TH-0608 | Brake | Crimes

T

H
E
T
H
E
HERALD HERALD
50 C 50 C
P
R
S
R
T

S
T
D
U
S

P
O
S
T
A
G
E
P
A
I
D
D
e
l
p
h
o
s
,

O
h
i
o
P
e
r
m
i
t

N
o
.

2
1
E
C
R

W
S
S
JUNE 8, 2011 VOLUME 102 NUMBER 22 © THE HERALD NEWSPAPERS SERVING SYLVANIA FOR OVER 100 YEARS • 12,500 CIRCULATION
T
H
E
T
H
E
HERALD HERALD
50 C 50 C
STOP IN AND SAVE
Quick Lane at
Brondes Ford Toledo
5545 Secor Road,
Toledo, OH 43623
419-471-2969
FREE
Car Wash with any purchase
or service!
Motorcraft
®
Premium
Synthetic Blend Oil
& Filter Change
$
19
95
Using the oil recommended for your vehicle
helps save fuel.
Up to five quarts of Motorcraft
®
oil and Motorcraft oil filter. Taxes, diesel
vehicles and disposal fees extra. See Quick Lane
®
Manager for vehicle
applications and details. Offer valid with coupon. Expires: 01/31/11.
SAVE ON EVERYDAY SERVICE
GET WIPERS THAT
DO THE WORK FOR YOU
Motorcraft
®
Premium
Wear Indicator Wiper
Blades
$
19
95
With Wear Indicator that
signals when to replace.
Per pair, installed. Taxes extra. See Quick Lane
®
Manager for vehicle
applications and details. Offer valid with coupon. Expires: 01/31/11.
OFF
COMPLETE
BRAKE SERVICE
Save on brake service with the experts.
Quick Lane®-installed retail Motorcraft® or Genuine Ford brake pads or shoes
only, on most cars and light trucks. Front or rear axle. Includes machining rotors
or drums. Taxes extra. Offer valid with coupon. See Quick Lane
®
Manager for
vehicle applications and details. Expires: 01/31/11.
$
10
ANDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAVE
2
Save on everyday service
Motorcraft
®
Premium Synthetic
Blend OIl and filter change
$
19
95
Using the oil recommended for your
vehicle helps save fuel.
Up to five quarts of Motorcraft
®
oil and Motorcraft oil filter.
Taxes, diesel vehicles, and disposal fees extra. See Quick
Lane Manager for vehicle applications and details. Offer
valid with coupon. Expires 12/31/11 SH
Get wipers that do the work for you
Motorcraft
®
Premium
Wiper Blades
$
20
Under
Installed
Per pair installed. See Quick Lane Manager for vehicle
applications and details Offer valid with coupon. SH
Play it Safe
FREE brake inspection
Save on brake service with the experts.
INspect brake friction material, caliper operation, rotors,
drums, hoses and connections. Inspect parking brake for
damge and proper operation See Quick Lane Manager for
vehicle applications and details. Expires 12/31/11 SH
Up to fve quarts of Motorcraft
®
oil and Motorcraft oil flter. Taxes, diesel vehicles and disposal
fees extra. See Quick Lane Manager for vehicle applications and details. Offer valid with coupon.
Motorcraft
®
Premium Synthetic
Blend Oil and flter change
Save on everyday service
Using the oil recommended for your vehicle helps save fuel.
$
19
95
Expires: 12/31/11
Motorcraft
®
Premium
Wiper Blades
Per pair, installed. Taxes extra. See Quick Lane Manager for vehicle applications and details.
Offer valid with coupon.
Get wipers that do the work for you
Under
Installed
$
20
Expires: 12/31/11
Inspect brake friction material, caliper operation, rotors, drums, hoses and connections.
Inspect parking brake for damage and proper operation. See Quick Lane Manager for vehicle
exclusions and details.
Play it safe
FREE brake inspection
Save on brake service with the experts.
Expires: 12/31/11
Quick Lane at Brondes Ford Toledo
5545 Secor Road
Toledo, OH 43623
(419) 471-2969
N
S
E W
Alexis Rd
S
e
c
o
r R
d
1/4 mile south of Alexis Rd at
Brondes Ford Toledo.
5005 W. Alexis Rd. • Sylvania, OH 43560
419-841-2442 office Accredited BBB
*WE BUY CARS • GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL
SPECIAL: 2008 Mitsubishi Endeavor, 70K, Auto,
6 cyl., AC, CD, Loaded, $13,990
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
Up to 100 Miles Per Gallon!
Dave Has Scooters!
Dave Stewart Auto Sales LTD
Photos from fire station
open house pg 8
Therma-Tru
®
has been a part of your community for nearly 50 years.
Thanks for being such a beautiful neighbor. www.thermatru.com/toledo
We’ve got a handle on beautiful doors.
TTD - 0050A TTD149_SH_10.5x3_0050A.indd 1 6/3/11 3:00 PM
T
H
E
T
H
E
HERALD HERALD
50 C 50 C
SYLVANIA- The
Olander Park System
(TOPS) issued a $1,000
reward for information
leading to the arrest and
conviction of the persons
who committed recent
vandalism at Fossil Park
and Olander Park.
The frst act of
vandalism occurred at
Fossil’s solar-powered
restroom between closing
Friday, May 13, and
opening Saturday, May
14. The second occurred
at the Olander Swim &
Beach Building after
closing Tuesday, May 31,
and opening Wednesday,
June 1, coinciding with
Sylvania School District
seniors being out of class.
“It is disappointing
individuals damaged the
solar-powered restroom
that covered eight
years of planning and
fundraising, as well as
the Swim Building built
by the Sylvania School
District Carpentry Class”
park system director
Gary Madrzykowski said.
“These are only the second
and third vandalism
incidents in my 13 years
and TOPS will implement
immediate measures to
see these do not reoccur.
The Fossil solar-powered
restroom and Olander
Swim building belong
to the Sylvania School
District taxpayers and
TOPS will safeguard their
investment. When we
locate these people, the
park system will prosecute
them to the fullest extent
of the law.”
Anyone with
information about the
acts of vandalism should
contact the Sylvania
Township Police
Department at 419-882-
1250 or 419-882-2055 to
be eligible for the award.
TOPS issues $1,000 reward
against park vandalism
Members of the Sylvania
Township Trustees
uncouple a fre hose to
symbolize the opening
of the new Fire Station
#2 on McCord Road.
The facility replaces an
older structure on Central
Avenue. Pictured are
trustees John Jennewine,
left, and Kevin Haddad,
right, actually separating
the hose while Fiscal
Offcer Dave Simko looks
on in the center. Holding
the hose at the ends are
John Zeitler, Township
Administrator, left, and
Trustee Neal Mahoney,
right. Sylvania Township
Fire Chief Jeffrey Kowalski
supervises the ceremony
next to Zeitler. The event
was June 4 and featured
tours of the new building,
a chance for children and
adults to experience how
a fre engine and house
operates, and food.
See page 8 for more
photos from the event.
Sylvania Township
opens new fre station
Kevin Brown photo
Several Sylvania residents
are among 50 Medical Mutual of
Ohio employees in Toledo who
are getting an extra paid day off
this year. The company is giving
the employees a day off to do
volunteer work and give back to
the community where they work
and live. Medical Mutual has
teamed up with United Way of
Greater Toledo for participation
in the United Way’s Days of
Caring program.
The 50 volunteers were
chosen from among 90
employees who entered a
drawing to have the opportunity
to volunteer as part of the
program. All volunteer activities
center on this year’s theme of
United Way Day of Caring
– education. More than 500
employees work at the Toledo
offce located at 3737 W.
Sylvania Avenue.
Donna Mikoleski and Sandi
Meyers recently spent several
hours helping at two community
organizations. Meyers spent a
half-day at the YMCA Child
Development Center at St.
Charles Hospital in Oregon,
while Mikoleski helped out
at the Padua Center in central
Toledo.
Meyers was one of seven
Medical Mutual volunteers who
read books to the children at
the Child Development Center,
played on the playground, and
even helped with infant care.
“I liked coming out to work
with kids. It’s a lot of fun and
gives me a break from sitting
at the desk,” Meyers, who
works in the company’s Care
Management Department, said.
“I think it’s great that Medical
Mutual is letting us volunteer
to help out the community so
we can see what’s going on and
work with the kids.”
Mikoleski was one of eight
co-workers who recently spent
several hours at the Padua
Center. The volunteers painted
a room and stairwell, and helped
clean the facility that hosts
after school tutoring programs
for children. It is located in
the rectory of the former St.
Anthony of Padua Church.
“I think it’s nothing short of
fantastic that Medical Mutual
volunteers its employees to help
out with the basic maintenance
of the building and in later
volunteer projects to help out
with the children,” Mikoleski
said. “I really enjoyed this
experience.”
Three other Medical Mutual
employees from Sylvania have
volunteered to help at the Padua
Center and East Toledo Family
Center later this summer and
fall. Those employees include
Sharon Kujawa, Paula Brehmer,
and Amanda Harpster-Hagen.
Medical Mutual employees
have long recognized the
importance of giving back to the
community, both fnancial and
hands-on support.
“Since joining Medical
Mutual in August, I have been
impressed with our commitment
to communities where we do
business,” Gary Thieman, senior
vice president, Northwestern
Ohio Region, said. “That
commitment is particularly
strong in Toledo. At the same
time, I believe we can do more,”
he said.
Volunteers are participating
in Toledo area activities such
as reading to pre-schoolers,
tutoring, assisting daycare
teachers with summer
programs, and helping with
lunch programs and other
activities. Some volunteers will
also help clean-up the school
buildings and landscape as well
as giving the facilities a fresh
coat of paint.
“This is a wonderful
opportunity Medical Mutual is
offering to its employees,” Bill
Kitson, United Way of Greater
Toledo president and CEO, said.
“Gary Thieman and his team
set an outstanding example of
seeing the value in allowing
employees to increase their
impact beyond just writing a
check.”
United Way of Greater
Toledo works to build stronger
communities by embracing
the collective power of people
and partnerships, driving
lasting change in the areas of
education, income, and health;
and providing a foundation of
essential services and outreach.
Medical Mutual employees give back
during United Way Day of Caring
Photos submitted
Sandi Meyers spent
time with the children
at the YMCA child
development center.
Donna Mikoleski volunteered at the Padua Center.
SylvaniaMania raises money for athletics
For the second year
in a row, SylvaniaMania
was hosted by the
Sylvania Schools
Athletic Foundation
to raise money for the
Sylvania Schools athletic
programs. The party
went from 6:00 p.m. until
midnight at Centennial
Terrace and included
food, a cash bar, games,
and raffles. The event
also featured live music
by local bands.
All proceeds from
the event will be used
to support improving
athletic facilities and
programs in Sylvania
schools.
TJ Irwin photos
Neal Mahoney buys
a 50/50 raffe ticket
from Dezzy Desmond at
SylvaniaMania.
Page 2 THE SYLVANIA HERALD WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2011
COMMUNITY
©

2
0
1
1

H
o
s
p
ic
e

o
f

N
o
r
t
h
w
e
s
t

O
h
io
thanks to the care from Hospice of Northwest Ohio. Now, we always recommend
that people consider hospice care early.
Patty, 2007

But my wife and I waited too long and we didn’t get all of the benefts we could
have received.
Tom, 1994

They relieved a lot of the worry, stress and fear. Don’t wait to get them involved.

Mary, 2001 and 2010
For 30 years, families have been writing to Hospice of Northwest Ohio to express
their thanks. Yet they often also say, “We wish we would have started hospice
care sooner.” The earlier you seek our expertise and support, the more we can
do to help.
Visit hospicenwo.org
419-661-4001 (Ohio)• 734-568-6801 (Michigan)
S E C OND I N A S E R I E S
NWOH-067 Gen2 8.5x5.indd 1 3/7/11 1:55 PM
General Manager: Kevin Brown
kbrown@theheraldpapers.com
Advertising: Anita Wilcox
ads@heraldpapers.org
Cary Wolfenbarger
cary@theheraldpapers.com
Contributing Writers:
Christine A. Holliday,
J. Patrick Eaken, Mike McHone
5700 Monroe St.
Ste. 406
Sylvania, OH 43560
419-885-9222
USPS-610-360
MEMBERS OF:
OHIO NEWSPAPERS ASSOC.
NAT’L NEWSPAPER ASSOC.
INLAND PRESS ASSOC.
is published every Wednesday by
THE HERALD NEWSPAPERS
www.thesylvaniaherald.com
Subscriptions:
In County: $25.00 Out-of-county: $32.00
Deadlines:
Classifieds News
Noon Monday 9am Monday
Display Advertising Corrections
Noon Friday Noon Monday
Submit your story
ideas, photos,
thoughts, ideas to
kbrown@theheraldpapers.com
Mr. and Mrs. Brian P. Mas-
ters of Sylvania are pleased to
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Tamara Lynn,
to Robert Joseph Marquardt,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert M.
Marquardt, also of Sylvania.
Tamara is a 2006 graduate
of Sylvania Northview High
School and a 2011 graduate of
the University of Cincinnati,
with a degree in biomedical en-
gineering. She is presently em-
ployed at the Cleveland Clinic.
Bobby is a 2006 graduate
of Sylvania Northview High
School and a 2010 graduate
of Kent State University. He is
currently a second year student
at Lake Erie College of Osteo-
pathic Medicine.
A July 2011 wedding is
planned at Manitou Beach,
Michigan.
Masters/Marquardt Engagement
Richard Sinkey of
Whitehouse, OH and Sherry
Foist of Brooklyn, MI are
very pleased to announce the
upcoming wedding of their
daughter, Ann Foist Sinkey,
to Kevin Michael Burnett, son
of Mike Burnett and Tammy
Burnett, both of Toledo.
Ann is a 2001 graduate of
Northview High School and
a 2005 graduate of The Ohio
State University with a degree
in psychology. She is currently
working for a cosmetic
surgeon in Perrysburg and is
pursuing a nursing degree.
She resides in Sylvania.
Kevin is also a 2001
graduate of Northview
High School and attended
the University of Toledo in
business. He is a production
foreman for Ohio Pickling
in Toledo and resides in
Sylvania.
Kevin and Ann have been
friends since running track
together at Arbor Hills Junior
High School.
The intimate wedding will
be on June 18 on Mackinac
Island, MI.
Sinkey/Burnett Engagement
Did you know?
According to a survey of 1,400 U.S. travelers, summer projects to be the most popular season for vacation rental
stays in 2011. The TripAdvisor(R) survey found that no region is more popular for rental stays than the southeast, with
31 percent of people planning a rental home stay saying they would do so in that region. The southwest and northwest
were second and third, respectively. Thirty-three percent of respondents said rental homes are the ideal choice for larger
groups, and the TripAdvisor survey found this is true for a variety of reasons. When asked what they liked most about
rental homes, 28 percent of respondents cited more space, while 23 percent said access to a full kitchen was what they
liked most. As is the case with any vacation, cost came into play as well, as 13 percent of respondents liked that
rentals were often less expensive than hotels. The duration of the vacation also plays a role. Forty-one percent of
respondents said vacation rentals were the bestoption when staying in the same destination for a week or more.
WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2011 THE SYLVANIA HERALD Page 3
COMMUNITY
Sylvania is a great place
to be in the summertime, and
2011 is no exception with lots
of activities and programs
planned for residents and
visitors to enjoy.
Centennial Terrace’s 2011
Summer Concert Series
started with Alice Cooper
on May 21 and continues
with outstanding programs
and performers all summer.
The Sylvania Star Spangled
Celebration is scheduled for
Sunday, July 3

with one of
the best fireworks displays in
northwest Ohio. Coming up
on July 22 and July 23 is the
second annual Pizza Palooza
which promises to be another
great time for all.
Olander Park is also
offering a variety of outside
music programs every other
Wednesday evening this
summer beginning with Eddie
Boggs on June 8. Olander
Park is a wonderful venue
anytime during the summer,
but especially so during their
open air music programs on
the deck overlooking Olander
Lake.
Even though the annual
Jamie Farr LPGA Classic
will be taking a break this
year due to the USGA
Senior Open at Inverness,
the Sylvania Area Chamber
of Commerce will continue
hosting “Taking It To The
Streets” downtown. In fact,
there will be three “Taking It
To The Streets” this year on
June 26 and July 14

, and one
was already held on May 22.
Our thanks to Councilman
Mike Brown for organizing a
classic auto show on May 22,
bringing a large crowd and
beautiful cars to downtown
Sylvania.
The Sylvania Riverball
Race will be held Saturday,
July 16

in Harroun Park
to benefit the Sylvania
Conservation Corps, with
many terrific prizes donated
by Sylvania businesses and
residents. The 20 junior
high school students of
the Sylvania Conservation
Corps will be recognized
at a family picnic for
their many improvement
projects planned around the
community this summer.
The circus is coming
to town again this year on
Friday, August 12, with two
shows presented by The
Kelly Miller Circus at 4:30
p.m. and 7:30 p.m. under the
big top at the corner of Brint
Road and Centennial. The
Sylvania Sunrise Lions Club
is sponsoring the circus, with
all proceeds going to benefit
those in need around the
Sylvania community.
The 31
st
annual Sylvania
Triathlon/Duathlon is
scheduled for August 14

at
Olander Park. The event has
brought thousands of world
class athletes to Sylvania over
the years. Also scheduled
the day before is the 25
th

annual Sylvania Superkids
Triathlon/Duathlon, one of
the oldest kids triathlons in
the country.
Swimming at Centennial
Terrace, Olander Park and
Plummer Pool is available
all summer. SAJRD offers
a wide variety of terrific
recreational activities for all
ages. Our many parks offer
wonderful opportunities for
family activities, picnics and
getting back to nature.
Sylvania is a great place
to be in summer. Hope your
summer is a great one!
Summer Events in Sylvania
From the mayor’s Desk
with
Craig
Stough
Lucas County held a
public meeting on May 1,
1837, and resolutions were
adopted, declaring “the
most sure and effectual
means for preventing
drunkenness in the country,
to be by imposing a heavy
duty on the importation of
all foreign spirits, and a like
duty on the manufacture of
domestic spirits.” The Lucas
Country Reform Association
intended to abolish the
means and abolish the crime
of drunkenness, to save the
country.
I found a copy of the
publication The Temperance
Cause in the Sylvania
Area Historical Society
archives. It seems during the
spring of 1881, the Lucas
County Women’s Christian
Temperance Union was
organized in Sylvania. Their
objective was to disseminate
and strengthen Temperance
sentiment through lectures
and literature. They were
active in support of the
Second Amendment to the
State Constitution, which
prohibited the manufacture
and sale of intoxicating
liquors within the state.
As well, this organization
supported securing scientific
temperance instruction
in the public schools. In
the promotion of these
objectives, $1,100 was
raised. They firmly believed
if the traffic of liquors was
abolished, crime would
diminish, good morals
would be promoted, and
the expenses of criminal
prosecutions would be
lessened.
One of the vice presidents
of the Sylvania Chapter
of the Women’s Christian
Temperance Union was Mrs.
Julia Lathrop. The same
Mrs. Lathrop we all know
and love from the now-
famous Lathrop House. The
house is now famous for
exemplifying tolerance and
love for all mankind, as its
occupants helped runaway
slaves make their way to
freedom. Apparently they
could live free, but imbibing
alcohol was not a good
idea.
Ostensibly, Sylvania was
a hotbed of prohibition-
flaunting, even as the church
ladies held their meetings
decrying the use of evil
spirits. Now, I’m no expert,
and this article certainly is
no scholarly thesis on the
topic of prohibition and what
went on during those times,
but I find it interesting that
Sylvania citizens seemed to
be split on the topic.
Our historic society owns
a genuine still, which was
donated to the collection
years ago. It has been stored
in a back room, not part of
public display. An elaborate
contraption, it’s made up
of a large wooden barrel,
a couple feet of copper
coil, and various jugs and
containers. It had never been
on display at the Sylvania
Heritage Museum and was
only seen now and then by
board members venturing
into the dusty room with
storage items.
But then, a few years
ago, the Sylvania Area
Historical Society took a
table at the Sylvania Expo
held at TamOShanter. They
displayed information about
the society, some interesting
local historic items, old
photos, a few old board
games and the still. It was
quite a production to clean
up the old apparatus and
transport it to the site. They
thought it a worthwhile
endeavor, figuring that
Sylvania citizens might find
it fascinating to see.
A board member had a
nagging thought, however.
What if it were not legal to
display a device for making
moonshine? After all, its
very existence was against
the law at that time. They
decided to call the Sylvania
Police Department to make
sure it would be legal to
include such a controversial
item in the display. It turned
out to be quite an amusing
conversation. Once the
policeman understood the
request, he assured them it
would be okay to display
the still as long as it wasn’t
in operation at the time.
The Historical Society
assured them it would not
be producing free samples
of hooch.
People enjoyed seeing
the device at the Expo that
year. In this day and age of
micro-breweries, homemade
wine, and even beer making
kits being sold to anyone,
nobody raised an eyebrow.
A few people discussed the
merits of the moonshine
recipe. Apparently, you
sprout corn, grind it into
mash, and ferment it to
convert into alcohol.
Yeast and sugar are other
ingredients, and filtering
through a pillowcase was a
favored method. It can yield
liquor 150 to180 proof and
was mighty powerful white
lightning.
Whether such drink was
legal, allowable only for
medicinal purposes by a
licensed physician, or totally
taboo, we still must accept
this was a controversial part
of Sylvania’s history.
Sylvania Sobriety
Thinking
about
yesterday
By Sheila
Painter
Mr. Beebe with the confiscated still.
A+ Rating
Call Father & Son at 419.471.1191
www.TOLEDOFANDSREMODELING.com
Remodel with Reliability.
We gladly accept: $Financing Available$
S P E C I A L I Z I N G I N
KITCHEN • BATH • ADDITIONS • ROOFING • SIDING • DECK/PORCH • BASEMENT • GARAGE
SAVE 20%
OFF ANY NEW
REMODEL JOB
S P R I NG R E MODE L I NG S P E CI AL
Demand Quality - Don’t Settle for Less. Just Pay Less.
LIFETIME
WARRANTY
SERVING
OH & MI
DESIGN
TO BUILDI
������������
����������
������������
Get a FREE Lifetime Membership!
Summer Specials Available!
Call Today for details!
Photo courtesy of historian Gayleen Gindy
ProMedica Physician’s
Services presented an
afternoon just for women
to learn how to improve
their overall health and
well-being. Several of
the women who attended
the presentation at the
Holiday Inn – French
Quarter were nurses and
administrative personal in
the health care industry.
The event featured
questions and answers
from an esteemed
panel that included
Mounir Boutros, MD;
Daniel Cassavar, MD;
Christopher Foetisch,
MD and Charu Trivedi,
MD. They answered
health questions about
cardiology, orthopaedics,
hematology/oncology and
dermatology and with all
the new information on
the horizon, their message
was important.
After the panel, a
break out session allowed
the guests to experience
– midlife information
from Dr. Terry Gibbs.
DO; exercise techniques
with Suzette Valiton from
Wildwood Athletic Club,
spring recipes with Chef
Gretchen Fayerweather
from Owens Community
College and Juggling
Multiple Demands
with Diane Derr Lewis,
PhD. The sessions were
amazing and so very
important to today’s busy
woman who is stressed
to the max and needs an
outlet for assistance.
After a shopping
session for women (who
can resist that), a luncheon
and extreme make-over
project was introduced
by emcee Barb Oostra
who showed a spring
collection from Dillard’s
Department Store and then
introduced two recipients
who were fortunate
to receive a wardrobe
make-over from Dillard’s
and hair and make-up
services from Shamas
Salon. The women looked
delightful and loved being
pampered.
After lunch, three
outstanding women
were introduced, Jackie
Frisch, Kristian Brown
and Natalie Cummerow.
All shared their personal
stories of learning,
loving and living. All are
exceptional role models
who give of their time and
talent with a smile on their
faces. After the amazing
women led a discussion,
a drawing was held for
several gifts.
“It’s All about You” was
a wonderful opportunity
to discover important
information to help a
woman live longer, laugh
louder and enjoy life.
Project Runway Benefit
Toledo Opera Guild
The Toledo Opera
Guild held its annual
fashion gala at Inverness
Country Club. Almost
150 people attended this
event that promotes opera
awareness, education
company service and
financial support for
opera in Toledo.
Karen DeNune and
Traci Schwann, fashion
show co-chairmen
welcomed the guests, gave
special thanks to Paula
Fall of Sophia Lustig and
Sophie’s Sister and Tania
Yoder of Kids Klothesline
who provided the fashions
for the afternoon. John
Casablanca’s provided
some of the models and
REVE provided the hair
and make-up services.
Suzanne Rorick, the
new executive director
of The Toledo Opera
encouraged the crowd
with anecdotes about the
special contribution the
guild does in support of
the opera. She encouraged
people to bid on the many
silent auction packages
and expressed how vital
support is.
Other committee
chairs that assisted
Karen and Traci included
Cindy Niggemyer, Shelli
Jacobs, Clare Gorski,
Mary Beaber, Barbara
Bettinger, Diane Shull,
Cookie Westmeyer,
Sue Lovett, Peggy
Crook, Susan Mason,
Linda McBee, Barbara
Baumgartner, Denise
Matheny and Sib Slagle.
Project Runway chairs
were Pam Bettinger and
Diane Rusk
Please send all
information to Pat Nowak,
Sylvania Herald, 5700
Monroe St., Suite 406,
Sylvania 43560, or e-mail
to nowakp112946@aol.
com. Please make sure to
send information in time
for publication deadlines.
“It’s All about You”- A Women’s Health Symposium
ProMedica Physician’s Services “It’s All About You” Event included guests Pat
Mooney, Barb Oostra, Mary Pat Moore, Joanie Kuhn and Susan Hammerling
Pat Nowak photo
The Week Ahead:
Aug. 24 through Aug. 30.
Aries
(March 21-April 19)
This is not a good moment for
making business decisions on gut
instincts, although this usually
works very well for you. Right
now, there are too many unknown
variables to be loose with your
cash, even if the information you
are analyzing sounds convincing.
Taurus
(April 20-May 20)
Expect communication to be
good this week, especially in your
relationships. Make sure you
spend some alone time with your
partner and clear the air.
Gemini
(May 21-June 21)
Right now, your physical
strength will be low. However,
your emotions will be on an all
time high leaving you feeling very
up and down.
Cancer
(June 22-July 22)
You are overwhelming the
people around you with your high
and low moods. Be careful not to
create long-term conflicts by
pushing people away from you.
Leo
(July 23-Aug. 22)
Lately you may have been
feeling like you are heading in
two directions at the same time.
So, now is the time to make a sen-
sible decision about what you
want to do with your life.
Virgo
(Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Your emotional well-being
hinges on staying in a positive
mindset. You will be challenged
by people who question your
opinion, but stay strong in what
feels right to you.
Libra
(Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Family and friends are very
supportive of the changes that you
want to make in your life right
now. Spend some time clearing
your mind and feeling the life pur-
pose that only you can fulfill.
Scorpio
(Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Expect great things financially
this week. Watch for sales of any
kind but especially those in real
estate. Your time is good for asset
creation.
Sagittarius
(Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
The week may get off to an
odd start but stay focused on just
today. By the end of the week you
will wonder why you were feeling
stressed at all. Plan a quick get-
away for the weekend or recon-
nect with a friend or loved one
from out of town.
Capricorn
(Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Balancing your time this week
will feel like a struggle. There are
responsibilities holding you back
from the things you really want to
do. Spend some time prioritizing
your projects and then rewards
yourself.
Aquarius
(Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Sometimes your friends and
co-workers distract your attention
and pull you away from your proj-
ects. Your caring nature wants to
help them but it’s important to
find balance between your goals
and helping everyone else accom-
plish their goals.
Pisces
(Feb. 19-March 20)
This is a great week for com-
municating with others. You will
feel like everyone is listening to
you and your energy will drawn
them in even closer. Start the
week ready to go and you will
enjoy the rewards by Friday.
Imagine if every week were this
easy how much you could accom-
plish.
One of the most exciting
yearly events is “A Night to
Remember,” sponsored by the
St. Vincent Medical Center
Foundation, and this year will
be no exception.
The event will take place
Friday, Sept. 12 at the
Valentine Theater in down-
town Toledo.
This year’s special guest is
Grammy Award-winning
singer/songwriter Peter
Cetera, formerly of the musi-
cal group Chicago and also
renowned for numerous chart
hits in his solo career.
Co-Chairs Mirza Baig,
M.D. and Bernardo Martinez,
M.D., promise an outstanding
event. The proceeds benefit
robotics simulation and train-
ing at St. Vincent Mercy
Medical Center with the use
of the daVinci robotic system.
The event features station
dining, bid board auctions and
a fabulous afterglow dessert
buffet and gourmet coffee bar.
For ticket information call
419-251-2117.
There are many dedicated
volunteers who step up to be
on the committee. Hats off to
Zehra Baig, Brenda Johnson,
Barbara Ledrick, Mary
Ziegler, Diane Shemak, Jackie
Snyder, Mary Price, Charla
Ulrich, Katie Loh, Lori
Strohmaier, Joanie Barrett,
Pat Bullard, Kathy Zacharias,
Richard Gray, James Brazeau,
J. Scott Stewart, Joanne
Ollivier, Denise Colturi, Joyce
Moses, Julie Klein and
Rosemary Yanik.
Toledo Symphony League
Can you believe that the
Toledo Symphony League
celebrates Fanfare at Fifty-
Five as a way to say Brava to
the League Crescendos who
directed the past and raise the
baton to the members who
give full measure to the
organization and applauds
new members who will direct
the organization?
The event will be held
Friday, Sept. 19 at the home
of Tom and Joan Fought in
Rossford. Cocktails, musical
entertainment and exquisite
dining stations are planned.
Additionally a tremendous
“Fanfare” cake will be
unveiled later in the evening.
It is suggested that black and
white cocktail attire is worn.
For more information call
Trina McGivern at 419-874-
6050.
City Chic to benefit the
Auxiliary to the Ability
Center of Greater Toledo
City Chic, the annual fash-
ion gala that benefits the
Ability Center of Greater
Toledo will be held
Wednesday, Sept. 24 at the
Stranahan Great Hall on
Heatherdowns.
As always this event kicks
off the fall fashion season,
and this year will be celebrat-
ing the fashions, companies
and resources of our great
city.
Models will be strutting the
stage wearing fashions from
locally owned stores Elegant
Rags, Gallippo’s Kids
Klothesline, Lady C, Lily
Whitestone, Ragazza, Sophia
Lustig, Sophie’s Sister and
Toledo Furs.
This event always draws a
huge crowd because of the
delightful vendor boutiques
that are set up beginning at 10
a.m., with a tasty luncheon
and the fashion extravaganza.
For more information call
419-885-5733.
—-
Please send all information
to Pat Nowak, Sylvania
Herald, 5700 Monroe St.,
Suite 406, Sylvania 43560, or
e-mail to
nowakp112946@aol.com.
AUGUST 20, 2008 PAGE A6 THE SYLVANIA HERALD
LOCAL
On the Scene
with
Pat
Nowak
‘A Night to Remember’ is exciting event
Inner Views with Kimmie Rose Zapf
SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1956
BILL’S SERVICE, INC.
116 E. Adrian (US-223) Blissfield (12 miles Northwest of Sylvania)
517-486-3104
New & Used
Lawn Mowers
Sales, Service
& Parts
Hours: M-F 8-5:30, Sat. 8-12
www.billsserviceinc.com
Page 4 THE SYLVANIA HERALD WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2011
FOR THE RECORD
POliCE REPORTs
Found property: On May 21, at
the 5300 block of S. Main Street, a
folding knife was left with officers
for safe keeping The owner failed
to return to retrieve it.
Dogs/animals running at large:
On May 20, at the 5900 block
Graystone Drive, a victim reported
a suspect failed to confine her dog
allowing it to enter the yard and
attack the victim’s dog.
Breaking and entering: On May
21, at the 6500 block of Woodhall
Drive, a victim reported unknown
suspect(s) entered his detached
garage and took a fishing rod and
reel and a circular saw.
Drive under influence: On May
20, at the 6200 block of Monroe
Street, Christine Davies, 67, was
involved in a traffic crash and fled
the scene. Witnesses followed the
suspect to a residence on N. Main
Street. An investigation at the
residence led to the suspect being
arrested for OVI with a chemical
breath test result of .233 BAC.
Possession of a controlled
substance: On May 20, at the 5400
block of S. Main Street, a 16 year
old suspect was found to be in
possession of less than 1 gram of
marijuana. He was released to his
mother.
Drive under influence,
minor possess/consume beer
etc., possession of controlled
substance, use/possession of drug
paraphernalia: On May 21, at the
5400 block of S. Main Street,
Andrew G. Lukas, 18, was found
to be operating a vehicle after
underage consumption with a
chemical breath test result of .018
BAC. He was also found to be
in possession of rolling papers, a
marijuana pipe and a marijuana
roach. Hannah Smith, 19, and two
17 year old suspects were found to
be in possession of alcohol while
under the age of 21.
Found property: On May 21,
at the 5900 block of Marshwood
Drive, a person reported a bike
was left in the creek behind her
house.
Minor possess/consume beer
etc., possession of a controlled
substance: On May 21, at the 5400
block of S. Main Street, Michael
J. Konrad, 18, was found walking
with an open container of malt
liquor. A 15 year old suspect was
found to be in possession of a pipe
with marijuana residue.
Under 21 buy beer etc.,
possession of a controlled
substance, use/possession of drug
paraphernalia: On May 21, at the
5400 block of S. Main Street,
three 16 year old suspects and a
17 year old suspect were found to
be in possession of a bottle of beer,
rolling papers, a one hitter with
marijuana residue, and six cans of
beer.
Minor possess/consume beer
etc.: On May 22, at the 5500
block of S. Main Street, a 17 year
old suspect was found to be in
possession of rum.
Disorderly conduct: On May
21, at the 5300 block of S. Main
Street, suspects were involved in a
physical altercation.
Arrest: On May 23, at the 6600
block of Maplewood Avenue,
Christopher A. Weinert, 28,
came to the police station to seek
medical help and was advised he
had an active warrant out of Toledo
for having an open container
in a stationary vehicle. He was
given a summons, released, and
transported to the hospital by
EMS.
Found property: On May 23,
at the 4400 block of Weldwood
Avenue, a person reported finding
a Blackberry in her backyard.
Petty theft: On May 20, at the
7200 block of W. Sylvania Avenue,
a victim stated $30, a $100 gift
card, and a gas card were taken
from her purse while at school.
Breaking and entering: On May
23, at the 5700 block of N. Main
Street, unknown suspect(s) broke
off a lock and made entry to a
building, breaking a wooden door.
Nothing appeared to be taken.
Petty theft: On May 23, at
the 5800 block of Monroe Street,
a victim reported unknown
suspect(s) removed $30 from her
purse while she left it unattended
at work.
Arrest: On May 23, at the
5400 block of Main Street, Keith
M. Cousino, 25, was involved in
disorderly conduct and found to
have active warrants for driving
without a license, operation of
vehicle at stop signs, and driver’s
view/drive while obstructed. He
was issued a summons.
Drive under influence: On May
24, at Harroun Road and Ravine
Drive, Jennifer Jean Dermyer, 51,
was stopped for a traffic violation
and found to be OVI with a
chemical breath test result of .123
BAC.
Drive under influence: On
May 24, at Vicksburg Drive and
Pickett Drive, Jeffrey S. Boda, 26,
was stopped for suspicious activity
and found to be OVI. He refused
a standard field sobriety test and a
chemical breath test.
Theft, criminal damaging,
abduction, robbery: On May 30, at
the 5800 block of N. Main Street,
a victim stated he witnessed a
suspect attempting to steal his car.
Aggravated trafficking,
possession of a controlled
substance: On May 30, at the 5200
block of W. Alexis Road, Thomas
C. Mallory, 23, was in possession
of three bags of marijuana and
scissors with marijuana residue.
Criminal damaging: On May
30, at the 100 block of US 23
N, a victim reported unknown
suspect(s) caused a substantial risk
of harm to his vehicle by throwing
a rock at it.
Drive under influence: On May
30, at Monroe Street and Main
Street, Jacob Jeffrey Putz, 24, was
stopped for a traffic violation and
found to be OVI with a chemical
breath test result of .197 BAC.
Drive under influence: On May
30, at Harroun Road and Ravine
Drive, Evan T. Feldstein, 23, was
stopped for a traffic violation and
found to be OVI. He refused to
submit to a chemical breath test.
Possession of drug abuse
instruments, obtain/possession/
use of controlled substance: On
May 29, at the 6300 block of
Wedgewood Drive, a reporting
person suspected the suspect was
using illegal drugs. The reporting
person found methadone tablets,
tramadol tablets, and a box
with suspected pill residue and
two hypodermic needles in the
suspect’s bedroom.
Arrest: On May 28, at the 5200
block of Harroun Drive, Robert
Clayton Smith, 39, was found
to have a warrant for aggravated
menacing. He was transferred to
Toledo Police custody.
Petty theft: On May 27, at
the 6700 block of Erie Street, the
victim rented the residence to the
suspect. The suspect move without
notification. Upon inspection of
the residence, the victim found the
new refrigerator was missing.
Receiving stolen property,
petty theft: On May 28, at the 500
block of Alexis Road, James E.
Bouyer, 38, took an Xbox game
system, $150, and an Xbox game
without the owner’s consent.
Use/possession of drug
paraphernalia: On May 28, at
Monroe Street and Olde Post Road,
Luke Arthur Vandenbusche, 22,
was stopped for a traffic violation
and found to be in possession of
a metal marijuana pipe. Brandon
Clark Dozer, 21, was a passenger
in the vehicle and also found to be
in possession of the items.
Lost property: On May 27, at
the 5300 block of S. Main Street,
a person reported losing a cell
phone.
Criminal child enticement:
On May 27, at the 5700 block of
Acres Road, a person reported two
suspicious persons approached her
daughters and asked them to get in
their vehicle.
Missing person juvenile: On
May 27, at the 7800 block of
Laurel Glen, a person reported her
daughter had left the residence and
she hadn’t heard from her since.
Drive under influence: On
May 27, at Monroe Street and
Parkwood, a witness contacted
Sylvania Police regarding a
vehicle that had struck a mailbox
and was weaving on the road. The
suspected vehicle was located
and stopped for a traffic violation.
Joshua J. Vance, 26, was found to
be OVI with a chemical breath test
result of .183 BAC.
Arrest: On May 27, at Balfour
Road and Randall Street, Bruce
Lee Audia, 30, was found to have a
warrant for disorderly conduct and
was taken into custody and booked
at Lucas County Jail.
Arrest: On May 26, at the 5800
block of Monroe Street, William
Kling, 21, was found to have a
warrant for attempt to commit
burglary.
Arrest: On May 26, at the
6700 block of Monroe Street,
Tricia K. Pennington, 40, checked
in at Sylvania Municipal Court
Probation and was found to have
a warrant for failure to pay taxes.
She was released to the custody of
Fulton County Sheriff’s Office.
Minor possess/consume beer
etc.: On May 26, at the 7200 block
of Sylvania Avenue, a teacher sent
a suspect to the office because she
had on odor of alcohol.
Arrest: On May 26, at the
6700 block of Monroe Street,
Frank J. DeMarco, 59, turned
himself in at court on a warrant for
felonious assault and was released
to the Sylvania Township Police
Department.
Threatening or harassing
telephone calls: On May 26, at the
3800 block of Hampstead Drive,
a victim reported she had been
receiving harassing hang up calls
for approximately a month and a
half.
Petty theft: On May 25, at the
7500 block of Sylvania Avenue,
a suspect removed money from a
cash register.
Arrest: On May 26, at Monroe
Street and River Crossings, Nathan
D. Allen, 24, was found to have a
warrant for speed and was issued a
summons.
Theft: On May 25, at the 6400
block of Monroe Street, a suspect
took a computerized cash register
and a sewing machine without the
victim’s permission.
Arrest: On May 25, at the
6700 block of Monroe Street,
Drake Gregory Graham, 20,
turned himself in at court and was
released on bond.
Criminal mischief, vehicle
trespass: On May 24, at the 5000
block of Green Spruce, a victim
stated unknown suspect(s) entered
her vehicle and removed the fuses
while it was parked.
Telecommunications
harassment: On May 24, at the
5000 block of Green Spruce Drive,
a victim stated a suspect had been
sending multiple harassing text
and phone messages.
Arrest: On May 25, at the 1600
block of Spielbusch, James David
Polhamus, 28, was stopped by
Toledo Police and found to have
a warrant for domestic violence.
He was transferred to Sylvania
custody and booked.
Endangering children: On May
24, at the 5300 block of W. Alexis
Road, a person called to report two
young children were outside with
no adult supervision.
Juvenile habitually disobedient:
On May 24, at the 6700 block
of Roosevelt, a person reported
the suspect is continuously
disobedient.
Missing person adult: On May
24, at the 600 block of Glasgow,
a person reported he last talked
with his adult son on May 18 and
has not heard from him since. He
reports this is unusual.
Arrest: On May 24, at the
6600 block of Maplewood, Jason
Michael Fahrer, 35, came into
the station to make a report and
was found to have a warrant
for domestic violence. He was
transported to Sylvania Municipal
Court and released after posting
bond.
Arrest: On May 24, at the 6700
block of Monroe Street, Justin R.
Hennagir, 27, turned himself in
at the probation department on a
warrant for probation violation/
traffic. He was issued a summons.
Students in grades 7-12 who are enrolled in a traditional high school can
earn credits – without disturbing summer job schedules – through the
Phoenix Academy Outreach Program. Students study on their home
computer or at one of our four computer labs. Classes are comprised of
modules, which are similar to textbook chapters. After completion of each
module, students take an exam at a Phoenix Credit Recovery Outreach Center.
Our computer-based curriculum offers the benefits students prefer:
• 24/7 access to lessons on your home computer
• A downtown computer lab and 3 convenient neighborhood computer
labs with hours that accommodate individual schedules
• One-on-one live teacher support is available in our labs. Teacher
support by e-mail is available 7 days a week.
• A clearly-defined discipline code and a safe, secure environment
Take charge of your education at Phoenix Academy. For more information and a list of available
courses visit www.phoenixtoledo.org and click on Credit Recovery Program.
www.phoenixtoledo.org
Recover High School Credits
at Your Convenience.
Neighborhood Credit Recovery Outreach Centers
3055 W. Alexis Rd. 1100 N. McCord Rd. 1020 Varland Ave.
1505 Jefferson Avenue
Toledo, OH 43604
Phone 419.720.4500
Prepared by Orwig Marketing Strategies
Title: “Summer Credit Recovery 2011”
Advertisement No.: PH6612P
Released 4/27/11
COURSES BEGIN JUNE 13
REGISTER AT ANY OF OUR 4 LOCATIONS WED.-THU., JUNE 8-9 9 AM-NOON
or REGISTER AT JEFFERSON ONLY MON.-TUE., JUNE 13-14 9 AM-NOON
oneCHURCHmultipleLOCATIONS
www
NEW
WHITEHOUSE Rt64oppositeRexam
WEST TOLEDO Sylvania&Douglas
SOUTH TOLEDO Byrne&Heatherdowns
PERRYSBURG LimeCitybetween795&Buck
INTERNET All 5 Services Live At CedarCreek.TV
Rebroadcasts of entire services Tuesdays at
7pm and 9pm and Wednesdays at Noon.
The message is identical at all campuses. 419.661.8661
SATURDAYS
5:15PM 7PM
SUNDAYS
9AM10:45AM12:30PM
MICHELLE
RHEE
SETH GODIN
CORY BOOKER
BILL HYBELS
STEVEN
FURTICK
LEN SCHLESINGER
MAMA MAGGIE GOBRAN
HOWARD SCHULTZ
HENRY CLOUD
BRENDA SALTER McNEIL
JOHN DICKSON ERWIN McMANUS
opening
soon
smechurch.org
smechurch.org
7000 Erie Street
across from
Plummer Pool
419-882-2205
www.sylvaniafrst.org
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church
4718 Brittany Road
(near Talmadge/Bancott Intersection)
419-531-1616
Saturday: 5:00p.m. Holy Eucharist
Sunday: 8:00a.m. Holy Eucharist
9:45a.m. Family Worship
10:45a.m. Education for all ages!
We invite you to join us as we Love,
Learn & Serve in Christ’s Name!
King Of Glory
Lutheran Church LCMS
6517 Brint Rd., Sylvania 419.882.6488
Handicapped Accessible
Informal Worship 8:30 am
Traditional Worship 10:30 am
Sun. School 9:30 am (Sept.-May)
Wed. Bible Study 10:00 am
Paul R. Schmidlin, Pastor
At The First Unitarian
Church of Toledo
there is room enough for different beliefs.
We invite you to join our liberal religious community,
nourishing the mind, body an soul.
Sunday at 10AM - providing a broad religious education
for youth and adults, nursery available
Worship Service at 11 AM
3205 Glendale__419-381-8999
Please join us for an intimate celebration of life and faith
www.uutoledo.org
St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church
5240 Talmadge 473-1187
A Christ Centered Parish Family • JOIN US!
8:00 am • Holy Echarist
9:15 am Christian Ed.
10:30 am • Holy Eucharist & Healing
Barrier Free
Joseph Keblesh Jr. • Rector
Service Times: 8:30am, 9:45am, and 11:00am
Sunday School: 9:45am, 11:00am
Pastor Larry Clark
SYLVANIA FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
(diSciPlES of chriSt)
Church Offce 882-3313
Dr. Joseph Hara - Pastor
5271 Alexis at Silvertown
Family Learning Hour 9:30 am
Morning Worship 10:30 am
smechurch.org
7000 Erie Street
across from
Plummer Pool
419-882-2205
www.sylvaniafrst.org
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church
4718 Brittany Road
(near Talmadge/Bancott Intersection)
419-531-1616
Saturday: 5:00p.m. Holy Eucharist
Sunday: 8:00a.m. Holy Eucharist
9:45a.m. Family Worship
10:45a.m. Education for all ages!
We invite you to join us as we Love,
Learn & Serve in Christ’s Name!
King Of Glory
Lutheran Church LCMS
6517 Brint Rd., Sylvania 419.882.6488
Handicapped Accessible
Informal Worship 8:30 am
Traditional Worship 10:30 am
Sun. School 9:30 am (Sept.-May)
Wed. Bible Study 10:00 am
Paul R. Schmidlin, Pastor
At The First Unitarian
Church of Toledo
there is room enough for different beliefs.
We invite you to join our liberal religious community,
nourishing the mind, body an soul.
Sunday at 10AM - providing a broad religious education
for youth and adults, nursery available
Worship Service at 11 AM
3205 Glendale__419-381-8999
Please join us for an intimate celebration of life and faith
www.uutoledo.org
St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church
5240 Talmadge 473-1187
A Christ Centered Parish Family • JOIN US!
8:00 am • Holy Echarist
9:15 am Christian Ed.
10:30 am • Holy Eucharist & Healing
Barrier Free
Joseph Keblesh Jr. • Rector
Service Times: 8:30am, 9:45am, and 11:00am
Sunday School: 9:45am, 11:00am
Pastor Larry Clark
SYLVANIA FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
(diSciPlES of chriSt)
Church Offce 882-3313
Dr. Joseph Hara - Pastor
5271 Alexis at Silvertown
Family Learning Hour 9:30 am
Morning Worship 10:30 am
smechurch.org
7000 Erie Street
across from
Plummer Pool
419-882-2205
www.sylvaniafrst.org
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church
4718 Brittany Road
(near Talmadge/Bancott Intersection)
419-531-1616
Saturday: 5:00p.m. Holy Eucharist
Sunday: 8:00a.m. Holy Eucharist
9:45a.m. Family Worship
10:45a.m. Education for all ages!
We invite you to join us as we Love,
Learn & Serve in Christ’s Name!
King Of Glory
Lutheran Church LCMS
6517 Brint Rd., Sylvania 419.882.6488
Handicapped Accessible
Informal Worship 8:30 am
Traditional Worship 10:30 am
Sun. School 9:30 am (Sept.-May)
Wed. Bible Study 10:00 am
Paul R. Schmidlin, Pastor
At The First Unitarian
Church of Toledo
there is room enough for different beliefs.
We invite you to join our liberal religious community,
nourishing the mind, body an soul.
Sunday at 10AM - providing a broad religious education
for youth and adults, nursery available
Worship Service at 11 AM
3205 Glendale__419-381-8999
Please join us for an intimate celebration of life and faith
www.uutoledo.org
St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church
5240 Talmadge 473-1187
A Christ Centered Parish Family • JOIN US!
8:00 am • Holy Echarist
9:15 am Christian Ed.
10:30 am • Holy Eucharist & Healing
Barrier Free
Joseph Keblesh Jr. • Rector
Service Times: 8:30am, 9:45am, and 11:00am
Sunday School: 9:45am, 11:00am
Pastor Larry Clark
SYLVANIA FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
(diSciPlES of chriSt)
Church Offce 882-3313
Dr. Joseph Hara - Pastor
5271 Alexis at Silvertown
Family Learning Hour 9:30 am
Morning Worship 10:30 am
smechurch.org
7000 Erie Street
across from
Plummer Pool
419-882-2205
www.sylvaniafrst.org
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church
4718 Brittany Road
(near Talmadge/Bancott Intersection)
419-531-1616
Saturday: 5:00p.m. Holy Eucharist
Sunday: 8:00a.m. Holy Eucharist
9:45a.m. Family Worship
10:45a.m. Education for all ages!
We invite you to join us as we Love,
Learn & Serve in Christ’s Name!
King Of Glory
Lutheran Church LCMS
6517 Brint Rd., Sylvania 419.882.6488
Handicapped Accessible
Informal Worship 8:30 am
Traditional Worship 10:30 am
Sun. School 9:30 am (Sept.-May)
Wed. Bible Study 10:00 am
Paul R. Schmidlin, Pastor
At The First Unitarian
Church of Toledo
there is room enough for different beliefs.
We invite you to join our liberal religious community,
nourishing the mind, body an soul.
Sunday at 10AM - providing a broad religious education
for youth and adults, nursery available
Worship Service at 11 AM
3205 Glendale__419-381-8999
Please join us for an intimate celebration of life and faith
www.uutoledo.org
St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church
5240 Talmadge 473-1187
A Christ Centered Parish Family • JOIN US!
8:00 am • Holy Echarist
9:15 am Christian Ed.
10:30 am • Holy Eucharist & Healing
Barrier Free
Joseph Keblesh Jr. • Rector
Service Times: 8:30am, 9:45am, and 11:00am
Sunday School: 9:45am, 11:00am
Pastor Larry Clark
SYLVANIA FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
(diSciPlES of chriSt)
Church Offce 882-3313
Dr. Joseph Hara - Pastor
5271 Alexis at Silvertown
Family Learning Hour 9:30 am
Morning Worship 10:30 am
smechurch.org
7000 Erie Street
across from
Plummer Pool
419-882-2205
www.sylvaniafrst.org
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church
4718 Brittany Road
(near Talmadge/Bancott Intersection)
419-531-1616
Saturday: 5:00p.m. Holy Eucharist
Sunday: 8:00a.m. Holy Eucharist
9:45a.m. Family Worship
10:45a.m. Education for all ages!
We invite you to join us as we Love,
Learn & Serve in Christ’s Name!
King Of Glory
Lutheran Church LCMS
6517 Brint Rd., Sylvania 419.882.6488
Handicapped Accessible
Informal Worship 8:30 am
Traditional Worship 10:30 am
Sun. School 9:30 am (Sept.-May)
Wed. Bible Study 10:00 am
Paul R. Schmidlin, Pastor
At The First Unitarian
Church of Toledo
there is room enough for different beliefs.
We invite you to join our liberal religious community,
nourishing the mind, body an soul.
Sunday at 10AM - providing a broad religious education
for youth and adults, nursery available
Worship Service at 11 AM
3205 Glendale__419-381-8999
Please join us for an intimate celebration of life and faith
www.uutoledo.org
St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church
5240 Talmadge 473-1187
A Christ Centered Parish Family • JOIN US!
8:00 am • Holy Echarist
9:15 am Christian Ed.
10:30 am • Holy Eucharist & Healing
Barrier Free
Joseph Keblesh Jr. • Rector
Service Times: 8:30am, 9:45am, and 11:00am
Sunday School: 9:45am, 11:00am
Pastor Larry Clark
SYLVANIA FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
(diSciPlES of chriSt)
Church Offce 882-3313
Dr. Joseph Hara - Pastor
5271 Alexis at Silvertown
Family Learning Hour 9:30 am
Morning Worship 10:30 am
smechurch.org
7000 Erie Street
across from
Plummer Pool
419-882-2205
www.sylvaniafrst.org
St. Michael’s Episcopal Church
4718 Brittany Road
(near Talmadge/Bancott Intersection)
419-531-1616
Saturday: 5:00p.m. Holy Eucharist
Sunday: 8:00a.m. Holy Eucharist
9:45a.m. Family Worship
10:45a.m. Education for all ages!
We invite you to join us as we Love,
Learn & Serve in Christ’s Name!
King Of Glory
Lutheran Church LCMS
6517 Brint Rd., Sylvania 419.882.6488
Handicapped Accessible
Informal Worship 8:30 am
Traditional Worship 10:30 am
Sun. School 9:30 am (Sept.-May)
Wed. Bible Study 10:00 am
Paul R. Schmidlin, Pastor
At The First Unitarian
Church of Toledo
there is room enough for different beliefs.
We invite you to join our liberal religious community,
nourishing the mind, body an soul.
Sunday at 10AM - providing a broad religious education
for youth and adults, nursery available
Worship Service at 11 AM
3205 Glendale__419-381-8999
Please join us for an intimate celebration of life and faith
www.uutoledo.org
St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church
5240 Talmadge 473-1187
A Christ Centered Parish Family • JOIN US!
8:00 am • Holy Echarist
9:15 am Christian Ed.
10:30 am • Holy Eucharist & Healing
Barrier Free
Joseph Keblesh Jr. • Rector
Service Times: 8:30am, 9:45am, and 11:00am
Sunday School: 9:45am, 11:00am
Pastor Larry Clark
SYLVANIA FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
(diSciPlES of chriSt)
Church Offce 882-3313
Dr. Joseph Hara - Pastor
5271 Alexis at Silvertown
Family Learning Hour 9:30 am
Morning Worship 10:30 am
INTERFAITH DIRECTORY
Obituary
Rick was born on March 6,
1943 to Donald and Cathryn
(Comstock) Coventry. He
grew up in Sylvania, OH and
graduated from Sylvania High
School in 1961. He received his
B.A. from DePauw University
in Indiana and was a member
of the Lambda Chi Alpha
fraternity. He taught middle
school math in Philadelphia for
a few years before returning
home to work at the family
business, Comstock & Coventry
Furniture in Sylvania. While working there he met Norma, his
wife of 38 years. In 1979, they opened Coventry Furniture
on W. Central Avenue, which closed in 1995. They moved to
Bowling Green, OH, where they happily settled for the next 16
years. Rick worked at the Juvenile Detention Center and later
the Juvenile Residential Center of Wood County in Bowling
Green, and retired in 2008.
Rick impacted many lives as he mentored youth through
Alcoholics Anonymous. He was a member of the Toledo
Museum of Art and a prolific painter and gardener. He was
fondly known around his communities for his laughter, caring,
and intelligence. His life revolved around his daughters, Andrea
of Rochester, NY and Allison of Seattle, WA. He also leaves
behind his wife, Norma (Brodbeck) Coventry of Bowling
Green, sister Linda (Warren Winders) Coventry of Abington,
MA, sister Carol (Jack) Reise of Portsmouth, RI, and brother
Phil (Maria) Coventry of Decatur, GA.
Visitation with the family was held at Reeb Funeral Home,
5712 N. Main St., Sylvania, on Sunday, June 5, 2011 from
5 p.m. to 8 p.m. A memorial service was held at St. Mark’s
Lutheran Church in Bowling Green, OH on Monday, June 6,
2011 at 11 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, please consider memorial donations to the
American Diabetes Association or Alzheimer’s Association.
The Week Ahead: June 12 through
June 18, 2011
Aries (March 21-Apr. 19)
Everything seems to fall into place
effortlessly for you this week. Allow the
energy to work for you. Connect with
people you haven’t seen in a while.
Opportunities for fun and excitement
will surface. Go with the flow and
financial matters improve also.
Taurus (Apr. 20-May 20)
Relationship issues could boil
over this week. Be mindful and think
before you speak. Otherwise, thing
might be said you will come to regret
later. Release the energy of holding
firm to your ideas. Compassion and
compromise are important this week.
Gemini (May 21-June 21)
Forgiveness and grounding are
important this week. Forgive yourself
for the things you have done in the
past, especially enabling others. Honor
that part of you that responses with an
intention of love rather than selfishness.
Take time now to love yourself.
Cancer (June 22-July 22)
This week you find yourself feeling
healthy and full of energy. Embrace this
energy that is filling you up and share
it with the people you love. Don’t allow
frustrations or disagreements to ruin
things. Make this a special time that
everyone will remember fondly.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Right now is a golden time for you.
Everything seems to be falling into
place and you may feel like you have
found your place in this world. Don’t
take things for granted. Remember
those who have supported you.
Showing them some gratitude goes a
long way.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Sometimes it seems that everything
is working against you. It’s not that you
have bad luck but rather the universe
is trying to get your attention. When
things aren’t working out the way you
want, the lesson is to look at things
from another point of view.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Karma has come to live with you
this week and everything that you’ve
done is coming back to you ten fold.
That could be a very good or a very
bad thing. Whichever way it goes,
see the deeper meaning and either go
with the flow or make some needed
changes.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Strong energies may be influencing
you this week. Arguments could start
over nothing if you’re not careful.
Awareness that possible conflicts could
arise will aid in preventing them. Take
a moment to see things as they really
are, and not as you think they are.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Just when you thought you had
gotten some things off your plate, you
find there is more to do. Don’t despair.
You’ll find a way to work them into your
schedule along with some proper down
time with those you love. The energy of
deep connection keeps you going.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
When you look closely at your life,
you will find that you are in a good
place right now. There have been ups
and downs along life’s journey, but
overall, you are happy and healthy.
And that’s something not everyone
around can say. Be in gratitude for all
your blessings.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
This week is one of reflection.
You’ve been facing a lot of problems
lately, and you may be wondering if
there’s any relief in sight. The short
answer is that it’s up to you. Find a
way to bring more peace and harmony
within yourself, or otherwise expect
more of the same.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Don’t let what others say upset
you. Sometimes people just say things
without thinking or without having all of
the facts. Do your best to rise above
it or otherwise problems may result.
When communicating with partners
don’t read more into what they are
saying to you.
Kimmie Rose is a professional
intuitive, vibrational astrologer, author,
public speaker and radio and television
host on CBS Radio and Telos Television
Networks. She is available for personal
readings, classes and seminars. For
more information, please call her office,
Lite the Way, at 734-854-1514 or visit
her website, www.kimmierose.com.
InnerViews by Kimmie Rose
Richard s. Coventry
THE SYLVANIA HERALD Page 5 WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2011
COMMUNITY
St. John’s Jesuit Academy
Come to Our
6th Grade
Open House!
June 15 at 7 p.m.
Placement Test, June 22 at 8 a.m.
or by appointment.
Now Offering 6th Grade
Like You Could Never Imagine!
Contact Admissions at 419.865.5743, ext 257.
www.sjjtitans.org
On March 26 the wolf
den from Pack 158 went on
their first campout to Camp
Miakonda. The scouts began
their camping adventure by
participating in a conservation
project for the camp which
was to gather fallen branches
from the ice storm earlier this
year. Following the clean-
up, they practiced raising,
lowering, and folding the US
flag and in the evening they
put their new skills to the task
of lowering the flag for the
camp.
In the afternoon the scouts
and leaders toured the museum
at the camp and then hiked the
Miakonda historic trail where
the scouts learned about the
long history of the camp,
including the interesting fact
that the camp once owned the
world’s longest swimming
pool. The scouts prepared
their own aluminum foil
dinners and cooked them
on a fire. Finally, the scouts
used their problem solving
skills by putting together a
marshmallow gun and then
practicing on targets. This
visit was the first time many
of the scouts and parents had
visited Camp Miakonda.
Pack 158 Cub Scout Wolf Den’s First Campout
Photos submitted
Wolf scouts participating in conservation project
(left to right) were Collin Ghesquiere, Jonathon Ray,
Jack Seal-Roth, Jack Van Cott, and Lucas Patterson
Pack 158 Wolf Den (left to right): George Ghesquiere, Rob Van Cott, Brian Patterson, Mike Burke, Bill Hill, and
Dan Dubiel. Front row: Jonathon Ray, Ben Seal-Roth, Yusuf Hassab-Elanaby, Jack Seal-Roth, Lucas Patterson,
Gavin Burke, Jack Van Cott, Collin Ghesquiere, Joshua Van Cott and David Dubiel.
To the Editor:
With another school year ending, we’d all agree that kids de-
serve some time away from the classroom; however, it’s also im-
portant, as parents, to prevent as much “summer learning loss”
over the next three months as possible.
As an educator, I’ve found that students suffer learning loss
when not participating in some educational pursuit over the sum-
mer. Unfortunately, research shows that, on average, students lose
approximately 2.6 months of grade equivalency in math alone
during the summer, leaving teachers the task of re-teaching mate-
rial for the frst two months of school when, in reality, the student
should be making progress through the curriculum.
And despite these statistics, only 10% of students participate
in a voluntary learning program during summer recess. I’m not
arguing on behalf of summer school for everyone. I’m suggesting
your local resources as a mean’s of stopping your child’s summer
learning leak.
Plan regular trips to the library, metroparks, or museums and
have the kids keep a journal of their travels to maintain writing
skills. Be stealthy about it, and every trip can be a math, reading,
or geography lesson!
Another resource is metro Toledo’s provider of supplemen-
tal education, Sylvan Learning Center. I know that many parents
have trusted Sylvan Learning to not only provide their children
with the necessary skills and tools to increase academic success
during the school year, but have utilized Sylvan Learning’s vari-
ety of academic summer camps to keep their learners’ skills sharp
and, ultimately, prevent “summer brain drain.”
Reinforcing your child’s learning is an ongoing responsibility,
and even though school is letting out, your task remains. Just keep
in mind that it doesn’t have to be boring. Summer learning should
be fun and memorable. From a parent’s perspective, it should also
be something that you enjoy, as well!

Ty Foust
Maumee, Ohio
Letter to the Editor
The Class of 2011 graduated
from Central Catholic High
School on May 25.
Members of the class have
been awarded $19 million in
college scholarships and have
been accepted into many top
universities, including the
University of Notre Dame,
New York University, Duke,
Boston College, the University
of Michigan, the Ohio State
University, and the United States
Air Force Academy.
The class Valedictorian is
Benjamin Laws of Maumee.
Ben will attend the University
of Notre Dame and has been
accepted into its Engineering
Scholars Program, an honors
program for underclassmen who
are interested in engineering.
Ben scored a perfect 36 on his
ACT and is a National Merit
Scholar. He was a member of
the National Honor Society and
the quiz bowl team at Central
Catholic.
Carolyn Comes of Maumee
and Courtney Rygalski of
Sylvania are Salutatorians, and
Sara Klein of Perrysburg was the
class’s Heritage Speaker. Carolyn
will attend the University of Notre
Dame, Courtney will attend the
University of Michigan, and
Sara will go to the University of
Pittsburgh.
Recipients of the Bishop’s
Cross are Morgan Delp of
Holland and Gregory Hoffman
of West Toledo. The Cross
of the Bishop of Toledo is
presented to an outstanding
lady and gentleman of the
senior class of Central Catholic
and is the most respected and
prestigious award granted to a
senior.
Students are nominated for the
award based on exhibiting gifts
of the Holy Spirit (understanding,
right judgment, courage, and
reverence), self discipline, a
sense of social responsibility,
and a high level of academic
achievement in religious studies.
Morgan plans to attend Hillsdale
College and major in journalism
or law. Gregory will attend
Siena Heights to study business
management and mortuary
science.
Nine members of the class
are the first Central Catholic
candidates for International
Baccalaureate diplomas. They
are Danielle Barnes, Cameron
Glover, Amanda Jerzykowski,
Connor Langenderfer, Derrick
Mitchell El II, Jason Mossing,
Zachary Sullivan, Gabrielle
Vasquez, and Marlee Warchol.
Eighty-seven percent of the
students in Central Catholic’s
Class of 2011 received some
type of college scholarship.
Andrew Dimick of West
Toledo received the Chick Evans
Caddie scholarship good for full
tuition and housing, renewable
for up to four years. Andrew will
attend the Ohio State University.
Carly Cassady of South
Toledo received a $5,000
scholarship from the Old
Newsboys Goodfellow
Association and a $3,000
renewable Jamie Farr Toledo
Classic scholarship through the
Toledo Community Foundation.
Carly will attend the University
of Pittsburgh. Arika Knannlein
of West Toledo also received a
$3,000 renewable Jamie Farr
Toledo Classic scholarship, and
she will attend Siena Heights
as a member of the track team.
This marks the first time that two
students from the same school
have received the Jamie Farr
scholarship.
Recipients of prestigious
college scholarships that have
been previously announced by
Central Catholic include the
following:
Jason Mossing – Received a
United States Air Force Academy
appointment equivalent to a
scholarship valued at $414,000.
Derrick Mitchell El II –
Received a Gates Millennium
Scholarship to cover tuition,
fees, books and living expenses,
and includes personal and
professional development and
academic support. He will study
international business and pre-
law at the Ohio State University.
Johnathon Bush – Received
the Daniel J. Mirto Young
Entrepreneur Award from
the National Federation of
Independent Business (NFIB)
Young Entrepreneur Foundation,
a $1,000 scholarship designed
to reward and encourage
entrepreneurial talents among
high school students. He will
study business at the University
of Toledo.
Central Catholic High School
Class of 2011 Achievements
Page 6 THE SYLVANIA HERALD WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2011
LOCAL
SYLVANIA- The Sylvania Town-
ship Police Department and the Sylva-
nia Township Fire Department held a
friendly competition to see which de-
partment could invite more people to
attend the special Premiere Night of
the new Ford Focus at Kistler Ford.
Bob Jorgensen, owner of Kistler Ford,
arranged the challenge and said he
would give $1000 to the winning de-
partment.
As the final votes were tallied, the
total differential was only two votes,
and fearing a recount demand, Mr. Jor-
gensen said “We recognize the tremen-
dous dedication that both our police
and fire departments give to our com-
munity and we’d like to show them our
appreciation for their efforts” and then
proceeded to award both departments
the prize.
(From L-R) Nick Scalzo, Dave Hatfield, Patrick Miller, Bob Jorgensen (President Kistler Ford), Fire Chief Jeff
Kowalski, Dennis O’Loughlin (Kistler Ford)
(From L-R) Lisa Kernes (Citizens Patrol Volunteer), Jeff Matuszewski, Bob Jorgensen (President Kistler Ford),
Police Chief Robert Boehme, Dan Krajicek, Dennis O’Loughlin (Kistler Ford)
Sylvania Township Police and Fire Department compete
TOLEDO- Central
Catholic science teachers
Ann Hajibrahim of West To-
ledo and Kathleen Wilkins
of Perrysburg recently re-
ceived certificates of recog-
nition and appreciation from
the Board of Lucas County
Commissioners for their
participation in the Student
Watershed Watch program.
Each also received a “Frog-
gy Award” from the Lake
Erie Western Alliance for
Sustainability (LEWAS).
This award is presented to
teachers who have gone
above and beyond for en-
vironmental science and
who inspire sustainability
in the classroom, and teach
and encourage recycling ef-
forts, alternative energy and
more.
Each year, Ms. Hajibra-
him and Ms. Wilkins and
their juniors and seniors in
the International Baccalau-
reate Chemistry and Con-
sumer Chemistry classes
at CCHS take part in the
Toledo Metropolitan Area
Council of Governments
(TMACOG) Student Wa-
tershed Watch. The students
draw water samples from
Swan Creek, the Maumee
River, and the Ottawa River
to analyze the water qual-
ity, and then they present
their results at a city-wide
conference held at the Uni-
versity of Toledo. This year
the Central Catholic classes
took two awards for their
work in the program – Best
Overall Presentation and
Most Creative Display
Board.
The teachers were rec-
ognized for their service and
dedication to the Northwest
Ohio community to pro-
mote environmental, eco-
nomic, and social sustain-
ability within the Western
Lake Erie Region through
education, outreach and
networking.
Central Catholic science
teachers recognized
Ann Hajibrahim
Kathleen Wilkins
PERRYSBURG– Ow-
ens Community College
students were recently rec-
ognized for their academic
excellence and leadership
within the community, earn-
ing membership into the
Gamma Zeta Chapter of the
Chi Alpha Epsilon National
Honor Society.
The Chi Alpha Epsilon
National Honor Society was
founded at West Chester
University of Pennsylvania
in 1989 in response to the
increasing need to acknowl-
edge the continuing success-
es of students within the aca-
demic institution’s academic
development program. Rec-
ognizing that students who
share similar experiences
could serve as models for
others, founder Dr. Elbert
Saddler proposed a Greek
letter honor society. In 2001,
Chi Alpha Epsilon received
official endorsement from
the National Association
for Developmental Educa-
tion. Today, there are over
150 chapters of the national
honor society.
The honor society pro-
motes continued high aca-
demic standards, fosters
communication among its
members and encourages
community service and
participation in academic
support programs where in-
dividuals may serve as role
models to entering students.
“Owens Community Col-
lege’s Gamma Zeta Chapter
of Chi Alpha Epsilon is ex-
tremely honored and proud
to recognize the academic
achievements of students
who enter college through
non-traditional criteria,”
Sharon Badenhop, Owens
associate professor of Eng-
lish and co-adviser of Chi
Alpha Epsilon, said. “The
inductees are outstanding
young men and women,
many of whom have defied
the odds and overcome ob-
stacles in pursuit of a college
education. This honor soci-
ety provides such a means
to encourage, motivate and
reward individuals for con-
tinuing to grow and develop
into role models for fellow
students.”
Selection criterion for ac-
ceptance into the honor so-
ciety is based upon students
achieving a 3.0 or higher cu-
mulative grade point average
for two consecutive full-time
semesters or three-four part-
time semesters. In addition,
individuals must have taken
at least one developmental
education course at Owens.
The College’s chapter was
founded in April 2006. The
Chi Alpha Epsilon National
Honor Society student in-
ductees for the 2011 Spring
Semester are:
Julie Barraclough of Or-
egon (office support)
Kevin Bernheisel of To-
ledo (biology)
Richard Bethel of Toledo
(business management)
Renee Bidlack of Wal-
bridge (pre-physical thera-
pist assistant)
Brian Bowers of Holland
(pre-nursing)
Joshua Breitigam of Find-
lay (business management)
Toni Breneman of Find-
lay (accounting)
Lori Burkett of Findlay
(pre-nursing)
Phillip Carlen of Findlay
(pre-business administra-
tion)
Paula Cartlidge of Toledo
(accounting)
Stephanie Cary of Lima
(pre-physical therapist as-
sistant)
Angela Cochran of Delta
(basic peace officer acad-
emy)
Kelsie Colburn of Find-
lay (criminal justice tech-
nology)
Octavia Dabney of To-
ledo (culinary arts)
Delaine Depp of Fostoria
(financial services sales)
Katie Duval of Genoa
(social work)
Eric Eagleston of Toledo
(pre-business administra-
tion)
Adam Ferrell of Bryan
(networking and informa-
tion systems support)
Christina Flathers of
Maumee (surgical)
Jill Gorham of Toledo
(pre-radiography)
Jonathan Hall of Toledo
(manufacturing technology)
Marcia Hall of Toledo
(pre-surgical)
Sheryl Hudson of Toledo
(pre-nursing)
Jason Kearns of Forest
(criminal justice technol-
ogy)
Joshua Kensler of Toledo
(medical office support)
Philip Kern of Maumee
(early childhood education)
Jordan Kuyoth of Sylva-
nia (CAD technology)
Ashley LaHote of Sylva-
nia (pre-radiography)
Michelle Leonard of To-
ledo (pre-surgical)
Cheryl Lewis of Toledo
(accounting)
Justin Liptack of Mill-
bury (social work)
Myiisha Lott of Toledo
(registered nursing)
Tiffany Lowery of Whar-
ton (medical office support)
Amber McCormick of
Toledo (registered nursing)
Angel Murphy of Toledo
(business management)
Sally Osborn of Holland
(multi-age education)
Casey Ostwinch of Find-
lay (landscape and turfgrass
management)
Tom Otieno of Toledo
(pre-physical therapist as-
sistant)
Karen Patton of Findlay
(pre-medical assistant)
Eileen Pfaffenberger of
Metamora (office coordina-
tion)
Kristen Ratajczak of
Maumee (massage therapy)
Cheryl Roth of Toledo
(medical office support)
Nancy Smeeton-Gaietto
of Bloomville (real estate)
Michael Sperry of Toledo
(criminal justice technol-
ogy)
Melissa Trombly of Per-
rysburg (radiography)
BYRNE ROAD Flea Mar-
ket ever y Sunday
7am-12pm. 206 S. Byrne,
Toledo, OH (next to the
TV station). Indoor & out-
door spaces available.
C o n t a c t M a r k
419-389-1095.
A-1 GUTTER CLEANING.
Eaves cleaned/flushed.
TV tower removal. Take
all debris away! Insured.
Call 419-865-1941.
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
Classified Ads
To Place An Ad Call 419-885-9222
Ads must be received by Noon Monday for Wednesday’s edition.
$12.00 for the first 15 words and 95
¢
for each additional word.
052

Garage Sale
(Moving)
GARAGE SALE. Thurs.,
Fri., Sat. June 9-11. 4719
N. Arvilla Drive off Flan-
ders. Tools and lots of
misc.
LARGE GARAGE & Yard
Sale. Sylvania Summit
Street North to Country
Place. Band saw, table
saw, router and table,
kitchen table-4 chairs, 2
leafs. June 9, 10, 11. 9am
to 6pm.
054

Flea Markets
072

Help Wanted
TRIPLE CROWN Services
needs owner operators.
Increased rates, fuel sur-
charge paid on all miles
Paid tolls, fuel cards,
health benefit programs,
Baseplates, Truck lease
purchase assistance. Call
today and ask about our
s i gn on bonus .
800-756-7433
triplecrownsvc.com
Steady strong company is
what you need!
100

Services
100

Services
DELUXE PAINTING
Interior-Exterior
Commercial-Residential
Aluminum-Vinyl Siding
Painted
Quality Work
Free Estimates
References in this area.
Member of BBB.
Call Dave 419-944-5414.
Moving in or out clean-up
& hauling. Attics, base -
ments, buildings, yards,
garages, rental properties
& special help for the eld-
erly & handicapped. Fore-
cl osures & Repai rs.
419-215-4194.
102

Painting & Papering
Hurley!s Painting
Interior/Exterior Painting
Reasonable prices. All
work guaranteed. Free es-
t i m a t e s . C a l l
419-882-6753
Place a
House for
Rent Ad
In the
Classifieds
Call
419 885-9222
Rummage
Sale
Little Flower Church
Olimphia and Dorr St.
Thursday and Friday
June 16 and 17 • 9-6
Saturday June 18 • 9-12
Saturday is 2 bags for
a dollar
Owens Community College students inducted into Spring Chi Alpha Epsilon National Honor Society
View More Informaton Online!
www.pamelaroseaucton.com
©2011
Pame a Rose
Pamela Rose, Auctoneer
AARE CAI
pam@pamelaroseaucton.com
Call For A Color Brochure
419.865.1224
corey woods auction!
real estate and contents!
4837 sprIngBrOOk drIVe
tOledO, OhIO 43615
Directons: East of Corey
sAturdAy, june 11, 2011
FurnIshIngs at 10:00 am
reAl estAte at 1:00 pm
Preview and Registraton begins at:
8:00 am for Furnishings Aucton
10:00 am for the Real Estate Aucton
Real Estate Notes: MInIMuM BId $100,000 – Prestgious Corey Woods
subdivision, from the circular drive to the marble entrance way, you and your
guests will know that you have arrived. 4 bedrooms, 3 full & 2 half baths, 3,784+/-
square feet in Sylvania Schools.
Got A SmArt Phone? Scan the bar code to view more information!
Furnishing Notes: Antque
Furnishings, Vintage Clothing,
Fur Coats, Signed Paintngs,
Primitves, Glassware, Potery,
Collectbles, Jewelry, and much
more is being added! OnlIne BIddIng Is
AVAIlABle for select items.
Michael Murray, Auctoneer
CAI GRI
michael@pamelaroseaucton.com
WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2011
THE SYLVANIA HERALD Page 7
COMMUNITY
Dental Assistants Are Ranked As One Of The
Top 20 Fastest Growing Occupations In America
In the Forum Building at the corner of Sylvania
& Talmadge
NW Ohio’s Most
Comprehensive Dental
Assistant Learning
Center Since 1994
Your Dental Assistant
Career Begins Soon!
Call Today For
Session Times!
419-841-1292
800-720-7005
OH Reg. 94-07-1402T
Be A Career
Dental Assistant
In Only 3 Months
Be A Career
Dental Assistant
In Only 3 Months
• Small, Friendly Classes
• Day & Evening Classes
Now Forming
• Tuition Plans Available
• Accelerated, Hands-on
Learning
• Your Most Economical
Choice
Dental Assistants Are Ranked As One Of The
Top 20 Fastest Growing Occupations In America
In the Forum Building at the corner of Sylvania
& Talmadge
NW Ohio’s Most
Comprehensive Dental
Assistant Learning
Center Since 1994
Your Dental Assistant
Career Begins Soon!
Call Today For
Session Times!
419-841-1292
800-720-7005
OH Reg. 94-07-1402T
Be A Career
Dental Assistant
In Only 3 Months
Be A Career
Dental Assistant
In Only 3 Months
• Small, Friendly Classes
• Day & Evening Classes
Now Forming
• Tuition Plans Available
• Accelerated, Hands-on
Learning
• Your Most Economical
Choice
• Small Friendly Classes • Day and Evening
Classes Now Forming • Tuition Plans Available
• Accelerated, Hands-On Learning
• Your Most Economical Choice
Be a Career Dental Assistant In Only 3 Months
In the Forum Building at the corner
of Sylvania & Talmadge.
www.tdacademy.com
Place a Classified Ad
TODAY!
Call 419-885-9222
to place your ad!
The Sylvania Herald
419-885-9222
Storm Cheer & Dance, a competitive cheer and dance organization, recently
completed its frst season
with frst and second place
trophies for all teams at all
competitions, and raised
over $700 for Sylvania
Southview’s Cheer for a
Cure.
Storm Cheer and Dance
was created to provide a
fun place for local kids to
learn sportsmanship, gain
skill, compete and have fun.
Storm Cheer & Dance is pre-
paring for their second sea-
son with tryouts at McCord
Christian Church on June 12

from 1-4 p.m. Email Storm-
Cheer2Dance@gmail.com
for more details.
Storm Cheer & Dance completes first season
Photo submitted
Sylvania area students
were among those re-
cently recognized with the
highest awards at the ffty-
fourth commencement of
St. Francis de Sales High
School.
Tyler Clark, of Sylva-
nia received the Award for
Unselfsh Service for his
service to the school and
to his fellow students over
the past four years and for
making St. Francis a bet-
ter community. Tyler is
the son of Dave and Diane
Clark. He has been very
active while attending
St. Francis as the Student
Council Vice-President, a
member of Campus Min-
istry and its core team,
the Men’s Chorus, and
performing in the spring
musicals. Tyler is a mem-
ber of the Interact Club,
which is the school’s
chapter of Toledo Rotary,
and Teen Institute which
helps educate youth about
the risks of drug and alco-
hol use. He also works on
the school’s TV station,
WSFK, and the sports
network, KSN as a broad-
caster. After obtaining a
degree at the University
of Toledo in communi-
cations he hopes to be a
sports analyst on ESPN.
Frank Bonfglio of Syl-
vania received the Award
of the Oblates of St. Fran-
cis de Sales; it is consid-
ered the highest and most
honored award in that
this award is given to the
graduate who most nearly
exemplifes the spirit of
the Oblates of St. Francis
de Sales, and, therefore,
the spirit of the patron
of St. Francis de Sales
High School. The citation
for the award of the Ob-
lates of St. Francis reads:
“Excellent student, true
gentleman, zealous apos-
tle. St. Francis de Sales
blended perfectly love of
knowledge with love of
God.” Frank is the son of
Paul and Robin Bonfglio.
Frank has demonstrated
excellence in the four pil-
lars of St. Francis by be-
ing an active member of
Campus Ministry, Student
Council, Collegium Hon-
orum, the National Honor
Society, and the baseball
team. He said, “I love the
camaraderie that lies be-
tween the halls of red and
blue.” Frank will graduate
with high honors having
at least a 4.0 GPA and he
will attend Bowling Green
State University to pursue
a degree in secondary ed-
ucation.
Michael DiSalle of To-
ledo received the Excel-
lence in Athletics Award.
DiSalle will swim for Ohio
State University. While
swimming for St. Fran-
cis, Michael has been a
four time state champion,
a district champion, and a
Junior National Qualifer.
He holds the 20th fastest
time in Ohio swimming
history for the 100 Free
and 16th fastest time in
Ohio swimming history
for the 200 Free. Michael
has been recognized as
an All-Academic Athlete,
graduating with honors
having above the required
3.6 GPA. He is the son of
Chris and Pam DiSalle.
Dan Yodzis of Toledo
received the Award for
Outstanding Leadership
for contributing outstand-
ing leadership to the
school and to his fellow
students. Dan is the son
Linda Savercool and Chris
Yodzis. Dan has been very
involved in various activi-
ties during his four years
at St. Francis. He was
President of his freshman,
sophomore, and junior
classes. He has played
basketball and football all
four years and served as
captain of both teams his
senior year. He is a mem-
ber of the National Honor
Society having a GPA
above a 4.5. He works on
the yearbook staff and has
served on Campus Min-
istry all four years. He is
a member of the Men’s
Chorus and the Interact
Club. He will graduate
with highest honors and
plans to study pre-med
courses at Ohio State Uni-
versity.
The St. Francis de Sales
High School Class of 2011
has 136 seniors and all
have been accepted into
one or more colleges of
choice, with total accep-
tances to more than 100
schools with nearly $14
million in scholarships.
The class boasts a Gates
Millennium Scholar and a
Ron Brown Scholar, a Na-
tional Merit Finalist and
a National Achievement
Finalist, and 4 National
Merit Commended Schol-
ars. There are 88 seniors
who have been recognized
as All-Academic Athletes.
One student has been ap-
pointed to the U.S. Coast
Guard Academy and one
student has received the
Chick Evans Caddie
Scholarship sponsored by
the Western Golf Associa-
tion/Evans Scholar Foun-
dation. This class has con-
tributed more than 13,000
hours in community ser-
vice to 115 local organiza-
tions, in Appalachia, and
U.S. inner cities.
Frank Bonfiglio of Sylvania, Michael DiSalle, Dan Yodzis and Tyler Clark of Sylvania received highest
awards at graduation.
Sylvania area students win highest awards at
St. Francis de Sales High School graduation
Photo submitted
TOLEDO- The Toledo
Zoo recently announced
that 32-year-old Renee,
one of their two female
African elephants, gave
birth to her second calf,
a male, estimated weight
approximately 200 – 225
lbs, at 11:28 pm on Friday,
June 3. The yet unnamed
calf was born without
assistance and appears to
be healthy.
“After 22 long months
of anxious anticipation,
it’s extremely gratifying
to have a healthy calf,”
Dr. Anne Baker, the zoo’s
executive director, said.
The calf stood within
minutes of birth and Renee
is showing excellent
maternal behavior.
The calf has attempted
to suckle and successful
nursing usually occurs
within 24 hours. Should
nursing not take place,
the zoo will supplement
the calf with colostrum,
the mother’s first milk
that is rich in antibodies,
or with a frozen reserve
of elephant plasma,
which also contains the
antibodies.
The calf was conceived
in August of 2009 through
an artificial insemination
procedure performed by
elephant reproductive
specialist Dr. Dennis
Schmitt and the Toledo Zoo
animal care team. There
were two sperm donors
and paternity will be
determined at a later date.
“With the major hurdle
of the birth behind us,
there are still many critical
milestones ahead for Renee
and her calf, including
bonding, successful
nursing, introduction
to the other Toledo Zoo
elephants, the one-year
mark, and weaning,” Dr.
Chris Hanley, Toledo Zoo
chief veterinarian, said .
Though the Toledo
Zoo is delighted with
the successful birth,
they remain cautiously
optimistic about the future
of Renee’s calf. Mother
and calf are being
monitored round the clock
to ensure that the calf
begins nursing and that
Renee continues to exhibit
good maternal behavior.
Renee and the newborn
calf are currently off
exhibit and will remain
so until the animal care
staff determines that all
necessary criteria for
public viewing have been
met. The criteria include
a healthy, strong calf,
maternal acceptance,
bonding, and Renee
appearing to be comfortable
as a new mom and with
the presence of people.
When viewing begins,
hours may be irregular
and limited. Renee’s first
offspring, eight-year-
old Louie, and Twiggy,
a 26-year-old female
that arrived at the Zoo
in February 2010 will
be available for viewing
during regular Zoo hours.
The successful birth of
Renee’s calf is vital to the
zoo elephant population
for several reasons. The
population of females is
aging rapidly with a large
percentage exceeding the
prime breeding age for the
species. Captive breeding
efforts are also hampered
by a lack of breeding-
age bulls and bulls that
are of age but show
no inclination toward
breeding. However,
through vigorous breeding
efforts, it is hoped that
the African elephant zoo
population will have a
strong future.
The newly born boy
elephant at the Toledo
Zoo touches trunks with
his mother, Renee.
Elephant born at the Toledo Zoo
Downtown Sylvania • next to Chandler Cafe • 419-882-4177
Tank you for voting Lady C the Best Boutique in Sylvania!
C
DISTINCTIVE LADIES FASHIONS
LADY
Shop Local for all your Graduation Gifts
Choose a gift
for your favorite
graduate from
our Vera Bradley
collection or our
Pandora Jewelry
selection, includ-
ing custom beads
for your Pandora
bracelet.
Photo courtesy of Toledo Zoo/Andi
Norman
Page 8 THE SYLVANIA HERALD WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2011
FIRE STATION DEDICATION
The former Sylvania Fire Station #2 is now closed.
The older station faced geographic and road challenges
for prompt response to fire calls that the new station
does not. The new building also features state-of-the-art
equipment and facilities along with sleeping quarters, a
gym, a day room and laundry facilities.
A control panel on one of the Township’s fire en-
gines displayed at the June 4 open house event.
Sylvania Township
Trustee John Jennewine
is pictured with his young
son, Luke, who came to the
event sporting a fireman’s
hat. Luke was one of several
area children that enjoyed
climbing into the fire en-
gines and using some of the
equipment stored there.
A firefighter from Station #2 explains two displays
to visitors during the event.
Luke Jennewine is ready to climb down to a helpful
fireman after learning what it feels like to sit in the driv-
er’s seat of a fire truck.
Another family views the interior of the one of the
fire trucks displayed on June 4 at the opening of Fire
Station #2.
Even man’s best friend took time to enjoy the fine
weather for the Open House of Fire Station #2 on June
4. Several area residents and their families toured the
facility and learned about how the fire station oper-
ates.
Sylvania Township Fire Chief Jeffrey Kowalski
welcomed the visitors to the
Open House of the new Fire
Station #2 while Trustees Neal
Mahoney, left, and John Jen-
newine, right, looked on.
+






The Olander Park System Presents
Sunset Serenades
Concert Series
Olander Park
Community Hall Deck
Every other Wednesday evening 7 p.m. to dusk.

June 8: Eddie Boggs
June 22: Razor Sharp Objects
July 6: Bob Wurst
July 20: Polish American Band
August 3: Jeff McDonald’s Swingmania
Orchestra
August 17: Extra Stout (Irish Band)

FREE to TOPS residents;
all others pay $3 per car.
Concerts move inside the hall in inclement weather.

www.olanderpark.com
Jeff Klein, Chief of the City
of Perrysburg Fire Depart-
ment, played the bagpipes to
mark the transition from the
old Station #2 to the new one.
He led the symbolic pushing
of the fire engine into the new
station and entertained the
visitors. Klein is a former vol-
unteer for the Sylvania Fire
Department.
Members of Station #2, along with the leaders from
Sylvania Township, push the fire engine into the sta-
tion, marking the opening of the new Station #2 and
the official retirement of the former building.
A young resident and her
mother tours the fire engine
after it was pushed into the
new station.
Interior of the changing
area in the new facility.
Kevin Brown photos A sleeping area at the new station.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful