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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The work presented in this thesis is done under the supervision of Associate
Professor Kevin Wong, Kai Fai. During the course of it, Dr. Wong has given the
author utmost guidance, assistance and encouragement. For this, the author wishes
to express sincere gratitude to Dr. Wong.

The acknowledgements of the author are also given to the School of Civil
and Environmental Engineering of Nanyang Technological University for the good
research environment it provides.

In addition, the help and suggestion of all friends are highly appreciated.

Finally, a special gratitude of the author goes to her family members, her
parents, Wang Shijie and Zang Quantong, especially to her husband, Dr. Liu
Xianbin and her pretty daughter, Liu Siming. Only with the great assistance and
constant support of them, the fulfillment of this work becomes possible.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……………………………………………………….. I

TABLE OF CONTENTS…………………………………………………………. II

SUMMARY………………………………………………………………………. VI

LIST OF FIGURES……………………………………………………………. VIII

LIST OF TABLES……………………………………………………………... XIII

LIST OF SYMBOLS…………………………………………………………….XV

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION……………………………………………...1

1.1 Background of This Research………………………………………. 1


1.2 Main Contributions…………………………………………………..3
1.3 Arrangement of Contents…………………………………………… 4

CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW………………………………..............7

2.1 General Statement……………………………………………………7


2.2 Energy-Based Seismic Analysis Method…………………………… 7
2.2.1 Evaluation of Energy Dissipation Capacity of Structures………...8
2.2.2 Energy-Based Damage Index…………………………………….13
2.3 Seismic Beam-Column Joint models of Moment Resisting Steel
Frames……………………………………………………………….15
2.3.1 Connections………………………………………………………16
2.3.2 Panel Zones……………………………………………………… 19
2.4 Nonlinear Stochastic Dynamic Study……………………………... 24
2.4.1 Analytical Methods……………………………………………… 25
2.4.2 Numerical Method……………………………………………......31
2.5 Discussion on This Research………………………………………. 32

II
CHAPTER 3 SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF INELASTIC STRUCTURES
WITH FORCE ANALOGY METHOD……………………..35

3.1 General Statement…………………………………………………..35


3.2 Force Analogy Method…………………………………………….. 36
3.2.1 Basic Concepts…………………………………………………... 36
3.2.2 Force Analogy Method…………………………………………...38
3.3 Inelastic Dynamic State Space Analysis Using The Force Analogy
Method……………………………………………………………… 41
3.4 Modified Force Analogy Method with Static Condensation…….. 43
3.5 Energy Evaluation Method of Inelastic Structures under
Earthquake Loading……………………………………………….. 48
3.5.1 General Energy Formulation…………………………………….48
3.5.2 Energy Formulation with Static Condensation…………………..50
3.6 Summary……………………………………………………………. 52

CHAPTER 4 DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INELASTIC STRUCTURES


WITH RIGID END OFFSETS……………………………… 54

4.1 General Statement…………………………………………………..54


4.2 Structural Modeling with Rigid End Offsets……………………...55
4.3 Member Stiffness Matrix with Rigid End Offsets………………...56
4.4 Numerical Examples……………………………………………….. 63
4.4.1 Example 1: One-Story One-Bay Moment Resisting Frame........... 64
4.4.2 Example 2: Six-Story Moment Resisting Frame………………… 71
4.5 Summary………………………………………………………….… 80

CHAPTER 5 DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INELASTIC STRUCTURES


WITH PANEL ZONE DEFORMATION…………………...82

5.1 General Statement…………………………………………………..82


5.2 Panel Zone Deformation Model…………………………………… 83
5.3 Numerical Examples……………………………………………….. 85
5.3.1 Example 1: One-Story One-Bay Moment Resisting Frame……... 85
5.3.2 Example 2: Six-Story Moment Resisting Frame………………… 91

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5.4 Summary…………………………………………………………... 121

CHAPTER 6 STOCHASTIC DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INELASTIC


STRUCTURES WITH THE FORCE ANALOGY
METHOD…………………………………………………… 124

6.1 General Statement…………………………………………………124


6.2 Stochastic Force Analogy Method (SFAM)……………………... 125
6.2.1 Solution to the Equation of Motion Based on the Force Analogy
Method and State Space Method………………………………..125
6.2.2 Recursive Equation Used in the Stochastic Analysis…………... 127
6.2.3 Expressions of Random Variables and Boundary of Domains
Based on the Force Analogy Method…………………………... 131
6.2.4 Calculation of Joint Probability Density Function…………….. 138
6.2.5 Calculation of the Variance and the Covariance……………….140
6.3 Numerical Example………………………………………………..146
6.4 Summary…………………………………………………………... 151

CHAPTER 7 SIMULATION AND RELIABILITY STUDY ON


INELASTIC STRUCTURES WITH RIGID END OFFSETS
AND DEFORMABLE PANEL ZONES…………………... 154

7.1 General Statement…………………………………………………154


7.2 Simulation of the Earthquake Ground Acceleration……………155
7.2.1 The Random Model of Ground Acceleration………………… 155
7.2.2 Generation of Artificial Ground Acceleration……………….. 157
7.3 Monte Carlo Simulation Study on Inelastic Structures with Rigid
End Offsets Using the Force Analogy Method………………….. 164
7.4 Monte Carlo Simulation Study on Inelastic Structures with
Deformable Panel Zones Using the Force Analogy Method…… 175
7.5 Reliability Analysis of Inelastic Structures with Rigid End Offsets
and Deformable Panel Zones…………………………………….. 191
7.5.1 Reliability Analysis of Inelastic Structures with Rigid End Offsets
…………………………………………………………………. 193
7.5.2 Reliability Analysis of Inelastic Structures with Deformable Panel
Zones…………………………………………………………… 196

IV
7.6 Summary…………………………………………………………... 204

CHAPTER 8 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS………… 206

8.1 Conclusions……………………………………………………...… 206


8.2 Recommendations………………………………………………… 208

REFERENCES………………………………………………………………..…211

V
SUMMARY

Severe earthquakes in most cases will cause significant inelastic


deformation in conventional building structures. Furthermore, due to the inherent
uncertainty of the earthquake excitation, random process should be a more
appropriate model to represent this type of ground motion. Therefore, from the
1950’s, seismic analysis of structures has been divided into two different directions,
deterministic and stochastic. Although in the past fifty years stochastic dynamics
and reliability analysis based on random vibration have made great progress in
various aspects, the traditional deterministic design procedures is still in the
dominance. More effort in the field of nonlinear stochastic dynamic study is
necessary with the objective of general application of stochastic dynamic
methodology.
In this research, the force analogy method is used as a main tool to analyze
the inelastic dynamic response and energy dissipation of structures in both
deterministic and stochastic fields. A simple analytical method of modeling the
panel zone deformation is proposed. The model of rigid end offsets is also included
to give a more accurate structural model. New stiffness matrices for members with
two ends being rigid are obtained using the unit displacement method. With the aid
of static condensation, each term in the stiffness matrices using in force analogy
method can be derived simply through multiplying by a scale factor, which only
depends on the sizes of rigid end and offset lengths.
Based on the proposed model, numerical simulations are performed on a
one-story one-bay frame and a six-story moment resisting frame. Comparison of
results, such as global responses, global energy dissipation, local responses, and
local energy dissipation, between different models shows that rigid end offsets as
well as elastic and inelastic deformation of panel zones have significant effects on
dynamic behavior of inelastic structures subjected to earthquake excitation. In
addition, the Monte Carlo simulation method using 500 sample ground acceleration
time histories performed on a six-story moment resisting frame based on the
proposed model also indicates the significant influence of rigid end offsets and
panel zone deformation on structural inelastic dynamic behaviors in a statistic sense.

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This type of significant effect is further verified by investigating the probability of
failure of individual plastic hinge location based on the concept of the plastic
energy dissipated at individual plastic hinge location.
Finally, a new stochastic dynamic analysis method for inelastic structures
based on the force analogy method is proposed for the first time. The force analogy
method combined with the state space method has been proven to be efficient in
solving the equation of motion in inelastic dynamic analysis, since in the recursive
process only initial stiffness is involved, while the inelastic property of structures is
reflected by the inelastic displacement. This advantage of the force analogy method
is also evident in stochastic inelastic dynamic analysis. The proposed stochastic
force analogy method can produce the covariance functions of displacement,
velocity, inelastic displacement, and plastic rotation at individual plastic hinge
location. The reasonability of the proposed method is demonstrated by means of the
agreement of results of the proposed method with those of the Monte Carlo
simulation method.

VII
LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 3.1 Bilinear Stiffness Relationship……………………………………. 37

Figure 3.2 Force Analogy Method……………………………………………. 41

Figure 4.1 Additional DOFs at Plastic Hinges………………………………... 56

Figure 4.2 Model of Member with Rigid End Offsets………………………... 56

Figure 4.3 Derivation of Element Stiffness Matrix for Member 1……………. 58

Figure 4.4 Derivation of Element Stiffness Matrix with Two Ends Being
Rigid……………………………………………………………….. 60

Figure 4.5 Calculation of Moments at Plastic Hinges Due to Different Unit


Displacement Patterns ……………………………………………...62

Figure 4.6 Ground Acceleration Time History of 1940 El-Centro Earthquake. 63

Figure 4.7 Acceleration, Velocity, and Displacement Spectra for 1940 El-
Centro Earthquake………………………………………………….64

Figure 4.8 One-Story One-Bay Moment Resisting Frame……………………. 65

Figure 4.9 Structural Global Responses of One-Story One-Bay Frame for Cases
NEO and REO……………………………………………………... 68

Figure 4.10 Some Local Responses of One-Story One-Bay Frame for Cases NEO
and REO…………………………………………………………… 69

Figure 4.11 Structural Energy Dissipation of One-Story One-Bay Frame for


Cases NEO and REO……………………………………………… 70

Figure 4.12 Six-Story Moment Resisting Frame……………………………….. 72

Figure 4.13 Model of Six-Story Moment Resisting Frame…………………….. 73

Figure 4.14 Structural Global Responses of MDOF Structure for Cases NEO and
REO………………………………………………………………... 75

Figure 4.15 Energy Dissipation of MDOF Structure for Cases NEO and REO.. 76

Figure 4.16 Plastic Rotation of MDOF Structure at Selected PHLs for Cases
NEO and REO ……………………………………………………...78

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Figure 4.17 Plastic Energy Dissipation of MDOF Structure at Selected PHLs for
Cases NEO and REO……………………………………………… 79

Figure 5.1 Structural Model with Rotational Springs………………………… 83

Figure 5.2 Effect of Rotational Spring on Joint Deformation………………… 84

Figure 5.3 One-Story One-Bay Moment Resisting Frame……………………. 86

Figure 5.4 Structural Global Responses of One-Story One-Bay Frame for


Different Rigidities in Panel Zones………………………………... 88

Figure 5.5 Some Local Responses of One-Story One-Bay Frame for Different
Rigidities in Panel Zones………………………………………….. 89

Figure 5.6 Structural Energy Dissipation of One-Story One-Bay Frame for


Different Rigidities in Panel Zones………………………………... 90

Figure 5.7 Model of Six-Story Moment Resisting Frame…………………….. 92

Figure 5.8 Structural Global Responses of MDOF Structure with Different


Rotational Spring Stiffness………………………………………... 94

Figure 5.9 Energy Dissipation of MDOF Structure with Different Rotational


Spring Stiffness……………………………………………………. 95

Figure 5.10 Plastic Rotation of MDOF Structure at Selected PHLs with Different
Rotational Spring Stiffness………………………………………... 99

Figure 5.11 Plastic Energy Dissipation of MDOF Structure at Selected PHLs


with Different Rotational Spring Stiffness………………………..100

Figure 5.12 Maximum Plastic Rotation and Plastic Energy at Each PHL with
Softer Rotational Spring k s1 = 4.80 × 105 kN-m/rad………………103

Figure 5.13 Maximum Plastic Rotation and Plastic Energy at Each PHL with
Soft Rotational Spring ks 2 = 5.55 ×105 kN-m/rad……………….. 105

Figure 5.14 Maximum Plastic Rotation and Plastic Energy at Each PHL with
Stiff Rotational Spring ks 3 = 1.55 × 106 kN-m/rad……………….. 107

Figure 5.15 Maximum Plastic Rotation and Plastic Energy at Each PHL with
Stiffer Rotational Spring ks 4 = 3.40 ×106 kN-m/rad……………... 109

Figure 5.16 Maximum Plastic Rotation and Plastic Energy at Each PHL with
Fully Rigid Spring ks 5 = ∞ kN-m/rad…………………………… 111

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Figure 5.17 Comparison of Maximum Global Responses between Models with
Different Stiffness and Yield Moment of Rotational Springs…….113

Figure 5.18 Comparison of Maximum Energy Dissipation between Models with


Different Stiffness and Yield Moment of Rotational Springs…….114

Figure 5.19 Comparison of Maximum Local Responses in Columns between


Models with Different Stiffness and Yield Moment of Rotational
Springs…………………………………………………………… 115

Figure 5.20 Comparison of Maximum Local Responses in Selected Beams


between Models with Different Stiffness and Yield Moment of
Rotational Springs………………………………………………... 116

Figure 5.21 Comparison of Maximum Local Responses in Selected Beam-


Column Joints between Models with Different Stiffness and Yield
Moment of Rotational Springs…………………………………… 117

Figure 6.1 Single degree of freedom of System with PHL at the Base of the
Column…………………………………………………………… 147

Figure 6.2 Time Histories of Response Statistics of SDOF System under Non-
Stationary Excitation……………………………………………... 149

Figure 7.1 Deterministic Temporal Modulation Function…………………... 156

Figure 7.2 Kanai-Tajimi Power Spectrum……………………………………156

Figure 7.3 Simulated Earthquake Ground Motion Time History-Sample 1… 160

Figure 7.4 Simulated Earthquake Ground Motion Time History-Sample 2… 161

Figure 7.5 Simulated Earthquake Ground Motion Time History-Sample 3… 162

Figure 7.6 Simulated Earthquake Ground Motion Time History-Sample 4… 163

Figure 7.7 Standard Deviation of Displacement per Floor of MDOF Structure


for Cases NEO and REO…………………………………………. 168

Figure 7.8 Standard Deviation of Velocity per Floor of MDOF Structure for
Cases NEO and REO…………………………………………….. 169

Figure 7.9 Standard Deviation of Acceleration per Floor of MDOF Structure for
Cases NEO and REO…………………………………………….. 170

Figure 7.10 Mean and Standard Deviation of Energy Dissipation of MDOF


Structure for Cases NEO and REO………………………………. 171

X
Figure 7.11 Standard Deviation of Plastic Rotation of MDOF Structure at
Selected PHLs for Cases NEO and REO………………………… 173

Figure 7.12 Mean and Standard Deviation of Plastic Energy Dissipation of


MDOF Structure at Selected PHLs for Cases NEO and REO…… 174

Figure 7.13 Maximum Mean and Standard Deviation of Global Response and
Energy Dissipation of MDOF Structure with Different Yield
Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-
m/rad……………………………………………………………... 179

Figure 7.14 Standard Deviation of Global Response of MDOF Structure with


Different Yield Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness
= 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad…………………………………………….180

Figure 7.15 Mean of Energy Dissipation of MDOF Structure with Different


Yield Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-
m/rad……………………………………………………………... 181

Figure 7.16 Standard Deviation of Energy Dissipation of MDOF Structure with


Different Yield Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness
= 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad……………………………………………. 182

Figure 7.17 Maximum STD of Plastic Rotation and Maximum Mean and STD of
Plastic Energy at each PHL with Different Yield Moments of
Rotational Springs with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad………... 183

Figure 7.18 Maximum STD of Plastic Rotation at each PHL with Different Yield
Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-
m/rad……………………………………………………………... 184

Figure 7.19 Maximum Mean of Plastic Energy at each PHL with Different Yield
Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-
m/rad……………………………………………………………... 185

Figure 7.20 Maximum STD of Plastic Energy at each PHL with Different Yield
Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-
m/rad……………………………………………………………... 186

Figure 7.21 Standard Deviation of Plastic Rotation of MDOF Structure at


Selected PHLs with Different Yield Moments of Rotational Springs
with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad……………………………. 187

Figure 7.22 Mean of Plastic Energy Dissipation of MDOF Structure at Selected


PHLs with Different Yield Moments of Rotational Springs with
Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad………………………………….. 188

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Figure 7.23 Standard Deviation of Plastic Energy Dissipation of MDOF
Structure at Selected PHLs with Different Yield Moments of
Rotational Springs with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad………... 189

Figure 7.24 Typical M − θ ′′ Curve Samples of Some Plastic Hinges………...190

Figure 7.25 Histograms of Plastic Energy at Some Selected PHLs for Case
NEO……………………………………………………………… 194

Figure 7.26 Histograms of Plastic Energy at Some Selected PHLs for Case
REO…………………………………………………………….…195

Figure 7.27 Probability of Failure at Individual PHL for Cases NEO and
REO……………………………………………………………….196

Figure 7.28 Histograms of Plastic Energy at Selected PHLs for M s = 1695 kN-
m with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad…………………………..199

Figure 7.29 Histograms of Plastic Energy at Selected PHLs for M s = 3050 kN-
m with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad…………………………. 200

Figure 7.30 Histograms of Plastic Energy at Selected PHLs for M s = 5875 kN-
m with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad…………………………. 201

Figure 7.31 Histograms of Plastic Energy at Selected PHLs for M s = 11000 kN-
m with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad…………………………. 202

Figure 7.32 Probability of Failure at each PHL of MDOF Structure with


Different Yield Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness
= 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad…………………………………………….203

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LIST OF TABLES

Table 4.1 Rigid End and Offset Properties of Each Member ...........................66

Table 4.2 Maximum Structural Global and Local Responses of One-Story One-
Bay Frame for Cases NEO and REO................................................67

Table 4.3 Maximum Global Responses and Energy Dissipation of MDOF


Structure for Cases NEO and REO...................................................74

Table 4.4 Maximum Local Responses and Energy Dissipation of MDOF


Structure for Cases NEO and REO...................................................77

Table 5.1 Maximum Structural Global and Local Responses of One-Story One-
Bay Frame with Different Rotational Spring Stiffness.....................87

Table 5.2 Maximum Global Responses and Energy Dissipation of MDOF


Structure with Different Rotational Spring Stiffness........................93

Table 5.3 Maximum Local Responses and Energy Dissipation of MDOF


Structure with Different Rotational Spring Stiffness........................96

Table 5.4 Maximum Responses of MDOF Structure with Different Yield


Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness ks1 = 4.80 × 105 kN-
m/rad ...............................................................................................102

Table 5.5 Maximum Responses of MDOF Structure with Different Yield


Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness ks 2 = 5.55 ×105 kN-
m/rad ...............................................................................................104

Table 5.6 Maximum Responses of MDOF Structure with Different Yield


Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness ks 3 = 1.55 × 106 kN-
m/rad ...............................................................................................106

Table 5.7 Maximum Responses of MDOF Structure with Different Yield


Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness ks 4 = 3.40 × 106 kN-
m/rad ...............................................................................................108

Table 5.8 Maximum Responses of MDOF Structure with Different Yield


Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness = ∞ kN-m/rad ......110

Table 7.1 Maximum Mean and Standard Deviation of Global Response and
Energy Dissipation of MDOF Structure for Cases NEO and REO 167

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Table 7.2 Maximum Mean and Standard Deviation of Local Response and
Energy Dissipation of MDOF Structure for Cases NEO and REO 172

Table 7.3 Maximum Mean and Standard Deviation of Global Response and
Energy Dissipation of MDOF Structure with Different Yield
Moments of Rotational Springs with Stiffness = 1.55 × 10 6 kN-m/rad
........................................................................................................178

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LIST OF SYMBOLS

a g (t ) Earthquake ground acceleration

ak Discrete form of earthquake ground acceleration

a g (t ) Earthquake ground acceleration vector

A Cross sectional area of member


A State space matrix
c Damping
C Damping
C Damping matrix
d Depth of beam
DE Damping energy
E Young’s modulus
E [ xk xk ] Covariance of relative displacement and relative velocity

E [ xk xk′′ ] Covariance of relative displacement and inelastic displacement

E [ xkθ k′′] Covariance of relative displacement and plastic rotation

E [ xk xk′′ ] Covariance of relative velocity and inelastic displacement

E [ xkθ k′′] Covariance of relative velocity and plastic rotation

E [ xk′′xk′′ ] Covariance of inelastic displacement

E [ z k xk′′ ] Covariance of state vector and inelastic displacement

E ⎡⎣ z k zTk ⎤⎦ Covariance of Structural state vector

E [ z kθ k′′] Covariance of state vector and plastic rotation

E [ x(t ) ] Mean of samples

Fs (t ) Force at any time

Fy Yield strength

F pc Inelastic displacement transition matrix

FRF (t ) Restoring force vector

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g Gravity acceleration
GXX (ω ) One-sided power spectral density function
H Earthquake transition matrix
Ib Moment of inertia of the beam

Ic Moment of inertia of the column


IE Input energy
I Identity matrix
k Time step
ke Initial stiffness

ks Spring rotational stiffness

kt Post-yield stiffness
K Stiffness
KE Kinetic energy
K Stiffness matrix
K nn Stiffness matrix after static condensation

KP Structural member recovery force


KP Structural member recovery force matrix

KP Structural member recovery force matrix after static condensation


KR Structural member restoring moment
KR Structural member restoring moment matrix

KR Structural member restoring moment matrix after static


condensation
L Length of member
Lb Length of beam

Lc Length of column

m (1) Total number of potential plastic hinge locations


(2) Mass
M Mass
Mb Yield moment of the beam

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Mc Yield moment of the column

Mk Discrete form of total moment

Ms Yield moment of the rotational spring


M Mass matrix
M (t ) Total moment vector
M ′(t ) Elastic moment vector
M ′′(t ) Inelastic moment vector
Mk Discrete form of total moment vector

M RF (t ) Restoring moment vector


n Structural degree of freedom
N (1) Original degree of freedom of structure
(2) Number of samples
Pf Probability of failure of individual plastic hinge location (PHL)

PE Plastic energy
PEcapacity Capacity of plastic energy dissipation at individual PHL

PEi Plastic energy at the i th plastic hinge

PEmax Maximum plastic energy dissipated at individual PHL

S (t ) Stationary process
SE Strain energy
S [ x(t ) ] Standard deviation of samples

t Time
t0 Initial time

tk Time at step k

t k +1 Time at step k+1


T (1) Natural period of structure
(2) Time duration
Tn Natural period of structure

V [ x(t ) ] Variance of samples

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x(t ) (1) Relative displacement
(2) Displacement
xk Discrete form of relative displacement

xy Yield displacement

X(t ) Relative displacement vector


Xk Discrete form of relative displacement vector

x (t ) Relative velocity
x k Discrete form of relative velocity
 (t )
X Relative velocity vector
x(t ) Relative acceleration
 (t )
X Relative acceleration vector
x ′(t ) Elastic displacement
X′(t ) Elastic displacement vector
x ′′(t ) Inelastic displacement
x k′′ Discrete form of inelastic displacement

X′′(t ) Inelastic displacement vector


X′k′ Discrete form of inelastic displacement vector

X g (t ) Ground displacement vector


 (t )
X Earthquake ground acceleration vector
g

Y(t ) Absolute displacement vector


 (t )
Y Absolute velocity vector
 (t )
Y Absolute acceleration vector
z (t ) Structural state vector
zk Discrete form of structural state vector

z (t ) Differential of structural state vector


∆t Time interval
∆ω Frequency increment
αg, βg Constants in deterministic modulation function

XVIII
σy Yield stress

σ a2 k
Variance of ground acceleration

σ x2 k
Variance of relative displacement

σ x2 k
Variance of relative velocity

σ θ2′′ k
Variance of plastic rotation

µa k
Mean of ground acceleration

µx k
Mean of relative displacement

µ x k
Mean of relative velocity

µθ ′′k
Mean of plastic rotation

εµ Ultimate strain

ζ Damping ratio
ζg Damping ratio of ground

ωg Natural frequency of ground

ωk Discrete form of frequency

ωl Left boundary of frequency interval

ωn Natural frequency of structure

ωr Right boundary of frequency interval


φ (t ) Deterministic modulation function
Φ0 Spectrum level

Φ XX (ω ) Two-sided power spectral density function

ϕk Random phase angles

θ ′′(t ) Plastic rotation


θ k′′ Discrete form of plastic rotation

Θ ′′(t ) Plastic rotation vector


∆Θ ′′(t ) Incremental form of plastic rotation vector
Θ ′k′ Discrete form of plastic rotation vector

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