termed local solidity. According to [21], typical values of the discussed variables
found in wind turbine blades are:
r/R c/r k (1P)
0.3 0.25 0.12
0.5 0.15 0.075
0.75 0.07 0.035
Table 2.2.1- Typical reduced frequencies found in wind turbine's operation
29
k≈
Dc
2Dr
=
c
2r
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
It should also be mentioned that, in wind engineering it is common to consider the unsteady effects of an
excitation if it is expected to have a reduced frequency greater than 0.02 ; this threshold is somewhat smaller than the
value indicated by Leishman, but wind tunnel experiments with pitch oscillating airfoils show some hysteresis even
when such low frequency excitations are imposed, also according to Snel [21].
Modelling Dynamic Stall in Wind Turbines
The dynamic stall models addressed before were developed mostly with the intention of being used in the
prediction of aerodynamic loads present during dynamic stall phenomena occurring in helicopters, namely, during
forward flight.
In a wind turbine the characteristic airflow may significantly differ, since the normal operating regime Mach
number and rotational frequency will be considerably lower; moreover, the airfoils used in wind turbine blades are
usually thicker. Consequentially specific dynamic stall engineering models “tuned” for wind turbines have been
developed:
• Øye Model: In this method it is assumed that the motion of the separation point on the suction side of the
airfoil can be computed with a simple-linear first order filter, and it uses this variable to introduce the
dynamic effects under dynamic stall. This model defines 2 parameters, which do not vary with the airfoil, and
requires two other profile dependent coefficients. Because of its simplicity and reasonable results this method
has been popular, however it does not predict dynamic effects under attached conditions, and thus it yields
less satisfactory results when there is little stall penetration. More information can be obtained in [22]
• Larsen-Nielsen-Krenk Model: This method combines memory delay effects under attached flow with
reduced lift due to flow separation under dynamic stall conditions, and it is described in [19]. In this model
only the lift coefficient is computed, and since it was developed specifically with Wind Turbine application in
mind, it does some simplifications relatively to the previously mentioned models, like neglecting
compressibility effects and including the non-circulatory effects as an added mass contribution. This model
requires relatively few empirical coefficients deriving from unsteady experiments, and it is fairly simpler than
other semi-empirical models, but according to [19] it performs at least equally better.
• ECN Model: This method computes solely the lift coefficient, and comparably with the ones previously
mentioned, it is relatively simple to implement, as can be consulted in [21]. It accounts for the dynamic
effects on the lift coefficient by adding two terms to the steady value, a first order part that describes the
response to the excitation frequency, following that same frequency, and a second order part that is
essentially nonlinear, allowing for self-excited force fluctuations, with a certain Strouhal number. This model
is based on the need to reproduce the measurements and does not implement a criterion for the stall onset,
requiring simply one non-steady empirical coefficient. The results obtained with this method are quite
satisfactory, and the subsequent ECN investigations will unite it with the Theodorsen model in the rotating
environment.
• Sheng-Galbraith-Coton Model: This is a very sophisticated method for Dynamic Stall Load prediction,
specifically designed for low Mach Numbers, as elucidated in [23]. It is a modification of the Beddoes-
Leishman model, including 3 relevant improvements, namely a different stall-onset criterion, new
modelling from the returned stalled state and a new formula for the chordwise force. This model can be
30
Theoretical Framework
considered complex and computationally heavier then the ones previously mentioned for wind turbine
dynamic stall modelling, and it requires several empirical coefficients. However, it yields very accurate
airload predictions for normal and chordwise forces and moment coefficients, especially when thin airfoils
are analysed.
2.3) The MEXICO project
The MEXICO acronym stands for Model Rotor Experiments under Controlled Conditions, and it is a EU
project with the main goal of providing a database of aerodynamic measurements. The project started in January 2001
and ended in December 2006. In this international effort an extensively instrumented 4.5 diameter HAWT model has
been tested in the Large Scale Low Speed Facility (LLF) of the German Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW), under several
flow conditions. A figure of the experiment is given below:
Model Specifications
The wind turbine model was equipped with 148 pressure sensors, distributed over 5 spanwise sections of
31
Figure 2.3 1: The MEXICO experiment
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
the blade, which had a sampling frequency of 5.5 kHz. At the root of the blade, the edgewise and flatwise bending
moments have been measured with strain gauges, and also stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements
have been made to measure the velocity field. The table below shows some of the main features of the wind turbine
model:
ROTOR
Rotation direction [-] Clockwise (facing the upwind part of the rotor)
Number of blades [-]
3
Power regulation [-] Not present, speed control by motor/generator
Rotor speed [rpm] 324.5 - 424.5
Swept area [m2 ] 15.9
Rotor diameter [m] 4.5
Hub height [m] 5.49
Tilt angle [ ◦]
0
BLADES
Blade length [m]
2.04
Cone angle [ ◦]
0
Prebend [-] No prebend
Roughness [-] Zig-zag tape at 5% chord (0.25 mm thick, 10 mm wide, pressure
and suction side)
Material [-] Aluminium 7075-T651 Alloy
TOWER
Type [-] Tubular
Height including base [m] 5.120
Diameter [m] 0.508
Wall thickness [m] 0.011
Roughness [-] Spiral flange to provoke transition
Material [-] Steel
PITCH SYSTEM
Type [-] Linear actuator
Range [◦] [-5,90]
Table 2.3.1: MEXICO model main specifications
It should also be noted that the MEXICO blades are comprised of three different airfoil sections, a DU 91-
W2-250 in the root region, a RISØA1-21 at mid span sections and a NACA 64-418 nearing the tip of the blade. A
figure of the airfoil distribution over the span is given below:
32
Theoretical Framework
The specific geometry of the MEXICO blade's airfoil sections is presented later in section 5.7. One should
also mention that the spanwise sections instrumented with pressure sensors are located at relative radius of 25, 35, 60,
82 and 92%, which was made with the intention of capturing the characteristic flow regions occurring in a wind
turbine blade. For further information on the MEXICO model the reader is referred to [24].
Trial Cases
As mentioned before, several flow conditions were imposed on the model, both steady and unsteady
regimes, namely axial flow, yawed flow, parked rotor, step in pitch angle and step in rotor speed. Some of the main
characteristics of the regimes imposed are displayed in the table below:
Upstream Velocity [m/s]
[5; 30]
Yaw Angle [º]
{−30; 0; 15; 30; 45}
Rotor Speed [rpm]
{0; 324, 5; 424, 5}
Pitch Angle [º]
[−5, 3; 90]
Table 2.3.2 - Range of parameters considered in MEXICO trials
For further information on the MEXICO trials the reader is referred to [24] and [25].
33
Figure 2.3 2: Airfoil section distribution over the MEXICO blades
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
3) Preliminary Analysis of MEXICO Pressure
Data
One of the aims of the current thesis project is to take advantage of the very high sampling rate of the sensors
in the MEXICO experiment and investigate dynamic effects occurring on the wind turbine's flow. As hinted
previously, one will be namely interested in the MEXICO data points where a yaw misalignment is present, so that a
posterior comparison with dynamic stall modelling can be conducted. Unfortunately, previous analysis on the
MEXICO measurements by Pascal [26] and Micallef [27] indicated that the pressure data does not always seem to be
coherent. Consequentially, and since one wishes to interpret the aerodynamic phenomena at dynamic, yawed flow, it
seemed appropriate to start by analysing simpler cases, namely the MEXICO results obtained in axial, steady flow.
This chapter will start by indicating how the data from the MEXICO was processed, in section 3.1. Section
3.2 shows the experimental pressure distribution obtained for all spanwise stations, and finally conclusions are drawn
on the MEXICO data's reliability in section 3.3.
3.1) Data Processing
This section will only consider the pressure measurements from the MEXICO experiment. The used
pressure data corresponds to the 'Reduced Pressure Files' and was taken from the MEXNEXT site [28]. The data in
these files has already been calibrated for the drift in pressure sensors. and it represents the gauge pressure, i.e. the
pressure measured with respect to the local atmospheric pressure. More information on the calibration procedure and
on the data files themselves can be obtained in [26].
In this preliminary data analysis it was chosen to plot the Pressure Coefficient, C
p
, and to compute this
quantity the pressure registered by each sensor is divided by the maximum pressured measured over the airfoil, i.e.

(3.1.1)
One should notice that the denominator in the expression above should be the stagnation pressure,
p
stag
,
and that p
stag
≥p
max
. However, the leading edge area is heavily instrumented and consequentially this
approximation should be enough to yield results where the main trends can be observed.
Once the pressure coefficient was calculated for each pressure sensor at each time instant, the results have
been averaged over the azimuth, since in axial flow trials one expects very little azimuthal dependence. Each
MEXICO trial lasted approximately 5 seconds, which means it includes approximately 27 revolutions for the low
rotational speed case and 35 revolutions for the high rotational speed trials.
Finally, the pressure coefficient distribution over the airfoil's chord was plotted, for each of the instrumented
spanwise sections of the MEXICO rotor blades.
34
C
p
¦i )=
p¦i )
p
max
Preliminary Analysis of MEXICO Pressure Data
Selected Data
With the intention of covering a wide range of flow conditions, it was chosen to plot the pressure coefficient
distributions, at all spanwise stations, considering 6 different trials with distinct governing parameters. The selected
trials were chosen to be representative of both low and high rotational speeds, at low, moderate and high wind tunnel
velocities, and are displayed in the table below:
Trial Nr
Wind Speed
(m/s)
Rotational Speed
(r.p.m)
Pitch
(deg)
Yaw Angle
(deg)
84 7.5 324.5 - 2.3 0
63 15 324.5 - 2.3 0
78 24 324.5 - 2.3 0
92 10 424.5 - 2.3 0
99 15 424.5 - 2.3 0
135 24 424.5 - 4.3 0
Table 3.1.1 - Data points considered in the preliminary data analysis
A remark should be made that sensors 51 (25% span), 77 (60% span) and 111 (82% span), corresponding
respectively to signals 53, 74 and 110 have not been included in the plots, since, as indicated in [29], these were not
properly functioning when the experiment was carried out.
3.2) Results and Discussion
The MEXICO data obtained for each of the spanwise positions are now shown and discussed, and the results
at different rotational speeds are plotted in different figures.
35
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
25% Span
Minding the figures above one can see that at this spanwise location the distribution of the pressure
coefficient on the upper surface is somewhat odd, since unexpected peaks take place, especially when the low
rotational speed case is considered.
At the highest rotational speed one can witness that the pressure distribution is more coherent; one also sees
that this airfoil section will experience a larger lift coefficient at higher wind speeds, indicated by the greater gap
between the upper and lower surface pressure distribution. This is to be expected since, as mentioned before,
increasing wind speeds increase the local angle of attack.
Specifically regarding the lower surface pressure distribution it is possible to see that in every case the
pressure sensor located around 35% of the chord seems to be off. In fact, the C
p
curve in the lower surface
follows the expected distribution, except for this pressure sensor where one can always observe kinks.
36
Figure 3.2 1: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational
speed cases (324.5 rpm) at the 25% spanwise station
Figure 3.2 2: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational
speed cases (424.5 rpm) at the 25% spanwise station
Preliminary Analysis of MEXICO Pressure Data
35% Span
From the figures above it is clear that for the 35% spanwise section the
C
p
chordwise distributions
obtained at low rotational speed are coherent. As for the highest rotational speed cases, on the upper surface and
approaching the trailing edge, the C
p
distribution are very atypical. Unexpected large amplitude oscillations are
observable, which are not attributable to common aerodynamic phenomenon. Consequentially one is led to believe
that in these trials there was probably some kind of sensor malfunction in this region of the airfoil, as already indicated
in [26].
One should notice that at high wind speeds, on the upper surface and near the leading edge there is often a
small kink, locally decreasing the suction force, which can probably be related with the transition device placed at the
5% chord.
60% Span
37
Figure 3.2 3: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational
speed cases (324.5 rpm) at the 35% spanwise station
Figure 3.2 6: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational
speed cases (324.5 rpm) at the 60% spanwise station
Figure 3.2 5: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational
speed cases (424.5 rpm) at the 60% spanwise station
Figure 3.2 4: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational
speed cases (424.5 rpm) at the 35% spanwise station
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
In the figures above it is clear that for this spanwise section the distribution of the pressure coefficient over
the chord follows the usual trends. Smooth curves were obtained, both for the upper and lower surface, and at both
high and low rotational speeds.
One can clearly witness that as the wind speed (and hence angle of attack) increases the distance between the
upper and lower surface's pressure coefficient increases as well, which means a larger normal force is produced. One
can also see that for the highest wind speeds the pressure coefficient curve on the upper surface becomes constant near
the trailing edge, which is indicative of stall.
82% Span
At the 82% spanwise section all the pressure coefficient's distributions yield quite smooth curves, following
the expected trends. Still, one can see a small localized suction drop near the leading edge in figure 23, probably
caused by the transition device placed in that region.
38
Figure 3.2 8: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational
speed cases (424.5 rpm) at the 82% spanwise station
Figure 3.2 7: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational
speed cases (324.5 rpm) at the 82% spanwise station
Preliminary Analysis of MEXICO Pressure Data
92% Span
As can be seen in the figures above, the distribution of the pressure coefficients at this radial coordinate is
identical to what was found for the 82% span, with smooth curves and following the expected trends.
3.3) Conclusions and Recommendations
Analysing the data displayed above, one can conclude the following:
• For the 25% spanwise station, the data often yields an unusual
C
p distribution over the upper surface
of the airfoil section. As for the pressure distribution obtained in the lower surface of the airfoil, one can see
there is a pressure sensor yielding a 'kink' in all considered trials, located approximately at the 35% chord
position. Consequentially it will not be included in posterior computations of the aerodynamic forces on the
blade.
• For the 35% spanwise station the lower surface pressure distribution seems to be according to what was
expected. However, at the upper surface, near the trailing edge and for the high rotational speed cases there
are very atypical peaks in the C
p
distribution. These irregularities seem to indicate there was some
sensor malfunctioning at this region of the airfoil. Having this in mind, and since at this radial stations the
C
p
distributions are often very odd, but not in every trial, it is recommended to check the distribution
for any given trial. Only if smooth, 'regular' curves are obtained one should compute the aerodynamic forces.
• For the 60%, 82% and 92% spanwise stations the distributions of the pressure coefficient are coherent and
yield smooth curves, and thus, in principle, should be reliable to compute aerodynamic forces from.
• In some trials and for some spanwise sections, in the upper surface, it appears that the transition device may
be causing a localized drop in suction.
39
Figure 3.2 9: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational
speed cases (324.5 rpm) at the 92% spanwise station
Figure 3.2 10: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational
speed cases (424.5 rpm) at the 92% spanwise station
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
4) Development and Validation of Blade
Element-Momentum codes
A comparative study will now be performed between two distinct Blade Element-Momentum (BEM) codes
and the pressure measurements from the MEXICO obtained at yawed flow conditions. One of the calculation
methods is termed “Classical BEM” and is based on the algorithm suggested in [18]; it was mainly adapted from the
previous work of Micallef et al. [30]. The other approach is referred to as “Empirical BEM” since it uses an empirical
model for the axial induced velocities from Schepers et al.[31]. The objective of this chapter is thus to test these
calculation methods so that posteriorly the DS model is included in the computation.
This chapter starts be giving a general description of the BEM method and justifying why it was used in this
assignment. In section 4.3 both implemented BEM models are introduced, and in section 4.4 the MEXICO data used
for the validation is addressed. The results obtained are then shown and discussed in section 4.5 and finally section 4.6
states the conclusions drawn.
4.1) The Blade Element-Momentum Method
A BEM approach is very often used for predicting aerodynamic loads on wind turbine blades. As hinted by its
designation, this method combines both the blade element approach and the balance of momentum of the air inside
the stream tube which contains the wind turbine's rotor.
This method assumes that there is no radial interaction between the flow through adjacent annuli, which is
only true if the induction factor does not vary radially. Described simply, this approach states that the forces acting on
the blades are responsible for the loss of momentum of the air which passes through the area swept by the rotor. To
compute the airloads an iterative procedure is used, which is illustrated below:
40
Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes
One should bear in mind that only a very brief description of the BEM method was given above; much more
detailed explanation can be found in several references of wind turbine aerodynamics, such as [18].
4.2) Why use the BEM method?
One of the main goals of this master thesis is to assess the performance of a DS model in the prediction of the
loads wind turbines under yawed flow conditions will experience. As discussed before, usually semi-empirical
dynamic stall models require the angle of attack history as an input, i.e., C
l
=f ¦o) with o=f ¦t ) .
First of all it is necessary to understand exactly what 'angle of attack' signifies; traditionally the 'angle of
attack' is defined as the angle which an airfoil's chord makes with the stream velocity. However, in the wind turbine
environment the local velocity greatly varies when different rotor positions are considered, since the blades indeed
“slow down” the incoming wind. The incidence angle at each spanwise section will thus depend on the local velocities
at the rotor plane, and not directly on the stream velocity. Particularly in yawed conditions this fact makes the 'angle
of attack' concept rather unclear.
Still, it is possible to compute the angle of attack at different spanwise stations and azimuthal positions of a
wind turbine using both BEM and lifting-line codes. In his work, Micallef et al. [32] used an inverse free wake code to
compute the local angles of attack throughout the rotor of the MEXICO. Inverse free wake codes use loads as input,
and considering the influence of bound, shed and trailed vortices they compute, locally, what should be the bound
circulation such that the Kutta-condition is met with. From this circulation, the angle of attack is then calculated, and
41
Figure 4.1 1: BEM method Calculation Procedure
Assume induction factor,
Compute α at each Blade Element, based
on wind velocity, U, rotational speed, Ω,
and twist radial distribution, θ(r)
Calculate aerodynamic forces in each
Blade Element, from airfoil 2D
static characteristics
and
Sum the forces at each Blade Element
and obtain the total thrust, and the
thrust coefficient,

Use momentum theory to compute
the new induction factor from
the thrust coefficient,

C
T
=4 a¦1−a)
a
C
l
¦o) C
d
¦o)
C
T
=
T
0.5¢U
2
A
Iterate induction factor
until convergence
is obtained

Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
based on its method of computation, let us call this quantity the 'circulatory' angle of attack.
However, DS models are generally based on wind tunnel measurements, where the angle of attack is usually
taken as the angle the airfoil's chord is instantly at with the stream velocity. Based upon how it is defined, let us call
this value the 'geometric' angle of attack. The direction of the stream velocity is well defined in wind tunnel testing
where most of the data used to derive the semi-empirical dynamic stall models was taken from, leaving no room for
ambiguity.
Naturally, if there is some shed vorticity in wind tunnel tests, the local velocity at the airfoil will be
influenced by it, and the bound circulation necessary to meet the Kutta condition will be associated with an
instantaneous 'circulatory' angle of attack which is different from the usually taken 'geometric' angle of attack.
Thus it is understood that using the angle of attack history, α=f(t), computed with an inverse free wake
method, as an input to DS models is not expected to yield good predictions of the aerodynamic loads, since we are
indeed in presence of two different ways to tackle and simulate the problem at hands.
The DS model will posteriorly be implemented inside the BEM code. This allows the instantaneous loads to
be calculated considering the angle of attack history, α=f(t), instead of using the static airfoil characteristics.
One should notice that BEM codes often incorporate a dynamic inflow model, which is introduced because
the stream tube velocities do not adapt instantaneously to a change in blade loading. Such models act to damp the
variation of the induction factors, and are normally used to improve the aerodynamic modelling performance when
calculating unsteady loads arising from a step in the blade's pitch or rotor's angular speed. However such a model will
not be introduced in the present implementation.
4.3) Description of the BEM models considered
The two Blade Element-Momentum models are now considered, and will be referred to as 'Classical BEM'
and 'Empirical BEM'. Before addressing the models though, it is important to notice that both approaches prescribe a
radial and azimuthal distribution for the axial induced velocity, u. This quantity is assumed to be positive in the
direction opposite to the wind speed, i.e. in -x direction defined in figure 2.2 2.
In case yaw-misalignment is present, this local axial induced velocity is given by:
u=U
Wind
cos¦ ß) a (4.3.1)
Classical BEM
This designation refers to the algorithm for BEM method code in the presence of yaw-misalignment
suggested in [18], and was mainly adapted from the previous work of Micallef et al. [30].
This model assumes the axial induced velocity to be given by:
u=u
avg
¦1+K ¦X) F ¦u) sin¦m))
(4.3.2)
42
Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes
where:
•K is a function of the wake shape
•χ represents the wake skew angle
•F is a flow expansion function
•µ represents the fraction radius,
This codes iterates the induction factors at each radial position by averaging over the azimuth, using vortex
cylinder theory for the thrust forces, and computes both azimuthally averaged axial and tangential induction
factors.
In this model the flow expansion is assumed to follow the simple model of Oye. The tip and root loss are
taken into account using the Prandtl/Glauert correction, and the wake rotation is computed considering the influence
of a single vortex being trailed from the centre of rotation. Once the azimuthally averaged inductions are computed
this model calculates the load variations, and the azimuthal variations can be found by using the thrust and torque
gradients. A more detailed description is given in [30] and [18].
Once the iterating procedure of the BEM method is finished, one wishes to derive the force coefficients in the
direction normal and tangential to the airfoil chord, at each spanwise section. These quantities are required because
one can thus compare the results directly with the MEXICO measurements. These coefficients are derived from the
computed lift and drag coefficients, using also the calculated angles of attack, according to he system of equations:

(4.3.3)
Empirical BEM
Axial Induction Velocities
This method of computation uses the empirical model from Schepers et al. [31] of the axially induced
velocities in a yawed flow wind turbine; it was derived from a wind tunnel experiment performed at TUDelft, where
the velocity distribution was measured at several spanwise and azimuthal positions and fit with a second harmonic
Fourier series. According to this model, the induced axial velocities are given by:
u=u
avg
¦1−A
1
cos ¦m−P
1
)−A
2
cos ¦2m−P
2
)) (4.3.4)
where
A
1
, A
2
, P
1
, P
2
are functions of the relative radius, of the azimuth angle and of the empirically
derived constants.
It should be noted that this empirical model of the axial induction velocities was derived only for the design
condition of the wind turbine, and that measurements only covered spanwise stations up to 80%. For positions closer
to the tip the results were simply extrapolated from the azimuthally averaged induction, which means that the tip-loss
was not taken into account.
43
r
R
C
n
=C
l
.cos¦o)+C
d
. sin¦o)
C
tg
=C
l
. sin¦o)−C
d
. cos¦o)
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
As explained in [31], this empirical model has been previously extensively validated, having been used to
compute the expected yawing and flatwise moments in a yaw-misaligned wind turbine. Comparison with
measurements has shown this empirical solution performs very often better than other models, and never worse.
'Empirical BEM' Implementation
Now regarding the BEM model implemented, the inplane velocities simply consider the skewed inflow,
which can be derived from geometric considerations; this means that in this approach the induced tangential
velocities are neglected. However it is not expected that this will greatly affect the force's calculation since the
magnitude of the tangential induced velocities is very small when compared with the velocities due to the blade's
rotation.
From the inplane and axial velocities, the angle of attack at each spanwise position is derived, and using
static
C
l
vs o and C
d
vso
functions, the forces on each blade element are calculated.
To account for the tip loss effects, this model uses the correction suggested by Shen et al. [33], which takes
the form:
C
n
r
=F
1
C
n
and C
tg
r
=F
1
C
tg
(4.3.5)
The correction factor is given by

(4.3.6)
where g is an empirically derived function of the number of blades, B, and tip-speed ratio, λ, according to:
g=exp|−0.125¦ B\−21)¦+0.1 (4.3.7)
The total thrust is then obtained by integrating over the span and summing the contribution of all blades.
Finally, the thrust coefficient in a yaw-misaligned configuration is computed with:

(4.3.8)
And the average axial induction coefficient is iterated using momentum theory according to:
(4.3.9)
Once the process converges, the normal and tangential force coefficients are computed in an identical way as in the
'Classical' BEM method.
Discretization Parameters
The same level of discretization was imposed in both BEM codes, so that a valid comparison could be
performed. Following the recommendations from Micallef et al. [30], it was chosen to use azimuthal increment of
10 degrees and 15 elements in the spanwise direction.
44
F
1
=
2
n
cos
−1
|
exp
¦
−g
B¦ R−r)
2Rsin !
)
¦
C
T
=
T
0.5¢.¦U
Wind
. cosß)
2
. A
C
T
=4a
avg
¦1−a
avg
)
Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes
The convergence of the BEM code including the DS model will posteriorly be assessed.
4.4) MEXICO data used for validation
It is important to state that the BEM models will be validated against MEXICO measurements obtained at
relatively high wind speeds; this is justified by the fact that at low wind speeds it is likely that the turbine is working
in the turbulent wake state, which means that the trailed vortices will have a major influence in the flow field and
consequentially in the observed loading. Bearing in mind that the goal is to use the BEM codes to simulate dynamic
stall, which is expected to occur at high wind speeds, it is understandable that the validation at low wind speeds is not
very relevant.
When high wind speeds are considered the airfoil is expected to stall, at least in some portion of the blades,
and as discussed before this stall will have a dynamic nature. Since the BEM codes under consideration use static
C
l
vs o
functions, it is not expectable that good agreement is found between calculations and measurements at
these high wind speeds, and so it makes little sense to compare such results.
Finally, one should also keep in mind that at high wind speeds, i.e. at low tip speed ratios, the induction
factors will have a smaller magnitude [18], which means that the advance/retreating blade effect will be dominant. As
mentioned before, BEM codes iterate on the induction factors, but since these factors will have a smaller magnitude
their contribution to the angle of attack 'seen' by the blade will also be small compared to the geometric effect.
Consequentially the accurate computation of these induction factors becomes less important in the prediction of the
unsteady loads the wind turbine blades will experience.
Minding the discussion above, the following data points will be considered in this validation:
Trial Nr
Wind Speed
(m/s)
Rotational Speed
(r.p.m)
Pitch Angle
(deg)
Yaw Angle
(deg)
158 15 424.5 -2.3 15
151 15 424.5 -2.3 30
165 15 424.5 -2.3 45
159 18 424.5 -2.3 15
152 18 424.5 -2.3 30
166 18 424.5 -2.3 45
Table 4.4.1 - MEXICO data points considered in the BEM codes' validation
Following the recommendations issued in the previous chapter, a preliminary visual inspection of the
chordwise pressure distribution was conducted on the MEXICO data points, at all spanwise sections. The table below
shows the outcome of this procedure:
45
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
Trial Nr 25% Span 35% Span 60% Span 82% Span 92% Span
158 Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted
151 Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted
165 Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted
159 Accepted Rejected Accepted Accepted Accepted
152 Accepted Rejected Accepted Accepted Accepted
166 Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted
Table 4.4.2: Preliminary analysis of the yawed flow trials
Derivation of the experimental aerodynamic coefficients
The aerodynamic force coefficients
C
n
and C
tg
of the MEXICO will be plotted for comparison with
the BEM methods implemented, and are taken as a reference to compute the associated error. Consequentially it is
necessary to explain how the experimental coefficients were obtained from the MEXICO data.
A cubic interpolation of the pressure measured by each sensor was performed over the airfoil surface. This
pressure distribution was integrated over a cubic interpolation of the airfoil surface, yielding the normal and
tangential forces.
To obtain the force coefficients
5
, the computed forces were divided by the maximum pressure occurring over
the airfoil, taken as the maximum of the cubic interpolation of the pressure sensors, according to

(4.4.1)
Following this approach the computed force coefficients are expected to yield results which are accurate
enough to compare models against.
Viscous Contribution
It should also be stated that simply by integrating the pressure distribution over the airfoil and considering the
chordwise force component one is not computing the actual tangential force, since obviously there is also a viscous
contribution.
When small angles of attack are considered, the tangential force coefficient will very approximately match
the drag force coefficient. Consequentially one can have an idea of the viscous contribution to the tangential force by
computing the difference between the total and pressure drag. According to [25], for the airfoil sections used in the
MEXICO's blades and at similar Reynolds numbers, wind tunnel 2D tests show that:
5
These are section force coefficients, i.e. per meter span, and thus the maximum pressure in the denominator should be
multiplied by the local chord of the airfoil.
46
C
n ,MEXICO
=
F
n, Interp
c.P
max, Interp
and C
tg , MEXICO
=
F
tg , Interp
c.P
max , Interp
Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes
C
d ,Visc
=C
d ,Tot
−C
d , Pres
0.01 (4.4.2)
The magnitude of this contribution is not very large, but it is significant especially for the thinner airfoils
where pressure drag is of less importance.
However if large angles of attack are imposed it is likely that some flow separation takes place. In this case
one expects smaller boundary layer velocities, and consequentially reduced shear stresses to occur at the airfoil's
surface. This means that the viscous contribution to the tangential force will not be significant when compared to the
contribution of the pressure forces.
Since one is mainly interested in analysing large angle of attack situations, and also since it was not measured
in the MEXICO and would be intricate to determine, the viscous contribution will not be taken into account in this
assignment.
4.5) Results and Discussion
The normal and tangential force coefficients' variation with the azimuth angle will now be plotted, both
from MEXICO data and using the BEM methods addressed. The wind tunnel speeds considered are 15 and 18 m/s, at
which one expects to encounter predominantly attached flow regimes.
The results obtained are shown for all spanwise stations, and considering a yaw misalignment of 30 degrees.
25% Spanwise
Regarding the general variation of the experimental normal force coefficient with the azimuth angle, the
figures above show that this quantity peaks at the 0 degrees position, and has a minimum at approximately 180
degrees. This variation is consistent with a strong advance/retreating blade effect, which was to be expected given
the inboard position of the considered section.
47
Figure 4.5 1: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 25%
spanwise station
Figure 4.5 2: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 25%
spanwise station
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
Minding figures 4.5 1 and 4.5 5 one also notices that all force coefficients from experimental data have larger
magnitudes in the larger wind tunnel speed case. This is not surprising since with increasing wind speed the angle of
attack is expected to increase, and consequentially so does the magnitude of the aerodynamic loading.
Now addressing the implemented models' performance, it is clear that both BEM methods fail to predict the
large experimental normal force coefficient values taking place at azimuth angles in the region of 0 degrees.
Because this is an inboard section, and given the geometry of the problem, at an azimuthal position of 0
degrees one expects the greatest values of local angles of attack to occur, according to [20]. Also because of its
spanwise location strong rotational augmentation should be present, and separation is likely to be delayed. However,
and as mentioned before, the implemented methods use 2D lift and drag coefficient characteristics, and
consequentially one understands that both models underpredict the actual aerodynamic loads at these azimuthal
positions.
Specifically comparing the implemented models, results indicate that the empirical model captures the
experimental trend better than the classical method. This is observable at azimuthal positions near 180 degrees, where
one expects a smaller angle of attack and consequentially no rotational augmentation.
35% Spanwise
Firstly it is necessary to mention that, according to table 4.4.2, at this spanwise station the data point with a
wind tunnel speed of 18 m/s and a yaw-misalignment of 30 degrees was rejected, and so only the lower wind tunnel
speed case is shown.
The figure above shows similarities with the results obtained at the 25% spanwise station. Rotational
augmentation is expected to also be important in this section, and consequentially the magnitudes of the normal force
coefficient are once again underpredicted by the implemented models.
Now comparing both computational approaches, the empirical BEM method seems to capture the
aerodynamic loading trend better than the classical BEM model at this spanwise station. One may say this improved
performance is observable both for the normal and tangential force coefficients.
48
Figure 4.5 3: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 35%
spanwise station
Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes
60% Spanwise
At this spanwise section one expects very little rotational augmentation, and so one understands that the
implemented models are able to predict the aerodynamic loading trends more accurately than at the inboard stations.
Comparing both methods of calculation the results from empirical BEM show better agreement with the
MEXICO data; this can be seen at the two considered wind tunnel speeds and both for the tangential and normal force
coefficients. As for the classical BEM method, it leads to a significant overprediction of the aerodynamic loading
magnitude in the considered cases.
82% Spanwise
At this spanwise station the normal force coefficient variation with azimuth angle is qualitatively different
from the sections analysed up to this moment; specially at the lower wind speed case, one can notice that the minimum
value of the normal force coefficient is shifted towards the 90 degrees position, and that the maximum is shifted
towards 270 degrees azimuth. This behaviour can be understood since this is an outboard section of the blade, and
49
Figure 4.5 5: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 60%
spanwise station
Figure 4.5 7: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 82%
spanwise station
Figure 4.5 4: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60%
spanwise station
Figure 4.5 6: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 82%
spanwise station
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
consequentially at low wind tunnel speeds the skewed wake effect will have a significant influence.
Regarding the implemented calculation methods, the results show that the empirical BEM model has a better
agreement with the MEXICO data at the considered wind tunnel speeds and both for normal and tangential force
coefficients. Similarly to the results from the 60% spanwise station, the classical BEM predicts significant larger
magnitudes of the force coefficients than experimentally measured.
92% Spanwise
The results show that at this spanwise position the variation of the experimental force coefficients with the
azimuth angle is similar to what was obtained for the 82% spanwise position; this was expected since the skewed
wake effect should also have a strong influence at the current spanwise coordinate.
Since this is the most outboard blade section which was instrumented in the MEXICO blades, one expects to
tip-effects to be present. However, the tip-correction introduced in the empirical BEM model appears to be excessive,
since the normal force coefficient values are underpredicted; still, this method performs at least equally as well as the
classical BEM approach. For the latter model, and similarly to the other spanwise stations, overpredictions of the
force coefficients were obtained in the considered data points.
Influence of the Yaw angle
All results shown before were obtained with a “representative” yaw-misalignment angle of 30 degrees. To
assess the influence of this quantity, data points with yaw angles of 15 and 45 degrees are now analysed, considering
a spanwise station of 60% and a wind tunnel speed of 18 m/s.
50
Figure 4.5 8: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 92%
spanwise station
Figure 4.5 9: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 92%
spanwise station
Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes
When considering the smaller yaw angle one can see that the experimental force coefficients will have a
larger magnitude but a smaller amplitude of variation with the azimuthal position. As for the larger yaw-
misalignment, it is clear in the figure above that the magnitude of the experimental force coefficients is decreased,
while the amplitude of azimuthal variation is increased. These trends can be understood by considering the geometric
effect of skewed inflow, expressed by equation 2.2.3 which is shown again for convenience:
Minding the expression one can see that if the yaw-misalignment is decreased, the numerator will increase,
and consequentially the inflow angle and the angle of attack will increase; This will bring about larger magnitudes of
the force coefficients. On the other hand, if the yaw angle increases, it is clear that the term associated with the
azimuthal position will increase. Thus the variation of the magnitude of the force coefficients over a revolution will
also become greater.
As for the performance of the implemented models, the figures above indicate that the empirical BEM
method yields a better agreement with experimental data, when considering different yaw-misalignment angles. As for
the classical BEM method, and similarly to what was obtained before for other data points, it seems there is an
overprediction of the force coefficients.
Quantitative Comparison
With the objective of quantitatively assessing the performance of the implemented calculation methods, the
average relative error in the normal force coefficient was computed for both the empirical and the classical BEM
models. The uncertainties associated with the chordwise forces are not addressed since these are expected to be of
much smaller magnitude, and also since some of the dynamic stall models previously considered do not include
chordwise loading computation.
The magnitude of the error was calculated by averaging the relative error of each model over the azimuth,
assuming the MEXICO data to be the exact solution. For each of the wind tunnel speeds, the results were averaged
51
Figure 4.5 11: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60%
spanwise station and yaw angle of 15 deg
Figure 4.5 10: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60%
spanwise station and yaw angle of 45 deg
!=atan
¦
|U
Wind
cos ¦ß)¦¦1−a)
| Dr −U
Wind
sin¦ ß) cos¦m)¦ ¦1+a´ )
)
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
over every yaw angle, using the data points from table 4.4.2. The expression used to compute the average relative
error in the normal force coefficient at each spanwise station and wind tunnel speed is thus:

(4.5.1)
For the wind tunnel speed of 15 m/s the following results were obtained:
Avg Rel Error ( % ) 25% span 35% span 60% span 82% span 92% span
Classical BEM 30.4 18.1 23.3 20.7 16.9
Empirical BEM 18.6 14.5 12.2 6.1 14.5
Table 4.5.1 - Average Normal Force coefficient relative error for U=15 m/s
And for the 18 m/s case:
Avg Rel Error ( % ) 25% span 35% span 60% span 82% span 92% span
Classical BEM 25.8 16.6 13.9 19.6 18.7
Empirical BEM 21.1 13.1 9.3 8.9 9.2
Table 4.5.2 - Average Normal Force coefficient relative error for U=18 m/s
Analysing the tables above it is clear that the empirical BEM method performs better than the classical
model, at both wind tunnel speeds and all spanwise stations. The tables also show that the relative errors are larger at
the more inboard stations, which had already been noticed in the azimuthal plots and is believed to be due to the
unaccounted rotational augmentation.
As for the magnitude of the expected uncertainty in the empirical BEM model, one can see that for the
sections where rotational augmentation is negligible, the average relative error in the normal force coefficient is
approximately 10%; this is particularly noticeable at the higher wind speed trials.
4.6) Conclusions and Recommendations
From the discussion above, one can draw the following conclusions:
• It is necessary to implement a correction on the aerodynamic force coefficients to account for rotational
augmentation, since both implemented BEM models fail to predict the experimental loading at the inboard
sections.
• At spanwise sections where rotational effects are not significant, generally the BEM models are able to
52
1
3

ß
1
360

m=1
360

C
n, Model
¦m)−C
n, MEXICO
¦m)

C
n, MEXICO
¦m)
, ß=¦15; 30 ; 45¦ deg
Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes
capture the observed experimental trends. Reasonable agreement is found for the different wind tunnel speeds
and yaw angles considered.
• Comparing the performance of both implemented methods, clearly the empirical BEM model yields more
accurate load predictions than the classical method. Better results were found for all spanwise stations and
data points considered, and consequentially the empirical model should be preferred when implementing the
DS model.
• Regarding the magnitude of the expected error in the empirical BEM method at outboard spanwise sections,
for the highest considered wind speed case it is approximately 10 %. Still this value is expected to decrease
with increasing wind speeds, as the advance/retreating blade effect becomes more important and the induced
velocities smaller.
• In all considered data points the classical BEM method overpredicts the aerodynamic loading, which is
consistent with what was found in previous comparisons of MEXICO data with BEM models, such as [26].
53
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
5) Selection, Implementation and Validation
of the Dynamic Stall Model
It has been previously explained that the DS model needs to be included in the BEM iteration loop, so that the
unsteady effects can be simulated and the calculated loads compared with the MEXICO results. However, it is good
practice to firstly be certain that the DS model is properly implemented before introducing it in the BEM code. It is
thus the objective of this chapter to describe the implementation and to verify the DS model.
This chapter starts by presenting a qualitative discussion on the DS models used in the HAWT framework,
and selecting the model for implementation. In section 5.2 the assumption of incompressibility is verified, and in
section 5.3 the Beddoes-Leishman (BL) DS model is thoroughly described, and its implementation is discussed.
Section 5.4 addresses the influence of thick airfoils on the BL DS model, and section 5.5 puts forward two different
approaches to denote LE separation. In section 5.6 the values used in the empirical constants of the DS model are
discussed. The experimental data used for validation of the implemented model is mentioned in section 5.7, and then
the results obtained are shown and discussed in section 5.8. Finally in section 5.9 the conclusions drawn in this chapter
are presented, together with some recommendations.
5.1) The choice of a Dynamic Stall Model
Ideally one would prefer to implement various DS models and compare their load prediction performance
with the results from the MEXICO; initially it was thought that such an analysis could be conducted in this master
thesis, but soon it was clear that implementing and validating a DS load prediction model alone required a
considerable amount of time. Consequentially, and also since there were other objectives set for this assignment, it
was chosen to analyse the load prediction capability of a single DS model in a yaw-misaligned wind turbine.
When thinking of modelling DS in a wind turbine environment, and based on the literature study conducted,
it is this author’s opinion that the following methods should be considered:
 ECN's 1
st
order model [21]
 Larsen et al. [19]
 Beddoes-Leishman [16]
 Sheng et al. [23]
The methods indicated above are ordered from top to bottom with increasing complexity, i.e. ECN's model is
54
Selection, Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model
the least complicated approach while the method of Sheng et al is the most complex; a brief qualitative description of
each model was given previously, and for further details the indicated references can be consulted.
Naturally, when increasing the degree of complexity of a given model, the main goal is to obtain a better level
of agreement with experimental results than simpler methods can provide; however, one must always keep in mind
what is the scope of application of the model.
The DS load prediction methods mentioned above have been created based on the interpretation of 2D airfoil
wind tunnel test data; consequentially several of the constants introduced in these models rely on some “empirical
feel” of the unsteady physical phenomena taking place during pitching or heaving oscillations.
However, the main goal of this master thesis research is to simulate the aerodynamics of a wind turbine in a
yawed configuration, which is far more complicated than the one the DS models were derived with. Because of this, it
is understandable that a very complex DS load prediction method might not perform well when compared with the
MEXICO results.
On the other hand, it would be preferable to implement a DS model which simulates, at least to some degree,
the physical phenomena of unsteady airfoil aerodynamics; in other words, one would ideally opt by a model which
entails more than a simple re-synthesis of experimental data.
From the discussion above, and also since the method is widely used in commercial applications, it was
chosen to implement the Beddoes-Leishman DS model. One can thus expect the unsteady airfoil aerodynamic
physical phenomena to be simulated, while keeping the amount of empirical “tuning” parameters to a reasonably
simple degree.
5.2) The Assumption of Incompressibility
It is important to mention that in the scope of Wind Engineering the compressibility of air is usually
neglected, since one is in presence of small magnitude velocities; in the MEXICO project the highest rotational speed
trials were carried out with Ω=44.4 rad/s and the largest tunnel speed tested was 30 m/s, resulting in a maximum local
speed at the tip of

(5.2.1)
The speed of sound in dry air at 15º C and atmospheric pressure is approximately
a
air
≈343m/ s
, and so
it is clear that also within the cases considered in the MEXICO the compressibility of air is negligible, since
.
Being so, in the implementation of the dynamic stall model incompressibility was assumed, and in the
following sections the equations presented implicitly assume that condition.
55
V
eff
MAX
a
air
/ 3
V
eff
MAX
=
.
¦ 44. 4×2. 25)
2
+30
2
≈104m/ s
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
5.3) The Model Explained
Even though the various phenomena involved in the dynamic stall process are intrinsically related, Beddoes
and Leishman managed to split it in modules. The unsteady loads are thus computed by considering each module
sequentially, in the following manner:
• In the attached flow module, and using the AOA history, α(t), as input, the unsteady attached force
coefficients are computed.
• These coefficients are then used as input in the trailing edge separation module, where both the peak
pressure lag and the boundary layer lag are included. The force coefficients are thus recalculated
incorporating the effects of the unsteady trailing edge separation point.
• The criterion to determine whether leading edge separation has occurred is based on a critical pressure, and
so this module uses the normal force coefficient including the pressure lag (not the viscous lag) to compute
the vortex time; this last variable keeps track of the time from which the leading edge pressure vortex is
detached.
• Finally, the vortex lift module is used, with the vortex time variable as input, and the outcome is added to the
result from the trailing edge separation module to yield the total, instantaneous normal force coefficient on
the airfoil.
Each module will now be addressed more thoroughly, and the expressions used and assumptions made will be
explained.
Attached Flow Module
The approach used to determine the instantaneous loads when there is no separated flow formulates the
problem in terms of a superposition of indicial aerodynamic responses, as mentioned in [16]. In unsteady attached
flow the aerodynamic forces acting on an airfoil can be divided in two components, circulatory and impulsive, and in
this module each of these contributions will be considered separately.
Circulatory Component
As indicated by the name, the circulatory loading is related with the vorticity, both bound and shed, that the
flow is imposing on the airfoil, and it builds up quickly to the steady state value; the circulatory normal force arising
from an accumulating series of step inputs in the angle of attack can be obtained using an equivalent angle of attack,
according to [16]
(5.3.1)
where n denotes the current sample; clearly, the delayed response with respect to the steady case is introduced with the
deficiency functions,
X
n
and
Y
n
, which are given by the set of equations:
56
C
N, n
C
=C
N
α
α
Eq , n
=C
N
α
¦
o
n
−X
n
−Y
n
)
Selection, Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model

(5.3.2)
where ΔS is the distance travelled by the airfoil in semi-chords over a sample interval Δt , and where
Δα
n
is the
corresponding change in the angle of attack over the time interval.
The coefficients
A
1,
A
2,
b
1
,b
2
are constants which come from the empirical approximation to the indicial
response, in terms of the exponential function; their values are given in [16] and shown in table 5.6.1 in section 5.6.
When the contribution of the deficiency functions is included all the information of the previously shed
wake's effects on the airloads is taken into account.
Impulsive Component
Whenever an airfoil undergoes a rapid motion there will be an initial non-circulatory loading, caused by local
pressure variations, according to piston theory [34], which quickly tends to vanish. The magnitude of the impulsive
normal force can be obtained with [16] :

(5.3.3)
Where
V
eff
is the effective velocity the airfoil is working at and c represents the airfoil chord. In this case
the deficiency function is given by:

(5.3.4)
where
T
I
=c/ a
is the non-circulatory time constant, and where the factor
K
α
is a function of the Mach number
which, given the assumption of incompressibility, will also become a constant, with the value indicated in table 5.6.1.
Once both the circulatory and impulsive contributions have been calculated, the total normal force
coefficient, for attached flow, in a given time instant, is given by:
C
N, n
P
=C
N , n
I
+C
N , n
C
(5.3.5)
Trailing Edge Separation Module
Even though dynamic stall necessarily encompasses stall delay and vorticity build up near the leading edge
with consequent vortex detachment, there is evidence that trailing edge separation may play a significant role on the
onset of dynamic stall [16]. For this reason it is considered in the present model.
Firstly, it is necessary to model the trailing edge separated flow in steady conditions, which can be done by
using Kirchhoff theory according to:
57
X
n
=X
n−1
exp
¦
−b
1
ΔS
)
+A
1
Δα
n
exp
¦
−b
1
ΔS / 2
)
Y
n
=Y
n−1
exp
¦
−b
2
ΔS
)
+A
2
Δα
n
exp
¦
−b
2
ΔS / 2
)
C
N , n
I
=
3c
V
eff
¦
Δα
n
Δt
−D
n
)
D
n
=D
n−1
exp
¦
−Δt
K
α
T
I
)
+
¦
Δα
n
−Δα
n−1
Δt
)
exp
¦
−Δt
2K
α
T
I
)
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment

(5.3.6)
where f is the dimensionless suction side separation point, seen from the leading edge, meaning that f=1 when the
flow is fully attached and f = 0 when the flow is completely separated.
By inverting the expression above and using the airfoil's static characteristic, it is possible to derive the value
of the separation point as a function of the angle of attack, obtaining f (α).
For unsteady conditions there will be a delay in the leading edge pressure response with respect to the
normal force coefficient derived in the attached flow module. Consequentially a time lag is introduced in the normal
force coefficient to produce a substitute value, which for a discretely sampled system is written as:
C
N, n
'
=C
N , n
−D
P, n
(5.3.7)
where the deficiency function is computed with

(5.3.8)
The time constant
T
P
is a function of the Mach number and is usually determined from unsteady airfoil
data; it appears that this parameter is largely independent of the airfoil shape [16], and given the narrow range of
relevant Mach numbers it will be assumed constant in all considered cases. The value used in this assignment is
given in table 5.6.2 in section 5.6, together with a brief discussion justifying its choice.
Once the unsteady pressure response is incorporated, it is possible to define yet another effective angle of
attack, which yields the same leading edge pressure as for the equivalent quasi-steady case, computed with

(5.3.9)
where
C
N
0
is the normal force coefficient obtained when the angle of attack is zero. With this effective angle of
attack and using the static separation point characteristic described above, it is now possible to compute the effective
separation point
f
n
'
=f
¦
α
f , n
) (5.3.10)
As previously mentioned, the boundary layer's response is also not instantaneous, and the unsteady effects
can be represented by applying a first order lag to the separation point, according to
f
n
''
=f
n
'
−D
f , n
(5.3.11)
where in this case the deficiency function is computed with

(5.3.12)
58
C
N
=C
N
α¦
1+. f
2
)
2
α
D
P , n
=D
P, n−1
exp
¦
−ΔS
T
P
)
+
¦
C
N , n
P
−C
N , n−1
P
)
exp
¦
−ΔS
2T
P
)
α
f , n
¦ t )=
C
N , n
'
−C
N
0
C
N
α
D
f
n
=D
f
n−1
exp
¦
−ΔS
T
f
)
+
¦
f
n
'
−f
n−1
'
)
exp
¦
−ΔS
2T
f
)
Selection, Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model
Like in the pressure lag,
T
f
is time constant which should be derived from unsteady airfoil data but it will
be assumed constant in all considered cases, with the value indicated in table 5.6.2.
Finally, the normal force coefficient incorporating both the pressure and viscous lag is computed with the
unsteady trailing edge separation point using the Kirchhoff relation at each time instant:

(5.3.13)
Leading Edge Separation
According to [16], defining the conditions under which leading edge separation takes place is the most
critical aspect of dynamic stall modelling; it is however possible to mark the onset of static leading edge separation
through a critical leading edge pressure criterion, which was confirmed to be valid also for unsteady conditions in
[13].
Since leading edge pressures are related to the normal force coefficient, it is possible to operate in the
C
n
domain alone by defining a critical value,
C
n , I
, which corresponds to the critical pressure for separation onset at the
appropriate Mach Number .
In practice this critical value of the normal coefficient can be obtained from the airfoil's static
characteristic by taking the
C
n
value at the angle of attack that corresponds to the break in the pitching moment;
this choice is understandable since when leading edge separation occurs there will necessarily be centre of pressure
movements and consequentially abrupt changes in the pitching moment.
Since the criterion used to define whether leading edge separation has occurred is based on a critical pressure,
it is logical that the unsteady normal coefficient used to assess whether this condition has been reached includes the
lag in leading edge pressure response, given previously in expression 5.3.7.
In general dynamic stall encompasses the formation of a vortex in the leading edge area of the airfoil which
subsequently detaches from the surface and is convected downstream. Naturally, it is very important to keep track of
the position of this concentrated vorticity since it has a great impact on the total normal force acting on the airfoil. In
the present model this tracking is accomplished by storing a non-dimensional vortex time parameter, in semi-chords,
according to:

(5.3.14)
As indicated above, this vortex time will only be incremented if critical conditions have been met, and the
0.45 factor is introduced because experimental tests [16] determined the rate at which the vortex convection occurs to
be somewhat less than half of the effective velocity.
Naturally, over a periodic angle of attack excitation there may be a vortex build up and separation with every
oscillation, and consequentially it is necessary to reset the vortex time parameter when the vortex that originated it
ceases to have a meaningful contribution. This is accomplished by imposing the condition:
59
C
N , n
f
=C
N
α¦
1+
.
f
n
''
2
)
2
α
Eq , n
+C
N , n
I
τ
v, n

v, n−1
+
dt
c/ 2
. V
Eff
0. 45 ,if C
N , n
'
>C
N , I
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
τ
v, n
=0 if C
N , n
<C
N , I
∧ Δα
n
>0
(5.3.15)
Assuming an oscillating motion, and according to the conditional expression above, the vortex will then be
assumed to have a negligible contribution to the normal force on the airfoil in the upstroke of the movement, as long
as the critical conditional is not met.
We can verify the validity of this assumption by using reference values for the problem we wish to model; if
there is a leading edge vortex detachment in the oscillation, we are certain that, by the time the following upstroke
starts, a time interval of at least half the oscillation period has passed, which may be written as:

(5.3.16)
In terms of the vortex time parameter and introducing the reduced frequency, k, we come to

(5.3.17)
Now assuming a high reduced frequency k=0.1 (in the wind turbine environment) and subtracting the airfoil's
length, we come to a representative distance travelled by a vortex, from the trailing edge, in the semi-chords:

(5.3.18)
The contribution of the vortex to the normal force in the airfoil peaks when it is situated just above the
trailing edge. From the instant the concentrated vorticity is downstream of the airfoil its contribution to the total
normal force coefficient is decaying according to [16]

(5.3.19)
Where the vortex decay constant was set to
T
V
=6 according to [35].
Finally, it is possible to witness that even when a high reduced frequency of 0.1 is considered, the vortex's
contribution to the normal force coefficient will be reduced to approximately 13% of its maximum by the time the
following upstroke starts. Keeping in mind that the vortex lift has a small magnitude when compared to the total lift
the airfoil experiences, expression 5.3.15 can be considered valid.
Vortex Lift Module
In this last module, the contribution of the concentrated vorticity to the normal force coefficient is computed,
based on the vortex time parameter introduced previously. According to Leishman, as long as the vortex remains
attached there are no significant changes in the pressure distribution, and consequentially the forces can be described
by ignoring the vortex. After the concentrated vorticity detaches, the development of stall seems to obey a basic
common process since qualitatively similar results have been observed as different modes of forcing were imposed
60
Δt
halfstroke
=
P
OSC
2
=
1
2f
OSC
=
π
ω
OSC
τ
halfstroke
=
π2V
Eff
ωc
0. 45=
0. 45 π
k
ΔS=0. 45
π
0.1
−2=12.1
C
N
V
=C
N
V
MAX
exp
¦
−ΔS
T
V
)
=0.132C
N
V
MAX
Selection, Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model
[16].
As long as the vortex is situated over the airfoil, it is assumed that the associated contribution to the normal
force coefficient will increase. This increment is determined by the difference between the instantaneous linearised
value of the unsteady circulatory lift, given in 5.3.1, and the corresponding unsteady nonlinear lift as given by the
Kirchhoff approximation:
C
V , n
=C
N , n
C
¦
1−K
N , n
)
( 5.3.20)
where

(5.3.21)
Finally, the total accumulated vortex contribution is calculated using

(5.3.22)
which, as we can see, is allowed to decay exponentially but may also be updated with a new change in the vortex lift.
The empirical constant
T
v
represents the vortex decay constant, and was introduced in equation 5.3.19. In the
expression above one should notice that the vortex lift contribution is only to be considered if the concentrated
vorticity is located over the airfoil, represented by the condition
τ
v
<T
vl
,otherwise the expression degenerates in
5.3.19 . The value of
T
vl
is given along with the other empirical time constants in table 5.6.2 .
It is also important to mention that a restriction was imposed so that the vortex contribution to the total lift
may never be negative. One can understand that, in an oscillatory motion, if the critical condition is not reached, i.e. if
there is no leading edge separation, on the downstroke of the movement the angle of attack will be decreased and
consequentially flow reattachment from the trailing edge will take place. According to expression 5.3.20 this means
that the vortex lift would have a negative derivative in time, and thus that the total accumulated vortex contribution for
the lift 5.3.22 could become negative. This however is a physically meaningless situation, and so it was chosen to
apply expression 5.3.22 only when
and otherwise simply use equation 5.3.19, which allows for the exponential decay of the vortex contribution to the
normal force coefficient.
At last, the instantaneous total normal coefficient can be obtained by superposition of the unsteady non-linear
contribution 5.3.13 and the vortex lift term:
C
N, n
=C
N , n
f
+C
N , n
V
(5.3.23)
61
K
N
=
¦1+.f'' )
2
4
C
N , n
V
=C
N , n−1
V
exp
¦
−ΔS
T
v
)
+
¦
C
V , n
−C
V , n−1
)
¦
−ΔS
2T
v
)
if τ
v
<T
vl
C
V
n
−C
V
n−1
>0
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
Tangential Force Coefficient
It is indicated in [16] that the unsteady tangential force coefficient, or chordwise force coefficient, can be
computed according to :
C
C ,n
=nC
N
o
o
E ,n
2
.
f
n
' '
This value includes both the leading edge pressure and viscous lag, and it represents only the pressure
contribution to the chordwise force.
In the expression above n represents the recovery factor, which is introduced to allow for the fact that the
airfoil does not realize 100 percent of the chordwise force attained in potential flow. Also according to [16], this factor
can be obtained empirically from static airfoil data, and a typical value is n≈0.95 .
In the present implementation however the unsteady tangential force coefficient will not be computed.
Instead, in the BEM iteration loop the chordwise force coefficient will simply be derived from the static airfoil curve
using the instantaneous angle of attack.
Illustrated Calculation Procedure
A flowchart is included below which exemplifies the working methodology of the model, with the objective
of clarifying whole process; even though the implemented algorithm obviously uses some of the values computed in
the previous iteration, the figure below represents the open loop system:
62
Figure 5.3 1: Flowchart of the Beddoes-Leishman DS model
Selection, Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model
5.4) The influence of thick airfoils
Mostly because of structural integrity, the airfoil sections found in wind turbine blades are usually quite thick,
say larger than 15%. However, the Beddoes-Leishman DS model was originally developed for helicopter industry
applications, where usually considerably thinner airfoils are used.
The stalling characteristic of a profile is mainly dependent on its relative thickness; generally speaking, in
thin airfoils usually the separation point is located near the leading edge, while in thick airfoil sections typically
separation occurs at the trailing edge (TE) region. Naturally the topology of stall can be more complex, if combined
LE and TE separation is present, and it is also dependent on other factors, such as the Reynolds number. For more
information on the topic the reader is referred to [36] and [37].
As mentioned previously, the Beddoes-Leishman DS model assumes that leading edge separation occurs
when a critical normal force coefficient is reached, which coincides with the break in the static pitching moment curve
of the airfoil. However, it is clear that if significant trailing edge separation occurs, the static leading edge separation
point may actually correspond to a value of the normal force coefficient smaller than its maximum, i.e.
C
N, LEsep
<C
N , MAX
. Taking for instance the NACA64418 airfoil experimental static characteristic from [25],
which has a relative thickness of 18%:
In figure 5.4 1 it is clear hat the break in the pitching moment takes place at an angle of attack of
approximately 22 deg. Now minding the normal force coefficient curve, one can see that this incidence angle
corresponds to a value of approximately
C
N
=1.1, which is smaller that the maximum value. Also, such a magnitude
of the normal force coefficient is actually firstly observed at an angle of attack of roughly 10 deg.
Obviously imposing this value of the normal force coefficient for the critical condition in the DS model
would yield invalid results, since leading edge stall would be predicted to occur much too soon, when the flow is still
expected to be attached over the most of the airfoil's surface.
Moreover, one might actually be working with an airfoil where no abrupt drop in the pitching curve can
easily be identified, if the stall characteristic is very smooth. Consequentially it is clear that another criterion is needed
63
Figure 5.4 1: Normal force coefficient characteristic of the
NACA64418 at Re=700 000
-5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
Cn vs alpha
Cn
alpha [deg]
C
n
Figure 5.4 2: Pitching moment coefficient characteristic of the
NACA64418 at Re=700 000
-5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40
-0.30
-0.25
-0.20
-0.15
-0.10
-0.05
Cm vs alpha
Cm
alpha [deg]
C
m
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
to derive the critical normal force coefficient,
C
N, I
, when considering thick airfoils.
5.5) Leading Edge Stall occurrence Criteria
Critical Angle of Attack
In [38] Timmer suggests a relation to predict the occurrence of leading edge stall on wind turbine application
airfoils based on the thickness of the nose, having obtained a very good agreement for several low speed airfoil
sections, in static conditions, at a constant Re=1x10
6
.
In his work Timmer assumes the airfoil upper nose thickness to be represented by the y/c ordinate at the
x/c=0.0125 chord station, and the leading edge separation angle of attack is approximated by:
α
LEsep
=1170.8¦ y/ c)−1.33
(5.5.1)
With the result being given in degrees. Using this LE separation angle of attack, it is then possible to derive a critical
normal force coefficient,
C
n , I
by assuming the flow remains fully attached, and thus using the thin airfoil theory
C
n , I
=
¦
2πα
LEsep
+C
l , 0
)
cosα
LEsep
(5.5.2)
Obviously this expression leads to extremely large normal force coefficients, which may actually never occur
in reality, given the fact that considerable trailing edge separation is most certainly present at such high incidence
angles. However, one must keep in mind that leading edge separation is related with a critical value of leading edge
pressure [13], and since we are working in the
C
n
domain, this critical condition corresponds to the normal
coefficient one would obtain in attached flow, i.e. the value given in expression 5.3.5 .
The validity of this methodology to determine the onset of leading edge separation will be verified
subsequently, as the results from the implemented model are compared with experimental data obtained for thick
oscillating airfoil sections.
Maximum Cn
Another criterion for the onset of leading edge separation will now also be considered; the dynamic stall
model may also be set so that the critical
C
n
is assumed to correspond to the maximum normal coefficient.
C
n , I
=C
n, MAX
(5.5.3)
For thin airfoils this criterion and the break in the pitching moment, suggested in [16], yield identical values
for the critical normal force coefficient, since usually when leading edge stall takes place very little trailing edge
separation has occurred; however, if one is in presence of thick airfoils, considerable trailing edge separation is
expected to occur before leading edge stall takes place, and thus by using the maximum
C
n
as the critical value to
denote the onset of leading edge separation one comes to values which may be substantially different from using the
approach from[16].
64
Selection, Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model
5.6) Choosing the Empirical time constants
The values of the time constants used in the DS method will obviously have a large impact on the load
predictions, since they directly affect the dynamics of the unsteady model; ideally, one would perform an optimization
of these time constants for each of the considered airfoil sections, in which a procedure along the lines of [39] could
be followed.
However, since there is no available unsteady aerodynamic data for MEXICO blade's airfoils, it was chosen
to select a set of “reference” values, from which one can expect to obtain a reasonable load prediction capability.
The time constants related with the unsteady attached flow are insensitive to the Mach number and airfoil
section's shape, and are given in the table below from [16]:
A
1
A
2
b
1
b
2
K
α
0.3 0.7 0.14 0.53 0.75
Table 5.6.1 - Empirical constants for attached flow
However, when there is flow separation the choice of the values of the time constants becomes more
delicate. In [16] it is indicated that the time constants associated with the pressure lag and with the vortex lift,
T
P
,
T
v
and
T
vl
, are mainly dependent of the Mach number, and not so much of the airfoil shape. As for the viscous
lag,
T
f
, the same reference indicates that this parameter is sensitive both to profile geometry and Mach number.
For the magnitudes of the empirical time constants, the original paper of the Beddoes-Leishman DS model
refers to a document from Westland Helicopters [35]. In this reference, values of the empirical time constants are
given for the NACA0012 airfoil based on unsteady experiments at
Re=8×10
6
, and for Mach numbers ranging
from 0.3 to 0.8. Table 5.6.2 displays the values indicated in [35] for the lowest Mach number, which is of the greatest
relevance in the present case. This set of parameters will be referred to as “Westland values”.
The Swedish Aeronautical Research Institute (FFA) conducted an optimization of the empirical time
constants in a Beddoes-Leishman DS model [39]. This was performed by comparing load predictions with
experimental data, and was carried out for several airfoils at low Mach numbers. “Reference” values were put
forward, which yielded reasonable agreement for the majority of the considered airfoils, and are shown also in table
5.6.2. This set of parameters will be referred to as “FFA values”.
However, it is important to mention that the Beddoes-Leishman DS model implemented in [39] does not use
a criterion for the start of “vortex travelling”, and vortex contribution is allowed as long as the angle of attack is
increasing. In other words, the approach used assumes that no leading edge separation takes place, based on the fact
that wind turbine application airfoils are thick.
The values of the empirical time constants in the current implemented model were selected taking into
account both references mentioned above:
• For the peak pressure lag,
T
P
, it was chosen to follow the trend of decreasing Mach number from [35];
this means that since
T
P
¦ M=0. 3) <T
P
¦ M=0. 4) ⇒ T
P,Implemented
<T
P
¦ M=0. 3)
. This was also
65
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
done because in [39] a “reference” value for this time constant was not clearly indicated.
• Regarding the boundary layer lag,
T
f
, the “reference” value from [39] was used; this choice was
motivated since this parameter is expected to be sensitive to airfoil shape, and consequentially, if one wishes
to apply the DS model to different airfoil sections, it makes little sense to use the value specifically derived
for a (thinner) profile from [35].
• As for the time constants related with the vortex lift,
T
v
and
T
vl
, it was again chosen to follow the trend
of decreasing Mach number from [35]; this procedure was taken since the DS model implemented in [39] did
not consider vortex shedding, and consequentially the value derived in the optimization is not expected to
yield a good level of prediction.
The set of parameters from the references mentioned above are indicated in table 5.6.2, together with the
values used in the current implementation:
Time Constants
T
P
T
f
T
v
T
vl
Westland (M=0.3) 1.7 3 6 7
FFA (“Reference”) 0.8 5 2 -
Implemented
Model
1.5 5 6 5
Table 5.6.2 - Values of the empirical time constants for separated flow
5.7) Validation Cases
To validate the implemented model it is necessary to compare the results with experimental 2D unsteady
aerodynamic data, preferably using a set of parameters which simulates, at least to some degree, what is expected in
the MEXICO trials. However unsteady wind tunnel aerodynamic data is not publicly available for every desired airfoil
and set of parameters, and in the present case the choice was limited to the OSU database [40] of unsteady
measurements.
From this database, the aerodynamic profiles were chosen to have identical relative thicknesses as the airfoils
which make up the MEXICO rotor blade, that is, t / c = [0.25;0.21;0.18]. Naturally, having the same maximum
relative thickness does not mean that the airfoils are identical, but should at least be representative of the behaviour
one may expect to encounter in the MEXICO environment.
Having this in mind, the airfoils chosen were the S814 for the root region, S809 for the mid-section region,
and the S825 for the tip region. The figure below shows the geometry of each of these airfoil sections as well as of the
66
Selection, Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model
“corresponding” MEXICO profiles
6
:
In the table below the relevant characteristics of each airfoil are shown, as well as the
C
n , I
obtained with
each of the leading edge separation criterion given above:
Airfoil Thickness
Moment Break
AOA
Timmer's LE
Separation AOA
Cn_crit
Timmer
Cn_Crit
Cn_Max
S825 17% 21º 22.7º 2.67 1.39
S809 21% 19º 20.5º 2.01 1.03
S814 24% 25º 25.7º 2.88 1.29
Table 5.7.1: Characteristics of the airfoil sections used in the DS model validation
Experimental Unsteady Data
The Reynolds number in the experiments selected from the OSU aerodynamic database was set to
Re=1×10
6
, and the geometric angle of attack was varying sinusoidally with a 10 deg amplitude around a 14
deg mean
7
.
6
The geometry of the RISOE A1-21 airfoil is not displayed due to confidentiality
7
In the OSU aerodynamic database the AOA amplitude of the unsteady data was 5 or 10 deg, and the mean AOA was 8,14 or 20
deg.
67
Figure 5.7 1: Geometry of airfoil sections used in the DS model validation
0.0000 0.1000 0.2000 0.3000 0.4000 0.5000 0.6000 0.7000 0.8000 0.9000 1.0000
-0.1500
-0.1000
-0.0500
0.0000
0.0500
0.1000
0.1500
DU91-W2-250
S814
Root Airfoil
Mid-Span Airfoil
Tip Airfoil
0.0000 0.1000 0.2000 0.3000 0.4000 0.5000 0.6000 0.7000 0.8000 0.9000 1.0000
-0.1500
-0.1000
-0.0500
0.0000
0.0500
0.1000
0.1500
S809
0.0000 0.1000 0.2000 0.3000 0.4000 0.5000 0.6000 0.7000 0.8000 0.9000 1.0000
-0.1000
-0.0500
0.0000
0.0500
0.1000
0.1500
NACA 64418
S825
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
Minding the relevant frequencies of operation, mentioned in table 2.2.1, results are shown for high and
moderately high reduced frequencies in the root airfoil, moderate reduced frequency at the mid-span airfoil and
low reduced frequency for the tip airfoil section.
Reduced Frequency Root Section Mid-Span Section Tip Section
Low (k≈0.027) no no yes
Moderate (k≈0.053) no yes no
Moderately High
(k≈0.064)
yes no no
High (k≈0.094) yes no no
Table 5.7.2: Validation Cases of the Beddoes-Leishman DS model
5.8) Results and Discussion
The results obtained with the Beddoes-Leishman DS model using both leading edge stall criteria mentioned
before are now presented, and compared with the experimental unsteady data. The results obtained at all airfoil
sections and for all reduced frequencies are shown in appendix D.
68
Figure 5.8 1: Tip region airfoil section at a low reduced
frequency
Figure 5.8 2: Mid-span region airfoil section at moderate
reduced frequency
Selection, Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model
Minding the results above one can say that generally reasonable to good agreement has been found between
the DS model and the experimental data; in some of the loops it seems that the reattachment is not always well
predicted, but this fact is to some extent expectable in Beddoes-Leishman model implementations, as discussed in
[23].
It is also possible to witness what seems to be some secondary vortex shedding, especially in the thinner
airfoils. This is present at the final part of the upstroke and is characterized by abrupt normal force coefficient peaks: it
is also consistent with rapid pitching moment variations observed at these time instants. These phenomena are not
modelled in the present implementation and, according to [23], they are specially occurring at low Mach numbers.
Now specifically addressing the two criteria used to denote the onset of leading edge separation, several
aspects can be mentioned; firstly, given the very high values of the critical normal force coefficient imposed using
Timmer's approach, it is assumed that there is actually no leading edge stall, which is why this criterion always yields
data sets with no “kinks”.
However, and specially at higher frequencies, experimental data indicates there is leading edge stall, even for
the thick airfoils, given the abrupt decay in normal force coefficient; this fact is also coherent with the break observed
in the pitching moment coefficient, which occurs at a much lower angle of attack than in static conditions. Being so, it
seems unrealistic to simply disregard leading edge stall in wind turbine application airfoil sections.
Comparing results obtained using the two criteria, in every case the
C
n , MAX
approach yields load
predictions at least as good as the ones obtained with Timmer's criterion. When higher frequencies are considered, it is
clear that a better agreement is found using the
C
n , MAX
criterion.
69
Figure 5.8 4: Root region airfoil section at moderately high
reduced frequency
Figure 5.8 3: Root region airfoil section at high reduced
frequency
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
5.9) Conclusions and Recommendations
Analysing the results and the minding the discussion above, the following conclusions can be drawn:
• The Beddoes-Leishman DS model was successfully implemented, and tailored to correspond to the wind
turbine environment by neglecting compressibility effects. The method was validated against unsteady 2D
experimental data. Generally a good agreement was found.
• Airfoil sections similar to those comprising the MEXICO blades were chosen as input, since one intends to
posteriorly compare the model’s results with this experimental data.
• Since the original Beddoes-Leishman model was proposed for thin profiles, it was necessary to adapt the
leading edge stall occurrence criteria for thick airfoil sections characteristic of wind turbine applications; two
methods were proposed and tested, referred to as Timmer’s and
C
n , MAX
criteria.
• Regarding the performance of the two criteria the
C
n , MAX
approach yielded load predictions at least as
good as the ones obtained with Timmer's criterion. For higher frequencies clearly a better agreement was
found using the
C
n , MAX
criterion. This method should thus be used in the subsequent analysis of the
MEXICO data.
• 2D wind tunnel experimental data indicated that, even when very thick airfoils are considered, leading edge
stall may occur. Consequentially it seems unrealistic to disregard LE separation in wind turbine application
profiles simply based on the fact that the airfoil sections are thick.
70
The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients
6) The Influence of Rotational Augmentation
on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients
It was made clear from the previous sections that the dynamic stall model requires static characteristics of
aerodynamic force coefficient as a function of the angle of attack as input; in other words, both
C
l
¦o)
and
C
d
¦o) steady curves must be supplied to the dynamic stall model so that the unsteady loads can be predicted.
Also, as mentioned before, the blades from the MEXICO rotor are comprised of three different airfoil types, and
consequentially the static C
l
¦o) and C
d
¦o) depend on the spanwise position. However, given the problem at
hands, it is even more important to consider the influence of rotational augmentation on the aerodynamic
coefficients over the spanwise positions of the blade.
This chapter starts by qualitatively describing the phenomenon of rotational augmentation in section 6.1. In
section 6.2 the 3D force coefficients from the MEXICO rotor are determined, through an inverse BEM method, and in
section 6.3 the results are shown. Section 6.4 discusses the aerodynamic coefficient implemented in the BEM code
and finally section 6.5 states the conclusions drawn in this chapter.
6.1) Physical Description
The expression “rotational augmentation” refers to the delay in stall occurrence one can witness in the most
inboard sections of a rotating blade, when compared to the 2D static characteristic of the airfoil. Since the separation
over the airfoil is delayed for higher angles of attack, it is possible to obtain very high maximum lift coefficients at
these spanwise sections, hence the “rotational augmentation” designation.
This phenomenon can be qualitatively understood by thinking of the parameters which influence the
boundary layer present in a rotating blade; since the air in the vicinity of the blade will also be rotating, it will be
pushed outwards in the spanwise direction, due to the centrifugal force and to the radial pressure gradient, and thus the
flow velocity will have a cross component. Because this velocity component will be in a rotating reference frame,
there will be a Coriolis Force acting on the air parcels, given by:
F
-
Cor
=−2D
-
∨V
-
(6.1.1)
Since the linear velocity vector
V
-
has the outward direction and because the angular velocity vector
D
-
is pointing in the direction perpendicular to the rotor plane, using the right-hand rule we can see that the
Coriolis force acts to accelerate the fluid from the leading edge to the trailing edge of the airfoil. In other words, this
contribution will make the pressure gradient over the airfoil section less adverse, and thus postpone the flow
separation to higher angles of attack, allowing for very large maximum lift coefficients to be obtained.
A figure of the phenomenon is shown below, where the relevant vectorial quantities are represented:
71
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment

It should be noted that the rotational augmentation is only significant at the inboard spanwise stations; at
the more outboard sections there will still be a spanwise velocity component, but the magnitude of the local effective
velocity will be much larger, given the larger radius, and thus the influence of the Coriolis force becomes negligible.
More information on this physical phenomenon can be found in [4].
6.2) Three Dimensional Force Coefficients Experimental
Determination
In the present work it is necessary to know the dependency of the lift coefficient with angle of attack at the
inboard spanwise stations of the MEXICO rotor, since rotational augmentation will most definitively be present and
play an important role in the phenomena associated with dynamic stall.
Procedure
This determination was done by analysing the pressure data from several axial flow trials of the MEXICO.
Following the procedure mentioned in chapter 4, for each considered trial the pressure distribution was interpolated
using a cubic spline and was integrated over the surface of the airfoil section to yield both Normal and Tangential
forces, F
n
and F
tg
respectively.
The convention used is again such that a positive normal force is pointing from the lower surface to the upper
surface of the airfoil, while a positive tangential force is pointing from the trailing edge to the leading edge of the
airfoil. One should note however that the viscous contribution is thus not taken into account.
To determine the angles of attack, and consequently the lift coefficient, a local inverse BEM method was
used [18], according to which the local axial induction factor is determined with:
2a¦1−a)¢V
wind
2
.2nr dr=B. F
ax
dr (6.2.1)
and the tangential induction factor is computed with:
2 a
'
¦1−a) ¢V
wind
Dr.2nr dr=B. F
rot
dr (6.2.2)
In the expressions above
F
ax
and
F
rot
represent the aerodynamic force acting on each blade element,
72
Figure 6.1 1: The rotational augmentation phenomenon
D
V
FCor
The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients
decomposed respectively in the axial direction and in the plane of the rotor. These components are calculated from
geometric considerations using the normal and tangential forces according to the set of equations:

(6.2.3)
Once the induction factors have been derived, the local angle of attack is computed with

(6.2.4)
and the lift and drag forces are computed by inverting the set of equations :

(6.2.5)
Finally, the lift and drag coefficient are computed with

(6.2.6)
where the local effective velocity is calculated including the induction factors according to:
(6.2.7)
Considered MEXICO data
One must keep in mind that the angular velocity may influence the rotational augmentation, according to
equation (6.1.1), and consequentially in all considered trials the rotational speed was approximately 424 rpm. This is
justified since the ultimate goal is to compare the model's results with the yawed flow trials from the MEXICO, and in
all these trials the rotational velocity was set to 424 rpm. It is also important to mention that the trials considered have
a wide variety of wind tunnel speeds and pitch angles. Hence the blades operate at a wide range of angles of attack.
Following the recommendations given in chapter 3, a visual inspection of the pressure distribution over each
spanwise section was conducted for each considered trial, before taking it into account in the determination of the
rotational augmentation.
Also, it is important to state that only the 25% and 35% spanwise sections were considered, since one
expects the rotational effects not to be significant at the other more outboard radial stations.
The table below shows the trial cases considered and their most important characteristics:
73
F
ax
=F
n
cos¦0
tot
)−F
tg
sin¦0
tot
)
F
rot
=F
n
sin¦0
tot
)+F
tg
. cos¦0
tot
)
o=arctan
¦
U¦1−a)
Dr ¦1+a' )
)
−0
tot
F
n
=L.cos¦o)+D.sin¦o)
F
tg
=L.sin¦o)−D.cos¦o)
C
l
=
L
0.5¢cV
eff
2
C
d
=
D
0.5¢c V
eff
2
V
eff
=.| Dr ¦1+a
´

2
+| U¦1−a)¦
2
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
The table above shows that for a very significant number of trials the pressure data obtained at the 35% span
is considered to be unacceptable, since, as mentioned previously, very strange pressure distributions were registered
over a considerable portion of the airfoil. For this reason, unfortunately the experimental investigation of the rotational
augmentation effect will only be carried out at the 25% spanwise position.
6.3) Results
Following the procedure described above, the lift coefficient dependency with the angle of attack at the 25%
span of the MEXICO rotor was obtained; for comparison, the figure below also includes the 2D airfoil data, from [25]:
74
Table 6.2.1: Trials Considered in the Rotational Augmentation Investigation
Trial Nr Wind Speed (m/s) Data at 25% span Data at 35% span
92 -2.3 9.97 Accepted Rejected
94 -2.3 18.05 Accepted Rejected
96 -2.3 13.42 Accepted Rejected
97 -2.3 14.05 Accepted Rejected
99 -2.3 15.44 Accepted Rejected
100 -2.3 15.91 Accepted Rejected
101 -2.3 6.91 Accepted Accepted
104 -2.3 11.04 Accepted Rejected
107 -2.3 16.92 Accepted Rejected
108 -2.3 19.02 Accepted Rejected
109 -2.3 19.89 Accepted Rejected
110 -2.3 22.01 Accepted Rejected
114 -5.3 14.91 Accepted Rejected
116 -5.3 18.03 Accepted Rejected
118 -5.3 23.97 Accepted Rejected
131 -3.3 18.07 Accepted Rejected
133 -0.3 18.11 Accepted Rejected
135 -4.3 23.98 Accepted Rejected
136 -2.3 23.98 Accepted Rejected
137 -1.3 23.98 Accepted Rejected
238 -2.3 29.98 Accepted Accepted
239 -2.3 26.06 Accepted Accepted
240 -2.3 28.05 Accepted Accepted
241 0.7 29.97 Accepted Accepted
242 -5.3 29.97 Accepted Accepted
243 -4.3 29.96 Accepted Accepted
244 -3.3 29.98 Accepted Accepted
246 -0.3 29.98 Accepted Rejected
247 1.7 29.98 Accepted Rejected
Pitch (deg)
The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients
Comparing the MEXICO data with the 2D curve one can clearly witness the rotational augmentation effect
since the maximum value of the lift coefficient registered is greater than 2, and also because it takes place at an
estimated angle of attack of 25 degrees.
One can also notice that at the lower angles of attack the values of the lift coefficient are underestimated with
respect to the 2D data, or alternatively one can say that the angle of attack is overestimated; this could be explained by
the fact that at lower wind speeds, and consequentially lower angles of attack, the axial induction factor may become
large and the wind turbine may be heavily loaded, which means that expression (6.2.1) may not necessarily be
verified. This fact could be overcome by introducing a turbulent wake correction in the BEM model. However the
idea was to investigate the rotational augmentation, which occurs at high angles of attack, and so this discrepancy was
not addressed further.
It is also interesting to dwell on the results obtained for the variation of the tangential force coefficient with
the angle of attack; this quantity is defined similarly to (6.2.5), according to

(6.3.1)
For comparison, the dependency of the pitching moment coefficient, C
m
, with the angle of incidence, obtained in
2D conditions [25] is also shown in the plot below:
75
Figure 6.3 1: Cl2D and Cl3D obtained with the inverse BEM
0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
Cl 2D and Cl 3D at the 25% spanwise station
Cl 3D (Inv BEM)
Cl 2D
alpha
C
l
C
tg
=
F
Tg
0.5¢cV
eff
2
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
Figures 6.3 1 and 6.3 2 show in the 2D case an abrupt load variation, at an angle of attack of 25 degrees;
both the lift and the moment coefficient suddenly drop, which is indicative of leading edge separation occurrence.
More interestingly, analysing the angle of attack dependency of the 3D force coefficients, and even though
the rotational augmentation phenomenon is clearly visible, one can see that an abrupt load variation also takes place
when the angle of incidence reaches 25 degrees. Both the lift and the tangential force coefficient suddenly drop
8
,
hinting the occurrence of leading edge separation.
The observation that the angle of attack where leading edge separation occurs is unaffected by rotation for an
inboard section of a rotating blade, despite the influence of rotational augmentation, is in no way to be taken as a
general fact.
To be able to establish such a relation it would be necessary to test the hypothesis at different spanwise
positions and with different airfoil sections. Unfortunately, as mentioned before, in the MEXICO only the 25%
spanwise position is suitable for assessing the matter at hands; consequentially and also due to time constraints, it will
not be addressed further.
Nevertheless, one can reason why such an event would take place by qualitatively considering the physics of
the problem. As mentioned before, the rotational augmentation is brought upon by the spanwise flow component,
which causes the pressure gradient over the upper surface of the airfoil to be less adverse. However, one can
understand that this phenomenon will be more significant in the aft region of the airfoil, since the cross flow will be
deflected by the Coriolis force and eventually be aligned with the local effective velocity. One can thus understand
that this change in the pressure gradient acts to keep the flow attached further aft, or in other words that rotational
effects delay stall by postponing trailing edge separation.
For thick airfoils, when occurring, leading edge separation usually takes place at much higher angles of
attack than trailing edge separation. It is brought upon by the fact that the flow “cannot handle” the very adverse
8
At high angles of attack, and as long as the flow remains attached, one expects significant suction in the leading edge area. This
will have a positive contribution to the tangential force, according to the assumed convention. Consequentially, when the
suction region ceases to exist, i.e. when leading edge separation occurs, the total tangential force is expected to decrease
abruptly.
76
Figure 6.3 2: Cm2D and Ct3D obtained with the inverse BEM
0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40
-0.3
-0.2
-0.1
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
Ct 3D and Cm 2D at the 25% spanwise station
Cm 2D
Ct 3D (Inv BEM)
alpha
The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients
pressure gradient which is felt immediately downstream of the suction peak, characteristic of large incidence angles
Consequentially flow separation takes place in chordwise positions close to the leading edge. In other words, this kind
of separation is deeply related with the local flow conditions and airfoil geometry present in the vicinity of the
leading edge.
One should keep in mind that in wind turbine applications the flow can always be regarded as
incompressible, and consequentially the information of the perturbations occurring in the aft region of the airfoil will
be propagated upstream. This means that, in reality, trailing and leading edge separation are not completely
independent. However, from the discussion above and minding the results obtained, one can argue that the two kinds
of separation are relatively distinct phenomena. Accordingly, in this project it will be assumed that leading edge
separation always occurs at an angle of attack of 25 degrees, in all MEXICO spanwise positions where the airfoil
section is the DU91-W2-250.
6.4) Implemented Aerodynamic Coefficients
Lift Coefficient
Up to now the rotational augmentation present at the 25% spanwise station of the MEXICO rotor has been
investigated, but one can understand that it is necessary to consider the rotational effects present in all inboard sections
of the blade. Naturally, one expects a different amount of rotational augmentation to exist at different spanwise
sections, and it is therefore essential to implement this radial dependency in the BEM code developed.
A number of modelling approaches, with a wide range of complexity, have been developed to predict the
augmented force coefficients dependency of the angle of attack. In [41] an effort was conducted to compare the
performance of six different stall delay models with experimental data from the NREL measurements, however a
conclusion was not reached on which of the implemented approaches yielded the more accurate results.
According to [18], a simple correction from Snel yields quite good results for the augmented lift coefficient
dependency with angle of attack; this approach was one of the methods considered in [41], and also since it performs
at least as well as the other models considered in [41], it will be implemented in the current project. The correction for
the augmented lift is expressed by:

(6.4.1)
where AC
l
is the difference between the actual 2D lift coefficient and the potential value, which is given by:
C
l , pot
=C
l
0
+2no
(6.4.2)
Where
C
l
0
represents the lift coefficient obtained when the angle of attack is zero. It is clear that if one
uses expression 6.4.2 for very large angles of attack, it may yield unrealistically large lift coefficients, specially at the
more inboard sections. To overcome this problem it is suggested in [41] to apply the correction up to an angle of attack
of 30 degrees, after which the correction itself should be linearly decreased to 0 at an angle of attack of 90 degrees,
resulting in a smoother transition in the application of the model. However, taking into account the discussion
77
C
l , 3D
=C
l , 2D
+3
¦
c
r
)
2
AC
l
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
presented previously on the leading edge separation occurrence, the lift coefficient augmentation correction will be
applied up to an angle of attack of 25 degrees, after which the correction is linearly decreased to 0 at an angle of
attack of 90 degrees.
The implemented lift coefficient angle of attack dependency for the inboard sections is shown in the graphic
below, together with the 2D static data and the empirically determined lift coefficient values at the 25% spanwise
section of the MEXICO rotor:
As expected, the figure above shows that the more inboard the airfoil section is located, the more significant
the rotational augmentation becomes, as the 3D lift coefficient grows further apart from the 2D values at the stations
closer to the blade's root.
More interestingly, one can notice that reasonable agreement is found between the experimental data
derived at the 25% spanwise position of the MEXICO rotor and the implemented correction, especially regarding the
maximum value of the lift coefficient. For angles of attack beyond 25 degrees the agreement found is not so good,
but since as mentioned before only data for the 25% spanwise section was available, no attempts were done to derive
an expression for this portion of the lift coefficient curve, and the procedure recommended in [41] was followed.
It is also important to mention that the correction for the rotational lift augmentation was applied only to a
radial position of 1.125 m, which corresponds to a relative radius of r/R=0.5. In the MEXICO rotor this radial
position is located in the transition area between the DU91-W2-250 and the RISOE A1-21, and according to
expression 6.4.2 the rotational augmentation at this station would, for the MEXICO blades, be given by:
As such the expected rotational augmentation is very small for this, and more outboard, radial position.
Consequentially, and also since it facilitates implementation, the application of the criterion mentioned above is
justified.
78
Figure 6.4 1: Implemented Cl dependency of angle of attack at
different spanwise positions
0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 30.00 35.00 40.00
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
Implemented Cl at different spanwise positions
25%
35%
45%
Cl 3D (Inv BEM) at 25%
Cl 2D
alpha
C
l
C
l , 3D
=C
l , 2D
+3
¦
0.158
1.115
)
2
AC
l
=C
l , 2D
+0.06AC
l
The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients
Drag Coefficient
In [41] several modelling approaches of the rotational effects in the drag coefficient dependency with the
angle of attack were considered and their performance compared with experimental data, but again there was not
conclusive evidence that one of the tested model's performance was generally better.
In the present project it was chosen to use the simple model of Chaviaropoulos and Hansen [42], according to
which the influence of the rotational effects in the drag coefficient is given by:
C
d ,3D
=C
d ,2D
+g
C
d
AC
d
(6.4.3)
where in this case AC
d
is the difference between the 2D drag coefficient and the drag coefficient obtained when
the angle of attack is zero. As for the scaling term in the equation above, it is given by
where 0
tw
represents the local twist angle. The twist comes into play because it is the angle between the rotation
plane (and hence the Coriolis force) and the chord (onto which the favourable pressure gradient should be applied).
Minding expression 6.4.3 one can see that the rotational correction acts to increase the drag coefficient,
when compared to the 2D case. This trend has been identified in experimental data [41], but however the physical
mechanism that leads to an increased drag force in a rotating environment is not completely understood yet.
However, one can argue that the less adverse chordwise pressure gradient will have a stronger influence on
the aft region of the airfoil section, since it is related with the spanwise flow component; this would mean that the
decrease in the pressure over the aft region of the upper surface of the airfoil would have a considerable contribution
to the drag. In other words, the pressure drag would be expected to increase because of the rotational effects.
Especially at high angles of attack, the magnitude of the pressure drag is much larger than the viscous drag
contribution, and so one can understand the trend imposed in equation 6.4.3.
Accordingly to what was done regarding the lift coefficient, the correction for the rotational effects on the
drag coefficient was applied up to an angle of attack of 25 degrees, after which the correction itself is linearly
decreased to 0 at an angle of attack of 90 degrees.
Also to maintain the coherence with the procedure taken for the lift coefficient, the drag correction was
imposed for spanwise positions which had relative radius smaller than 0.5 .
The implemented drag coefficient angle of attack dependency for the inboard sections is shown in below,
along with the 2D static data and the empirically determined drag coefficient values at the 25% spanwise section of
the MEXICO rotor:
79
g
C
d
=2.2
¦
c
r
)
cos
4
¦0
tw
)
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
Firstly, one should notice that there is a sudden increase of the drag coefficient values for an angle of attack
of approximately 25 degrees, even though this is less noticeable in the empirically derived data. This occurrence is
consistent with the assumption that leading edge separation takes place at such an incidence, since one would thus
expect the suction area near the leading edge of the airfoil to abruptly decrease, thus increasing the drag coefficient.
Identically to what was seen for the lift coefficient, the more inboard the airfoil section is located the more
significant the rotational augmentation will become, as the 3D drag coefficient grows further apart from the 2D values
at the stations closer to the blade's root.
It can also be seen that the agreement found between the experimental data derived at the 25% spanwise
position of the MEXICO rotor and the implemented correction is good. Introducing the rotational correction yields
better agreement with empirical data then when 2D drag coefficient data is considered, and consequentially the
application of the rotational correction mentioned above is justified. Unfortunately consistent MEXICO data was not
available for other inboard spanwise sections, impeding other test cases to be carried out.
6.5) Conclusions and Recommendations
In the present section the influence of rotational augmentation on the aerodynamic coefficients was
addressed, and it was possible to draw the following conclusions:
• The dependency of the experimental aerodynamic coefficients with angle of attack at the 25% spanwise
station of the MEXICO rotor was determined; this was done by considering several axial flow data points and
using an inverse BEM method. The MEXICO results from the 35% spanwise station were not taken into
account since in most trials there was indication of pressure sensor malfunction.
80
Figure 6.4 2: Implemented Cd dependency of angle of attack at
different spanwise positions
0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 30.00 35.00 40.00
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
Implemented Cd at different spanwise positions
35%
25%
Cd 3D (Inv BEM) at
25%
Cd 2D
alpha
C
d
The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients
• Results indicate that the angle of attack at which the leading edge separation occurs seems to be unaffected
by rotational augmentation; accordingly it was assumed that this critical angle of attack remains constant for
all rotationally augmented spanwise sections.
• Empirical corrected for the lift and drag 3D coefficients have been compared with results from the MEXICO,
and reasonable to good agreement was found. These corrections should thus be implemented in the BEM
model, up to a relative radius of 0.5.
81
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
7) Results of the BEM code including the
Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects
Rotational augmentation of the static airfoil coefficients has been included in the BEM code, and the DS
model has also been implemented in the BEM iteration loop. The objective of this chapter is thus to compare the
results obtained with the complete model against the MEXICO data at yaw-misaligned configurations, when large
wind tunnel speeds are imposed.
The chapter starts by assessing the convergence of the implemented model, and in section 7.2 the MEXICO
data used for comparison is addressed. Section 7.3 shows the results obtained and discusses the trends observed, and
finally the conclusions drawn in this chapter are stated in section 7.4.
7.1) Model Convergence
Because one wishes to test the implemented code's performance when DS phenomena are expected to occur,
it was chosen to impose in all considered test cases a high wind speed, U=24m/s, and a relatively large yaw angle, β=
30 deg. Also, since the BEM model will subsequently be compared with MEXICO data, the rotational speed and pitch
angle match the MEXICO's yawed flow data points' settings, i.e. Ω=424 rpm and θ=-2.3 deg.
Number of elements in the spanwise direction
Using an azimuthal spacing of 10 degrees, the complete BEM code was run considering different number of
elements in the spanwise direction. The results below show the variation of the normal force coefficient obtained at all
spanwise stations, at an azimuthal position of 0 degrees. It was chosen to plot the azimuthal position of 0 deg since it
displayed the larger dependency of the number of spanwise elements; results obtained for other azimuthal coordinates
are included in appendix E.
82
Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects
Minding the figure above it is clear that, for the inboard spanwise stations, the number of elements considered
has an influence on the normal force coefficient obtained. One can also see that increasing the number of elements in
the spanwise direction beyond 15 does not yield a significant difference in the value of the force coefficient obtained.
For the other spanwise stations, the results obtained show that the number of elements considered does not
have a significant influence on the normal force coefficient obtained.
Azimuthal Angular Increment
Using 15 elements in the spanwise direction, the BEM code was run considering different azimuthal
angular increments. The results below show the variation of the normal force coefficient obtained at all spanwise
stations, at an azimuthal position of 120 degrees.
It was chosen to plot the azimuthal position of 120 degrees since it displayed the larger dependency of the
azimuthal increment; results obtained for other azimuthal coordinates are included in appendix E.
Firstly one should notice that, for all spanwise stations, the angular increment considered does not have a
83
Figure 7.1 2: Cn variation with azimuthal increment at 120 deg
azimuth
2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22
0.3
0.5
0.7
0.9
1.1
1.3
1.5
1.7
1.9
Cn Convergence with Angular Increment at 120 deg azimuth
25%
35%
60%
82%
92%
Angular Increment (deg)
C
n
Figure 7.1 1: Cn variation with spanwise number of elements at
0 deg azimuth
6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
Convergence of Model with Nr Elements at 0 deg azimuth
25%
35%
60%
82%
92%
Nr Elements
C
n
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
very significant influence on the normal force coefficient obtained.
The spanwise section with a greater dependency of the azimuthal discretization is again the most inboard
station. Still, one can argue that decreasing the azimuthal angular increment beyond 10 degrees does not yield a
significant difference in the value of the force coefficient obtained.
Number of Revolutions
One can say that the DS model has “memory”, in the sense that it requires the airfoil aerodynamic parameters'
history to compute the instantaneous loads. However, these aerodynamic parameters (degree of separation, vortex lift,
etc.) must be initially prescribed; since it is assumed that in the first time instant the flow is fully attached and no
circulation has been shed, one can understand that some iteration time must be allowed before the model reaches a
definite solution.
Considering an azimuthal angular increment of 10 degrees and 15 elements in the spanwise direction, the
following evolution in time of the normal force coefficients was obtained for each spanwise section:
From the figure above one can see that after one revolution (360 deg), the results obtained seem to no longer
be influenced by the initial condition imposed; this is based on fact that, for all spanwise stations, the normal
coefficient variation over the second revolution (from 360 to 720 deg) is indistinguishable from the curve
corresponding to the third revolution (from 720 to 1080 deg).
7.2) Comparison with MEXICO data
The results obtained with the complete BEM code are now compared with the data from MEXICO trials.
With the purpose of investigating the concrete influence of the Beddoes-Leishman method, the results obtained
without using the DS model are also shown.
Keeping in mind the discussion of the previous section, it was chosen to run the model imposing an
84
Figure 7.1 3: Cn variation with azimuth angle
0 180 360 540 720 900 1080
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5
Convergence of Cn over 3 revolutions
25%
35%
60%
82%
92%
Azimuth (deg)
C
n
Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects
azimuthal discretization of 10 degrees and 15 elements in the spanwise direction. It should also be mentioned that
the results displayed were obtained over the third revolution (from 720 to 1080 deg).
The comparison between the MEXICO data and the results of the model is done through the normal force
coefficient, since this dimensionless quantity is of great importance to calculate the loads acting on the rotor's blades.
Another reason to use C
n
to assess the model's performance is that it directly available from the MEXICO
measurements, since it does not depend on the angle of attack. The results display the azimuthal variation of the
normal force coefficient quantity, as well the C
n
vs o loops, where the angles of attack obtained with the BEM
code were used also to plot the MEXICO data.
Before the results are presented, it is useful to remind the reader that the MEXICO blades were rotating
clockwise, and that in the yawed flow trials the wind was blowing from the left hand side, when looking in line with
the rotor's axis from the upwind side. Referring to figure 2.2 2 , this means that the blades were rotating in the positive
direction of ψ, and that the yaw misalignment was also positive, β>0.
The advance/retreating blade effect present in this configuration will thus impose a minimum angle of attack
at the vertically downward azimuthal position, m=180deg⇒o
min
, and maximum incidence at the vertically
upward angular coordinate, m=0 deg⇒o
max
. Since this effect will be dominant at the inboard stations when
large wind speeds are considered, one comes the conclusion that the upstroke of the cycle, i.e. the period when the
angle of attack is increasing, corresponds to azimuthal positions from 180 to 360 deg. By analogy, the downstroke
of the cycle, i.e. the period when the angle of attack is decreasing, corresponds to azimuthal positions from 0 to 180
deg.
Considered MEXICO data
It was mentioned before that the MEXICO's pressure sensors at the 35% span often seemed to be
malfunctioning, since very irregular pressure distributions have been obtained at relative chord positions from 40 to
70%. However, at high angles of attack one might expect small pressure differences between 40 and 70% relative
chord positions, given the fact that significant trailing edge separation is most likely present.
Since experimental data also showed this trend, it was chosen to interpolate the value of the pressure between
the sensors which were not malfunctioning; this allows the model's performance to be compared against MEXICO
data also at the 35% spanwise station. The experimental pressure distribution obtained at this radial section for the
relevant MEXICO data points is shown in appendix F.
Dynamic stall phenomena are expected to occur mostly at inboard sections, and consequentially emphasis is
given at the 25 and 35% spanwise stations. Other radial sections will also be addressed. Naturally, the considered wind
tunnel speeds will now be large, with the purpose of imposing large angles of attack on the airfoil sections. The
MEXICO data points considered are shown in the table below, together with the spanwise sections analysed:
85
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
Trial U (m/s) β (deg) θ (deg) 25% span 35% span 60% span 82% span
152 18 30 -2.3 yes yes no no
153 24 30 -2.3 yes yes yes yes
160 24 15 -2.3 yes yes no no
167 24 45 -2.3 yes yes no no
Table 7.2.1 - MEXICO data points and spanwise positions used to compare the model against
7.3) Results and Discussion
U=18 m/s
The results obtained at this wind tunnel speed are now displayed, with the purpose of assessing the model's
performance when little stall penetration is present. The normal force coefficient variation is shown for the inboard
spanwise sections, imposing a yaw angle of 30 deg:
25 % Spanwise section
At this spanwise section good agreement is found between the predicted and experimental azimuthal variation of the
normal force coefficient. It is not clear however that including the DS model improves the load prediction. As for the
C
n
vs o loop, the figure above shows that the predicted loading yields a somewhat narrower curve than what was
measured in the MEXICO trial, even though both predicted and experimental curves are in the clockwise direction.
86
Figure 7.3 1: Cn variation with azimuth for U=18 m/s and β=30
deg at 25% span
0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
Cn vs Azimuth
Model
Model_noDS
MEXICO
Azimuth angle [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 2: Cn variation with alpha for U=18 m/s and β=30
deg at 25% span
0 5 10 15 20 25
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
Cn vs alpha
Model
MEXICO
Angle of Attack [deg]
C
n
Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects
35 % Spanwise section
For this spanwise station reasonable to good agreement was found between the predicted and the
experimental loading. Including the DS model clearly improves the load prediction capability, particularly at the 0 deg
azimuthal position, where larger angles of attack are expected. As for the C
n
vs o loop, reasonable to good
agreement was also found, and one can see both predicted and experimental curves are in the clockwise direction.
U=24 m/s
By increasing the wind tunnel speed one expects DS phenomena to play a more important role. The
normal force coefficient's variation is again shown for the inboard spanwise sections, imposing a yaw angle of 30 deg:
25 % Spanwise section
87
Figure 7.3 4: Cn variation with azimuth for U=18 m/s and β=30
deg at 35% span
0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.8
Cn vs Azimuth
Model
Model_noDS
MEXICO
Azimuth angle [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 5: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30
deg at 25% span
0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
Cn vs Azimuth
Model
Model_noDS
MEXICO
Azimuth angle [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 6: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30
deg at 25% span
10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
Cn vs alpha
Model
MEXICO
Angle of Attack [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 3: Cn variation with alpha for U=18 m/s and β=30
deg at 35% span
6 8 10 12 14 16 18
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.8
Cn vs alpha
Model
MEXICO
Angle of Attack [deg]
C
n
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
At this spanwise station one can clearly see that stall is present. Accordingly, when using the BEM code
without the DS model, the agreement between calculations and measurements is not good. When including the DS
model the load prediction capability is improved.
The magnitude of the normal force coefficient is somewhat overpredicted, even though the trend is well
captured, which can also be seen in the
C
n
vs o
loop.
35 % Spanwise section
For this spanwise agreement good agreement was found between the predicted and the measured loading.
Including the DS model clearly improves the results when compared to the static model. One can also notice that
higher frequency components are present in the experimental results, which is coherent with what one may expect
from a dynamically stalled airfoil.
Influence of the Yaw Error
The results obtained for the yaw errors of 15 and 45 degrees at the inboard stations will now be displayed.
The wind speed is set to 24 m/s , since one expects more stall penetration at this velocity and also since the axial
induction factor is expected to be smaller, meaning that uncertainties arising from the yaw BEM model itself are thus
made less important.
88
Figure 7.3 7: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30
deg at 35% span
0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
Cn vs Azimuth
Model
Model_noDS
MEXICO
Azimuth angle [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 8: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30
deg at 35% span
10 15 20 25 30 35
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
Cn vs alpha
Model
MEXICO
Angle of Attack [deg]
C
n
Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects
β=15 deg
At this yaw-misalignment angle reasonable agreement was found between experiments and the BEM
including the DS model. When the DS model is not used, the agreement seems to be somewhat poorer.
Minding the C
n
vs o curves, one can see that the direction of the loops is well predicted. One can also
notice that the loop obtained with the model at the 25% spanwise station is somewhat wider than for the 30º yaw
misalignment.
89
Figure 7.3 10: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and
β=15 deg at 25% span
0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
Cn vs Azimuth
Model
Model_noDS
MEXICO
Azimuth angle [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 9: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=15
deg at 25% span
18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
Cn vs alpha
Model
MEXICO
Angle of Attack [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 11: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and
β=15 deg at 35% span
0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.8
Cn vs Azimuth
Model
Model_noDS
MEXICO
Azimuth angle [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 12: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=15
deg at 35% span
16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.8
Cn vs alpha
Model
MEXICO
Angle of Attack [deg]
C
n
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
β=45 deg
A yaw misalignment of 45 deg will impose a wider range of angles of attack of operation and consequentially
(dynamic) stall will be necessarily present. Accordingly, using the BEM model without the DS model yields a poor
agreement with the experimental data. When including the Beddoes-Leishman model good agreement was found
between the predicted load magnitude and the measured results.
As for the C
n
vs o loops, one can see that poor agreement is found between the modelled and
experimental results, especially concerning the downstroke of the oscillation. The measured data show an abrupt
decay of the normal force coefficient at the highest angle of attack, which is consistent with significant flow
separation. However the implemented model does not capture this trend.
One should mention that in the upstroke of the motion the predicted loading agrees quite well with the
MEXICO data, for both inboard spanwise sections.
90
Figure 7.3 14: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=45
deg at 25% span
0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
Cn vs alpha
Model
MEXICO
Angle of Attack [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 15: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=45
deg at 35% span
5 10 15 20 25 30
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
Cn vs alpha
Model
MEXICO
Angle of Attack [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 16: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and
β=45 deg at 35% span
0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
Cn vs Azimuth
Model
Model_noDS
MEXICO
Azimuth angle [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 13: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and
β=45 deg at 25% span
0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
Cn vs Azimuth
Model
Model_noDS
MEXICO
Azimuth angle [deg]
C
n
Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects
Having the 1P frequency as reference, the reduced frequency of excitation depends only on the radial
position; however one can argue that the actual unsteadiness of the flow is characterized by the time derivative of the
angle of attack.
If the yaw error is larger the angle of attack amplitude over a revolution will be larger, and accordingly the
AOA time derivative will also increase. Since the DS model uses the AOA time derivative as input, it will effectively
“see” the larger yaw error as an increased unsteadiness. This will mean that, over an oscillation, which in the present
case corresponds to a blade revolution, the vortex lift component will decay more slowly, and will persist having a
considerable contribution over the downstroke of the movement. This may explain why the C
n
vs o loops are so
narrow.
In appendix G the results obtained with the DS model in a 2D situation at very high reduced frequencies are
shown (k>0.12). Each of the components of the normal force coefficient are represented, so that one can understand
what the computational approach actually models.
Results at other Spanwise stations
At more outer spanwise stations the amplitude of the angle of attack oscillations over a revolution will
necessarily be smaller, and the angles of attack will also be considerably smaller than at the 25 and 35% spanwise
stations. Thus, one expects the dynamic stall model to be of less importance in predicting the loads at these sections.
Still, the results obtained at the 60 and 82% spanwise sections will now be shown, when considering a wind speed of
24 m/s and a yaw error of 30 degrees.
60 % Spanwise section
At this spanwise section reasonable to good agreement is found between the measured and predicted loads,
both in terms of magnitude and regarding the
C
n
vs o
loop. Minding the figures above one can also say that
including the DS model slightly improves the results obtained.
91
Figure 7.3 17: Cn variation with Azimuth for U=24 m/s and
β=30 deg at 60% span
0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
Cn vs Azimuth
Model
Model_noDS
MEXICO
Azimuth angle [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 18: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30
deg at 60% span
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
Cn vs alpha
Model
MEXICO
Angle of Attack [deg]
C
n
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
82 % Spanwise section
Minding the figures above it is clear that the DS model has very little influence on the results obtained with
the BEM model; this is understandable since at this spanwise section each revolution imposes a small range of angles
of attack and a low reduced frequency. Comparing the experimental results with the implemented model, it is possible
to say that the normal force coefficient is somewhat overpredicted.
In the C
n
vs o curves one can see that the predicted loops are in the opposite direction of experimental
data.
Quantitative Analysis
With the objective of quantitatively assessing the performance of the implemented calculation method the
average relative error in the normal force coefficient was computed for the BEM code including the DS model. The
magnitude of the error was calculated by averaging the relative error of model results over a revolution and assuming
the MEXICO data to be the exact solution, similarly to what was done in chapter 4.
The expression used to compute the average relative error in the normal force coefficient at each spanwise
station and MEXICO trial is repeated here for convenience:
The results obtained for the considered trials are shown below, where the relative error in the normal
coefficient averaged over the azimuth is shown in percentage. The average of the error obtained at each trial is
displayed in the last row:
92
Figure 7.3 19: Cn variation with Azimuth for U=24 m/s and
β=30 deg at 82% span
0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
Cn vs Azimuth
Model
Model_noDS
MEXICO
Azimuth angle [deg]
C
n
Figure 7.3 20: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30
deg at 82% span
10 10.5 11 11.5 12 12.5 13 13.5 14 14.5
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
Cn vs alpha
Model
MEXICO
Angle of Attack [deg]
C
n
e
Cn , avg
=
1
360

m=1
360

C
n , Model
¦m)−C
n , MEXICO
¦m)

C
n , MEXICO
¦m)
Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects
Trial U (m/s) β (deg) 25% span 35% span 60% span 82% span
152 18 30 12.1 8.1 12.3 10.3
153 24 30 25.4 7.6 6.5 17.9
160 24 15 12.3 11.1 9.9 14.0
167 24 45 25.1 24.0 14.5 6.4
Average - - 18.7 12.7 11.6 12.2
Table 7.3.1: Relative error in Cn averaged over a revolution
From the table one can see that the average error in the predicted normal force coefficient is approximately
12% , except for the 25% spanwise station. It was mentioned before that the agreement found in the downstroke of the
motion at the more inboard stations was not always satisfactory. Particularly at large yaw angles, the predicted C
n
values substantially differ from the experimental data when considering azimuthal positions from 0 to 180 deg, which
explains the relatively large average error in the normal force coefficient found at these stations.
However, the figures included before show good agreement between the predicted and experimental loading
during the upstroke of the movement, even when large yaw misalignments are imposed. To quantify this trend, and
also since the extreme loads occurring over a revolution are important in assessing the blade's robustness and fatigue
resistance, the relative error in the maximum normal force coefficient over a revolution was computed, according
to:

(7.3.1)
The results obtained for the considered trials are shown below, where the relative error in the maximum
normal coefficient is shown in percentage. The average of the error obtained at each trial is displayed in the last row:
Trial U (m/s) β (deg) 25% span 35% span 60% span 82% span
152 18 30 2.0 0.2 9.9 5.9
153 24 30 19.1 15.0 0.1 2.2
160 24 15 5.0 2.4 14.9 1.1
167 24 45 2.5 12.8 13.5 4.2
Average - - 7.2 7.6 9.6 3.4
Table 7.3.2: Relative error in Maximum Cn over a revolution
The table shows that good agreement was obtained for the maximum normal force coefficient over a
revolution, since the average error in the considered trial is below 10%. Specifically regarding the inboard sections,
where the DS model will have a greater influence, one can say that the implemented code is capable of predicting the
load magnitude occurring over a revolution, with an average error of approximately 7%.
93
e
Cn , MAX
=

C
n ,MEXICO ,MAX
−C
n , Model , MAX

C
n ,MEXICO, MAX
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
7.4) General Remarks and Conclusions
Minding the results obtained and the discussion above, one can come to the following conclusions:
• The variation of the normal force coefficient with the azimuth angle was studied, with emphasis given at
inboard spanwise stations. C
n
vs o loops have also been plotted, using the angle of attack from the BEM
code. Generally speaking reasonable to good agreement was found between the predicted loading and the
MEXICO data.
• Including the DS model in the BEM code generally improves the load prediction capability when compared
to the static BEM, especially when large angles of attack are imposed.
• Specifically when considering large yaw-misalignments the agreement found in the
C
n
vs o
loops is
poor; in the downstroke motion measurements seem to indicate that significant separation occurs, denoted by
an abrupt decay in the normal force coefficent while the implemented model does not predict this trend.
However, quite good agreement was found in the upstroke motion, and consequentially the amplitude of the
loading over a revolution is well predicted.
• As for the other spanwise sections, reasonable to good agreement was also found between the predicted and
experimental loads. However, over a revolution the imposed range of angles of attack will be smaller, and the
reduced frequency will also be decreased, and consequentially including the DS brings only a slight
improvement to the load predicting capability of the model at more outboard stations.
• The average error in the predicted loads over a revolution is approximately 12%, except for the 25%
spanwise station. However, the predicted maximum normal force coefficient occurring over a revolution was
within 10% of the measured values. Specifically considering the inboard stations, where the DS influence is
larger, the accuracy obtained in predicting the maximum
C
n
was approximately 7%.
• In the
C
n
vs o
loops the direction of motion was indicated with arrows, and results show that the
implemented model is able to capture the trends displayed in the experimental results, except for the 82%
spanwise section.
As a final remark, one should always bare in mind that the DS model is of a semi-empirical nature, and was
developed for a 2D situation, with the data being taken from 2D static conditions. In the present case, the static data
given as input to the dynamic stall model has a 3D dependency, due to the rotational augmentation, but one must have
present that this
C
n
¦ o )
characteristic was derived in steady conditions, from axial flow trials.
However, these two phenomena, rotational augmentation and dynamic stall, are intrinsically related, since
they are part of the boundary layer flow around each profile; consequentially their influence on the total loading taking
place in wind turbine's airfoil section is very complex to describe, and by superimposing their effects, as was done in
the present implementation, one can only expect to approximate the actual loading to an engineering level.
94
Conclusions and Recommendations
8) Conclusions and Recommendations
8.1) Conclusions
The present thesis developed a BEM code for a yaw-misaligned turbine, which was validated using MEXICO
data obtained at moderately high wind tunnel speeds. Posteriorly the Beddoes-Leishman DS model was adapted to the
wind turbine framework and validated against 2D wind tunnel aerodynamic data from the OSU. Finally the DS model
was implemented in the BEM code and the results of the complete model were compared with the MEXICO data
obtained at large wind tunnel speeds. The MEXICO data had to be pre-processed in order to be used for validation.
The most important conclusions drawn in this assignment are now stated:
• Regarding the MEXICO data, often unusual pressure distributions have been found at the inboard stations.
At the 25% spanwise station a pressure sensor consistently showed odd readings and consequentially it was
not considered in the computation of the sectional forces. In some MEXICO data points the pressure
distribution at the 35% station was also very atypical, indicating some sensor malfunction in the aft region of
the airfoil section. For this reason, before any force calculation was performed at this spanwise section the
pressure distribution obtained was visually inspected for each data point.
• As for the other spanwise sections, the pressure distributions found in the MEXICO data are coherent and
yield smooth curves, and thus were considered reliable to compute aerodynamic forces from.
• Two BEM methods were implemented and tested against MEXICO data. Relatively high wind tunnel speeds
were chosen to perform the validation, since little separation is expected to occur in such conditions.
Comparing both BEM models it was clear that the 'Empirical BEM' yielded the best agreement with
experimental data, and consequentially it was selected to implement the DS model.
• The Beddoes-Leishman DS model was successfully implemented and results were compared against
unsteady 2D data experimental data; generally a good agreement was found.
• The DS model was adapted to consider thick airfoil sections by implementing different LE stall criteria. From
the methods tested, the C
N , MAX
criterion clearly yields better agreement with measurements and
consequentially it was selected for subsequent computations.
• 2D wind tunnel experimental data indicated that even when very thick airfoils are considered LE stall may
occur. Consequentially it seems unrealistic to disregard LE separation in HAWT application profiles simply
because the airfoils are thick.
95
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
• Regarding rotational augmentation, empirical corrections for the lift and drag 3D coefficients have been
compared with results from the MEXICO using an inverse local BEM approach, and reasonable to good
agreement was found. These corrections have thus been implemented in the BEM model, up to a relative
radius of 0.5.
• Results indicate that the angle of attack at which the leading edge separation occurs seems to be unaffected
by rotational augmentation; accordingly it was assumed that this critical angle of attack remains constant for
all rotationally augmented spanwise sections.
• The DS model was implemented in the BEM code, and the predicted loads have been compared with the
MEXICO data obtained at high wind tunnel speeds in yawed configuration. Generally speaking, reasonable
to good agreement was found, and it was also clear that including the DS model improved the load predicting
capability when compared to the BEM code using static aerodynamic airfoil coefficients.
• Particularly at large yaw angles, the model did not capture the experimental trend in the downstroke motion
in a satisfactory way. This is thought to be related with the increased unsteadiness brought upon by large yaw
misalignments which the DS model “sees” as an increased reduced frequency.
• Still, the loading during the upstroke of the motion was quite well predicted by the model. At the inboard
stations, and even when large yaw error were considered, the maximum value of C
N
over a revolution
obtained with the model was within 8% of experimental results.
• As a final remark it should be noted that rotational augmentation and DS are complex phenomena which are
intrinsically related, but their effects have been superimposed in the current model. Still, the results indicate
that, even though the experimental trends were not always captured, the magnitude of the loading
amplitude occurring over a revolution in a yawed configuration at high wind speeds was reasonably well
predicted. This is important especially for blade fatigue calculations and is an encouraging result.
8.2) Recommendations
Throughout this research there were several topics that captured the attention of the author but which
unfortunately there was no time to pursue further. The most important are now mentioned:
• Results from the MEXICO indicate that, for the 25% span, LE stall is not affected by rotational
augmentation. Even though this phenomenon was to some degree justified in the current document and can
be explained, further experimental validation is required to confirm this hypothesis.
96
Conclusions and Recommendations
• Naturally, it would also be very interesting to implement other DS model in the BEM code and assess their
performance. This procedure could start by considering the 3 other approaches highlighted before.
• Regarding the DS model implemented in this assignment, one could think of different criteria to denote the
LE separation occurrence. Since the criterion used seems to predict LE stall slightly sooner than experiments
show, it could be worthwhile to take the critical C
N
as the potential normal force coefficient one obtains
when using the angle of attack at which the maximum
C
N
occurs.
• In yawed operation, the reduced frequency an airfoil section is working at is usually estimated using the 1P as
excitation source. However one can argue that the local degree of unsteadiness is related with the time
derivative of the angle of attack, which is related also with the yaw angle and wind speed magnitude. DS
models could thus be validated experimentally for very high reduced frequencies, which might occur when
large yaw misalignments are present.
97
Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
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Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 1993
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Annual Forum of the American Helicopter Society, 1970
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Forum of the American Helicopter Society, 1975
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European Rotorcraft Forum, 1996
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[35] – Leishman, J., Beddoes, T., 'A generalised model for airfoil unsteady aerodynamic behaviour and dynamic stall
using the indicial method', 42
nd
Annual Forum of the American Helicopter Society, Washington D.C., June 1986
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[37] – ESDU, 'The low-speed stalling characteristics of aerodynamically smooth airfoils', ESDU TR66034, 1966
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[40] - http://wind.nrel.gov/OSU_data/data/
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101

Acknowledgements
I am sincerely grateful to everyone who made this master thesis possible. My formation as an engineering student started almost eight years ago at Lisbon's Instituto Superior Técnico. I have learned so much in this university , and I have many fond memories from the good teachers and colleagues I have had. In 2007 I went to the Netherlands, to study at the TUDelft. This was a great experience, which gave me a different perspective and the opportunity to learn a lot about wind energy engineering. Also, I was lucky enough to do my internship at the Energy Center of the Netherlands. This institute does research in wind energy, which allowed me to get in contact with scientists who work in this field for decades. I am especially thankful to my internship supervisor, Ir. Gerard Schepers, for his insightful advise and fruitful discussions. I must also thank my master thesis coordinator, Prof. João Melo de Sousa, for allowing me to be his graduation student and for the help and good advice he gave me. Also, he was my Aerodynamics professor and contributed to my decision of studying this difficult but very interesting field of science. Last, but definitely not least, I must thank my family and friends for their everlasting patience and support.

iii

iv .

but the magnitude of the loads occurring over a revolution was well predicted. and validated against unsteady airfoil wind tunnel data. The rotational augmentation of the aerodynamic coefficients was also investigated using an inverse BEM method and empirical rotational corrections have been applied. and the results were compared with high wind speed yawed flow MEXICO data. Beddoes-Leishman. accurate load prediction when DS is present becomes essential. Finally the rotational corrections and the DS model were implemented in the BEM code. Different leading edge stall criteria were tested and good agreement was found. v . and consequentially two BEM approaches were compared with MEXICO data obtained at moderately high wind speeds. Reasonable to good agreement was found. providing a database of aerodynamic data for a HAWT. The aim of this master thesis was to choose and implement a DS model and to compare it with the MEXICO data obtained at high wind speeds in the presence of yaw misalignment. The European Union developed a project named MEXICO. It was chosen to implement the DS model in a Blade-Element Momentum (BEM) code. Posteriorly the Beddoes-Leishman DS model was tailored to the HAWT environment. nevertheless any structure that is put forward must be robust. as well as to validate these models under higher excitation frequencies. MEXICO Less expensive design solutions are sought in the wind energy industry. The dynamic stall (DS) phenomenon imposes large amplitude loading on airfoil sections and since it occurs in horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) operating envelope.Abstract Keywords: Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine. The experimental trends observed were not always captured by the model. For future research it is suggested to test the performance of other DS models. and it was clear that including the dynamic stall model improved the computational results. Dynamic Stall.

vi .

e dado que ocorre frequentemente em turbinas eólicas de eixo horizontal (HAWT).Resumo Palavras-chave: turbina eólica de eixo horizontal. e utilizaram-se para comparação os dados experimentais do MEXICO a velocidades de vento elevados e com a HAWT desalinhada. Beddoes-Leishman. tendo-se obtido bons resultados. Foram testados dois critérios de perda de bordo de ataque. Finalmente as correcções devidas à rotação das pás e o modelo de DS foram implementados no código BEM. Embora os resultados do modelo não tenham correspondido aos dados experimentais em todas as posições azimutais. O objectivo desta tese de mestrado foi seleccionar e implementar um modelo de DS. e a inclusão do modelo de DS melhorou os resultados computacionais. A concordância obtida entre os resultados do modelo e os dados experimentais foi razoavelmente boa. Optou-se por conjugar o modelo de DS com a modelação Blade-Element Momentum (BEM). a magnitude do carregamento a que as secções da pá estão sujeitas numa revolução foi calculada correctamente. A perda dinâmica (DS) é um fenómeno que provoca grandes amplitudes no carregamento a que um perfil alar está sujeito. é essencial prever com precisão o impacto deste fenómeno. e compará-lo com os resultados experimentais do MEXICO obtidos a velocidades de vento elevadas e com a HAWT desalinhada. A influência que a rotação das pás tem na característica dos coeficientes aerodinâmicos dos perfis alares foi também investigada utilizando um método de BEM invertido. no entanto a integridade estrutural das turbinas eólicas deve necessariamente ser assegurada. A União Europeia desenvolveu um projecto denominado MEXICO. tendo sido validados dois códigos BEM utilizando dados do MEXICO obtidos a velocidades de vento moderadas. MEXICO A indústria de Energia Eólica procura designs menos dispendiosos. vii . no âmbito do qual foi criada uma extensa base de dados duma HAWT. Posteriormente o modelo de DS Beddoes-Leishman foi adaptado ao ambiente das HAWT e validado utilizando dados experimentais de perfis aerodinâmicos em regime não-estacionário. perda dinâmica. Sugere-se para futuras investigações que outros modelos de DS sejam implementados. e também que estes modelos sejam validados a frequências de excitação mais elevadas.

Number of blades [-] C d .Correction factor for tip-loss [-] K .Vortex lift [-] D .Wake shape function [-] K  .Deficiency function used in the Beddoes-Leishman dynamic stall model [-] F .Normal force coefficient including the pressure lag [-] C N .2 .Pressure [Pa] P1.List of Symbols A .Normal force coefficient at an angle of attack of 0 deg [-] f C N .Critical normal force coefficient [-] C V .Derivative of the normal force coefficient with respect to the angle of attack [/deg] .Tangential force coefficient [-] C V .Normal force coefficient including the pressure lag and viscous lag [-] CN C ' N  .Constants used in the empirical approximation to the indicial response [-] B .Thrust coefficient [-] C tg .Rotor diameter [m] D .Non-circulatory factor [-] P .2 .Drag force coefficient [-] C l .Radius of the rotor disk [m] viii .Function used in the induced velocities empirical model [-] A1.Force [N] F .Normal force coefficient [-] C N0 . I .Area swept by the rotor [m2] A1.Vortex contribution to the normal coefficient [-] N C P .Function used in the induced velocities empirical model [-] R .Flow expansion function [-] F 1 .Pressure coefficient [-] C T .2 .Lift force coefficient [-] C N .

Equivalent leading edge pressure angle of attack [deg] ix .Deficiency function used in the Beddoes-Leishman dynamic stall model [-] a .Frequency [Hz] f .Velocity [m/s] X -Deficiency function used in the Beddoes-Leishman dynamic stall model [-] Y .Non-dimensional separation point including the pressure lag and the viscous lag [-] g .2 .Tangential induction factor [-] b 1.Non-dimensional separation point including the pressure lag [-] f ' ' .Non-dimensional separation point [-] f ' .Constants used in the empirical approximation to the indicial response [-] c .Non-circulatory time constant [-] T P .Viscous lag time constant [-] T v .Reduced frequency [-] r .Axial induced velocity [m/s] Greek Symbols  – angle of attack [deg]  f .Function of number of blades and tip loss ratio [-] k .Re .Axial induction factor [-] a ' .Wind speed [m/s] V .Local radius [m] t .Airfoil thickness [m] u .Airfoil chord [m] f .Vortex position time constant [-] U .Pressure lag time constant [-] T f .Reynolds number [-] S .Semi-chords of an airfoil [-] T I .Vortex lag time constant [-] T vl .Time [s] t .

Wake skew angle [deg]  – Tip speed ratio [-]  – Increment in quantity [-] v .Non-dimensional vortex time parameter [-]  . .Inflow angle [deg]  .Pitch angle [deg]  .Yaw-misalignment angle [deg]  .Azimuth angle [deg]  .Total n – Time sample p – Pitch r – Rotating sep .Effective I – Impulsive OSC – Oscillation Press – Pressure P – Unsteady attached Tot.Fraction radius [-]  .Frequency [rad/s] Indices C – Circulatory Eff .Separation visc – Viscous tw – Twist x .Rotor's angular velocity [rad/s] or [rpm]  .

...................................................33 Figure 3........................................2 1: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324..............................Abbreviations 2D – Two dimensional 3D – Three dimensional AOA – Angle of attack BEM – Blade Element-Momentum BL – Beddoes-Leishman CFD – Computational Fluid Dynamics DS – Dynamic stall DNW – German Dutch wind tunnel ECN – Energy Research Center of the Netherlands FFA ..................2 1: Rotating Blade Airfoil Section Convention..........................2 2: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424.....2 2: Convention for a Wind Turbine in Yaw.......25 Figure 2..................................5 rpm) at the 35% spanwise station............................................................................37 xi .... 36 Figure 3...................................Flygtekniska Forsoksanatalten (Swedish Aeronautical Research Institute) HAWT – Horizontal axis wind turbine LE – Leading edge LLF – Large scale low speed facility MEXICO ....1 2: Classical rotational corrections from [6].........................................31 Figure 2............Model rotor experiments under controlled conditions OSU – Ohio state university PIV – Particle image velocimetry RPM – Revolutions per minute TE – Trailing edge TSR .....................1 1: Dynamic Stall stages from [2]..............................3 2: Airfoil section distribution over the MEXICO blades.......................2 3: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324..3 1: The MEXICO experiment..............................................Tip-speed-ratio List of Figures Figure 2....19 Figure 2.................5 rpm) at the 25% spanwise station .............27 Figure 2........5 rpm) at the 25% spanwise station ......................................36 Figure 3............................23 Figure 2..........................

................................5 10: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60% spanwise station and yaw angle of 45 deg ..1 1: BEM method Calculation Procedure...............3 9: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 25% span......3 1: Cn variation with azimuth for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span............49 Figure 4............ 38 Figure 3..........85 Figure 7.......................................................90 Figure 7....................3 2: Cm2D and Ct3D obtained with the inverse BEM..........91 Figure 7................................................................................................................................5 6: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 82% spanwise station.............90 Figure 7.......5 rpm) at the 92% spanwise station .........................................................84 Figure 7..................3 13: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 25% span...49 Figure 4........5 rpm) at the 82% spanwise station .......4 2: Implemented Cd dependency of angle of attack at different spanwise positions........8 3: Root region airfoil section at high reduced frequency.................................................88 Figure 7...............................................3 4: Cn variation with azimuth for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span.........3 8: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span..........7 1: Geometry of airfoil sections used in the DS model validation......89 Figure 7............................................50 Figure 4....5 4: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60% spanwise station............3 16: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 35% span...............5 rpm) at the 82% spanwise station ..........................................81 Figure 7..........................................3 1: Cl2D and Cl3D obtained with the inverse BEM.....39 Figure 3............................5 1: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 25% spanwise station.....................91 Figure 7......92 Figure 7...........69 Figure 5.............................Figure 3.........................................................................3 2: Cn variation with alpha for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span..........3 3: Cn variation with alpha for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span..8 2: Mid-span region airfoil section at moderate reduced frequency................................................41 Figure 4...........................................................51 Figure 5..........5 2: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 25% spanwise station .........5 rpm) at the 60% spanwise station ......................91 Figure 7.73 Figure 6.50 Figure 4...................4 2: Pitching moment coefficient characteristic of the NACA64418 at Re=700 000..........................49 Figure 4.......3 15: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 35% span....90 Figure 7.............2 5: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424.....1 3: Cn variation with azimuth angle.........................47 Figure 4..........................................2 8: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424...............................................................................5 rpm) at the 60% spanwise station ......................................................49 Figure 4..47 Figure 4..................8 1: Tip region airfoil section at a low reduced frequency.............................38 Figure 3.......5 3: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 35% spanwise station.......3 7: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span.......................37 Figure 3............5 8: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 92% spanwise station...............................92 Figure 7..3 11: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 35% span.......3 10: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 25% span............................................3 1: Flowchart of the Beddoes-Leishman DS model.................................3 17: Cn variation with Azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 60% span..87 Figure 7....................................................3 5: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span...3 6: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span....................89 Figure 7.................................................................5 rpm) at the 35% spanwise station .....................................87 Figure 7.....................................84 Figure 7............................................5 9: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 92% spanwise station..............................5 5: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 60% spanwise station..............3 19: Cn variation with Azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 82% span.....5 11: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60% spanwise station and yaw angle of 15 deg.................5 rpm) at the 92% spanwise station 39 Figure 4.93 xii ...........................................5 7: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 82% spanwise station ..............2 9: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324.3 18: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 60% span.............88 Figure 7............76 Figure 6.....3 12: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 35% span..........................................................2 6: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324.............70 Figure 6........8 4: Root region airfoil section at moderately high reduced frequency..................................................... 37 Figure 3............................................4 1: Implemented Cl dependency of angle of attack at different spanwise positions ...........1 2: Cn variation with azimuthal increment at 120 deg azimuth..........................................................................................................................................88 Figure 7...............63 Figure 5.........1 1: The rotational augmentation phenomenon.............................63 Figure 5..............................................70 Figure 5.2 7: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324...........68 Figure 5.91 Figure 7..................................1 1: Cn variation with spanwise number of elements at 0 deg azimuth...........................................................88 Figure 7.......................................................79 Figure 6..............3 14: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 25% span.51 Figure 4......................................................2 10: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424.........69 Figure 5..62 Figure 5....................................48 Figure 4......90 Figure 7. 37 Figure 3...........................................................................................................................................................4 1: Normal force coefficient characteristic of the NACA64418 at Re=700 000........................................................................................2 4: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424.....77 Figure 6.................................................................

..................................................................75 Table 7.....................1: MEXICO model main specifications..........1 ............................29 Table 2........................3.2................2 .............45 Table 4..........6.....................................................Range of parameters considered in MEXICO trials.....1 ......................Values of the empirical time constants for separated flow...........3...........1 ................................1: Relative error in Cn averaged over a revolution......7.................................................................3........................94 Table 7......................................................65 Table 5..........2 ................................1: Characteristics of the airfoil sections used in the DS model validation...............2: Relative error in Maximum Cn over a revolution..................2: Validation Cases of the Beddoes-Leishman DS model........................4.....66 Table 5....3............87 Table 7........................................52 Table 4....MEXICO data points considered in the BEM codes' validation..3 20: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 82% span..............1: Trials Considered in the Rotational Augmentation Investigation.......................Data points considered in the preliminary data analysis.........................46 Table 4..............7.....32 Table 2................MEXICO data points and spanwise positions used to compare the model against ................................2..........Figure 7...........................................................33 Table 3................................2 ................2: Preliminary analysis of the yawed flow trials..........................Typical reduced frequencies found in wind turbine's operation............69 Table 6................................................5...................................1........6...............................35 Table 4........................94 xiii .........Average Normal Force coefficient relative error for U=15 m/s..................Empirical constants for attached flow....93 List of Tables Table 2..68 Table 5.............4...................Average Normal Force coefficient relative error for U=18 m/s..........................1 ..........52 Table 5..............2...................1.....................................................1 ...............................................5..............

.....................................................................................................................................................................................................40 4.................. iii Abstract ..................3)The MEXICO project..................................... viii List of Figures .................................31 3) Preliminary Analysis of MEXICO Pressure Data....................................................................... xiii 1) Introduction...........................................................................................................52 5) Selection...........16 1..................................................54 5...........5)Results and Discussion........... xi List of Tables ….................39 4) Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes........................45 4..34 3..........................35 3...............................….................................................................3)Description of the BEM models considered..................54 5..............................................................................................................................................................2)Dynamic Stall on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines...........2)Results and Discussion.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................18 2............................................................................................. v Resumo …..................................34 3.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................3)Conclusions and Recommendations .........................................................1)The Dynamic Stall Phenomenon.......17 2) Theoretical Framework............................................................2)Why use the BEM method?..............................................................................19 2............42 4....................1)Data Processing...................................................................................................... Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model...................................................................................................................................................25 2......47 4............................ vii List of Symbols .........................55 xiv ..................................1)Project Goals & Methodology...............................................................................................................................................................................................6)Conclusions and Recommendations..............................................1)The choice of a Dynamic Stall Model........Table of Contents Acknowledgements .............16 1.......................................................................................................................................................4)MEXICO data used for validation .............................1)The Blade Element-Momentum Method ............................................................2)The Assumption of Incompressibility ..........................................40 4..............2)Report Layout........................................................41 4.........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

5.3)The Model Explained.....................................................................................................................................56 5.4)The influence of thick airfoils........................................................................................................................63 5.5)Leading Edge Stall occurrence Criteria..........................................................................................................64 5.6)Choosing the Empirical time constants .........................................................................................................65 5.7)Validation Cases.............................................................................................................................................66 5.8)Results and Discussion...................................................................................................................................68 5.9)Conclusions and Recommendations...............................................................................................................70

6) The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on Aerodynamic Coefficients........71
6.1)Physical Description.......................................................................................................................................71 6.2)Three Dimensional Force Coefficients Experimental Determination............................................................72 6.3)Results............................................................................................................................................................74 6.4)Implemented Aerodynamic Coefficients........................................................................................................77 6.5)Conclusions and Recommendations...............................................................................................................80

7) Results of the BEM code including the DS model and rotational effects..........82
7.1)Model Convergence........................................................................................................................................82 7.2)Comparison with MEXICO data ...................................................................................................................84 7.3)Results and Discussion ..................................................................................................................................86 7.4)General Remarks and Conclusions.................................................................................................................94

8) Conclusions and Recommendations...................................................................95
8.1)Conclusions....................................................................................................................................................95 8.2)Recommendations..........................................................................................................................................96

9) References..........................................................................................................98 Appendices........................................................................................................102

xv

Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment

1) Introduction
One can not deny the growing concern in decreasing the cost of energy in recent years, which has naturally also had an impact in the wind energy community. It is also true that it is common engineering practice to opt for conservative designs, which in the wind energy industry usually brings about heavier, more expensive rotor blades. In order to be able to push through cheaper, lighter structures it is necessary to ensure that such designs are able to withstand the loads expected to occur over the life time of a wind turbine. One of the main requirements which must be met when certifying a wind turbine's structural integrity is that of fatigue damage resistance; a material's fatigue damage is especially related with the cyclic loading it is subjected to, and consequentially it is very important to accurately estimate the load variation a component will undertake.

For the same angle of attack range, the phenomenon of dynamic stall (DS) is characterized by imposing a very large load amplitude on the airfoil section, when compared to the static loading characteristic. This brings about significant hysteresis, which also affects the aerodynamic damping of a wind turbine. Since one expects dynamic stall to occur in wind turbine operation, especially when yaw misalignment is present at high wind speeds, it is clear that it is crucial to be able to predict the magnitude of the aerodynamic loads taking place when this phenomenon is present. In the last decades several models have been proposed to predict the aerodynamic loads occurring during DS in rotary wings, with a wide range of complexity and using distinct approaches. The European Union developed a project with the main goal of providing a database of aerodynamic measurements of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT), so that computational models could be validated. This project was named MEXICO, which stands for Model Rotor Experiments under Controlled Conditions. For this purpose, an extensively instrumented 4.5m diameter HAWT model was tested in December 2006 in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel, under several flow conditions. The Energy Center of the Netherlands (ECN) was the coordinator of this project, even though several international entities participated, and the calculation rounds are still taking place.

1.1) Project Goals & Methodology
Based on a literature study conducted, the main goal of this master thesis is to select a dynamic stall model and to assess the load predicting capabilities of the method in a real HAWT environment. Data from the MEXICO project is especially suited to conduct a validation of the implemented model, and consequentially these measurements will be used to evaluate the performance of the model's predictions. It is thus also an objective of this master thesis to process and analyse the MEXICO data, namely the one used in the model's validation, to ensure that the comparison with the implemented model is trustworthy. To assess the performance of the DS model, it was chosen to implement the model in a Blade-Element Momentum (BEM) code. Accordingly, it was necessary to firstly validate the BEM model in attached flow conditions. Posteriorly the DS model was tailored to the HAWT environment and validated against wind tunnel test 16

Introduction
data from the Ohio State University (OSU) database. Finally the DS model was included in the BEM code so that a comparison with the MEXICO data could be carried out.

1.2) Report Layout
The body of this report is divided in 7 chapters. After this introduction, the theoretical background of the work carried out is given in chapter 2. The phenomenon of Dynamic Stall is addressed, explaining its relevance within the HAWT's environment, and the MEXICO experiment is also introduced. In chapter 3 a preliminary analysis of the MEXICO data is carried out, with the objective of identifying possible incoherences in the pressure data. Chapter 4 describes the implementation of two distinct BEM codes for yaw-misaligned HAWTs, and validates these models against MEXICO data obtained at moderately high wind tunnel speeds. In chapter 5 the Beddoes-Leishman DS model is explained, and validated against wind tunnel test data from oscillating airfoils. The model is tailored for HAWT application with different leading edge (LE) stall criteria being assessed. Chapter 6 discusses the influence of rotational augmentation on the static aerodynamic force coefficients; three dimensional (3D) corrections are implemented and compared with the MEXICO data using an inverse BEM method. In chapter 7 the results obtained implementing the DS model and the rotational corrections in the BEM code are presented, and compared with the MEXICO data obtained at high wind tunnel speeds. Finally chapter 8 states the most important conclusions drawn in this assignment and suggests topics of possible future investigation.

17

It is thus clear that accurate unsteady aerodynamic load prediction is crucial if more cost-effective design solutions are to be achieved. less expensive designs usually also mean lighter and less resistant structures.3 the MEXICO project itself is addressed. 2.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment 2) Theoretical Framework Increasing concern in reducing the costs associated with energy production in recent years has naturally impacted the wind energy community. in section 2. and it is known that unsteady aerodynamic loading has a considerable impact on the total fatigue damage a wind turbine will undertake. Section 2. Fatigue resistance is a main requirement when certifying a wind turbine's structural integrity. Finally in section 2. if dynamic stall is expected to occur. which is the velocity the airfoil experiences. and consequentially cheaper design solutions are strived for. The Theodorsen effect is also of non-viscous nature. Usually the unsteady effects taking place in wind turbine aerodynamics can be divided in three “contributions”[1]: 1. In HAWT's normal operating regimes the two time scales of the unsteady effects mentioned above will have very different orders of magnitude. together with an overview of some “engineering” models which have been developed. the Theodorsen effect must also be taken into consideration. from a qualitative point of view. namely the delay of the airloads with respect to the angle of attack when it varies rapidly. This chapter will start by describing the dynamic stall phenomenon and the several aspects which it is influenced by. by mentioning its main characteristics and relevant data for the present assignment. However. 18 . since these phenomena are intrinsically related and describe the airfoil unsteady aerodynamics. and it refers to the change on the airfoil characteristics while in fully attached flow conditions. 3. and it is usually caused by a change in blade pitch angle or in rotor speed. This effect involves a rather complex set of interlinked phenomena and it is also characterized by a time scale in the order of c /V Eff . It has a time scale in the order of D/U . it is usual to study the effects of dynamic inflow and of the airfoil unsteady aerodynamics separately. which nevertheless must be able to withstand the loads expected to occur over the life time of a wind turbine. where D stands for the diameter of the rotor and U represents the incoming wind velocity. This effect has a time scale in the order of c / V Eff . Dynamic inflow is an inviscid effect on the induced velocity. Dynamic stall is a viscous effect on the airfoil characteristics at stalled conditions which is known to yield transient force coefficients of much larger magnitude than experienced in the static case.2 frames the occurrence of dynamic stall within the HAWT environment and normal operating envelope.1. One can also understand that. and consequentially. where c stands for the airfoil’s chord and V Eff represents the effective local velocity.

As long as the flow remains attached and the airfoil is not very thick.1 1: Dynamic Stall stages from [2] 19 . a complex set of interlinked phenomena occur. To better grasp this sequence of events it is useful to divide the DS phenomenon in 5 stages. when the flow initiates separation. yielding aerodynamic forces very different from those obtained in static conditions. This means that several subsequent different phenomena take place.. causing an overshoot in lift. Physical Description If the airfoil experiences an oscillation in angle of attack in which it goes beyond the static stall angle DS may be present. usually referred to as dynamic stall . Figure 2. Dynamic stall is characterized by an accumulation of vorticity near the leading edge of the airfoil as the angle of attack is increasing.1) The Dynamic Stall Phenomenon When an airfoil undergoes a flow regime in which its angle of attack (AOA) changes rapidly the aerodynamic resulting forces and moments will differ from their static value. the aerodynamic loading can be computed with the “elegant” Theodorsen’s theory. illustrated in the figure below from [2]. However.Theoretical Framework 2. This is followed by an abrupt decrease in the normal force when the built up vortex is convected downstream of the airfoil as the angle of attack is decreasing. with a fairly complex overall behaviour of the airfoil loading. together with very large pitching moment variations due to centre of pressure movements. which was developed considering a 2D oscillating flat plate. since obviously the flow regime and consequent pressure distribution do not adapt instantaneously.

2.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment As the value of angle of attack increases rapidly in stage 1 there is a reduction in adverse pressure gradients along the chord.05 the problem is quasi-steady. the unsteady effects are generally small and can be neglected. the vortex disturbance will be cast off from the leading edge and swept downstream across the chord. Further augmenting the angle of attack. is not solely dependent on the frequency of the excitation. as well as many other systems. compared to what one would obtain in the quasi-steady case for the same angle of attack. the moment stall will occur at the onset of vortex shedding. if we have k>0. as long as the vortex disturbance stays over the upper surface it will provide additional lift. but how exactly can one quantify this? The response of an airfoil to changes in the local flow. one can consider that if k<0. and the unsteady terms in the equations cannot be neglected if a realistic analysis is to be conducted. Thus. Effect of forcing conditions on Dynamic Stall It is clear that dynamic stall involves a complex set of phenomena which may be extremely sensitive even to small perturbations. Moreover. and the onset of separation is delayed. and so it is easy to understand that by changing the forcing conditions the aerodynamic loading may have large variations. since. and consequentially the problem is highly unsteady. as the vortex disturbance passes the trailing edge of the airfoil. and full reattachment is postponed to configurations in which the airfoil is well below its normal static stall angle. According to Leishman [2]. We should notice that the factor 2 in the expression above was introduced by historical reasons1. it is common to characterize the response of an airfoil undergoing oscillations by the reduced frequency. At some point. The concept of Reduced Frequency Previously it was mentioned that dynamic effects can be noticeable in the aerodynamic loading when the angle of attack changes “rapidly”.1. Afterwards. the unsteady terms will begin to dominate the behaviour of the airloads. A qualitative description of 1 The original work of Theodorsen on airfoil unsteady aerodynamics used the profile's semi-chord as length scale.05 it is considered unsteady. Stage 3 is characterized by a sudden break in the lift coefficient. k. That is to say. the reattachment of the flow is significantly lagged. It is also related with the local velocity. obviously. which brings us to stage 2. c. there is a build up of vorticity in that region of the airfoil.1) since this quantity is indeed representative of the system’s dynamics. while the lift stall will happen only when the vortex passes into the wake. if a problem is characterized by a reduced frequency k> 0. and chord. and as the separation point approaches the leading edge. which will take place at a higher angle of attack than the abrupt decrease in the pitching moment. which will cause an aft movement of the centre of pressure and consequently a very large nose-down pitching moment. defined as k= c 2V (2. as denoted by stage 5. Still. The flow on the upper surface then becomes fully separated. the speed of propagation of a perturbation is finite. V. since turbulence and flow separation are most likely present. ω. and subsequently nearly all investigation conducted in the same topic adopted his convention 20 . usually referred to as moment stall.e. which is common to designate by stage 4. i.

the reduced frequency can be interpreted as the degree of unsteadiness of an oscillation. C m will have a small amplitude. the mean AOA of the periodic motion can dictate the degree of stall penetration in a cycle. However it is clear that real-life engineering situations are usually not completely described simply by considering 2 dimensions of a problem. tested on wind tunnels in 2D flows. However. indicative of larger vortex shedding. when the mean angle of attack of the oscillation is large (as large as the static stall angle or greater).Theoretical Framework what changes can be expected in the airloads when different forcing parameters are varied will be given now as: • Mean angle of attack . However. it takes longer until it “becomes aware” of the changes in angle of attack. one usually will encounter “deep” dynamic stall. and thus the vortex shedding is delayed. k – As mentioned before. Still. Mach Number. because of the favourable effects of the spanwise development of the boundary layer. meaning that the characteristic of attached flow. By further increasing the reduced frequency. thus there is a periodic angle of attack variation imposed on the airfoil. according to [2]. but that its slope is smaller. It is also referred to as “plunging”. as well of most of the experimental data available. the angle of attack at which the flow over the airfoil reattaches seems insensitive to changes in the mean angle of attack of the oscillation. and consequentially typical 3D situations will now be addressed: • Sweep – If one imposes high sweep angles on a 2D airfoil on a steady regime the onset of stall will be delayed and the maximum lift coefficient will be larger than the one obtained at an aligned configuration. when pitch oscillations are imposed in a swept airfoil. Now minding the pitching moment behaviour. refers to oscillating airfoils. and thus it will take more time to reach the trailing edge since the local chord is at an 2 A heaving airfoil by definition has a forcing normal cyclic velocity. according to [2]. because it is narrower. dynamic stall onset may involve a shock wave. and that the oscillations of the moment coefficient.when considering an oscillating airfoil. as well as the reattachment. experiments [2] show that the moment stall occurs approximately at the same angle of attack. the system will have “less time” to adapt to the changes. In this case. meaning that there will be more stall penetration and a larger amount of hysteresis in the whole cycle. it is expected that the C l vs  curve will resemble the ellipses airfoil will undergo “light” dynamic stall. This is possible to understand if one admits that the shed vorticity will be convected in the direction of the flow. and also since the lift curve shows less hysteresis. On the other hand. the effects of compressibility cause the stall angle to be decreased. If the mean angle of attack is small (considerably smaller than the static stall angle). where there will be a larger lift overshoot relatively to the static behaviour. it is clear that the sweep angle has an influence. 21 . If the free stream velocity is large enough that the local Mach number approaches the sound barrier. either pitching or heaving 2. it is even possible to prevent flow separation from initiating in any point of the cycle. Reduced Frequency. it is also verified that a very significant nose-down pitching moment occurs. and assuming the other parameters remain constant. it appears that the maximum normal force coefficient is not increased when compared with the unswept dynamic case. and it is not pitching. M – Analogously to what happens in the static case. • • 3 Dimensional Effects on Dynamic Stall The brief qualitative explanation of the features of the dynamic stall process given above. or in other words. it is thus easy to understand that as one increases the reduced frequency. since the dynamic stall lift is delayed to a higher angle of attack. and there will be complex centre of pressure movements. α .

the influence of the finiteness of the wing does not greatly affect the dynamics of the stall occurring when angle of attack oscillations are imposed. provokes an outwards spanwise flow component. Blade rotation will originate a centrifugal force which. which is why this effect is usually termed as rotational augmentation. According to [3]. Rotational Effects Besides the 3D effects mentioned above.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment angle with the flow. [6] the average lift coefficient in a cycle is somewhat larger. • Finite Wing – Since all the wings are finite. Because this velocity is in a rotating reference frame. is usually regarded as steady phenomenon. The effect described above. and since it is necessarily the case in helicopters and wind turbines. but the hysteresis is of a smaller magnitude. but it is identical to the one obtained when the mean angle of attack of the oscillation is decreased. even though it necessarily implies movement since the blade is rotating. there will necessarily be a vortex at the tip. The tip vortex will indeed have an influence on the more outboard wing sections. thus increasing at the blade's root. We can thus expect a reduction in the average lift-curve-slope when moving outboard towards the tip. there will be a Coriolis force which acts to accelerate the fluid from the leading edge to the trailing edge of the airfoil. when an unsteady regime is imposed in a rotationally augmented blade section. when one is considering sections extremely close to the tip the results are less transient. it is relevant to consider it. thus decreasing the actual angle of attack they are operating at. according to [5]. with intensity comparable to the circulation of the wing sections in its vicinity. together with the radial pressure gradient . thus postponing separation. which suggest that leading edge vortex shedding does not occur because the tip-vortex alone dominates the flow field. the fact that a blade is rotating will bring about noticeable changes. A figure of this effect is shown below: 22 . since the wing is swept. However. This concentrated vorticity induces a downward velocity on the wing’s sections near the tip. the maximum lift the airfoil will experience may be significantly increased. when compared to the 2D case. Because the separation is delayed to higher angles of attack. It has also been verified [4] that the amount of lift added depends on the value of the chord to radius ratio ( c/r). but this is a quasi-steady effect. which was discussed previously.

these models always require a significant number of empirical parameters. they simply try to “rebuild” the trends observed experimentally. Still. Modelling Dynamic Stall From the explained above. and currently the models that try to predict the effects of dynamic stall range from fairly simple empirical or semi-empirical models to complex computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. and thus attempting to model its effects is not straight forward at all. On the other hand. especially people involved in helicopter design and analysis have been working on this task since the 1960’s. given the nature of the phenomena present in Dynamic stall. [8]. Engineering Models Some of the “Engineering Models” developed to predict the effects of dynamic stall are a form of resynthesis of the measured unsteady airfoil airloads. and their application is limited to the airfoil and Mach number they were developed for. Proper CFD simulation can only be obtained using the full Navier-Stokes equations with an adequate turbulence model. and will not be further addressed to in this assignment.1 2: Classical rotational corrections from [6] From the brief discussion above. it is obvious that dynamic stall encompasses a complex set of phenomena.e. these models show some promise in predicting 2D and 3D dynamic stall events. Also because the computational resources for these CFD solutions are prohibitive. however the quantitative predictions of the airloads are not yet satisfactory. and consequentially this matter will be posteriorly addressed in greater depth. it is clear that rotational effects play an important role in the blade sections where dynamic stall is expected to occur. Some of these models will now be 23 . according to [7]. by using sets of linear and non-linear equations to simulate the aerodynamic loads. Aerodynamicists.Theoretical Framework Figure 2. the so-called “Semi-Empirical” models contain simplified representations of the physical processes taking place. usually both from steady and unsteady experiments. we will now concentrate on more approximate models of the dynamic stall phenomenon. i.

B Method: This is a resynthesis method developed around 1970. which then decay back to the static loads. and then two non-dimensional time delays are used. the basic physics of the dynamic process. These time delays were obtained from a large amount of airfoil tests at different Mach numbers. and its approach is described in [9]. the behaviour of the airloads in the attached flow regime are obtained using the Wagner indicial response function. Johnson’s Method: This is a fairly simple method. This model has shown credible predictions of the unsteady airloads. and also has the advantage that it requires relatively few empirical coefficients. where the static stall lift and pitching moment are corrected as a function of the pitch rate.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment considered: • UTRC α. [10] . and where vortex shedding is assumed to occur just above the static stall angle. the first representing the delay in the onset of separation. even though it seems to have some difficulties predicting flow reattachment. this method calculates an equivalent point of separation based on the angle of attack history. to represent the 24 • • • • • . and it has known some success. for the aerodynamic effects associated with separated flow. This methods yields good predictions of the unsteady airloads. although less satisfactory estimates are obtained for the moment oscillations. and it is described in [12]. namely. even though in a simplified manner. This method actually tries to simulate. This final value is then used to obtain values from the static airload curves. vortex shedding produces increments in lift and nose-down pitching moments to a peak value. an attached flow model for the unsteady linear airloads. For the non-linear part of the model. Gangwani’s Method: It is a synthesized method. also time-based. which is based in the time domain. but it has the inconvenient that extensive data tables must be generated for each airfoil and Mach Number. a separated flow model for the non-linear airloads. and the method has given good predictions. More details are available in [14]. Leishman-Beddoes Method: This method is capable of assessing the unsteady lift. which is then used to reconstruct the non linear loads. and it characterized by having a more complete physical representation of the unsteady aerodynamic problem. according to Kirchhoff/Helmholtz theory. where compressibility is taken into account. and a dynamic stall model for the airloads induced by the leading edge vortex. It tries to isolate the dynamic contributions to the airloads by subtracting the static coefficients. It is comprised of three subsystems. and a second correction is applied from an empirical function dependent on airfoil and Mach Number. a large set of equations with several empirical coefficients are used to represent the forces produced by the airflow. but it is not so accurate predicting situations with little stall penetration.[13]. finally. This model yields reasonable predictions for the normal force coefficient. pitching moment and drag. further developed in [15]. also referred to as the Theodorsen effect. The loads in the attached flow regime are obtained through indicial functions. and the second accounting for the time during which leading-edge vorticity shedding takes place. Time Delay Method: This is a semi-empirical model developed in 1978. In this model. A. where the airloads in attached flow are modelled in a very similar way as the time-delay method mentioned above. Boeing-Vertol ‘gamma’ Function Method: In this method the influence of the airfoil motion is taken into account by computing an effective angle of attack The influence of the pitching and plunging effects is determined from the forcing conditions. having been extensively validated with experimental data. More details are available in [11].

and it also adapts the trailing-edge separation approach from Kirchhoff/Helmholtz theory. and it has the important advantage that it requires relatively few empirical coefficients. It can be found in [16]. firstly it is necessary to describe the geometry convention normally used in wind engineering as far as airfoil aerodynamics is concerned. and the coefficients in the equations are exclusively determined by comparison with experiments on oscillating airfoils. described in [17]. even though it behaves less satisfactorily predicting flow reattachment. HAWT Airfoil Aerodynamics When in presence of a rotating blade it becomes easier to grasp the characteristic flow a local airfoil section is subjected to by considering the following representation : Ωr(1+a´) θ U(1-a) Φ α U eff V Figure 2. This method assumes that the dynamic stall process is initiated when an equivalent leading-edge pressure parameter reaches a critical value. the dynamic effects of a concentrated leading-edge vortex passing across the upper surface and being convected downstream are taken into account. uses 18 empirical coefficients. However. This method yields indeed quite good results. Being so. and consequentially it becomes important to frame the occurrence of dynamic stall in the HAWT's envelope of normal operating regimes. and the entities represented in the figure above are thus: • • •  U is the incoming wind speed   represents the blade's angular velocity Veff is the effective velocity the airfoil experiences 25 .Theoretical Framework effects of dynamic stall. • ONERA Method: This model uses a set of nonlinear differential equations to describe the unsteady airfoil behaviour in both attached flow and during dynamic stall. most of which derived from static airfoil data. the later version of the model. 2.2 1: Rotating Blade Airfoil Section Convention This sort of analysis is usually termed blade element method. With this model one generally obtains reasonable predictions of the unsteady airloads. and this explains why it is so popular and has been extensively used in helicopter rotor loads prediction.2) Dynamic Stall on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines In the current work aerodynamic data obtained from an instrumented wind turbine rotor model tested in a wind tunnel section will be analysed.

the wind is stochastic. and consequentially the effective flow velocity at the rotor plane is substantially different from the unperturbed conditions. These velocity components are influenced respectively by the tangential induction factor . since the blades of the MEXICO rotor had no cone angle and no pre-bend. 3 Following common practice in wind engineering literature.1) One should also notice that the pitch angle illustrated above refers to the total pitch angle.2 1 it is clear that increasing wind speed while keeping the angular velocity constant will increase the angle of attack the airfoil section is working at. one can see that the angle of attack is thus given by =−=atan  U 1−a −  r 1a ´   (2. Dynamic Stall occurrence Almost every process occurring in a real wind turbine will have a dynamic nature. since the blades are spinning. From geometric considerations. this wind speed spatial gradient will obviously cause a local angle of attack variation. in this report the expression “rotor plane” refers to the plane perpendicular to the HAWT's axis. and thus may define whether DS phenomena are present in a given airfoil section. and axial induction factor.2) Thorougher characterizations of typical wind turbine airfoil section aerodynamics can be found in wind engineering manuals. a wind gust may not be felt evenly throughout the rotor. Moreover. Still minding figure 2. it is clear that these induction factors will have a large impact on the angle of attack experienced by the blade element. which is a combination of both the blade's local twist and the pitch angle the blade is working at. since the incidence is proportional to the ratio of the wind speed to the angular velocity.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment • a is the axial induction factor • a´ represents the tangential induction factor • Φ is the inflow angle • θ is the pitch angle • α represents the angle of attack • r is the radius of the considered section In figure 2. according to = ptw (2.2. These induction factors are introduced to compensate for the fact that the air stream is “aware” of the rotating blades before the rotor plane is reached.2. this designation leaves no room for ambiguity. Consequentially. such as [18]. and especially considering the trend to increase the size of wind turbine rotors. the determination of these factors will posteriorly be addressed in more depth. together with expected trends for the induction factors as different wind turbine operating regimes are considered. Still. a.2 1 one can see that the effective velocity the airfoil section is working at will have a component in the rotor plane3 and in the direction orthogonal to the rotor plane. a'. 26 .

a rotor yaw-misalignment. opposite to the situation in the field. and so we will concentrate on it further in the next section. From the considered above. and is often the main “responsible” for the occurrence of DS phenomena. It is noted that such measurements are done at a constant and known yaw angle where the tunnel flow is without turbulence and wind shear.Theoretical Framework Also. and more importantly. which obviously may also bring about unsteady airfoil aerodynamic effects However. which makes the excitation precisely known. can yield very significant cyclic angle of attack variations. and for which experimental results are available and will be used for comparison. there will be angle of attack variations over a complete rotation. simply considering the atmospheric boundary layer. between the lower and higher azimuthal positions due to wind shear. It is also a configuration which can be easily simulated in a wind tunnel. and again minding the very large size of modern wind turbines. one can thus see it is interesting and useful to study the problem of dynamic stall and to consider it in the Wind Turbine framework.2 2: Convention for a Wind Turbine in Yaw 27 . The convention shown in the figure below will be adopted throughout the whole text: ψ U Wind β Ω Figure 2. according to [19]. frequently present in real life operating regimes. and the geometric parameters which are important when a HAWT is operating under yawed conditions. One should also keep in mind that in recent years attempts to actively control tower and blade vibrations has led to very large pitch velocities of up to 20 °/s. Wind Turbine in Yawed Flow To gain a greater understanding of the problem at hand it is firstly necessary to define the working reference frame.

assume to be positive if. and it is given by the ratio between the velocity due to blade rotation at the tip and the undisturbed wind speed. and in clockwise manner. The expression to quantify the inflow angle as a function of the azimuth angle. and thus a maximum angle of attack.e. It is not straight-forward to predict the loads a wind turbine blade will experience over a whole revolution when it is yawed. which vector in this case coincides with the X axis. the wind blows from the left-hand side. i. if the wind is not blowing perpendicular to the rotor plane. at the vertically upward position. •Ψ is the blade azimuth angle. •Y is the horizontal axis in the rotor plane. Ψ =0º.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment In figure 2. which is usually referred to as the Skewed Wake Effect. •Z is the vertical axis in the rotor plane. 2.2. when looking in line with the wind.   is the angular velocity. depending on the convention. and pointing in the downstream direction. A correct prediction of this type of loads is very important. •β is the yaw angle. it is clear that the load variation from the advancing/retreating blade effect is very important for accurately predicting the damping characteristics and fatigue loads of wind turbine blades.3) Considering the expression above.2 2 as reference. it is also understandable that this effect is mainly 'felt' at high wind speeds and low tip-speed-ratios4. which will be even throughout the rotor plane. measured from the vertical upward position. The fact that the wake is not being convected perpendicularly to the rotor's plane brings about an azimuthal variation of the induced velocities and consequentially of the aerodynamic loads. assumed in this case to have no vertical component. However this component will have a positive/negative contribution to the total in-plane velocity when the rotor blades are in the downward/upward position. keeping the convention defined above.2 2 the following variables are represented: •X is the axis perpendicular to the rotor plane. Taking figure 2. i. and so one often encounters dynamic stall phenomena. Ψ =180º. if β > 0 . This means that at these conditions the angle of attack becomes large. • • U Wind is the incoming wind speed. not only for fatigue 4 The tip-speed-ratio (TSR) characterizes the regime the wind turbine is working at. the angle the incoming wind is at with the vector normal to the rotor plane. Being so. considered to be positive in the vertically upward direction. we will necessarily have an extra in-plane velocity component. and a maximum in-plane velocity and thus a minimum angle of attack at the vertically downward position. and also minding that the axial induction factor's magnitude decreases with decreasing tip-speed-ratio [18].e. we will have a minimum in-plane velocity. and is defined such that the third axis of the right hand Cartesian reference frame is pointing vertically upwards. when seen from upstream.e. i. is given by =atan  [U Wind cos ]1−a [ r−U Wind sin  cos ]1a ´   (2. but according to [20] it is possible to identify two more or less distinct characteristic phenomena: 1. TSR=ΩR/U 28 . The so-called Advancing/Retreating Blade Effect can be understood simply from considering the geometry of the problem.

we come to: k≈ c c = 2 r 2r (2. It is also important to mention that this effect yields more complex load variations over the rotor plane than the advancing-retreating blade effect.5 0. one can see again the term of the local chord to radius ratio. one can assume that the magnitude of the local effective velocity a blade element will experience is given by the inplane velocity component. which is usually also termed local solidity. It is easy to understand that this effect is mostly relevant when there are large induced velocities. with identical characteristics obtained for similar azimuthal positions.15 0. This means that at Ψ =90º the induced velocity would be larger than at Ψ =180º . this means that one can assume that the frequency of excitation of this problem matches the angular frequency of the blade's rotation. for spanwise positions near the root it is the root vorticity which has a greater influence on the induced velocities. the downwind side of the turbine would be for Ψ ∈ [0.Theoretical Framework calculation but also because this effect induces a load unbalance between the 'upwind' and 'downwind' side of the turbine. For example. it is now possible to have an idea of the unsteadiness of the flow one may encounter in a yaw-misaligned wind turbine. Reduced frequencies of operation Based on the previously introduced concept of reduced frequency. and at the spanwise positions near the tip the influence of the convected tip vortices would be greater at the downwind side of the rotor than at the upwind side. it is desirable that the overall yawing moment tends to align the turbine with the incoming wind. at the downwind side of the rotor plane the angles of attack are larger than at the upwind side. and the upwind side would correspond to Ψ ∈ [180.2.1). and thus has stabilizing character. However.1.2. and so we have the opposite trend. Naturally. Introducing these two approximations in (2. as in the influence of rotational effects. Naturally.180]. According to [21].1. In other words.360].12 0.075 0. and thus causes yawing moments. again taking the convention of figure 2. which happens when the wind turbine is working at relatively high tip speed ratios and low wind speeds. that is.07 k (1P) 0. one expects that the flow in a given rotating blade section will have a periodic behaviour over time.035 Table 2.Typical reduced frequencies found in wind turbine's operation 29 .2 2 and assuming β >0.4) In the expression above. typical values of the discussed variables found in wind turbine blades are: r/R 0. which is usually also termed 1P . Now noticing that the incoming wind speed is of small magnitude when compared to the rotational speed.3 0.25 0.75 c/r 0. since usually the induced velocities greatly change both with the azimuthal position and with the radial station. and thus the local angle of attack will be greater at the upwind side of the rotor than at the downwind side.

moreover. the airfoils used in wind turbine blades are usually thicker. but according to [19] it performs at least equally better. but wind tunnel experiments with pitch oscillating airfoils show some hysteresis even when such low frequency excitations are imposed. This model can be 30 • • • . it does some simplifications relatively to the previously mentioned models. as can be consulted in [21]. This model is based on the need to reproduce the measurements and does not implement a criterion for the stall onset. Because of its simplicity and reasonable results this method has been popular. ECN Model: This method computes solely the lift coefficient. In a wind turbine the characteristic airflow may significantly differ. requiring simply one non-steady empirical coefficient. specifically designed for low Mach Numbers. also according to Snel [21]. allowing for self-excited force fluctuations. In this model only the lift coefficient is computed. It is a modification of the BeddoesLeishman model. including 3 relevant improvements. this threshold is somewhat smaller than the value indicated by Leishman.02 . This model requires relatively few empirical coefficients deriving from unsteady experiments. it is relatively simple to implement. a first order part that describes the response to the excitation frequency.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment It should also be mentioned that. and it uses this variable to introduce the dynamic effects under dynamic stall. It accounts for the dynamic effects on the lift coefficient by adding two terms to the steady value. with a certain Strouhal number. as elucidated in [23]. and it is fairly simpler than other semi-empirical models. and thus it yields less satisfactory results when there is little stall penetration. and since it was developed specifically with Wind Turbine application in mind. and the subsequent ECN investigations will unite it with the Theodorsen model in the rotating environment. which do not vary with the airfoil. since the normal operating regime Mach number and rotational frequency will be considerably lower. and comparably with the ones previously mentioned. during forward flight. and it is described in [19]. namely. however it does not predict dynamic effects under attached conditions. This model defines 2 parameters. following that same frequency. Sheng-Galbraith-Coton Model: This is a very sophisticated method for Dynamic Stall Load prediction. and a second order part that is essentially nonlinear. namely a different stall-onset criterion. Consequentially specific dynamic stall engineering models “tuned” for wind turbines have been developed: • Øye Model: In this method it is assumed that the motion of the separation point on the suction side of the airfoil can be computed with a simple-linear first order filter. new modelling from the returned stalled state and a new formula for the chordwise force. and requires two other profile dependent coefficients. like neglecting compressibility effects and including the non-circulatory effects as an added mass contribution. The results obtained with this method are quite satisfactory. More information can be obtained in [22] Larsen-Nielsen-Krenk Model: This method combines memory delay effects under attached flow with reduced lift due to flow separation under dynamic stall conditions. in wind engineering it is common to consider the unsteady effects of an excitation if it is expected to have a reduced frequency greater than 0. Modelling Dynamic Stall in Wind Turbines The dynamic stall models addressed before were developed mostly with the intention of being used in the prediction of aerodynamic loads present during dynamic stall phenomena occurring in helicopters.

In this international effort an extensively instrumented 4. The project started in January 2001 and ended in December 2006. A figure of the experiment is given below: Figure 2.5 diameter HAWT model has been tested in the Large Scale Low Speed Facility (LLF) of the German Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). and it is a EU project with the main goal of providing a database of aerodynamic measurements.3 1: The MEXICO experiment Model Specifications The wind turbine model was equipped with 148 pressure sensors. distributed over 5 spanwise sections of 31 . it yields very accurate airload predictions for normal and chordwise forces and moment coefficients. and it requires several empirical coefficients. However. under several flow conditions. especially when thin airfoils are analysed.Theoretical Framework considered complex and computationally heavier then the ones previously mentioned for wind turbine dynamic stall modelling.3) The MEXICO project The MEXICO acronym stands for Model Rotor Experiments under Controlled Conditions. 2.

a DU 91W2-250 in the root region.424.508 0.011 Spiral flange to provoke transition Steel [m] [ ◦] [-] [-] [-] 2. the edgewise and flatwise bending moments have been measured with strain gauges.3. At the root of the blade. The table below shows some of the main features of the wind turbine model: ROTOR Rotation direction Number of blades Power regulation Rotor speed Swept area Rotor diameter Hub height Tilt angle BLADES Blade length Cone angle Prebend Roughness Material TOWER Type Height including base Diameter Wall thickness Roughness Material PITCH SYSTEM Type Range [-] [◦] Linear actuator [-5.1: MEXICO model main specifications It should also be noted that the MEXICO blades are comprised of three different airfoil sections. A figure of the airfoil distribution over the span is given below: 32 . speed control by motor/generator 324.04 0 No prebend Zig-zag tape at 5% chord (0.5 . 10 mm wide.120 0.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment the blade.5 kHz. which had a sampling frequency of 5.90] [-] [m] [m] [m] [-] [-] Tubular 5.5 15.9 4. a RISØA1-21 at mid span sections and a NACA 64-418 nearing the tip of the blade.49 0 Table 2. and also stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements have been made to measure the velocity field.25 mm thick. pressure and suction side) Aluminium 7075-T651 Alloy [-] [-] [-] [rpm] [m2 ] [m] [m] [ ◦] Clockwise (facing the upwind part of the rotor) 3 Not present.5 5.

parked rotor. 15. 60. 35. 30. 90] Table 2. 30] {−30. namely axial flow. 5. One should also mention that the spanwise sections instrumented with pressure sensors are located at relative radius of 25.3. 33 . several flow conditions were imposed on the model. 3. 324. 0. yawed flow. both steady and unsteady regimes. 424. 5} [−5. Trial Cases As mentioned before. 45} {0. which was made with the intention of capturing the characteristic flow regions occurring in a wind turbine blade.7.2 . Some of the main characteristics of the regimes imposed are displayed in the table below: Upstream Velocity Yaw Angle Rotor Speed Pitch Angle [m/s] [º] [rpm] [º] [5. 82 and 92%.3 2: Airfoil section distribution over the MEXICO blades The specific geometry of the MEXICO blade's airfoil sections is presented later in section 5.Range of parameters considered in MEXICO trials For further information on the MEXICO trials the reader is referred to [24] and [25]. step in pitch angle and step in rotor speed.Theoretical Framework Figure 2. For further information on the MEXICO model the reader is referred to [24].

1. namely the MEXICO results obtained in axial.3.1) One should notice that the denominator in the expression above should be the stagnation pressure. However. Unfortunately. Finally.e. More information on the calibration procedure and on the data files themselves can be obtained in [26]. As hinted previously. previous analysis on the MEXICO measurements by Pascal [26] and Micallef [27] indicated that the pressure data does not always seem to be coherent. C p . and since one wishes to interpret the aerodynamic phenomena at dynamic. Once the pressure coefficient was calculated for each pressure sensor at each time instant. so that a posterior comparison with dynamic stall modelling can be conducted. it seemed appropriate to start by analysing simpler cases. the leading edge area is heavily instrumented and consequentially this and that approximation should be enough to yield results where the main trends can be observed. 3. the pressure coefficient distribution over the airfoil's chord was plotted.2 shows the experimental pressure distribution obtained for all spanwise stations. which means it includes approximately 27 revolutions for the low rotational speed case and 35 revolutions for the high rotational speed trials. one will be namely interested in the MEXICO data points where a yaw misalignment is present. i. since in axial flow trials one expects very little azimuthal dependence. This chapter will start by indicating how the data from the MEXICO was processed.e. and it represents the gauge pressure.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment 3) Preliminary Analysis of MEXICO Pressure Data One of the aims of the current thesis project is to take advantage of the very high sampling rate of the sensors in the MEXICO experiment and investigate dynamic effects occurring on the wind turbine's flow. in section 3. p stag . The used pressure data corresponds to the 'Reduced Pressure Files' and was taken from the MEXNEXT site [28]. Consequentially. Section 3.1. steady flow. the pressure measured with respect to the local atmospheric pressure. and finally conclusions are drawn on the MEXICO data's reliability in section 3. In this preliminary data analysis it was chosen to plot the Pressure Coefficient. Each MEXICO trial lasted approximately 5 seconds. yawed flow. 34 . and to compute this quantity the pressure registered by each sensor is divided by the maximum pressured measured over the airfoil. C p i= p i pmax (3. for each of the instrumented spanwise sections of the MEXICO rotor blades. The data in these files has already been calibrated for the drift in pressure sensors. p stag≥ p max . i. the results have been averaged over the azimuth.1) Data Processing This section will only consider the pressure measurements from the MEXICO experiment.

3 . moderate and high wind tunnel velocities.3 Yaw Angle (deg) 0 0 0 0 0 0 Table 3.Preliminary Analysis of MEXICO Pressure Data Selected Data With the intention of covering a wide range of flow conditions.2) Results and Discussion The MEXICO data obtained for each of the spanwise positions are now shown and discussed. and the results at different rotational speeds are plotted in different figures.4.2. 77 (60% span) and 111 (82% span). as indicated in [29]. 3.2.3 .5 424. 74 and 110 have not been included in the plots.p.5 15 24 10 15 24 Rotational Speed (r. it was chosen to plot the pressure coefficient distributions. 35 .5 324.5 424. at all spanwise stations.2. corresponding respectively to signals 53.m) 324.3 .3 . considering 6 different trials with distinct governing parameters.5 424.2. since. The selected trials were chosen to be representative of both low and high rotational speeds.Data points considered in the preliminary data analysis A remark should be made that sensors 51 (25% span).2. these were not properly functioning when the experiment was carried out.1 .3 .5 324. and are displayed in the table below: Trial Nr 84 63 78 92 99 135 Wind Speed (m/s) 7.5 Pitch (deg) . at low.1.

Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment 25% Span Figure 3.2 2: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424.5 rpm) at the 25% spanwise station Figure 3. except for this pressure sensor where one can always observe kinks. At the highest rotational speed one can witness that the pressure distribution is more coherent. since unexpected peaks take place. This is to be expected since.5 rpm) at the 25% spanwise station Minding the figures above one can see that at this spanwise location the distribution of the pressure coefficient on the upper surface is somewhat odd. 36 . as mentioned before. Specifically regarding the lower surface pressure distribution it is possible to see that in every case the pressure sensor located around 35% of the chord seems to be off. especially when the low rotational speed case is considered. one also sees that this airfoil section will experience a larger lift coefficient at higher wind speeds. increasing wind speeds increase the local angle of attack. In fact. the C p curve in the lower surface follows the expected distribution. indicated by the greater gap between the upper and lower surface pressure distribution.2 1: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324.

2 5: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424. As for the highest rotational speed cases. on the upper surface and near the leading edge there is often a small kink.5 rpm) at the 60% spanwise station 37 . the C p distribution are very atypical.Preliminary Analysis of MEXICO Pressure Data 35% Span Figure 3. which can probably be related with the transition device placed at the 5% chord. Consequentially one is led to believe that in these trials there was probably some kind of sensor malfunction in this region of the airfoil. Unexpected large amplitude oscillations are observable.5 rpm) at the 35% spanwise station From the figures above it is clear that for the 35% spanwise section the C p chordwise distributions obtained at low rotational speed are coherent.2 4: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424.2 3: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324. locally decreasing the suction force. as already indicated in [26]. which are not attributable to common aerodynamic phenomenon. 60% Span Figure 3. One should notice that at high wind speeds.2 6: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324. on the upper surface and approaching the trailing edge.5 rpm) at the 35% spanwise station Figure 3.5 rpm) at the 60% spanwise station Figure 3.

which means a larger normal force is produced. and at both high and low rotational speeds. Smooth curves were obtained.5 rpm) at the 82% spanwise station Figure 3. One can also see that for the highest wind speeds the pressure coefficient curve on the upper surface becomes constant near the trailing edge. which is indicative of stall.2 7: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324. 82% Span Figure 3. Still. one can see a small localized suction drop near the leading edge in figure 23.5 rpm) at the 82% spanwise station At the 82% spanwise section all the pressure coefficient's distributions yield quite smooth curves. probably caused by the transition device placed in that region.2 8: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424. One can clearly witness that as the wind speed (and hence angle of attack) increases the distance between the upper and lower surface's pressure coefficient increases as well. 38 . both for the upper and lower surface. following the expected trends.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment In the figures above it is clear that for this spanwise section the distribution of the pressure coefficient over the chord follows the usual trends.

near the trailing edge and for the high rotational speed cases there are very atypical peaks in the C p distribution. and since at this radial stations the C p distributions are often very odd. For the 35% spanwise station the lower surface pressure distribution seems to be according to what was expected. it appears that the transition device may be causing a localized drop in suction. Only if smooth. For the 60%. 82% and 92% spanwise stations the distributions of the pressure coefficient are coherent and yield smooth curves.2 9: Cp distribution with chord in the low rotational speed cases (324. but not in every trial. one can conclude the following: • For the 25% spanwise station.2 10: Cp distribution with chord in the high rotational speed cases (424. at the upper surface. Having this in mind.5 rpm) at the 92% spanwise station As can be seen in the figures above. 39 • • • . located approximately at the 35% chord position. Consequentially it will not be included in posterior computations of the aerodynamic forces on the blade. it is recommended to check the distribution for any given trial. and thus. However.5 rpm) at the 92% spanwise station Figure 3. should be reliable to compute aerodynamic forces from. with smooth curves and following the expected trends. the distribution of the pressure coefficients at this radial coordinate is identical to what was found for the 82% span. one can see there is a pressure sensor yielding a 'kink' in all considered trials.Preliminary Analysis of MEXICO Pressure Data 92% Span Figure 3. In some trials and for some spanwise sections. As for the pressure distribution obtained in the lower surface of the airfoil. 'regular' curves are obtained one should compute the aerodynamic forces. 3. in principle.3) Conclusions and Recommendations Analysing the data displayed above. These irregularities seem to indicate there was some sensor malfunctioning at this region of the airfoil. the data often yields an unusual C p distribution over the upper surface of the airfoil section. in the upper surface.

[31]. which is illustrated below: 40 . As hinted by its designation. This method assumes that there is no radial interaction between the flow through adjacent annuli. 4. In section 4. this approach states that the forces acting on the blades are responsible for the loss of momentum of the air which passes through the area swept by the rotor. The results obtained are then shown and discussed in section 4. The other approach is referred to as “Empirical BEM” since it uses an empirical model for the axial induced velocities from Schepers et al. which is only true if the induction factor does not vary radially. this method combines both the blade element approach and the balance of momentum of the air inside the stream tube which contains the wind turbine's rotor.3 both implemented BEM models are introduced.5 and finally section 4. and in section 4.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment 4) Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes A comparative study will now be performed between two distinct Blade Element-Momentum (BEM) codes and the pressure measurements from the MEXICO obtained at yawed flow conditions. One of the calculation methods is termed “Classical BEM” and is based on the algorithm suggested in [18]. The objective of this chapter is thus to test these calculation methods so that posteriorly the DS model is included in the computation. Described simply. it was mainly adapted from the previous work of Micallef et al. [30].6 states the conclusions drawn.1) The Blade Element-Momentum Method A BEM approach is very often used for predicting aerodynamic loads on wind turbine blades.4 the MEXICO data used for the validation is addressed. This chapter starts be giving a general description of the BEM method and justifying why it was used in this assignment. To compute the airloads an iterative procedure is used.

in the wind turbine environment the local velocity greatly varies when different rotor positions are considered. the angle of attack is then calculated. since the blades indeed “slow down” the incoming wind. [32] used an inverse free wake code to compute the local angles of attack throughout the rotor of the MEXICO. First of all it is necessary to understand exactly what 'angle of attack' signifies. and 41 . From this circulation.1 1: BEM method Calculation Procedure One should bear in mind that only a very brief description of the BEM method was given above. Particularly in yawed conditions this fact makes the 'angle of attack' concept rather unclear. θ(r) Iterate induction factor until convergence is obtained Calculate aerodynamic forces in each Blade Element. and not directly on the stream velocity. it is possible to compute the angle of attack at different spanwise stations and azimuthal positions of a wind turbine using both BEM and lifting-line codes. As discussed before. i. much more detailed explanation can be found in several references of wind turbine aerodynamics. rotational speed. and twist radial distribution.5  U 2 A Use momentum theory to compute the new induction factor from the thrust coefficient. a Compute α at each Blade Element. CT= T 0. and the thrust coefficient. In his work. 4. The incidence angle at each spanwise section will thus depend on the local velocities at the rotor plane.2) Why use the BEM method? One of the main goals of this master thesis is to assess the performance of a DS model in the prediction of the loads wind turbines under yawed flow conditions will experience. Micallef et al. what should be the bound circulation such that the Kutta-condition is met with. usually semi-empirical dynamic stall models require the angle of attack history as an input. and considering the influence of bound. Inverse free wake codes use loads as input..Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes Assume induction factor. Ω. such as [18]. C l= f  with = f t  . locally. C T =4 a 1−a Figure 4. from airfoil 2D static characteristics C l  and C d  Sum the forces at each Blade Element and obtain the total thrust. based on wind velocity. However. traditionally the 'angle of attack' is defined as the angle which an airfoil's chord makes with the stream velocity. Still. U.e. shed and trailed vortices they compute.

This allows the instantaneous loads to be calculated considering the angle of attack history. Based upon how it is defined. and are normally used to improve the aerodynamic modelling performance when calculating unsteady loads arising from a step in the blade's pitch or rotor's angular speed.2) . Before addressing the models though. instead of using the static airfoil characteristics. in -x direction defined in figure 2.2 2.3) Description of the BEM models considered The two Blade Element-Momentum models are now considered. this local axial induced velocity is given by: u=U Wind cos  a (4. However such a model will not be introduced in the present implementation. u. as an input to DS models is not expected to yield good predictions of the aerodynamic loads. The direction of the stream velocity is well defined in wind tunnel testing where most of the data used to derive the semi-empirical dynamic stall models was taken from. The DS model will posteriorly be implemented inside the BEM code. This quantity is assumed to be positive in the direction opposite to the wind speed. This model assumes the axial induced velocity to be given by: u=u avg 1K  F  sin 42 (4. and will be referred to as 'Classical BEM' and 'Empirical BEM'. and was mainly adapted from the previous work of Micallef et al. Naturally. computed with an inverse free wake method. One should notice that BEM codes often incorporate a dynamic inflow model. [30].e. where the angle of attack is usually taken as the angle the airfoil's chord is instantly at with the stream velocity. which is introduced because the stream tube velocities do not adapt instantaneously to a change in blade loading. Thus it is understood that using the angle of attack history.3. the local velocity at the airfoil will be influenced by it. i. since we are indeed in presence of two different ways to tackle and simulate the problem at hands. it is important to notice that both approaches prescribe a radial and azimuthal distribution for the axial induced velocity. let us call this quantity the 'circulatory' angle of attack. and the bound circulation necessary to meet the Kutta condition will be associated with an instantaneous 'circulatory' angle of attack which is different from the usually taken 'geometric' angle of attack. if there is some shed vorticity in wind tunnel tests.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment based on its method of computation. leaving no room for ambiguity. α=f(t).1) Classical BEM This designation refers to the algorithm for BEM method code in the presence of yaw-misalignment suggested in [18]. In case yaw-misalignment is present. let us call this value the 'geometric' angle of attack. Such models act to damp the variation of the induction factors. 4. DS models are generally based on wind tunnel measurements. However.3. α=f(t).

and the azimuthal variations can be found by using the thrust and torque gradients. Once the iterating procedure of the BEM method is finished.cos C d .3. P 1 . which means that the tip-loss was not taken into account. 43 . using vortex cylinder theory for the thrust forces. [31] of the axially induced velocities in a yawed flow wind turbine. P 2 are functions of the relative radius.4) A1 . at each spanwise section. In this model the flow expansion is assumed to follow the simple model of Oye. and the wake rotation is computed considering the influence of a single vortex being trailed from the centre of rotation. cos  (4. one wishes to derive the force coefficients in the direction normal and tangential to the airfoil chord. These coefficients are derived from the computed lift and drag coefficients. A2 . and that measurements only covered spanwise stations up to 80%. it was derived from a wind tunnel experiment performed at TUDelft. These quantities are required because one can thus compare the results directly with the MEXICO measurements. using also the calculated angles of attack. according to he system of equations: C n=C l . of the azimuth angle and of the empirically where derived constants. The tip and root loss are taken into account using the Prandtl/Glauert correction. sin−C d . It should be noted that this empirical model of the axial induction velocities was derived only for the design condition of the wind turbine. Once the azimuthally averaged inductions are computed this model calculates the load variations. the induced axial velocities are given by: u=u avg 1− A1 cos −P 1 −A2 cos 2 −P 2  (4.3) Empirical BEM Axial Induction Velocities This method of computation uses the empirical model from Schepers et al. and computes both azimuthally averaged axial and tangential induction factors. sin C tg =C l . For positions closer to the tip the results were simply extrapolated from the azimuthally averaged induction.3.Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes where: •K is a function of the wake shape •χ represents the wake skew angle •F is a flow expansion function •µ represents the fraction radius. A more detailed description is given in [30] and [18]. where the velocity distribution was measured at several spanwise and azimuthal positions and fit with a second harmonic Fourier series. r R This codes iterates the induction factors at each radial position by averaging over the azimuth. According to this model.

cos  . Comparison with measurements has shown this empirical solution performs very often better than other models. this means that in this approach the induced tangential velocities are neglected.3. having been used to compute the expected yawing and flatwise moments in a yaw-misaligned wind turbine.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment As explained in [31]. and using C l vs  and C d vs functions. according to: g=exp [−0.U Wind . which takes the form: C r =F 1 C n n The correction factor is given by and C r =F 1 C tg tg (4. the thrust coefficient in a yaw-misaligned configuration is computed with: CT = 0. A 2 (4. [33]. which can be derived from geometric considerations.3. static From the inplane and axial velocities. Finally. the forces on each blade element are calculated. [30]. it was chosen to use azimuthal increment of 10 degrees and 15 elements in the spanwise direction. However it is not expected that this will greatly affect the force's calculation since the magnitude of the tangential induced velocities is very small when compared with the velocities due to the blade's rotation. so that a valid comparison could be performed. and tip-speed ratio.7) The total thrust is then obtained by integrating over the span and summing the contribution of all blades. Discretization Parameters The same level of discretization was imposed in both BEM codes.8) And the average axial induction coefficient is iterated using momentum theory according to: C T =4 a avg 1−a avg  (4. To account for the tip loss effects.3. Following the recommendations from Micallef et al. this model uses the correction suggested by Shen et al.3.125 B−21 ]0. and never worse.5  . this empirical model has been previously extensively validated.1 (4.6) where g is an empirically derived function of the number of blades.9) Once the process converges. the normal and tangential force coefficients are computed in an identical way as in the 'Classical' BEM method. 'Empirical BEM' Implementation Now regarding the BEM model implemented.3.5) F 1= 2 B R−r  cos−1 exp −g  2Rsin  [  T ] (4. λ. B. 44 . the angle of attack at each spanwise position is derived. the inplane velocities simply consider the skewed inflow.

Since the BEM codes under consideration use static C l vs  functions. this is justified by the fact that at low wind speeds it is likely that the turbine is working in the turbulent wake state.5 Pitch Angle (deg) -2. which means that the trailed vortices will have a major influence in the flow field and consequentially in the observed loading.3 -2.Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes The convergence of the BEM code including the DS model will posteriorly be assessed. at all spanwise sections.5 424. the following data points will be considered in this validation: Trial Nr 158 151 165 159 152 166 Wind Speed (m/s) 15 15 15 18 18 18 Rotational Speed (r.5 424. which is expected to occur at high wind speeds.1 . Consequentially the accurate computation of these induction factors becomes less important in the prediction of the unsteady loads the wind turbine blades will experience. As mentioned before. a preliminary visual inspection of the chordwise pressure distribution was conducted on the MEXICO data points. When high wind speeds are considered the airfoil is expected to stall.5 424.4. The table below shows the outcome of this procedure: 45 .3 -2.3 -2. BEM codes iterate on the induction factors. Minding the discussion above. Bearing in mind that the goal is to use the BEM codes to simulate dynamic stall.3 -2. 4. Finally. i. at low tip speed ratios. and as discussed before this stall will have a dynamic nature.e. at least in some portion of the blades.3 Yaw Angle (deg) 15 30 45 15 30 45 Table 4.4) MEXICO data used for validation It is important to state that the BEM models will be validated against MEXICO measurements obtained at relatively high wind speeds. it is understandable that the validation at low wind speeds is not very relevant. but since these factors will have a smaller magnitude their contribution to the angle of attack 'seen' by the blade will also be small compared to the geometric effect.p. it is not expectable that good agreement is found between calculations and measurements at these high wind speeds.5 424. one should also keep in mind that at high wind speeds. which means that the advance/retreating blade effect will be dominant. the induction factors will have a smaller magnitude [18].3 -2.MEXICO data points considered in the BEM codes' validation Following the recommendations issued in the previous chapter.m) 424.5 424. and so it makes little sense to compare such results.

according to C n .e. the tangential force coefficient will very approximately match the drag force coefficient. yielding the normal and tangential forces. When small angles of attack are considered.P max . Interp and C tg . MEXICO = F tg . A cubic interpolation of the pressure measured by each sensor was performed over the airfoil surface.4. According to [25]. for the airfoil sections used in the MEXICO's blades and at similar Reynolds numbers.4.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment Trial Nr 158 151 165 159 152 166 25% Span Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted 35% Span Accepted Accepted Accepted Rejected Rejected Accepted 60% Span Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted 82% Span Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted 92% Span Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Table 4.P max .1) Following this approach the computed force coefficients are expected to yield results which are accurate enough to compare models against. and are taken as a reference to compute the associated error. 46 . and thus the maximum pressure in the denominator should be multiplied by the local chord of the airfoil. To obtain the force coefficients5. Interp c.MEXICO = F n . taken as the maximum of the cubic interpolation of the pressure sensors. per meter span.2: Preliminary analysis of the yawed flow trials Derivation of the experimental aerodynamic coefficients The aerodynamic force coefficients C n and C tg of the MEXICO will be plotted for comparison with the BEM methods implemented. Consequentially one can have an idea of the viscous contribution to the tangential force by computing the difference between the total and pressure drag. i. the computed forces were divided by the maximum pressure occurring over the airfoil. Consequentially it is necessary to explain how the experimental coefficients were obtained from the MEXICO data. Viscous Contribution It should also be stated that simply by integrating the pressure distribution over the airfoil and considering the chordwise force component one is not computing the actual tangential force. This pressure distribution was integrated over a cubic interpolation of the airfoil surface. Interp c. wind tunnel 2D tests show that: 5 These are section force coefficients. since obviously there is also a viscous contribution. Interp (4.

and has a minimum at approximately 180 degrees.4.5 2: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 25% spanwise station Regarding the general variation of the experimental normal force coefficient with the azimuth angle.2) The magnitude of this contribution is not very large.01 (4. Pres0. and considering a yaw misalignment of 30 degrees. 25% Spanwise Figure 4.5 1: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 25% spanwise station Figure 4.Visc =C d . This variation is consistent with a strong advance/retreating blade effect. Since one is mainly interested in analysing large angle of attack situations.Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes C d . both from MEXICO data and using the BEM methods addressed.Tot −C d . and consequentially reduced shear stresses to occur at the airfoil's surface. which was to be expected given the inboard position of the considered section. 4. The results obtained are shown for all spanwise stations. and also since it was not measured in the MEXICO and would be intricate to determine. at which one expects to encounter predominantly attached flow regimes. 47 . the viscous contribution will not be taken into account in this assignment.5) Results and Discussion The normal and tangential force coefficients' variation with the azimuth angle will now be plotted. This means that the viscous contribution to the tangential force will not be significant when compared to the contribution of the pressure forces. the figures above show that this quantity peaks at the 0 degrees position. The wind tunnel speeds considered are 15 and 18 m/s. In this case one expects smaller boundary layer velocities. but it is significant especially for the thinner airfoils where pressure drag is of less importance. However if large angles of attack are imposed it is likely that some flow separation takes place.

However. results indicate that the empirical model captures the experimental trend better than the classical method. and consequentially one understands that both models underpredict the actual aerodynamic loads at these azimuthal positions. 48 .5 5 one also notices that all force coefficients from experimental data have larger magnitudes in the larger wind tunnel speed case. and consequentially so does the magnitude of the aerodynamic loading. This is not surprising since with increasing wind speed the angle of attack is expected to increase. One may say this improved performance is observable both for the normal and tangential force coefficients. 35% Spanwise Figure 4. The figure above shows similarities with the results obtained at the 25% spanwise station.4. it is clear that both BEM methods fail to predict the large experimental normal force coefficient values taking place at azimuth angles in the region of 0 degrees. and so only the lower wind tunnel speed case is shown. at this spanwise station the data point with a wind tunnel speed of 18 m/s and a yaw-misalignment of 30 degrees was rejected. according to [20].2. according to table 4. and given the geometry of the problem. where one expects a smaller angle of attack and consequentially no rotational augmentation. Now addressing the implemented models' performance.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment Minding figures 4. the implemented methods use 2D lift and drag coefficient characteristics. Specifically comparing the implemented models. This is observable at azimuthal positions near 180 degrees. and separation is likely to be delayed. Rotational augmentation is expected to also be important in this section. at an azimuthal position of 0 degrees one expects the greatest values of local angles of attack to occur. and consequentially the magnitudes of the normal force coefficient are once again underpredicted by the implemented models. Now comparing both computational approaches. Also because of its spanwise location strong rotational augmentation should be present. and as mentioned before.5 1 and 4.5 3: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 35% spanwise station Firstly it is necessary to mention that. Because this is an inboard section. the empirical BEM method seems to capture the aerodynamic loading trend better than the classical BEM model at this spanwise station.

Comparing both methods of calculation the results from empirical BEM show better agreement with the MEXICO data. one can notice that the minimum value of the normal force coefficient is shifted towards the 90 degrees position.5 5: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 60% spanwise station Figure 4. 82% Spanwise Figure 4. this can be seen at the two considered wind tunnel speeds and both for the tangential and normal force coefficients. and that the maximum is shifted towards 270 degrees azimuth. and 49 . This behaviour can be understood since this is an outboard section of the blade.5 6: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 82% spanwise station At this spanwise station the normal force coefficient variation with azimuth angle is qualitatively different from the sections analysed up to this moment. As for the classical BEM method.5 7: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 82% spanwise station Figure 4. specially at the lower wind speed case. it leads to a significant overprediction of the aerodynamic loading magnitude in the considered cases.Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes 60% Spanwise Figure 4. and so one understands that the implemented models are able to predict the aerodynamic loading trends more accurately than at the inboard stations.5 4: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60% spanwise station At this spanwise section one expects very little rotational augmentation.

For the latter model.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment consequentially at low wind tunnel speeds the skewed wake effect will have a significant influence.5 9: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 92% spanwise station The results show that at this spanwise position the variation of the experimental force coefficients with the azimuth angle is similar to what was obtained for the 82% spanwise position.5 8: BEM models comparison for U=15 m/s at 92% spanwise station Figure 4. However. since the normal force coefficient values are underpredicted. this was expected since the skewed wake effect should also have a strong influence at the current spanwise coordinate. 50 . overpredictions of the force coefficients were obtained in the considered data points. the results show that the empirical BEM model has a better agreement with the MEXICO data at the considered wind tunnel speeds and both for normal and tangential force coefficients. this method performs at least equally as well as the classical BEM approach. considering a spanwise station of 60% and a wind tunnel speed of 18 m/s. Regarding the implemented calculation methods. To assess the influence of this quantity. data points with yaw angles of 15 and 45 degrees are now analysed. the classical BEM predicts significant larger magnitudes of the force coefficients than experimentally measured. the tip-correction introduced in the empirical BEM model appears to be excessive. still. one expects to tip-effects to be present. Since this is the most outboard blade section which was instrumented in the MEXICO blades. 92% Spanwise Figure 4. Similarly to the results from the 60% spanwise station. and similarly to the other spanwise stations. Influence of the Yaw angle All results shown before were obtained with a “representative” yaw-misalignment angle of 30 degrees.

5 10: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60% spanwise station and yaw angle of 45 deg When considering the smaller yaw angle one can see that the experimental force coefficients will have a larger magnitude but a smaller amplitude of variation with the azimuthal position. For each of the wind tunnel speeds.Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes Figure 4. The uncertainties associated with the chordwise forces are not addressed since these are expected to be of much smaller magnitude.3 which is shown again for convenience: =atan  [U Wind cos ]1−a [r −U Wind sin  cos ]1a ´   Minding the expression one can see that if the yaw-misalignment is decreased. the figures above indicate that the empirical BEM method yields a better agreement with experimental data. As for the performance of the implemented models. assuming the MEXICO data to be the exact solution. the average relative error in the normal force coefficient was computed for both the empirical and the classical BEM models. As for the classical BEM method. the numerator will increase. expressed by equation 2. when considering different yaw-misalignment angles. and similarly to what was obtained before for other data points. the results were averaged 51 . The magnitude of the error was calculated by averaging the relative error of each model over the azimuth. it seems there is an overprediction of the force coefficients. This will bring about larger magnitudes of the force coefficients. and consequentially the inflow angle and the angle of attack will increase. and also since some of the dynamic stall models previously considered do not include chordwise loading computation. On the other hand. Quantitative Comparison With the objective of quantitatively assessing the performance of the implemented calculation methods. if the yaw angle increases. These trends can be understood by considering the geometric effect of skewed inflow. Thus the variation of the magnitude of the force coefficients over a revolution will also become greater.5 11: BEM models comparison for U=18 m/s at 60% spanwise station and yaw angle of 15 deg Figure 4.2. it is clear that the term associated with the azimuthal position will increase. it is clear in the figure above that the magnitude of the experimental force coefficients is decreased. while the amplitude of azimuthal variation is increased. As for the larger yawmisalignment.

5.5.4 18.2 82% span 20. ={15 .3 82% span 19. at both wind tunnel speeds and all spanwise stations.9 92% span 18. this is particularly noticeable at the higher wind speed trials. MEXICO  . 45 } deg (4. 30 .7 6. since both implemented BEM models fail to predict the experimental loading at the inboard sections. ModelC 3  =1 n . one can see that for the sections where rotational augmentation is negligible.6 35% span 18.2 Table 4. At spanwise sections where rotational effects are not significant. which had already been noticed in the azimuthal plots and is believed to be due to the unaccounted rotational augmentation. The tables also show that the relative errors are larger at the more inboard stations. 4.4.6 13.1 14.9 9. MEXICO ∣ ∣C 1 1 ∑ 360 ∑ n .7 9.6 8. the average relative error in the normal force coefficient is approximately 10%. using the data points from table 4.1 .1 92% span 16.3 12. generally the BEM models are able to 52 .6) Conclusions and Recommendations From the discussion above.2.1 60% span 13.Average Normal Force coefficient relative error for U=18 m/s Analysing the tables above it is clear that the empirical BEM method performs better than the classical model.5 60% span 23. As for the magnitude of the expected uncertainty in the empirical BEM model.8 21. one can draw the following conclusions: • • It is necessary to implement a correction on the aerodynamic force coefficients to account for rotational augmentation.9 14.5.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment over every yaw angle. The expression used to compute the average relative error in the normal force coefficient at each spanwise station and wind tunnel speed is thus: 360 −C n .5 Table 4.Average Normal Force coefficient relative error for U=15 m/s And for the 18 m/s case: Avg Rel Error ( % ) Classical BEM Empirical BEM 25% span 25.1) For the wind tunnel speed of 15 m/s the following results were obtained: Avg Rel Error ( % ) Classical BEM Empirical BEM 25% span 30.1 35% span 16.2 .

for the highest considered wind speed case it is approximately 10 %. Better results were found for all spanwise stations and data points considered. In all considered data points the classical BEM method overpredicts the aerodynamic loading.Development and Validation of Blade Element-Momentum codes capture the observed experimental trends. • Comparing the performance of both implemented methods. Reasonable agreement is found for the different wind tunnel speeds and yaw angles considered. and consequentially the empirical model should be preferred when implementing the DS model. as the advance/retreating blade effect becomes more important and the induced velocities smaller. Regarding the magnitude of the expected error in the empirical BEM method at outboard spanwise sections. clearly the empirical BEM model yields more accurate load predictions than the classical method. such as [26]. Still this value is expected to decrease with increasing wind speeds. which is consistent with what was found in previous comparisons of MEXICO data with BEM models. • • 53 .

Consequentially. This chapter starts by presenting a qualitative discussion on the DS models used in the HAWT framework. 5. and section 5.7. and also since there were other objectives set for this assignment. ECN's model is 54 . The experimental data used for validation of the implemented model is mentioned in section 5.2 the assumption of incompressibility is verified.5 puts forward two different approaches to denote LE separation. [23] The methods indicated above are ordered from top to bottom with increasing complexity. and its implementation is discussed.e. and in section 5. initially it was thought that such an analysis could be conducted in this master thesis. It is thus the objective of this chapter to describe the implementation and to verify the DS model. together with some recommendations. Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model It has been previously explained that the DS model needs to be included in the BEM iteration loop. Section 5.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment 5) Selection. it is good practice to firstly be certain that the DS model is properly implemented before introducing it in the BEM code. [19] Beddoes-Leishman [16] Sheng et al.4 addresses the influence of thick airfoils on the BL DS model. When thinking of modelling DS in a wind turbine environment. and then the results obtained are shown and discussed in section 5. In section 5. it is this author’s opinion that the following methods should be considered:     ECN's 1st order model [21] Larsen et al.1) The choice of a Dynamic Stall Model Ideally one would prefer to implement various DS models and compare their load prediction performance with the results from the MEXICO. In section 5. it was chosen to analyse the load prediction capability of a single DS model in a yaw-misaligned wind turbine. so that the unsteady effects can be simulated and the calculated loads compared with the MEXICO results. i.9 the conclusions drawn in this chapter are presented. but soon it was clear that implementing and validating a DS load prediction model alone required a considerable amount of time. and based on the literature study conducted.3 the Beddoes-Leishman (BL) DS model is thoroughly described. Finally in section 5.6 the values used in the empirical constants of the DS model are discussed. However.8. and selecting the model for implementation.

since one is in presence of small magnitude velocities. the main goal of this master thesis research is to simulate the aerodynamics of a wind turbine in a yawed configuration. in other words. in the implementation of the dynamic stall model incompressibility was assumed. at least to some degree. On the other hand. 55 . however. and so it is clear that also within the cases considered in the MEXICO the compressibility of air is negligible. it would be preferable to implement a DS model which simulates. and also since the method is widely used in commercial applications.2) The Assumption of Incompressibility It is important to mention that in the scope of Wind Engineering the compressibility of air is usually neglected. 25  30 2≈104 m/s  2 (5. while keeping the amount of empirical “tuning” parameters to a reasonably simple degree. 4×2.1) The speed of sound in dry air at 15º C and atmospheric pressure is approximately a air ≈343 m / s . Naturally. and in the following sections the equations presented implicitly assume that condition. one would ideally opt by a model which entails more than a simple re-synthesis of experimental data. which is far more complicated than the one the DS models were derived with. Being so. it was chosen to implement the Beddoes-Leishman DS model. Because of this. consequentially several of the constants introduced in these models rely on some “empirical feel” of the unsteady physical phenomena taking place during pitching or heaving oscillations. and for further details the indicated references can be consulted. in the MEXICO project the highest rotational speed trials were carried out with Ω=44.Selection. since V eff MAX a air /3 . it is understandable that a very complex DS load prediction method might not perform well when compared with the MEXICO results. From the discussion above. 5. Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model the least complicated approach while the method of Sheng et al is the most complex. However. the main goal is to obtain a better level of agreement with experimental results than simpler methods can provide. a brief qualitative description of each model was given previously. when increasing the degree of complexity of a given model. resulting in a maximum local speed at the tip of V eff MAX =  44. one must always keep in mind what is the scope of application of the model. the physical phenomena of unsteady airfoil aerodynamics.4 rad/s and the largest tunnel speed tested was 30 m/s.2. The DS load prediction methods mentioned above have been created based on the interpretation of 2D airfoil wind tunnel test data. One can thus expect the unsteady airfoil aerodynamic physical phenomena to be simulated.

α(t). which are given by the set of equations: 56 . that the flow is imposing on the airfoil. Finally. the vortex lift module is used. the circulatory loading is related with the vorticity. Beddoes and Leishman managed to split it in modules.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment 5. as mentioned in [16]. instantaneous normal force coefficient on the airfoil. n =C N α Eq . according to [16] C N . the delayed response with respect to the steady case is introduced with the deficiency functions. the unsteady attached force coefficients are computed. and it builds up quickly to the steady state value. with the vortex time variable as input.1) where n denotes the current sample. the circulatory normal force arising from an accumulating series of step inputs in the angle of attack can be obtained using an equivalent angle of attack. and the outcome is added to the result from the trailing edge separation module to yield the total. and so this module uses the normal force coefficient including the pressure lag (not the viscous lag) to compute the vortex time. as input. • • Each module will now be addressed more thoroughly. The force coefficients are thus recalculated incorporating the effects of the unsteady trailing edge separation point. n =C N  n− X n−Y n  α α C (5. Circulatory Component As indicated by the name.3) The Model Explained Even though the various phenomena involved in the dynamic stall process are intrinsically related. circulatory and impulsive. The unsteady loads are thus computed by considering each module sequentially. both bound and shed. clearly. this last variable keeps track of the time from which the leading edge pressure vortex is detached. These coefficients are then used as input in the trailing edge separation module. X n and Y n . Attached Flow Module The approach used to determine the instantaneous loads when there is no separated flow formulates the problem in terms of a superposition of indicial aerodynamic responses. and in this module each of these contributions will be considered separately. In unsteady attached flow the aerodynamic forces acting on an airfoil can be divided in two components. The criterion to determine whether leading edge separation has occurred is based on a critical pressure. where both the peak pressure lag and the boundary layer lag are included.3. and the expressions used and assumptions made will be explained. in the following manner: • • In the attached flow module. and using the AOA history.

it is necessary to model the trailing edge separated flow in steady conditions.2) where ΔS is the distance travelled by the airfoil in semi-chords over a sample interval Δt .5) Trailing Edge Separation Module Even though dynamic stall necessarily encompasses stall delay and vorticity build up near the leading edge with consequent vortex detachment. In this case the deficiency function is given by: D n =D n−1 exp   Δα n −Δα n−1 −Δt −Δt  exp K αT I Δt 2K α T I (5. and where Δ α n is the corresponding change in the angle of attack over the time interval. there is evidence that trailing edge separation may play a significant role on the onset of dynamic stall [16]. The magnitude of the impulsive normal force can be obtained with [16] : C IN . which quickly tends to vanish. will also become a constant. For this reason it is considered in the present model.3.3) Where V eff is the effective velocity the airfoil is working at and c represents the airfoil chord. The coefficients A1. in a given time instant.6. in terms of the exponential function.3.3.3. Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model X n =X n−1 exp −b1 ΔS  +A1 Δαn exp  −b 1 ΔS /2  Y n =Y n−1 exp −b 2 ΔS  +A2 Δα n exp −b2 ΔS /2  (5. Firstly. Impulsive Component Whenever an airfoil undergoes a rapid motion there will be an initial non-circulatory loading. n +C C . the total normal force coefficient. which can be done by using Kirchhoff theory according to: 57 . is given by: C P .6. and where the factor K α is a function of the Mach number which. n = Δαn 3c − Dn V eff Δt      (5.1. When the contribution of the deficiency functions is included all the information of the previously shed wake's effects on the airloads is taken into account. n N N N (5. for attached flow.4) where T I =c/ a is the non-circulatory time constant. n =C I . according to piston theory [34].Selection. b1 . caused by local pressure variations. with the value indicated in table 5. their values are given in [16] and shown in table 5.1 in section 5. Once both the circulatory and impulsive contributions have been calculated.b 2 are constants which come from the empirical approximation to the indicial response.6. given the assumption of incompressibility. A2.

3. By inverting the expression above and using the airfoil's static characteristic.6) where f is the dimensionless suction side separation point.2 in section 5. it is now possible to compute the effective separation point f n =f  α f ' . according to f '' =f 'n −D f n . computed with αf . n−1 exp N N TP 2T P    (5.9) where C N 0 is the normal force coefficient obtained when the angle of attack is zero. With this effective angle of attack and using the static separation point characteristic described above. The value used in this assignment is given in table 5. n −C P .n  (5.n (5.3.3. it is possible to derive the value of the separation point as a function of the angle of attack.6. and the unsteady effects can be represented by applying a first order lag to the separation point.3. it is possible to define yet another effective angle of attack. together with a brief discussion justifying its choice.n  t = C 'N . which for a discretely sampled system is written as: C N . Once the unsteady pressure response is incorporated. n =D P . n where the deficiency function is computed with ' (5. n −C N CN α 0 (5. it appears that this parameter is largely independent of the airfoil shape [16].10) As previously mentioned. seen from the leading edge. which yields the same leading edge pressure as for the equivalent quasi-steady case.3. the boundary layer's response is also not instantaneous.7) D P . n =C N . n −D P .6.8) The time constant T P is a function of the Mach number and is usually determined from unsteady airfoil data.3. obtaining f (α). Consequentially a time lag is introduced in the normal force coefficient to produce a substitute value. meaning that f=1 when the flow is fully attached and f = 0 when the flow is completely separated. and given the narrow range of relevant Mach numbers it will be assumed constant in all considered cases. n−1 exp   −ΔS −ΔS  C P .3.11) where in this case the deficiency function is computed with D f =D f exp n n −1   −ΔS −ΔS  f 'n − f 'n−1  exp Tf 2T f 58   (5. For unsteady conditions there will be a delay in the leading edge pressure response with respect to the normal force coefficient derived in the attached flow module.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment C N =C N α  1  f 2  2 α (5.12) .

Since leading edge pressures are related to the normal force coefficient. n−1  dt .13) Leading Edge Separation According to [16]. In practice this critical value of the normal coefficient can be obtained from the airfoil's static characteristic by taking the C n value at the angle of attack that corresponds to the break in the pitching moment. it is very important to keep track of the position of this concentrated vorticity since it has a great impact on the total normal force acting on the airfoil.14) As indicated above. this vortex time will only be incremented if critical conditions have been met. which was confirmed to be valid also for unsteady conditions in [13]. 45 . it is however possible to mark the onset of static leading edge separation through a critical leading edge pressure criterion. n = τv . n >C N . I .2. n =C N f α  1  f '' n α Eq . Since the criterion used to define whether leading edge separation has occurred is based on a critical pressure. Naturally. Naturally. and the 0.if C'N .3. In the present model this tracking is accomplished by storing a non-dimensional vortex time parameter. C n . over a periodic angle of attack excitation there may be a vortex build up and separation with every oscillation. this choice is understandable since when leading edge separation occurs there will necessarily be centre of pressure movements and consequentially abrupt changes in the pitching moment. the normal force coefficient incorporating both the pressure and viscous lag is computed with the unsteady trailing edge separation point using the Kirchhoff relation at each time instant: C N . with the value indicated in table 5. and consequentially it is necessary to reset the vortex time parameter when the vortex that originated it ceases to have a meaningful contribution.6. it is logical that the unsteady normal coefficient used to assess whether this condition has been reached includes the lag in leading edge pressure response. In general dynamic stall encompasses the formation of a vortex in the leading edge area of the airfoil which subsequently detaches from the surface and is convected downstream.Selection. T f is time constant which should be derived from unsteady airfoil data but it will be assumed constant in all considered cases. defining the conditions under which leading edge separation takes place is the most critical aspect of dynamic stall modelling. This is accomplished by imposing the condition: 59 . I c/2 Eff (5. Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model Like in the pressure lag.3. given previously in expression 5.3. it is possible to operate in the C n domain alone by defining a critical value. V 0 . according to: τ v . which corresponds to the critical pressure for separation onset at the appropriate Mach Number . n +C IN .7. in semi-chords. Finally.45 factor is introduced because experimental tests [16] determined the rate at which the vortex convection occurs to be somewhat less than half of the effective velocity. n 2  2 (5.

by the time the following upstroke starts.17) Now assuming a high reduced frequency k=0.1 is considered. we come to a representative distance travelled by a vortex.18) The contribution of the vortex to the normal force in the airfoil peaks when it is situated just above the trailing edge. n <C N . 45 π k (5. it is possible to witness that even when a high reduced frequency of 0. from the trailing edge. After the concentrated vorticity detaches.19) Where the vortex decay constant was set to T V =6 according to [35]. k. and according to the conditional expression above. 45= 0 .16) In terms of the vortex time parameter and introducing the reduced frequency. we are certain that.15) Assuming an oscillating motion. and consequentially the forces can be described by ignoring the vortex. the contribution of the concentrated vorticity to the normal force coefficient is computed. if there is a leading edge vortex detachment in the oscillation.3. expression 5. We can verify the validity of this assumption by using reference values for the problem we wish to model.1 (in the wind turbine environment) and subtracting the airfoil's length. a time interval of at least half the oscillation period has passed. 45 π −2=12 . Keeping in mind that the vortex lift has a small magnitude when compared to the total lift the airfoil experiences. we come to τ halfstroke= π2V Eff ωc 0 . which may be written as: Δt halfstroke= POSC 2 = 1 2f OSC = π ω OSC (5. I ∧ Δ α n 0 (5. in the semi-chords: ΔS= 0 . n =0 if C N . Vortex Lift Module In this last module. the vortex's contribution to the normal force coefficient will be reduced to approximately 13% of its maximum by the time the following upstroke starts. According to Leishman.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment τ v .132 C N MAX TV (5.3.3.3.1 0 . based on the vortex time parameter introduced previously.1 (5. the development of stall seems to obey a basic common process since qualitatively similar results have been observed as different modes of forcing were imposed 60 . the vortex will then be assumed to have a negligible contribution to the normal force on the airfoil in the upstroke of the movement.3. as long as the vortex remains attached there are no significant changes in the pressure distribution. as long as the critical conditional is not met.15 can be considered valid. From the instant the concentrated vorticity is downstream of the airfoil its contribution to the total normal force coefficient is decaying according to [16] C V =C N MAX exp N V   V −ΔS =0 . Finally.3.

n f V (5. represented by the condition τ v <T vl . n +C N . and the corresponding unsteady nonlinear lift as given by the Kirchhoff approximation: C V .3. It is also important to mention that a restriction was imposed so that the vortex contribution to the total lift may never be negative. i. n−1  Tv 2Tv   if τ v <T vl (5. n =C V .3. This however is a physically meaningless situation.3.2 . is allowed to decay exponentially but may also be updated with a new change in the vortex lift. According to expression 5. n  1−K N .3.22 could become negative.22) which. given in 5.3.otherwise the expression degenerates in 5. One can understand that. the instantaneous total normal coefficient can be obtained by superposition of the unsteady non-linear contribution 5.1.20 this means that the vortex lift would have a negative derivative in time.Selection. In the expression above one should notice that the vortex lift contribution is only to be considered if the concentrated vorticity is located over the airfoil. n−C V . as we can see.e. on the downstroke of the movement the angle of attack will be decreased and consequentially flow reattachment from the trailing edge will take place. Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model [16].19. if there is no leading edge separation.6.13 and the vortex lift term: C N . and was introduced in equation 5. if the critical condition is not reached. in an oscillatory motion.3.3. n =C N . and so it was chosen to apply expression 5. n  N where ( 5. As long as the vortex is situated over the airfoil.3. The value of T vl is given along with the other empirical time constants in table 5. At last.23) 61 .3.19 . This increment is determined by the difference between the instantaneous linearised value of the unsteady circulatory lift. it is assumed that the associated contribution to the normal force coefficient will increase.3.21) Finally. which allows for the exponential decay of the vortex contribution to the normal force coefficient.22 only when C V −C V 0 n n−1 and otherwise simply use equation 5. and thus that the total accumulated vortex contribution for the lift 5. n−1 exp N N   −ΔS −ΔS  C V . the total accumulated vortex contribution is calculated using C V . The empirical constant T v represents the vortex decay constant.19.3. n =C C .20) K N= 1 f''  4 2 (5.3.

Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment Tangential Force Coefficient It is indicated in [16] that the unsteady tangential force coefficient. this factor can be obtained empirically from static airfoil data. even though the implemented algorithm obviously uses some of the values computed in the previous iteration. Instead. with the objective of clarifying whole process. the figure below represents the open loop system: Figure 5. can be computed according to : C C . In the expression above  represents the recovery factor.n  f n ' '  2 This value includes both the leading edge pressure and viscous lag. Also according to [16].95 . which is introduced to allow for the fact that the airfoil does not realize 100 percent of the chordwise force attained in potential flow.3 1: Flowchart of the Beddoes-Leishman DS model 62 . Illustrated Calculation Procedure A flowchart is included below which exemplifies the working methodology of the model. and it represents only the pressure contribution to the chordwise force. In the present implementation however the unsteady tangential force coefficient will not be computed.n =C N  E . and a typical value is ≈0. or chordwise force coefficient. in the BEM iteration loop the chordwise force coefficient will simply be derived from the static airfoil curve using the instantaneous angle of attack.

the Beddoes-Leishman DS model was originally developed for helicopter industry applications. Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model 5. one might actually be working with an airfoil where no abrupt drop in the pitching curve can easily be identified. such as the Reynolds number.1.25 -0. which is smaller that the maximum value.4 1 it is clear hat the break in the pitching moment takes place at an angle of attack of approximately 22 deg. and it is also dependent on other factors. Moreover.2 1 -0. it is clear that if significant trailing edge separation occurs.6 0. where usually considerably thinner airfoils are used.15 Cm -0. while in thick airfoil sections typically separation occurs at the trailing edge (TE) region. Obviously imposing this value of the normal force coefficient for the critical condition in the DS model would yield invalid results. However.Selection.e. However. such a magnitude of the normal force coefficient is actually firstly observed at an angle of attack of roughly 10 deg. As mentioned previously.20 0. LEsep <C N .30 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 alpha [deg] alpha [deg] Figure 5.2 0 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Cn -0. say larger than 15%. C N .4 1: Normal force coefficient characteristic of the NACA64418 at Re=700 000 Figure 5.4 0.4 1. Also.05 Cm vs alpha -0. Naturally the topology of stall can be more complex. Consequentially it is clear that another criterion is needed 63 . the Beddoes-Leishman DS model assumes that leading edge separation occurs when a critical normal force coefficient is reached. one can see that this incidence angle corresponds to a value of approximately C N =1. when the flow is still expected to be attached over the most of the airfoil's surface. the airfoil sections found in wind turbine blades are usually quite thick. i.10 0. Taking for instance the NACA64418 airfoil experimental static characteristic from [25].4) The influence of thick airfoils Mostly because of structural integrity. which has a relative thickness of 18%: Cn vs alpha 1. The stalling characteristic of a profile is mainly dependent on its relative thickness. in thin airfoils usually the separation point is located near the leading edge. Now minding the normal force coefficient curve. if the stall characteristic is very smooth. generally speaking. if combined LE and TE separation is present. For more information on the topic the reader is referred to [36] and [37].4 2: Pitching moment coefficient characteristic of the NACA64418 at Re=700 000 In figure 5.8 Cm Cn -0. the static leading edge separation point may actually correspond to a value of the normal force coefficient smaller than its maximum. since leading edge stall would be predicted to occur much too soon. MAX . which coincides with the break in the static pitching moment curve of the airfoil.

and thus using the thin airfoil theory C n . as the results from the implemented model are compared with experimental data obtained for thick oscillating airfoil sections.8  y /c  −1 . 64 . having obtained a very good agreement for several low speed airfoil sections.5. 0  cos α LEsep (5. I by assuming the flow remains fully attached. however. However.5. I = 2 πα LEsep +C l . and since we are working in the C n domain. in static conditions.1) With the result being given in degrees. it is then possible to derive a critical normal force coefficient. one must keep in mind that leading edge separation is related with a critical value of leading edge pressure [13]. when considering thick airfoils. given the fact that considerable trailing edge separation is most certainly present at such high incidence angles.5) Leading Edge Stall occurrence Criteria Critical Angle of Attack In [38] Timmer suggests a relation to predict the occurrence of leading edge stall on wind turbine application airfoils based on the thickness of the nose. this critical condition corresponds to the normal coefficient one would obtain in attached flow. Maximum Cn Another criterion for the onset of leading edge separation will now also be considered. C N .3.5 . considerable trailing edge separation is expected to occur before leading edge stall takes place. The validity of this methodology to determine the onset of leading edge separation will be verified subsequently. which may actually never occur in reality. since usually when leading edge stall takes place very little trailing edge separation has occurred. i. the value given in expression 5. I . at a constant Re=1x106 .33 (5. yield identical values for the critical normal force coefficient. 5. if one is in presence of thick airfoils. In his work Timmer assumes the airfoil upper nose thickness to be represented by the y/c ordinate at the x/c=0. C n .0125 chord station. C n .e.3) For thin airfoils this criterion and the break in the pitching moment. Using this LE separation angle of attack. suggested in [16]. I =C n .5. MAX (5. and the leading edge separation angle of attack is approximated by: α LEsep=1170 . and thus by using the maximum C n as the critical value to denote the onset of leading edge separation one comes to values which may be substantially different from using the approach from[16]. the dynamic stall model may also be set so that the critical C n is assumed to correspond to the maximum normal coefficient.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment to derive the critical normal force coefficient.2) Obviously this expression leads to extremely large normal force coefficients.

ideally. “Reference” values were put forward. This was also 65 . the same reference indicates that this parameter is sensitive both to profile geometry and Mach number.Empirical constants for attached flow However. based on the fact that wind turbine application airfoils are thick. This set of parameters will be referred to as “FFA values”. and for Mach numbers ranging from 0. The time constants related with the unsteady attached flow are insensitive to the Mach number and airfoil section's shape. For the magnitudes of the empirical time constants. However. one would perform an optimization of these time constants for each of the considered airfoil sections.6.6) Choosing the Empirical time constants The values of the time constants used in the DS method will obviously have a large impact on the load predictions. As for the viscous lag. and was carried out for several airfoils at low Mach numbers. the approach used assumes that no leading edge separation takes place.7 b1 0. T f .3 A2 0. it was chosen to select a set of “reference” values. T P . are mainly dependent of the Mach number. which is of the greatest relevance in the present case. and are shown also in table 5.2.75 Table 5. since they directly affect the dynamics of the unsteady model.14 b2 0. and not so much of the airfoil shape. this means that since T P  M= 0 .Implemented <T P  M= 0 . it is important to mention that the Beddoes-Leishman DS model implemented in [39] does not use a criterion for the start of “vortex travelling”. 3  . the original paper of the Beddoes-Leishman DS model refers to a document from Westland Helicopters [35]. in which a procedure along the lines of [39] could be followed. Table 5. values of the empirical time constants are given for the NACA0012 airfoil based on unsteady experiments at Re=8×106 . T v and T vl . and vortex contribution is allowed as long as the angle of attack is increasing. In [16] it is indicated that the time constants associated with the pressure lag and with the vortex lift. This set of parameters will be referred to as “Westland values”.1 .6. In other words.6. it was chosen to follow the trend of decreasing Mach number from [35]. This was performed by comparing load predictions with experimental data.8. However. Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model 5. In this reference.2 displays the values indicated in [35] for the lowest Mach number.53 Kα 0.3 to 0. since there is no available unsteady aerodynamic data for MEXICO blade's airfoils. 3  <T P  M= 0 . T P . The Swedish Aeronautical Research Institute (FFA) conducted an optimization of the empirical time constants in a Beddoes-Leishman DS model [39]. The values of the empirical time constants in the current implemented model were selected taking into account both references mentioned above: • For the peak pressure lag. which yielded reasonable agreement for the majority of the considered airfoils. from which one can expect to obtain a reasonable load prediction capability. 4  ⇒ T P.Selection. and are given in the table below from [16]: A1 0. when there is flow separation the choice of the values of the time constants becomes more delicate.

the aerodynamic profiles were chosen to have identical relative thicknesses as the airfoils which make up the MEXICO rotor blade. From this database. As for the time constants related with the vortex lift. but should at least be representative of the behaviour one may expect to encounter in the MEXICO environment. T f . together with the values used in the current implementation: Time Constants Westland (M=0. it was again chosen to follow the trend of decreasing Mach number from [35]. and the S825 for the tip region. what is expected in the MEXICO trials.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment done because in [39] a “reference” value for this time constant was not clearly indicated. t / c = [0. and consequentially.2 .8 1.7 0. • The set of parameters from the references mentioned above are indicated in table 5. S809 for the mid-section region.6. T v and T vl .25.7) Validation Cases To validate the implemented model it is necessary to compare the results with experimental 2D unsteady aerodynamic data. that is. and consequentially the value derived in the optimization is not expected to yield a good level of prediction. this procedure was taken since the DS model implemented in [39] did not consider vortex shedding. • Regarding the boundary layer lag. Having this in mind.0.0.6. at least to some degree.2.3) FFA (“Reference”) Implemented Model TP 1. However unsteady wind tunnel aerodynamic data is not publicly available for every desired airfoil and set of parameters. The figure below shows the geometry of each of these airfoil sections as well as of the 66 .5 Tf 3 5 5 Tv 6 2 6 T vl 7 5 Table 5. Naturally. having the same maximum relative thickness does not mean that the airfoils are identical.Values of the empirical time constants for separated flow 5. the airfoils chosen were the S814 for the root region. it makes little sense to use the value specifically derived for a (thinner) profile from [35]. preferably using a set of parameters which simulates. if one wishes to apply the DS model to different airfoil sections. the “reference” value from [39] was used. this choice was motivated since this parameter is expected to be sensitive to airfoil shape.18].21. and in the present case the choice was limited to the OSU database [40] of unsteady measurements.

1000 -0.2000 0. I obtained with each of the leading edge separation criterion given above: Airfoil S825 S809 S814 Thickness 17% 21% 24% Moment Break AOA 21º 19º 25º Timmer's LE Separation AOA 22.1500 0.0000 0. Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model “corresponding” MEXICO profiles6: 0.7000 0.1000 0.1000 0.9000 1.1500 0.0500 -0.5000 0.3000 0.1000 0.7.0000 0.39 1.0500 0.8000 0.0000 0.5000 0. as well as the C n .1500 0.7000 0.6000 0.0000 -0.0000 -0.0000 Root Airfoil DU91-W2-250 S814 Mid-Span Airfoil S809 Tip Airfoil 0.1000 0.4000 0.29 Figure 5.1: Characteristics of the airfoil sections used in the DS model validation Experimental Unsteady Data The Reynolds number in the experiments selected from the OSU aerodynamic database was set to 6 Re=1×10 . 67 .6000 0.1500 0.9000 1.0000 NACA 64418 S825 In the table below the relevant characteristics of each airfoil are shown.88 Cn_Crit Cn_Max 1.1000 0.01 2.14 or 20 deg.0500 0.9000 1.7000 0.8000 0.Selection.5000 0.7º Cn_crit Timmer 2.7º 20.1000 0. and the mean AOA was 8.2000 0. 6 7 The geometry of the RISOE A1-21 airfoil is not displayed due to confidentiality In the OSU aerodynamic database the AOA amplitude of the unsteady data was 5 or 10 deg.4000 0. and the geometric angle of attack was varying sinusoidally with a 10 deg amplitude around a 14 7 deg mean .0000 0.3000 0.0500 -0.1500 0.0500 0.03 1.6000 0.8000 0.4000 0.67 2.7 1: Geometry of airfoil sections used in the DS model validation Table 5.1000 -0.2000 0.5º 25.3000 0.0000 -0.0500 -0.1000 0.

1. Figure 5.8) Results and Discussion The results obtained with the Beddoes-Leishman DS model using both leading edge stall criteria mentioned before are now presented. mentioned in table 2.7.094) no no yes yes no yes no no yes no no no Table 5. Reduced Frequency Root Section Mid-Span Section Tip Section Low (k≈0.027) Moderate (k≈0.064) High (k≈0.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment Minding the relevant frequencies of operation. results are shown for high and moderately high reduced frequencies in the root airfoil.8 2: Mid-span region airfoil section at moderate reduced frequency 68 .053) Moderately High (k≈0.2: Validation Cases of the Beddoes-Leishman DS model 5. and compared with the experimental unsteady data.8 1: Tip region airfoil section at a low reduced frequency Figure 5. moderate reduced frequency at the mid-span airfoil and low reduced frequency for the tip airfoil section. The results obtained at all airfoil sections and for all reduced frequencies are shown in appendix D.2.

in some of the loops it seems that the reattachment is not always well predicted. MAX approach yields load predictions at least as good as the ones obtained with Timmer's criterion. which is why this criterion always yields data sets with no “kinks”. firstly.8 4: Root region airfoil section at moderately high reduced frequency Figure 5. 69 . as discussed in [23]. several aspects can be mentioned. given the abrupt decay in normal force coefficient. Implementation and Validation of the Dynamic Stall Model Figure 5. but this fact is to some extent expectable in Beddoes-Leishman model implementations. according to [23]. given the very high values of the critical normal force coefficient imposed using Timmer's approach. Being so. experimental data indicates there is leading edge stall. However. MAX criterion. This is present at the final part of the upstroke and is characterized by abrupt normal force coefficient peaks: it is also consistent with rapid pitching moment variations observed at these time instants. Now specifically addressing the two criteria used to denote the onset of leading edge separation. this fact is also coherent with the break observed in the pitching moment coefficient. and specially at higher frequencies. which occurs at a much lower angle of attack than in static conditions. These phenomena are not modelled in the present implementation and.8 3: Root region airfoil section at high reduced frequency Minding the results above one can say that generally reasonable to good agreement has been found between the DS model and the experimental data. it seems unrealistic to simply disregard leading edge stall in wind turbine application airfoil sections. When higher frequencies are considered. Comparing results obtained using the two criteria. especially in the thinner airfoils. It is also possible to witness what seems to be some secondary vortex shedding. even for the thick airfoils. it is assumed that there is actually no leading edge stall. in every case the C n . they are specially occurring at low Mach numbers. it is clear that a better agreement is found using the C n .Selection.

MAX approach yielded load predictions at least as good as the ones obtained with Timmer's criterion. Generally a good agreement was found. Airfoil sections similar to those comprising the MEXICO blades were chosen as input. two methods were proposed and tested. 2D wind tunnel experimental data indicated that. For higher frequencies clearly a better agreement was found using the C n . Consequentially it seems unrealistic to disregard LE separation in wind turbine application profiles simply based on the fact that the airfoil sections are thick.9) Conclusions and Recommendations Analysing the results and the minding the discussion above. since one intends to posteriorly compare the model’s results with this experimental data. even when very thick airfoils are considered. leading edge stall may occur.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment 5. referred to as Timmer’s and C n . This method should thus be used in the subsequent analysis of the MEXICO data. • • • • 70 . MAX criterion. the following conclusions can be drawn: • The Beddoes-Leishman DS model was successfully implemented. MAX criteria. The method was validated against unsteady 2D experimental data. it was necessary to adapt the leading edge stall occurrence criteria for thick airfoil sections characteristic of wind turbine applications. Since the original Beddoes-Leishman model was proposed for thin profiles. Regarding the performance of the two criteria the C n . and tailored to correspond to the wind turbine environment by neglecting compressibility effects.

In section 6. and thus postpone the flow separation to higher angles of attack. Section 6. through an inverse BEM method. and thus the flow velocity will have a cross component. A figure of the phenomenon is shown below.2 the 3D force coefficients from the MEXICO rotor are determined. and consequentially the static C l  and C d  depend on the spanwise position. since the air in the vicinity of the blade will also be rotating.4 discusses the aerodynamic coefficient implemented in the BEM code and finally section 6.1. as mentioned before. In other words. This phenomenon can be qualitatively understood by thinking of the parameters which influence the boundary layer present in a rotating blade. Also.3 the results are shown. due to the centrifugal force and to the radial pressure gradient. and in section 6. given by: F Cor=−2 ∨V      (6. this contribution will make the pressure gradient over the airfoil section less adverse. where the relevant vectorial quantities are represented: 71 . Because this velocity component will be in a rotating reference frame. it is possible to obtain very high maximum lift coefficients at these spanwise sections. This chapter starts by qualitatively describing the phenomenon of rotational augmentation in section 6.The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients 6) The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients It was made clear from the previous sections that the dynamic stall model requires static characteristics of C l  and aerodynamic force coefficient as a function of the angle of attack as input. allowing for very large maximum lift coefficients to be obtained. using the right-hand rule we can see that the  Coriolis force acts to accelerate the fluid from the leading edge to the trailing edge of the airfoil. the blades from the MEXICO rotor are comprised of three different airfoil types.1.1) Physical Description The expression “rotational augmentation” refers to the delay in stall occurrence one can witness in the most inboard sections of a rotating blade. Since the separation over the airfoil is delayed for higher angles of attack. it is even more important to consider the influence of rotational augmentation on the aerodynamic coefficients over the spanwise positions of the blade. given the problem at hands.1) Since the linear velocity vector V has the outward direction and because the angular velocity vector is pointing in the direction perpendicular to the rotor plane. both C d  steady curves must be supplied to the dynamic stall model so that the unsteady loads can be predicted. hence the “rotational augmentation” designation. when compared to the 2D static characteristic of the airfoil.5 states the conclusions drawn in this chapter. 6. there will be a Coriolis Force acting on the air parcels. in other words. However. it will be pushed outwards in the spanwise direction.

Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment  V FCor Figure 6. 72 . according to which the local axial induction factor is determined with: 2 a 1−a  V wind . but the magnitude of the local effective velocity will be much larger. More information on this physical phenomenon can be found in [4].1) 2 a 1−a V wind  r. for each considered trial the pressure distribution was interpolated using a cubic spline and was integrated over the surface of the airfoil section to yield both Normal and Tangential forces.2) Three Dimensional Determination Force Coefficients Experimental In the present work it is necessary to know the dependency of the lift coefficient with angle of attack at the inboard spanwise stations of the MEXICO rotor. given the larger radius.2. at the more outboard sections there will still be a spanwise velocity component. F ax dr and the tangential induction factor is computed with: 2 (6.1 1: The rotational augmentation phenomenon It should be noted that the rotational augmentation is only significant at the inboard spanwise stations.2 r dr=B.2) In the expressions above F ax and F rot represent the aerodynamic force acting on each blade element. a local inverse BEM method was used [18]. and consequently the lift coefficient.2. while a positive tangential force is pointing from the trailing edge to the leading edge of the airfoil. Procedure This determination was done by analysing the pressure data from several axial flow trials of the MEXICO. F n and F tg respectively. Following the procedure mentioned in chapter 4. One should note however that the viscous contribution is thus not taken into account. The convention used is again such that a positive normal force is pointing from the lower surface to the upper surface of the airfoil. 6. and thus the influence of the Coriolis force becomes negligible. To determine the angles of attack. since rotational augmentation will most definitively be present and play an important role in the phenomena associated with dynamic stall.2 r dr=B. F rot dr ' (6.

5) L 0. and consequentially in all considered trials the rotational speed was approximately 424 rpm.5  c V 2 eff Cl= where the local effective velocity is calculated including the induction factors according to: (6. a visual inspection of the pressure distribution over each spanwise section was conducted for each considered trial. according to equation (6. before taking it into account in the determination of the rotational augmentation. it is important to state that only the 25% and 35% spanwise sections were considered. and in all these trials the rotational velocity was set to 424 rpm.1). Also. since one expects the rotational effects not to be significant at the other more outboard radial stations. It is also important to mention that the trials considered have a wide variety of wind tunnel speeds and pitch angles.2. This is justified since the ultimate goal is to compare the model's results with the yawed flow trials from the MEXICO.2.4) and the lift and drag forces are computed by inverting the set of equations : F n =L.5  c V 2 eff D Cd = 0. These components are calculated from geometric considerations using the normal and tangential forces according to the set of equations: F ax =F n cos  tot −F tg sin tot  F rot =F n sin tot F tg .sin−D.6) V eff =[r 1a´ ]2 [ U 1−a]2 (6. The table below shows the trial cases considered and their most important characteristics: 73 .2. the local angle of attack is computed with (6.The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients decomposed respectively in the axial direction and in the plane of the rotor.cos Finally.7) Considered MEXICO data One must keep in mind that the angular velocity may influence the rotational augmentation.1.2.2.3) =arctan  U 1−a −tot r 1a '   (6. cos  tot  Once the induction factors have been derived.cosD. Hence the blades operate at a wide range of angles of attack. the lift and drag coefficient are computed with (6.sin  F tg =L. Following the recommendations given in chapter 3.

3 -3.98 23.3 -2.3 -2.92 19. very strange pressure distributions were registered over a considerable portion of the airfoil.04 16.05 29.3 -2.98 29. the figure below also includes the 2D airfoil data.97 29.98 29.3 -2.3 -5.91 11.05 13.3 -2.7 Wind Speed (m/s) 9.3 -2.06 28.01 14.3 -4.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment Trial Nr 92 94 96 97 99 100 101 104 107 108 109 110 114 116 118 131 133 135 136 137 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 246 247 Pitch (deg) -2.3 -0.3 1. as mentioned previously.97 18.3) Results Following the procedure described above.98 23.3 -2.96 29.11 23. the lift coefficient dependency with the angle of attack at the 25% span of the MEXICO rotor was obtained.97 18.42 14.05 15.3 -2.3 -2.3 -4.1: Trials Considered in the Rotational Augmentation Investigation The table above shows that for a very significant number of trials the pressure data obtained at the 35% span is considered to be unacceptable.89 22.3 -1. 6.2.3 -0.3 -2.97 29.44 15.3 -3. for comparison.3 -2.3 -5.98 29.02 19.3 -2.98 26.3 0.3 -2.98 Data at 25% span Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Data at 35% span Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Accepted Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Rejected Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Accepted Rejected Rejected Table 6.03 23. For this reason.07 18. since.3 -2.3 -2.91 6.3 -5. from [25]: 74 . unfortunately the experimental investigation of the rotational augmentation effect will only be carried out at the 25% spanwise position.91 18.7 -5.

The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients Cl 2D and Cl 3D at the 25% spanwise station 2. One can also notice that at the lower angles of attack the values of the lift coefficient are underestimated with respect to the 2D data.5). this quantity is defined similarly to (6. C m .1) For comparison.5 Cl 3D (Inv BEM) Cl 2D 1 Cl 0.5 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 alpha Figure 6.2.3. This fact could be overcome by introducing a turbulent wake correction in the BEM model.2. and also because it takes place at an estimated angle of attack of 25 degrees. or alternatively one can say that the angle of attack is overestimated. which means that expression (6. this could be explained by the fact that at lower wind speeds. which occurs at high angles of attack. and consequentially lower angles of attack. However the idea was to investigate the rotational augmentation. and so this discrepancy was not addressed further. the axial induction factor may become large and the wind turbine may be heavily loaded.5 2 1. according to C tg = F Tg 0. It is also interesting to dwell on the results obtained for the variation of the tangential force coefficient with the angle of attack. with the angle of incidence.5  c V 2 eff (6.3 1: Cl2D and Cl3D obtained with the inverse BEM Comparing the MEXICO data with the 2D curve one can clearly witness the rotational augmentation effect since the maximum value of the lift coefficient registered is greater than 2.1) may not necessarily be verified. obtained in 2D conditions [25] is also shown in the plot below: 75 . the dependency of the pitching moment coefficient.

which is indicative of leading edge separation occurrence.1 -0. More interestingly.3 2 show in the 2D case an abrupt load variation. Both the lift and the tangential force coefficient suddenly drop 8. when leading edge separation occurs.4 0. i. which causes the pressure gradient over the upper surface of the airfoil to be less adverse. one expects significant suction in the leading edge area. it will not be addressed further. leading edge separation usually takes place at much higher angles of attack than trailing edge separation.3 2: Cm2D and Ct3D obtained with the inverse BEM Figures 6. Nevertheless. 76 .3 0.2 -0. The observation that the angle of attack where leading edge separation occurs is unaffected by rotation for an inboard section of a rotating blade. hinting the occurrence of leading edge separation. at an angle of attack of 25 degrees. the total tangential force is expected to decrease abruptly. both the lift and the moment coefficient suddenly drop. As mentioned before. when the suction region ceases to exist.3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 alpha Figure 6. consequentially and also due to time constraints. analysing the angle of attack dependency of the 3D force coefficients. one can reason why such an event would take place by qualitatively considering the physics of the problem. Consequentially. It is brought upon by the fact that the flow “cannot handle” the very adverse 8 At high angles of attack.e. However. according to the assumed convention. in the MEXICO only the 25% spanwise position is suitable for assessing the matter at hands.2 0. Unfortunately. despite the influence of rotational augmentation. one can see that an abrupt load variation also takes place when the angle of incidence reaches 25 degrees. To be able to establish such a relation it would be necessary to test the hypothesis at different spanwise positions and with different airfoil sections. when occurring.1 Cm 2D Ct 3D (Inv BEM) 0 -0. For thick airfoils.3 1 and 6. or in other words that rotational effects delay stall by postponing trailing edge separation. as mentioned before. is in no way to be taken as a general fact. This will have a positive contribution to the tangential force. and even though the rotational augmentation phenomenon is clearly visible. since the cross flow will be deflected by the Coriolis force and eventually be aligned with the local effective velocity. and as long as the flow remains attached. one can understand that this phenomenon will be more significant in the aft region of the airfoil.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment Ct 3D and Cm 2D at the 25% spanwise station 0. the rotational augmentation is brought upon by the spanwise flow component. One can thus understand that this change in the pressure gradient acts to keep the flow attached further aft.

it may yield unrealistically large lift coefficients.1) is the difference between the actual 2D lift coefficient and the potential value.2) Where C l 0 represents the lift coefficient obtained when the angle of attack is zero. The correction for the augmented lift is expressed by: c C l . One should keep in mind that in wind turbine applications the flow can always be regarded as incompressible. this approach was one of the methods considered in [41]. In [41] an effort was conducted to compare the performance of six different stall delay models with experimental data from the NREL measurements. However. It is clear that if one uses expression 6. and it is therefore essential to implement this radial dependency in the BEM code developed. specially at the more inboard sections. but one can understand that it is necessary to consider the rotational effects present in all inboard sections of the blade. To overcome this problem it is suggested in [41] to apply the correction up to an angle of attack of 30 degrees. it will be implemented in the current project. one expects a different amount of rotational augmentation to exist at different spanwise sections. 2D3 Cl r where  C l  2 (6. 6.4.4. However. have been developed to predict the augmented force coefficients dependency of the angle of attack. and also since it performs at least as well as the other models considered in [41].2 for very large angles of attack. and consequentially the information of the perturbations occurring in the aft region of the airfoil will be propagated upstream. from the discussion above and minding the results obtained. with a wide range of complexity. A number of modelling approaches. trailing and leading edge separation are not completely independent.4) Implemented Aerodynamic Coefficients Lift Coefficient Up to now the rotational augmentation present at the 25% spanwise station of the MEXICO rotor has been investigated. This means that. one can argue that the two kinds of separation are relatively distinct phenomena. taking into account the discussion 77 . which is given by: C l . resulting in a smoother transition in the application of the model. According to [18]. Naturally. in this project it will be assumed that leading edge separation always occurs at an angle of attack of 25 degrees. in all MEXICO spanwise positions where the airfoil section is the DU91-W2-250. In other words. Accordingly. this kind of separation is deeply related with the local flow conditions and airfoil geometry present in the vicinity of the leading edge. in reality. 3D=C l .The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients pressure gradient which is felt immediately downstream of the suction peak. pot =C l 2   0 (6.4. however a conclusion was not reached on which of the implemented approaches yielded the more accurate results. characteristic of large incidence angles Consequentially flow separation takes place in chordwise positions close to the leading edge. a simple correction from Snel yields quite good results for the augmented lift coefficient dependency with angle of attack. after which the correction itself should be linearly decreased to 0 at an angle of attack of 90 degrees.

5 2 1. The implemented lift coefficient angle of attack dependency for the inboard sections is shown in the graphic below. but since as mentioned before only data for the 25% spanwise section was available.5 0 0.5. no attempts were done to derive an expression for this portion of the lift coefficient curve. after which the correction is linearly decreased to 0 at an angle of attack of 90 degrees.00 40. radial position. 2D3 C l =C l . one can notice that reasonable agreement is found between the experimental data derived at the 25% spanwise position of the MEXICO rotor and the implemented correction.2 the rotational augmentation at this station would.4 1: Implemented Cl dependency of angle of attack at different spanwise positions As expected. the lift coefficient augmentation correction will be applied up to an angle of attack of 25 degrees. For angles of attack beyond 25 degrees the agreement found is not so good. 2D0.00 15.00 30.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment presented previously on the leading edge separation occurrence. and more outboard.00 35. be given by: 0. Consequentially. and the procedure recommended in [41] was followed. as the 3D lift coefficient grows further apart from the 2D values at the stations closer to the blade's root.00 20.00 alpha Figure 6. and according to expression 6. the more significant the rotational augmentation becomes.4. It is also important to mention that the correction for the rotational lift augmentation was applied only to a radial position of 1.00 10.115 As such the expected rotational augmentation is very small for this.00 25. and also since it facilitates implementation.   2 78 . together with the 2D static data and the empirically determined lift coefficient values at the 25% spanwise section of the MEXICO rotor: Implemented Cl at different spanwise positions 2.5 25% 35% 45% Cl 3D (Inv BEM) at 25% Cl 2D Cl 1 0.00 5.06 C l 1. In the MEXICO rotor this radial position is located in the transition area between the DU91-W2-250 and the RISOE A1-21. which corresponds to a relative radius of r/R=0.125 m. 3D=C l . the figure above shows that the more inboard the airfoil section is located. especially regarding the maximum value of the lift coefficient. the application of the criterion mentioned above is justified. for the MEXICO blades.158 C l . More interestingly.

but again there was not conclusive evidence that one of the tested model's performance was generally better.3D=C d . according to which the influence of the rotational effects in the drag coefficient is given by: C d . The twist comes into play because it is the angle between the rotation plane (and hence the Coriolis force) and the chord (onto which the favourable pressure gradient should be applied).The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients Drag Coefficient In [41] several modelling approaches of the rotational effects in the drag coefficient dependency with the angle of attack were considered and their performance compared with experimental data.4. the correction for the rotational effects on the drag coefficient was applied up to an angle of attack of 25 degrees. this would mean that the decrease in the pressure over the aft region of the upper surface of the airfoil would have a considerable contribution to the drag.3 one can see that the rotational correction acts to increase the drag coefficient. Minding expression 6. Especially at high angles of attack. This trend has been identified in experimental data [41].3.4. after which the correction itself is linearly decreased to 0 at an angle of attack of 90 degrees.2 d  c cos 4  tw  r where tw represents the local twist angle. As for the scaling term in the equation above. when compared to the 2D case. and so one can understand the trend imposed in equation 6. but however the physical mechanism that leads to an increased drag force in a rotating environment is not completely understood yet. the pressure drag would be expected to increase because of the rotational effects. one can argue that the less adverse chordwise pressure gradient will have a stronger influence on the aft region of the airfoil section. The implemented drag coefficient angle of attack dependency for the inboard sections is shown in below.5 .4. However. the drag correction was imposed for spanwise positions which had relative radius smaller than 0. In other words. Also to maintain the coherence with the procedure taken for the lift coefficient. since it is related with the spanwise flow component. Accordingly to what was done regarding the lift coefficient. it is given by gC =2.2DgC  C d d (6. along with the 2D static data and the empirically determined drag coefficient values at the 25% spanwise section of the MEXICO rotor: 79 . In the present project it was chosen to use the simple model of Chaviaropoulos and Hansen [42].3) where in this case  C d is the difference between the 2D drag coefficient and the drag coefficient obtained when the angle of attack is zero. the magnitude of the pressure drag is much larger than the viscous drag contribution.

00 15. even though this is less noticeable in the empirically derived data. and it was possible to draw the following conclusions: • The dependency of the experimental aerodynamic coefficients with angle of attack at the 25% spanwise station of the MEXICO rotor was determined.00 30.00 alpha Figure 6.2 1 0.5) Conclusions and Recommendations In the present section the influence of rotational augmentation on the aerodynamic coefficients was addressed.4 35% 25% Cd 3D (Inv BEM) at 25% Cd 2D 0. 80 . Unfortunately consistent MEXICO data was not available for other inboard spanwise sections.00 40.00 20. and consequentially the application of the rotational correction mentioned above is justified. since one would thus expect the suction area near the leading edge of the airfoil to abruptly decrease. this was done by considering several axial flow data points and using an inverse BEM method. The MEXICO results from the 35% spanwise station were not taken into account since in most trials there was indication of pressure sensor malfunction. It can also be seen that the agreement found between the experimental data derived at the 25% spanwise position of the MEXICO rotor and the implemented correction is good. impeding other test cases to be carried out.6 0.2 0 0. one should notice that there is a sudden increase of the drag coefficient values for an angle of attack of approximately 25 degrees.00 10. Introducing the rotational correction yields better agreement with empirical data then when 2D drag coefficient data is considered. as the 3D drag coefficient grows further apart from the 2D values at the stations closer to the blade's root.8 Cd 0. Identically to what was seen for the lift coefficient. the more inboard the airfoil section is located the more significant the rotational augmentation will become.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment Implemented Cd at different spanwise positions 1. 6. thus increasing the drag coefficient. This occurrence is consistent with the assumption that leading edge separation takes place at such an incidence.00 35.4 2: Implemented Cd dependency of angle of attack at different spanwise positions Firstly.00 5.00 25.

The Influence of Rotational Augmentation on the Sectional Aerodynamic Coefficients • • Results indicate that the angle of attack at which the leading edge separation occurs seems to be unaffected by rotational augmentation. accordingly it was assumed that this critical angle of attack remains constant for all rotationally augmented spanwise sections. These corrections should thus be implemented in the BEM model. and reasonable to good agreement was found. 81 . up to a relative radius of 0.5. Empirical corrected for the lift and drag 3D coefficients have been compared with results from the MEXICO.

and a relatively large yaw angle. and finally the conclusions drawn in this chapter are stated in section 7. and the DS model has also been implemented in the BEM iteration loop. since the BEM model will subsequently be compared with MEXICO data. it was chosen to impose in all considered test cases a high wind speed.2 the MEXICO data used for comparison is addressed. The objective of this chapter is thus to compare the results obtained with the complete model against the MEXICO data at yaw-misaligned configurations. and in section 7. Ω=424 rpm and θ=-2. i. It was chosen to plot the azimuthal position of 0 deg since it displayed the larger dependency of the number of spanwise elements.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment 7) Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects Rotational augmentation of the static airfoil coefficients has been included in the BEM code. Also. β= 30 deg. the complete BEM code was run considering different number of elements in the spanwise direction. Number of elements in the spanwise direction Using an azimuthal spacing of 10 degrees. The chapter starts by assessing the convergence of the implemented model.3 shows the results obtained and discusses the trends observed.e.1) Model Convergence Because one wishes to test the implemented code's performance when DS phenomena are expected to occur. at an azimuthal position of 0 degrees.3 deg. 7. when large wind tunnel speeds are imposed. 82 . The results below show the variation of the normal force coefficient obtained at all spanwise stations. Section 7. results obtained for other azimuthal coordinates are included in appendix E. U=24m/s. the rotational speed and pitch angle match the MEXICO's yawed flow data points' settings.4.

the angular increment considered does not have a 83 . The results below show the variation of the normal force coefficient obtained at all spanwise stations.7 1. One can also see that increasing the number of elements in the spanwise direction beyond 15 does not yield a significant difference in the value of the force coefficient obtained. the results obtained show that the number of elements considered does not have a significant influence on the normal force coefficient obtained.1 2: Cn variation with azimuthal increment at 120 deg azimuth It was chosen to plot the azimuthal position of 120 degrees since it displayed the larger dependency of the azimuthal increment. the BEM code was run considering different azimuthal angular increments. Cn Convergence with Angular Increment at 120 deg azimuth 1.9 1.5 3 2.Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects Convergence of Model with Nr Elements at 0 deg azimuth 3.3 1. at an azimuthal position of 120 degrees. for the inboard spanwise stations.5 1.5 0.1 1: Cn variation with spanwise number of elements at 0 deg azimuth Minding the figure above it is clear that. Azimuthal Angular Increment Using 15 elements in the spanwise direction.3 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 25% 35% 60% 82% 92% Cn Angular Increment (deg) Figure 7.9 0.5 25% 35% 60% 82% 92% Cn 2 1. the number of elements considered has an influence on the normal force coefficient obtained. results obtained for other azimuthal coordinates are included in appendix E.1 0. for all spanwise stations. For the other spanwise stations. Firstly one should notice that.5 6 8 10 12 14 16 Nr Elements 18 20 22 24 26 Figure 7.7 0.5 1 0.

the following evolution in time of the normal force coefficients was obtained for each spanwise section: Convergence of Cn over 3 revolutions 5 4. in the sense that it requires the airfoil aerodynamic parameters' history to compute the instantaneous loads.1 3: Cn variation with azimuth angle From the figure above one can see that after one revolution (360 deg). Considering an azimuthal angular increment of 10 degrees and 15 elements in the spanwise direction.5 3 25% 2. With the purpose of investigating the concrete influence of the Beddoes-Leishman method.2) Comparison with MEXICO data The results obtained with the complete BEM code are now compared with the data from MEXICO trials.5 4 3. etc.) must be initially prescribed. one can understand that some iteration time must be allowed before the model reaches a definite solution. the results obtained without using the DS model are also shown.5 2 1. these aerodynamic parameters (degree of separation.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment very significant influence on the normal force coefficient obtained. for all spanwise stations. the normal coefficient variation over the second revolution (from 360 to 720 deg) is indistinguishable from the curve corresponding to the third revolution (from 720 to 1080 deg). However. Still. The spanwise section with a greater dependency of the azimuthal discretization is again the most inboard station. it was chosen to run the model imposing an 84 . this is based on fact that. one can argue that decreasing the azimuthal angular increment beyond 10 degrees does not yield a significant difference in the value of the force coefficient obtained. the results obtained seem to no longer be influenced by the initial condition imposed.5 0 0 180 360 540 720 900 1080 35% 60% 82% 92% Cn Azimuth (deg) Figure 7.5 1 0. 7. Number of Revolutions One can say that the DS model has “memory”. Keeping in mind the discussion of the previous section. vortex lift. since it is assumed that in the first time instant the flow is fully attached and no circulation has been shed.

Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects
azimuthal discretization of 10 degrees and 15 elements in the spanwise direction. It should also be mentioned that the results displayed were obtained over the third revolution (from 720 to 1080 deg). The comparison between the MEXICO data and the results of the model is done through the normal force coefficient, since this dimensionless quantity is of great importance to calculate the loads acting on the rotor's blades. Another reason to use C n to assess the model's performance is that it directly available from the MEXICO measurements, since it does not depend on the angle of attack. The results display the azimuthal variation of the normal force coefficient quantity, as well the C n vs  loops, where the angles of attack obtained with the BEM code were used also to plot the MEXICO data. Before the results are presented, it is useful to remind the reader that the MEXICO blades were rotating clockwise, and that in the yawed flow trials the wind was blowing from the left hand side, when looking in line with the rotor's axis from the upwind side. Referring to figure 2.2 2 , this means that the blades were rotating in the positive direction of ψ, and that the yaw misalignment was also positive, β>0. The advance/retreating blade effect present in this configuration will thus impose a minimum angle of attack at the vertically downward azimuthal position, =180 deg ⇒ min , and maximum incidence at the vertically upward angular coordinate, =0 deg⇒ max . Since this effect will be dominant at the inboard stations when large wind speeds are considered, one comes the conclusion that the upstroke of the cycle, i.e. the period when the angle of attack is increasing, corresponds to azimuthal positions from 180 to 360 deg. By analogy, the downstroke of the cycle, i.e. the period when the angle of attack is decreasing, corresponds to azimuthal positions from 0 to 180 deg.

Considered MEXICO data
It was mentioned before that the MEXICO's pressure sensors at the 35% span often seemed to be malfunctioning, since very irregular pressure distributions have been obtained at relative chord positions from 40 to 70%. However, at high angles of attack one might expect small pressure differences between 40 and 70% relative chord positions, given the fact that significant trailing edge separation is most likely present. Since experimental data also showed this trend, it was chosen to interpolate the value of the pressure between the sensors which were not malfunctioning; this allows the model's performance to be compared against MEXICO data also at the 35% spanwise station. The experimental pressure distribution obtained at this radial section for the relevant MEXICO data points is shown in appendix F. Dynamic stall phenomena are expected to occur mostly at inboard sections, and consequentially emphasis is given at the 25 and 35% spanwise stations. Other radial sections will also be addressed. Naturally, the considered wind tunnel speeds will now be large, with the purpose of imposing large angles of attack on the airfoil sections. The MEXICO data points considered are shown in the table below, together with the spanwise sections analysed:

85

Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment
Trial 152 153 160 167 U (m/s) 18 24 24 24 β (deg) 30 30 15 45 θ (deg) -2.3 -2.3 -2.3 -2.3 25% span yes yes yes yes 35% span yes yes yes yes 60% span no yes no no 82% span no yes no no

Table 7.2.1 - MEXICO data points and spanwise positions used to compare the model against

7.3) Results and Discussion
U=18 m/s
The results obtained at this wind tunnel speed are now displayed, with the purpose of assessing the model's performance when little stall penetration is present. The normal force coefficient variation is shown for the inboard spanwise sections, imposing a yaw angle of 30 deg:

25 % Spanwise section
Cn vs Azimuth
2.5 2.5

Cn vs alpha

2

2

1.5

1.5

Cn

Model_noDS 1 MEXICO

Cn

Model

Model MEXICO 1

0.5

0.5

0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360

0 0 5 10 15 20 25

Azimuth angle [deg]

Angle of Attack [deg]

Figure 7.3 1: Cn variation with azimuth for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span

Figure 7.3 2: Cn variation with alpha for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span

At this spanwise section good agreement is found between the predicted and experimental azimuthal variation of the normal force coefficient. It is not clear however that including the DS model improves the load prediction. As for the C n vs  loop, the figure above shows that the predicted loading yields a somewhat narrower curve than what was measured in the MEXICO trial, even though both predicted and experimental curves are in the clockwise direction.

86

Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects
35 % Spanwise section
Cn vs Azimuth
1.8 1.8

Cn vs alpha

1.6

1.6

1.4

1.4

1.2

1.2

1

1

Cn

Cn

Model 0.8 Model_noDS MEXICO 0.6

Model 0.8 MEXICO

0.6

0.4

0.4

0.2

0.2

0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360

0 6 8 10 12 14 16 18

Azimuth angle [deg]

Angle of Attack [deg]

Figure 7.3 4: Cn variation with azimuth for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span

Figure 7.3 3: Cn variation with alpha for U=18 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span

For this spanwise station reasonable to good agreement was found between the predicted and the experimental loading. Including the DS model clearly improves the load prediction capability, particularly at the 0 deg azimuthal position, where larger angles of attack are expected. As for the C n vs  loop, reasonable to good agreement was also found, and one can see both predicted and experimental curves are in the clockwise direction.

U=24 m/s
By increasing the wind tunnel speed one expects DS phenomena to play a more important role. The normal force coefficient's variation is again shown for the inboard spanwise sections, imposing a yaw angle of 30 deg:

25 % Spanwise section
Cn vs Azimuth
4 4

Cn vs alpha

3.5

3.5

3

3

2.5

2.5

Cn

Cn

2

Model Model_noDS MEXICO

2

Model MEXICO

1.5

1.5

1

1

0.5

0.5

0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360

0 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45

Azimuth angle [deg]

Angle of Attack [deg]

Figure 7.3 5: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span

Figure 7.3 6: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 25% span

87

88 . the agreement between calculations and measurements is not good. meaning that uncertainties arising from the yaw BEM model itself are thus made less important. which is coherent with what one may expect from a dynamically stalled airfoil. when using the BEM code without the DS model.5 1. 35 % Spanwise section Cn vs Azimuth 2. The wind speed is set to 24 m/s .5 Model Model_noDS Cn Cn Model MEXICO 1 1 MEXICO 0.5 0.5 2. even though the trend is well captured. Influence of the Yaw Error The results obtained for the yaw errors of 15 and 45 degrees at the inboard stations will now be displayed. The magnitude of the normal force coefficient is somewhat overpredicted.5 0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0 10 15 20 25 30 35 Azimuth angle [deg] Angle of Attack [deg] Figure 7.3 8: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span For this spanwise agreement good agreement was found between the predicted and the measured loading.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment At this spanwise station one can clearly see that stall is present.3 7: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 35% span Figure 7. When including the DS model the load prediction capability is improved. which can also be seen in the C n vs  loop. Accordingly.5 Cn vs alpha 2 2 1. Including the DS model clearly improves the results when compared to the static model. since one expects more stall penetration at this velocity and also since the axial induction factor is expected to be smaller. One can also notice that higher frequency components are present in the experimental results.

3 12: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 35% span At this yaw-misalignment angle reasonable agreement was found between experiments and the BEM including the DS model.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.8 Model_noDS MEXICO Cn Model Model 0.2 0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 Azimuth angle [deg] Angle of Attack [deg] Figure 7.2 1 1 Cn 0.5 Model Model_noDS MEXICO 1.2 1.4 1. the agreement seems to be somewhat poorer.3 9: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 25% span Cn vs alpha 1.3 11: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 35% span Figure 7.6 1.3 10: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=15 deg at 25% span Cn vs Azimuth 1.8 MEXICO 0. 89 .5 Model MEXICO 1 1 0.5 2 2 Cn Cn 1.4 0.8 1. one can see that the direction of the loops is well predicted.Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects β=15 deg Cn vs Azimuth 3 3 Cn vs alpha 2.2 0. One can also notice that the loop obtained with the model at the 25% spanwise station is somewhat wider than for the 30º yaw misalignment. When the DS model is not used.4 0. Minding the C n vs  curves.6 1.8 Figure 7.5 0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 Azimuth angle [deg] Angle of Attack [deg] Figure 7.5 2.

5 Cn Cn 2 2 Model MEXICO 1.3 15: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 35% span A yaw misalignment of 45 deg will impose a wider range of angles of attack of operation and consequentially (dynamic) stall will be necessarily present.5 1 1 0.5 0.5 0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Azimuth angle [deg] Angle of Attack [deg] Figure 7. which is consistent with significant flow separation.5 Model MEXICO 1 1 0. 90 .5 0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Azimuth angle [deg] Angle of Attack [deg] Figure 7.5 2. especially concerning the downstroke of the oscillation.3 16: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 35% span Figure 7. one can see that poor agreement is found between the modelled and experimental results.5 3 3 2.5 2 2 Cn Cn 1.5 Model Model_noDS MEXICO 1. However the implemented model does not capture this trend.5 0. using the BEM model without the DS model yields a poor agreement with the experimental data. The measured data show an abrupt decay of the normal force coefficient at the highest angle of attack. for both inboard spanwise sections.5 Model Model_noDS MEXICO 1. Accordingly.5 2. When including the Beddoes-Leishman model good agreement was found between the predicted load magnitude and the measured results. One should mention that in the upstroke of the motion the predicted loading agrees quite well with the MEXICO data.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment β=45 deg Cn vs Azimuth 4 4 Cn vs alpha 3.5 3.3 13: Cn variation with azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 25% span Cn vs Azimuth 3 Figure 7. As for the C n vs  loops.3 14: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=45 deg at 25% span Cn vs alpha 3 2.

6 Cn vs alpha 1. it will effectively “see” the larger yaw error as an increased unsteadiness. In appendix G the results obtained with the DS model in a 2D situation at very high reduced frequencies are shown (k>0.12). one expects the dynamic stall model to be of less importance in predicting the loads at these sections. This may explain why the narrow.8 Model MEXICO 0. Results at other Spanwise stations At more outer spanwise stations the amplitude of the angle of attack oscillations over a revolution will necessarily be smaller. Thus. and accordingly the AOA time derivative will also increase. 60 % Spanwise section Cn vs Azimuth 1. This will mean that. 91 . so that one can understand what the computational approach actually models. and the angles of attack will also be considerably smaller than at the 25 and 35% spanwise stations.2 0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Azimuth angle [deg] Angle of Attack [deg] Figure 7.4 0.4 0.3 18: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 60% span At this spanwise section reasonable to good agreement is found between the measured and predicted loads.2 1 1 Cn Model_noDS MEXICO 0. and will persist having a C n vs  loops are so considerable contribution over the downstroke of the movement. Minding the figures above one can also say that including the DS model slightly improves the results obtained. when considering a wind speed of 24 m/s and a yaw error of 30 degrees.Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects Having the 1P frequency as reference.6 0. Still.4 1.8 Model 0. Each of the components of the normal force coefficient are represented. Since the DS model uses the AOA time derivative as input.6 Cn 0.6 1. the vortex lift component will decay more slowly. If the yaw error is larger the angle of attack amplitude over a revolution will be larger. over an oscillation.4 1. the reduced frequency of excitation depends only on the radial position. the results obtained at the 60 and 82% spanwise sections will now be shown. both in terms of magnitude and regarding the C n vs  loop. which in the present case corresponds to a blade revolution.2 1.3 17: Cn variation with Azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 60% span Figure 7. however one can argue that the actual unsteadiness of the flow is characterized by the time derivative of the angle of attack.2 0.

5 11 11.4 0 0 45 90 135 180 225 270 315 360 0. MEXICO ∣ ∣ 1 ∑ n .5 14 14.2 10 10.2 1. where the relative error in the normal coefficient averaged over the azimuth is shown in percentage.8 Model MEXICO 0. The magnitude of the error was calculated by averaging the relative error of model results over a revolution and assuming the MEXICO data to be the exact solution.6 0.6 Model_noDS MEXICO 0.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment 82 % Spanwise section Cn vs Azimuth 1.4 1. Comparing the experimental results with the implemented model.2 0. avg= 360 C −C n . The average of the error obtained at each trial is displayed in the last row: 92 . this is understandable since at this spanwise section each revolution imposes a small range of angles of attack and a low reduced frequency. ModelC 360 =1 n . The expression used to compute the average relative error in the normal force coefficient at each spanwise station and MEXICO trial is repeated here for convenience: Cn . In the data. MEXICO  The results obtained for the considered trials are shown below.5 Azimuth angle [deg] Angle of Attack [deg] Figure 7.3 19: Cn variation with Azimuth for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 82% span Figure 7.5 12 12.8 Cn Cn Model 0.4 0.5 13 13.4 Cn vs alpha 1. similarly to what was done in chapter 4.3 20: Cn variation with alpha for U=24 m/s and β=30 deg at 82% span Minding the figures above it is clear that the DS model has very little influence on the results obtained with the BEM model. it is possible to say that the normal force coefficient is somewhat overpredicted. C n vs  curves one can see that the predicted loops are in the opposite direction of experimental Quantitative Analysis With the objective of quantitatively assessing the performance of the implemented calculation method the average relative error in the normal force coefficient was computed for the BEM code including the DS model.2 1 1 0.

Specifically regarding the inboard sections.2 Table 7.9 2. Particularly at large yaw angles. since the average error in the considered trial is below 10%.1 24.9 14.3 25.4 12.2: Relative error in Maximum Cn over a revolution The table shows that good agreement was obtained for the maximum normal force coefficient over a revolution. where the relative error in the maximum normal coefficient is shown in percentage. However.6 82% span 5.9 14.0 2. MAX (7.4 12. and also since the extreme loads occurring over a revolution are important in assessing the blade's robustness and fatigue resistance.6 82% span 10.6 11. where the DS model will have a greater influence.6 60% span 9.1 18.3.5 7.MEXICO . MAX∣ C n .1 5.9 13. according to: Cn .Results of the BEM code including the Dynamic Stall model and rotational effects Trial 152 153 160 167 Average U (m/s) 18 24 24 24 β (deg) 30 30 15 45 25% span 12.5 11.1 7. except for the 25% spanwise station.1 25.MEXICO .1: Relative error in Cn averaged over a revolution From the table one can see that the average error in the predicted normal force coefficient is approximately 12% . MAX = ∣C n .5 9.0 2.2 3. The average of the error obtained at each trial is displayed in the last row: Trial 152 153 160 167 Average U (m/s) 18 24 24 24 β (deg) 30 30 15 45 25% span 2. Model .MAX −C n .3 6. even when large yaw misalignments are imposed.5 9. 93 .3.1) The results obtained for the considered trials are shown below.2 15. with an average error of approximately 7%.0 19.1 14. the predicted C n values substantially differ from the experimental data when considering azimuthal positions from 0 to 180 deg.9 0.4 12.2 35% span 0. which explains the relatively large average error in the normal force coefficient found at these stations.7 60% span 12.8 7. the figures included before show good agreement between the predicted and experimental loading during the upstroke of the movement.3.0 6. one can say that the implemented code is capable of predicting the load magnitude occurring over a revolution.2 1. To quantify this trend.1 4.7 35% span 8. the relative error in the maximum normal force coefficient over a revolution was computed.4 Table 7.0 12.3 17. It was mentioned before that the agreement found in the downstroke of the motion at the more inboard stations was not always satisfactory.

these two phenomena. Specifically considering the inboard stations. over a revolution the imposed range of angles of attack will be smaller. one can come to the following conclusions: • The variation of the normal force coefficient with the azimuth angle was studied. consequentially their influence on the total loading taking place in wind turbine's airfoil section is very complex to describe.4) General Remarks and Conclusions Minding the results obtained and the discussion above. and results show that the implemented model is able to capture the trends displayed in the experimental results. Including the DS model in the BEM code generally improves the load prediction capability when compared to the static BEM. In the present case. Generally speaking reasonable to good agreement was found between the predicted loading and the MEXICO data. 94 . from axial flow trials. • • • • • As a final remark. with emphasis given at inboard spanwise stations. C n vs  loops have also been plotted. and the reduced frequency will also be decreased. one can only expect to approximate the actual loading to an engineering level. one should always bare in mind that the DS model is of a semi-empirical nature.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment 7. the accuracy obtained in predicting the maximum C n was approximately 7%. denoted by an abrupt decay in the normal force coefficent while the implemented model does not predict this trend. and consequentially the amplitude of the loading over a revolution is well predicted. as was done in the present implementation. However. However. in the downstroke motion measurements seem to indicate that significant separation occurs. are intrinsically related. with the data being taken from 2D static conditions. The average error in the predicted loads over a revolution is approximately 12%. and consequentially including the DS brings only a slight improvement to the load predicting capability of the model at more outboard stations. In the C n vs  loops the direction of motion was indicated with arrows. and by superimposing their effects. However. As for the other spanwise sections. where the DS influence is larger. Specifically when considering large yaw-misalignments the agreement found in the C n vs  loops is poor. especially when large angles of attack are imposed. reasonable to good agreement was also found between the predicted and experimental loads. except for the 25% spanwise station. using the angle of attack from the BEM code. due to the rotational augmentation. rotational augmentation and dynamic stall. the static data given as input to the dynamic stall model has a 3D dependency. quite good agreement was found in the upstroke motion. However. and was developed for a 2D situation. but one must have present that this C n    characteristic was derived in steady conditions. except for the 82% spanwise section. the predicted maximum normal force coefficient occurring over a revolution was within 10% of the measured values. since they are part of the boundary layer flow around each profile.

The DS model was adapted to consider thick airfoil sections by implementing different LE stall criteria. the pressure distributions found in the MEXICO data are coherent and yield smooth curves. MAX criterion clearly yields better agreement with measurements and consequentially it was selected for subsequent computations. 95 . In some MEXICO data points the pressure distribution at the 35% station was also very atypical. and consequentially it was selected to implement the DS model. Finally the DS model was implemented in the BEM code and the results of the complete model were compared with the MEXICO data obtained at large wind tunnel speeds. Comparing both BEM models it was clear that the 'Empirical BEM' yielded the best agreement with experimental data. The most important conclusions drawn in this assignment are now stated: • Regarding the MEXICO data. since little separation is expected to occur in such conditions. At the 25% spanwise station a pressure sensor consistently showed odd readings and consequentially it was not considered in the computation of the sectional forces. 2D wind tunnel experimental data indicated that even when very thick airfoils are considered LE stall may occur. indicating some sensor malfunction in the aft region of the airfoil section.1) Conclusions The present thesis developed a BEM code for a yaw-misaligned turbine. Posteriorly the Beddoes-Leishman DS model was adapted to the wind turbine framework and validated against 2D wind tunnel aerodynamic data from the OSU. often unusual pressure distributions have been found at the inboard stations.Conclusions and Recommendations 8) Conclusions and Recommendations 8. The MEXICO data had to be pre-processed in order to be used for validation. From the methods tested. • • • The Beddoes-Leishman DS model was successfully implemented and results were compared against unsteady 2D data experimental data. Relatively high wind tunnel speeds were chosen to perform the validation. which was validated using MEXICO data obtained at moderately high wind tunnel speeds. generally a good agreement was found. • • Two BEM methods were implemented and tested against MEXICO data. the C N . Consequentially it seems unrealistic to disregard LE separation in HAWT application profiles simply because the airfoils are thick. and thus were considered reliable to compute aerodynamic forces from. before any force calculation was performed at this spanwise section the pressure distribution obtained was visually inspected for each data point. As for the other spanwise sections. For this reason.

At the inboard stations. reasonable to good agreement was found. The most important are now mentioned: • Results from the MEXICO indicate that. Even though this phenomenon was to some degree justified in the current document and can be explained. up to a relative radius of 0. • • The DS model was implemented in the BEM code. Still. accordingly it was assumed that this critical angle of attack remains constant for all rotationally augmented spanwise sections. the maximum value of C N over a revolution obtained with the model was within 8% of experimental results.2) Recommendations Throughout this research there were several topics that captured the attention of the author but which unfortunately there was no time to pursue further. 8. Still. and it was also clear that including the DS model improved the load predicting capability when compared to the BEM code using static aerodynamic airfoil coefficients. and the predicted loads have been compared with the MEXICO data obtained at high wind tunnel speeds in yawed configuration. the results indicate that.Validating the Beddoes-Leishman Dynamic Stall Model in a HAWT environment • Regarding rotational augmentation.5. for the 25% span. empirical corrections for the lift and drag 3D coefficients have been compared with results from the MEXICO using an inverse local BEM approach. and even when large yaw error were considered. • • • As a final remark it should be noted that rotational augmentation and DS are complex phenomena which are intrinsically related. Generally speaking. This is important especially for blade fatigue calculations and is an encouraging result. further experimental validation is required to confirm this hypothesis. LE stall is not affected by rotational augmentation. the model did not capture the experimental trend in the downstroke motion in a satisfactory way. the loading during the upstroke of the motion was quite well predicted by the model. Particularly at large yaw angles. and reasonable to good agreement was found. even though the experimental trends were not always captured. These corrections have thus been implemented in the BEM model. the magnitude of the loading amplitude occurring over a revolution in a yawed configuration at high wind speeds was reasonably well predicted. Results indicate that the angle of attack at which the leading edge separation occurs seems to be unaffected by rotational augmentation. but their effects have been superimposed in the current model. 96 . This is thought to be related with the increased unsteadiness brought upon by large yaw misalignments which the DS model “sees” as an increased reduced frequency.

• 97 . it would also be very interesting to implement other DS model in the BEM code and assess their performance. However one can argue that the local degree of unsteadiness is related with the time derivative of the angle of attack. DS models could thus be validated experimentally for very high reduced frequencies. In yawed operation. it could be worthwhile to take the critical C N as the potential normal force coefficient one obtains when using the angle of attack at which the maximum C N occurs. which might occur when large yaw misalignments are present. Regarding the DS model implemented in this assignment. which is related also with the yaw angle and wind speed magnitude. This procedure could start by considering the 3 other approaches highlighted before.Conclusions and Recommendations • • Naturally. Since the criterion used seems to predict LE stall slightly sooner than experiments show. the reduced frequency an airfoil section is working at is usually estimated using the 1P as excitation source. one could think of different criteria to denote the LE separation occurrence.

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