A GUIDE FOR NEWCOMERS

Welcome to New Zealand
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Part of the Department of Labour
LINKZ Magazine is available free of charge for newcomers
during their first two years in New Zealand.

The magazine deals with topics of general interest to new migrants and is
designed to make the process of settling here just that little bit smoother. If
you would like to receive LINKZ, please fill in and return this card—no postage
is required if the card is mailed in New Zealand. If you prefer to use email
please send us the information below to linkzsubscriptions@dol.govt.nz
Fold along here, moisten the adhesive and seal.
Moisten and seal here.
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LINKZ
MAGAZINE
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Title (delete those not applicable)
Mr / Mrs / Ms / Miss / Dr
First Name:

Family Name:
Date of arrival in New Zealand:
Email Address:
Contact address in New Zealand:
The privacy of your personal information
is important to us.
This information is collected and held by
the Department of Labour for the purpose
of sending you LINKZ magazine and
other settlement information. We do not
share information provided to us unless it
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was provided.
You are welcome to contact us at
any time to access and update your
information or to unsubscribe or opt-out
of receiving further communications from
us. To do so please contact:
Settlement Division
Department of Labour
P O Box 3705
Wellington 6140
Email: linkzsubscriptions@dol.govt.nz
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Important things to do 1
Emergencies 3
Helping you and your family settle in New Zealand 4
Accommodation 6
Employment (including tax) 9
Money 13
Health 15
Education (early childhood, primary, secondary and tertiary) 17
English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)
and interpreting services 20
Transport 22
Utilities (electricity, gas, water) 24
Communications (phone, mail, internet) 25
Government, city councils and district councils 27
Legal 29
Te Ao o te Maori - Maori culture 31
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Contents
Before you leave home
1. Ensure you have all the necessary documents for you and your family.
Your first few days in New Zealand are more likely to be problem—free if
you arrive with the following documents:
º u|r¦| cer¦|[ca¦es
º marr|aue cer¦|[ca¦es
º academ|c uua||[ca¦|ons
º re[erences [rom µrev|ous emµ|overs
º curr|cu|um v|¦ae
º cred|¦ re[erences
º an |n¦erna¦|ona| dr|ver ||cence or µerm|¦. See µaue 22.
All documents should be originals, not copies. If documents are not in
English they should be accompanied by a certified translation.
2. 0ruan|se accommoda¦|on [or vour [rs¦ davs or wee|s |n New Zea|and.
See µaue 6.
3. Se¦ uµ a New Zea|and µos¦ uoz [or vour ma||. See µaue 26.
4. 0u¦a|n a New Zea|and ¦az numuer [or memuers o[ vour [am||v w|o are
|n¦end|nu ¦o wor|. See µaue 12.
-. 0µen a uan| accoun¦. See µaue 13.
6. C|ec| w|e¦|er vou can use vour uua||[ca¦|ons |n New Zea|and. See µaue 0.
Important things to do
1
Once you arrive in New Zealand
1. Contact Settlement Support New Zealand in your area. See page 4.
2. Make contact with organisations that can help you find work. See page 9.
3. Register with a local doctor. See page 15.
4. Enrol your children in school. See page 17.
5. Apply for a driver’s licence. See page 22.
2
DIAL 111 for ambulance, fire or police. For other emergencies refer to the
front section of the local telephone book White Pages.
Ambulances are provided by non-profit, community-based services.
In Wellington services are free; in other centres there may be a part-charge
for emergency call outs. Charges vary according to location; the highest rate
for a medical emergency call out is $67.50.
If your injury or medical condition is not an emergency, make an appointment
to see your local doctor or, if you are unsure, phone Healthline free on
0800 611 116 for advice.
Emergencies
3
Helping you and your family settle in New Zealand
D;MP;7B7D:
Settlement Support New Zealand is a
national support network set up to
direct newcomers and their families to
services they might need during their
first years in New Zealand. There are
19 locations around the country and
Settlement Support New Zealand is
your first point of contact for
information and services in the area
where you live.
If you go to your local Settlement Support New Zealand office and are not
comfortable speaking English, you can access the Multi-lingual Information
Service, a service of the Citizens Advice Bureau. This national telephone
service is available free of charge if accessed through Settlement Support
New Zealand.
To find your nearest Settlement Support New Zealand location:
º Ca||. 0800 SSNZ4U l0800 776 048ì. !||s |s a [ree ca|| [rom a |and||ne and
your call will be directed to the Settlement Support New Zealand office
nearest to you.
º Co ¦o. www.|mm|ura¦|on.uov¦.nz|ssnz.
Whangarei
Tauranga
has¦|nus|Naµ|er
Hamilton
New Plymouth
Palmerston North
Ne|son|!asman
Christchurch
Dunedin Invercargill
North Shore
Waitakere
Auckland
Manukau
Wellington
Porirua
Hutt
Ro¦orua|!auµo
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LINKZ magazine
LINKZ is available free-of-charge to newcomers during the first two years of
their residence in New Zealand. The magazine deals with topics of general
interest to newcomers and is designed to make the process of settling
here just that little bit smoother. If you would like to receive LINKZ, please
complete the form at the back of this brochure and post it to us. Postage is
free if mailed in New Zealand. Alternatively, you are welcome to view LINKZ
on our weus|¦e. www.|mm|ura¦|on.uov¦.nz|||n|z.
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Organising accommodation when first arriving in New Zealand
Some newcomers arrange to stay with family or friends when they first arrive
in New Zealand. For others it is best to arrange initial accommodation before
leaving for New Zealand.
There are many websites that provide information on accommodation in
New Zealand. These include:
º www. accommoda¦|onnewzea|and.co.nz
º www.aa¦rave|.co.nz
º www.|asons.com.
Housing in general
Property styles and prices vary widely by area. Prices have risen sharply in
recent years due to high demand.
Most New Zealand houses are stand-alone wooden buildings. Newer houses
are insulated but older houses may have minimal insulation. Most houses are
heated by open fires, wood burners, heat pumps, or electric or gas heaters.
Central heating and double-glazing are not common.
Accommodation
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Rental housing
Most newcomers rent for a period of time and New Zealand has good
systems in place to protect the rights of tenants.
You can find out more about renting in New Zealand from:
º 0eµar¦men¦ o[ bu||d|nu and hous|nu. [ree µ|one 0800 83 62 62 or
www.tenancy.govt.nz.
Tenants need to sign a tenancy agreement and pay a bond and rent in
advance. The landlord is responsible for property insurance, but you should
insure your belongings and insure against accidental damage to the property.
!|e ues¦ µroµer¦|es are ren¦ed uu|c||v.
To find properties, go to:
º '!o Le¦' co|umns |n newsµaµers or weus|¦es
º rea| es¦a¦e auenc|es or |e¦¦|nu cen¦res ||s¦ed |n ¦|e Ye||ow Paues or a¦
www.yellowpages.co.nz
º Rea| Ls¦a¦e lns¦|¦u¦e o[ New Zea|and. www.rea|enz.co.nz.
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Buying a house
As in many parts of the world, owning your own home is becoming
increasingly more expensive.
Most properties in New Zealand are sold through real estate agents who are
paid a commission by the seller. Properties can be sold by auction, tender
or negotiation. You can visit any open home or contact any real estate
agent to view properties they have listed. An open home is a brief period of
time, usually on weekends, when the house is open and anyone can view.
Real estate agents will be able to give you an indication of prices in your area.
For information about buying a house, go to:
º vour uan|, manv µrov|de comµre|ens|ve |n[orma¦|on on uuv|nu a |ouse
on their websites, and they may also be able to assist with finance.
In addition, many banks offer specialist services for migrants. You can find
'ban|s' ||s¦ed |n ¦|e Ye||ow Paues or a¦ www.ve||owµaues.co.nz.
For information about property values, go to:
º 0uo¦au|e va|ue. www.uv.co.nz
To find properties, go to:
º newsµaµers on wednesdavs and Sa¦urdavs
º rea| es¦a¦e auen¦s ||s¦ed |n ¦|e Ye||ow Paues or a¦ www.ve||owµaues.co.nz
º Rea| Ls¦a¦e lns¦|¦u¦e o[ New Zea|and. www.rea|enz.co.nz
º www.oµen2v|ew.com.
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New Zealand has low unemployment and needs skilled workers to help build
the economy. While there is low unemployment many employers value local
New Zealand work experience. If you do not have employment arranged before
you arrive in New Zealand it may take you time and persistence to get a job.
You mav a|so need ¦o a||ow ¦|me ¦o |ave vour uua||[ca¦|ons eva|ua¦ed or
apply for professional or trade registration. It is recommended that you check
w|e¦|er vou can use vour uua||[ca¦|ons |n New Zea|and ue[ore vou ¦rave|.
lor |n[orma¦|on on uua||[ca¦|ons. uo ¦o.
º New Zea|and 0ua||[ca¦|ons Au¦|or|¦v. µ|one 04 463 3000 or
www.nzua.uov¦.nz.
For information on professional or trade registration, go to:
º !|e re|evan¦ |ndus¦rv uoard ||s¦ed a¦ www.|mm|ura¦|on.uov¦.nz under
'reu|s¦ra¦|on au¦|or|¦|es'.
lor |n[orma¦|on auou¦ emµ|ovmen¦. New Zea|and s¦v|e curr|cu|um v|¦aes lCvsì.
|ou |un¦|nu and |n¦erv|ew ¦ec|n|uues uo ¦o.
º wor|S|¦e. www.wor|s|¦e.uov¦.nz
º Career Serv|ces. µ|one 0800 222 733 or www.careers.uov¦.nz
º New K|w|s. www.new||w|s.co.nz.
Employment
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To find jobs, go to:
º s|¦ua¦|ons vacan¦ ||s¦|nus |n newsµaµers. !|e |arues¦ ||s¦|nus can ue [ound
in The New Zealand Herald (Auckland region) www.nzherald.co.nz and
The Dominion Post (Wellington region) www.dompost.co.nz and The Press
(Canterbury region) www.press.co.nz.
º |ou vacancv weus|¦es. [or ezamµ|e www.see|.co.nz and
www.trademejobs.co.nz
º µr|va¦e recru|¦men¦ auenc|es ||s¦ed |n ¦|e Ye||ow Paues or a¦
www.yellowpages.co.nz
º wor| and lncome. www.wor|and|ncome.uov¦.nz
º New K|w|s. www.new||w|s.co.nz.
If setting up your own business in New Zealand, contact a Chamber of
Commerce, city or local council in your region, or go to:
º b|z ln[o. www.u|z.oru.nz
º lmm|ura¦|on New Zea|and. www.|mm|ura¦|on.uov¦.nz.
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KiwiSaver
KiwiSaver is a voluntary work-based savings initiative which started in July
2007. It aims to encourage long-term saving and asset accumulation by New
Zealanders who want to enjoy more than a basic standard of living in their
retirement.
When you start a job in New Zealand, you will be automatically enrolled with
KiwiSaver though you can choose to opt out. To join KiwiSaver you must
meet certain conditions, including being a New Zealand citizen or being
entitled to live in New Zealand indefinitely.
For more information, go to:
º vour emµ|over
º www.K|w|Saver.uov¦.nz
º www.sor¦ed.oru.nz.
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Employment agreements
You can choose to join a union and, where there is one, become part of
the collective employment agreement. Employees can also negotiate extra
conditions. If there is no collective agreement, your employer must make a
written offer, which you can seek advice on.
Adults over 18 years must be paid a minimum hourly rate and holiday,
sickness, bereavement and parental leave. Women and men doing the same
work must be paid the same amount.
For information about the rights and obligations of employees and employers,
go to:
º www.ers.uov¦.nz.
For information about workplace health and safety, go to:
º 0eµar¦men¦ o[ Lauour. [ree µ|one 0800 20 00 20 or www.os|.do|.uov¦.nz.

Tax
You must pay tax on all income you receive, whether generated in New
Zealand or overseas. Usually your employer deducts tax from your salary or
wages, so you will need an Inland Revenue Department (IRD) number before
you start working.
Tax rates vary depending on the amount of income earned.
To apply for an IRD number and for more information on tax, go to:
º ln|and Revenue. [ree µ|one 0800 2-7 773 or www.|rd.uov¦.nz.
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Bank accounts
Banking services are available at registered banks, credit unions and building
societies. Many have specialist migrant banking teams and staff who can
speak languages other than English. Banking hours may vary by location,
though banks are usually open Monday to Friday between 9.00am and 4.30pm.
To open an account you will need photo identification and proof of your
µermanen¦ address. uu¦ re[erences are no¦ usua||v reuu|red. Your accoun¦ |s
usually open within 10 days. You may be able to open your account before
you come to New Zealand.
To find banks, go to:
º uan|s ||s¦ed |n ¦|e Ye||ow Paues or a¦ www.ve||owµaues.co.nz.

Using money in New Zealand
Vanv New Zea|anders use Ll!P0S|cas| or cred|¦ cards [or dav-¦o-dav
shopping and internet and telephone banking are common.
Money
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Financial support for families
If your family income is below a certain level, you may be eligible for Working
for Families and tax credits. Working for Families is available for low to
middle income families with children aged 18 years or younger who are not
financially independent and are living at home. Temporary permit or visa
holders or those unlawfully in New Zealand are not eligible.
For information about Working for Families, go to:
º ln|and Revenue. [ree µ|one 0800 227 773 or
www.workingforfamilies.govt.nz.
Pensions
!|ere are sµec|[c reuu|remen¦s reuard|nu aue and res|dence ¦|a¦ µeoµ|e
mus¦ sa¦|s[v ¦o uua||[v [or New Zea|and Suµerannua¦|on l¦|e S¦a¦e µens|onì.
Reuu|remen¦s varv deµend|nu on ¦|e |enu¦| o[ res|dence |n New Zea|and and
on whether there is a social security agreement between New Zealand and
your home country (and the terms of any such agreement).
Pension transfers can be complex and it is advisable to seek expert advice
well before arriving in New Zealand. The Ministry of Social Development can
provide detailed guidance on which provisions may apply.
For detailed information, go to:
º !|e V|n|s¦rv o[ Soc|a| 0eve|oµmen¦ a¦ www.msd.uov¦.nz.
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Your family doctor or general practitioner (GP) will probably be your first
contact with the health system. It is recommended that once you decide
where you are going to live you register with a GP in your area. It is free to
register with any GP of your choice. You must pay a charge for each GP visit,
but you may be eligible for government subsidies. A friend or support person
can stay with you during most medical examinations.
To find a GP:
º |oo| |n ¦|e 'Ved|ca|' sec¦|on a¦ ¦|e [ron¦ o[ ¦|e w||¦e Paues or a¦
www.whitepages.co.nz.
For after-hours advice or treatment:
º hea|¦|||ne l24-|ourì. [ree µ|one 0800 611 116
º [nd an a[¦er-|ours med|ca| cen¦re ||s¦ed |n ¦|e [ron¦ o[ ¦|e w||¦e Paues or
at www.whitepages.co.nz
º µ|one vour CP÷mos¦ |ave a recorded messaue w|¦| adv|ce.
If you need medicine, your GP will give you a written prescription to take
to a pharmacy to collect. There is a charge for each prescription item
although subsidies may be available. Pharmacists are trained to give advice
on medicines and some health problems, and this advice is usually free.
Outside normal trading hours medicine is available from urgent pharmacies.
Health
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To find an urgent pharmacy, go to:
º ¦|e 'Ved|ca|' sec¦|on a¦ ¦|e [ron¦ o[ ¦|e w||¦e Paues or a¦
www.whitepages.co.nz.
To be eligible for public healthcare, you need to be a New Zealand citizen,
a New Zealand resident, the holder of a two-year work permit or a refugee.
Take your passport and immigration documents with you if you need medical
services.
Non-residents may have to pay for some hospital services, but you will not be
refused emergency care if you cannot pay.
To get help if you are injured, Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC)
provides personal injury cover to New Zealand citizens, residents and
temporary visitors to New Zealand.
For information about ACC personal injury cover:
º lree µ|one 0800 101 006 or v|s|¦ www.acc.co.nz. ln¦erµre¦ers are ava||au|e.
Dental treatment charges vary widely. Dentists are listed in the Yellow Pages
or under '0en¦|s¦s' a¦ www.ve||owµaues.co.nz.
Children’s health
Many health services for children are free as are most medicines for children
under six years of age. Basic dental care for children is free from birth until
the end of year 13 (end of secondary school).
Plunket is a free service that helps families with children under five years
through branches nationwide, mobile clinics and a free phone service,
PlunketLine.
For more information, go to:
º P|un|e¦L|ne [ree µ|one 0800 033 022 or www.µ|un|e¦.oru.nz
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Early childhood education
You can enrol your child in the early childhood service that best suits you and
your child. Fees vary widely and there may be a waiting list.
To find early childhood services, go to:
º c|||d care and educa¦|on ||s¦|nus |n ¦|e Ye||ow Paues or a¦
www.yellowpages.co.nz
º C|¦|zens' Adv|ce bureauz. ca|| vour |oca| uureau ||s¦ed |n ¦|e w||¦e Paues
www.whitepages.co.nz or free phone 0800 367 222 or www.cab.org.nz
º V|n|s¦rv o[ Lduca¦|on na¦|ona| o[[ce. 04 463 8000 or www.m|nedu.uov¦.nz.
For information about early childhood education, go to:
º !eam-Uµ. www.¦eamuµ.co.nz.
Primary and secondary school education
School is compulsory for children between their sixth and sixteenth birthdays,
but most start school when they turn five. You can apply to enrol your
child at any state school as long as there is no enrolment scheme in place.
Most children go to a state school, but there are also private schools,
boarding schools, the Correspondence School and home-based schooling. You
can visit schools and meet the principal and staff before enrolling your child.
State schools are co-educational at primary and intermediate level, with
classes of both boys and girls. Some state secondary schools offer single-sex
education. The school day usually begins at 9.00am and finishes about
Education
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3.00pm, or 3.30pm for secondary schools. Meals are not provided and most
children take lunch to school with them. You will need to buy stationery and
uniforms (if the school has a uniform) and you may be asked to pay some
other costs.
You are legally responsible to make sure your children go to school every day.
You are also responsible to ensure they travel to and from school safely.
Children with special education needs are enrolled with other children
in ordinary classes whenever possible and specialist support services are
available. Residential special schools provide teaching and live-in care for
children with major difficulties.
You can reuues¦ ¦|a¦ vour c|||d ue ezcused [rom re||u|ous and sez
education classes.
For information about primary and secondary education, go to:
º !eam-Uµ. www.¦eamuµ.uov¦.nz.
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Tertiary education
Tertiary study is available at universities, institutes of technology,
polytechnics, colleges of education, wananga (tertiary organisation focused
on Maori culture) and private training establishments. The academic year
usually starts in February and application forms are available from each
tertiary institution.
Costs vary depending on the type and level of course. Student loans are
available to permanent residents or refugees entitled to live in New Zealand
indefinitely.
Most tertiary institutions ask students to prove their English language skills.
For more information, go to:
º www.educa¦|onnz.oru.nz
º www.m|nedu.uov¦.nz.
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Private language schools and most polytechnics, universities and secondary
schools offer ESOL tuition for adults across a range of levels. If you cannot
attend formal language classes, ESOL Home Tutors—the national network of
volunteer home tutors—may be able to help.
º LS0L home !u¦ors. µ|one 0800 4 LS0L l0800 367 376ì or www.eso||¦.oru.nz.
Some m|uran¦s are reuu|red ¦o µre-µav [or ¦|e|r LS0L ¦u|¦|on ue[ore ¦|ev |eave [or
New Zealand.
To find an ESOL provider, go to:
º !er¦|arv Lduca¦|on Comm|ss|on. [ree µ|one 0800 832 463 or www.¦ec.uov¦.nz.
Adult and Community Education classes are available in most areas throughout
New Zealand.
For more information about courses, go to:
º www.z¦end.co.nz

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)
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Interpreting services
A number of government agencies and local city or district councils use
the Government interpreting service—Language Line. Language Line is
available Monday to Friday from 9am to 6pm. If you are phoning or visiting a
government office and do not feel comfortable using English, please ask for
Language Line—www.languageline.govt.nz.
If you go to a local Settlement Support New Zealand office or Citizens Advice
Bureau, interpreters are available through the Multi-Lingual Information
Serv|ce÷www.cau.oru.nz|con¦ac¦||ndezd|rec¦|on||¦m|.
Other interpreters may be available in your area. Go to the listing for
Interpreters in the Yellow Pages or at www.yellowpages.co.nz.
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Public transport
Air, train and bus services may be limited, especially outside the main cities.
Taxis are clearly marked and must have reliable meters with the driver’s
identification card and fare schedule displayed. Bargaining and tipping are
not common.
To find out about transport services and timetables, go to:
º v|s|¦or |n[orma¦|on cen¦res ||s¦ed a¦. www.newzea|and.uov¦.nz
º vour c|¦v counc|| or d|s¦r|c¦ counc|| ||s¦ed a¦ Loca| Covernmen¦ New Zea|and.
www.lgnz.co.nz.
Driving
You can drive for up to one year with a current and valid driver’s licence from
another country or an International Driving Permit. If your driver’s licence is not
in English, you must carry an English translation or have an International
Driving Permit. If you plan to stay longer than one year, you should apply for a
New Zealand driver’s licence as soon as possible.
New Zea|anders dr|ve on ¦|e |e[¦ and ¦|ere |s a un|uue u|ve wav ru|e. so [nd
out about rules and conditions before you drive. Drivers and passengers must
wear seatbelts or approved safety restraints at all times. Plunket has a rental
service for children’s safety restraints. Approved safety helmets are
Transport
22
compulsory for all cyclists and motorcyclists. Speeding and drink driving are
serious offences with heavy penalties.
For information, go to:
º Land !ransµor¦ New Zea|and. [ree µ|one 0800 600 000 luenera| uuer|esì.
free phone 0800 822 422 (driver licences) or www.landtransport.govt.nz
º P|un|e¦ l[or c|||dren's car sea¦sì. [ree µ|one 0800 033 022 or
www.plunket.org.nz.
Buying a car
Second hand cars are sold by car dealers or private sellers. The Automobile
Assoc|a¦|on lAAì or ve||c|e !es¦|nu New Zea|and can |nsµec¦ ve||c|es ¦o c|ec|
for mechanical problems for a fee. Sellers and buyers must both notify Land
Transport New Zealand of a vehicle’s change of ownership within seven days.
ve||c|es mus¦ ue reu|s¦ered annua||v [or use on µuu||c roads and µass a s|z-
monthly Warrant of Fitness inspection.
For information on buying a car, go to:
º www.consumera[[a|rs.uov¦.nz.
To register vehicles, go to:
º Pos¦ S|oµs. [ree µ|one 0800 -01 -01 or www.nzµos¦.co.nz
º ¦|e Au¦omou||e Assoc|a¦|on. [ree µ|one 0800 -00 333 or www.aa.co.nz
º ve||c|e !es¦|nu New Zea|and. µ|one 04 40- 2-00 or www.v¦nz.co.nz.
To book a Warrant of Fitness (WOF) inspection, go to:
º au¦|or|sed ve||c|e wor|s|oµs
º ve||c|e !es¦|nu New Zea|and. µ|one 04 40- 2-00 or www.v¦nz.co.nz.
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Utilities
Electricity and gas
Your landlord can tell you the name of the electricity or gas supplier for your
property. Gas is available in most areas either using LPG cylinders or piped
natural gas.
To find electricity and gas suppliers, go to:
º L|ec¦r|c|¦v suµµ||ers and uas comµan|es ||s¦ed |n ¦|e Ye||ow Paues or a¦
www.yellowpages.co.nz.
Water
All New Zealand tap water is safe to drink. Fluoride is added as a dental
health practice in most areas. Water supplies are managed by your city
council or district council. In some parts of the country there is a charge
for water, based on usage.
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Phones
Home phones can be set up by either Telecom or TelstraClear. There may
be a phone at the property when you move in or you can buy one from an
electronic goods shop or phone company. Pricing plans vary widely.
Vou||e µ|one serv|ces are ava||au|e [rom !e|ecom and voda[one. Pr|ce µ|ans
vary widely. Mobile phones are sold at electronic goods shops or specialist
phone shops. Public phones in town centres and suburban areas use pre-paid
phone cards which are available from supermarkets, newsagents, or dairies
(small local shops).
Calls to phone numbers beginning with 0800 or 0508 are free. 0900 numbers
are used for services including donations to charities, surf and weather
reports, competition or chat lines, and you are charged higher rates than
standard calls. Directory assistance is available on 018 for a charge.
No¦e. ¦|e ¦e|ecommun|ca¦|ons |ndus¦rv |n New Zea|and c|anues uu|c||v so
there may be other providers.
Communications
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Mail
A postal box is acceptable as your official address until you have a
permanent address.
To set up a postal box you can visit your local PostShop or Books & More
outlet or go to:
º Pos¦S|oµs. [ree µ|one 0800 -01 -01 or www.nzµos¦.co.nz
º Pr|va¦e boz. µ|one 04 831 1333 or www.µr|va¦euoz.co.nz.
Internet
There are a number of internet providers offering broadband and dial-up plus
a range of mobile and wireless services.
To find internet providers, go to:
º ¦|e Ye||ow Paues or www.ve||owµaues.co.nz under comµu¦ers and e|ec¦ron|cs.
To find public internet access, go to:
º ¦|e |oca| µuu||c ||urarv
º |n¦erne¦ ca[es ||s¦ed |n ¦|e Ye||ow Paues or a¦ www.ve||owµaues.co.nz.
26
City councils and district councils provide services including rubbish
collection and recycling, dog control, noise control, water supply, parks,
libraries, cultural and sporting events, and visitor information centres.
Services are funded mainly by property rates. If you rent a property, your
landlord pays the rates. If you buy a property, you will be sent a rates account
four times a year.
To find the city council or district council in your area, go to:
º Loca| Covernmen¦ New Zea|and. µ|one 04 024 1200 or www.|unz.co.nz
º ln[orma¦|on cen¦res. [ree |n[orma¦|on on accommoda¦|on. ¦ransµor¦.
food, tourist attractions and entertainment is available from Information
Centres. These are identified by a prominent logo.
Government, city councils and district councils
27
Enrolling and voting
You must enrol on the Parliamentary Electoral Roll if you are 18 years or
older, are a New Zealand citizen or permanent resident, and have lived in New
Zea|and con¦|nuous|v [or a vear. l[ vou are reuu|red ¦o |eave ¦|e coun¦rv uv a
set date (such as student or visitor permit holders), you are not a permanent
resident for electoral purposes and do not have to enrol. Enrolling to vote is
compulsory in New Zealand, but voting is optional.
For information or enrolment forms, go to:
º L|ec¦|ons New Zea|and. [ree µ|one 0800 LNR0LN0w l36 76 -6ì or
www.elections.org.nz. Information on this site is available in several
languages
º Pos¦ S|oµs.
Dog ownership
Dogs must be registered every year at your city council or district council
and most dogs must also be micro-chipped. Dog control bylaws are set and
enforced by the city council or district council.
For information about dog ownership, go to:
º vour c|¦v counc|| or d|s¦r|c¦ counc|| ||s¦ed a¦ Loca| Covernmen¦ New Zea|and.
www.lgnz.co.nz
º 0ou Sa[e¦v. www.dousa[e¦v.uov¦.nz.
28
Newcomers to New Zealand have the same rights and obligations under New
Zealand law as any other person living here. It is against the law for anyone
to steal or damage your property and it is against the law for anyone to
deliberately attempt to injure you or anyone in your family. The New Zealand
Police are respected members of New Zealand communities and it is their job
to enforce the law and investigate incidents that are reported to them.
Police
You can approach the police at any time to talk or ask for help. Police officers
do not normally carry guns. Most wear a police uniform but they should be
able to show you their police identification card and tell you which station
they are from. Firearms and guns must be licensed at your local police station.
For police help:
º ln an emeruencv - [ree µ|one 111
º 0¦|er ¦|an |n an emeruencv ca|| ¦|e neares¦ µo||ce s¦a¦|on ||s¦ed |n ¦|e
government section of the White Pages or www.whitepages.co.nz
º ¦o reµor¦ a ¦ra[[c |nc|den¦. ca|| ¯--- [rom vour mou||e µ|one.
For safety information in several languages, go to: www.police.govt.nz.
Legal
29
Fishing and collecting seafood
There are limits for many fish and shellfish species to prevent over-fishing.
Breaches of these limits are treated very seriously.
For information about fishing limits, go to:
º V|n|s¦rv o[ l|s|er|es. [ree µ|one 0800 4RULLS l0800 478 -37ì or
www.fish.govt.nz.
Alcohol
!|e |eua| dr|n||nu aue |s 18 vears. You mav ue as|ed [or µ|o¦o |den¦|[ca¦|on
when purchasing alcohol. Alcohol is available from supermarkets and liquor
outlets seven days a week. Bylaws in some areas prevent drinking alcohol in
public places. Drinking and driving is a serious offence with heavy penalties.

Smoking
Smo||nu |s uanned |n wor|µ|aces and mos¦ µuu||c areas. |nc|ud|nu s|oµµ|nu
malls, public transport, pubs, bars and restaurants.

30
Maori are the tribal people indigenous to Aotearoa (New Zealand) and make
up about 16 percent of the total population. Maori culture and the Treaty of
Waitangi—an agreement between Maori and the Crown—are important in
New Zealand society. Many Maori words are part of everyday Kiwi language.
To learn more about Maori culture, go to:
º Vuseum o[ New Zea|and !e Paµa !onuarewa. www.¦eµaµa.uov¦.nz
º !rea¦v o[ wa|¦anu| ln[orma¦|on Prouramme. www.¦rea¦vo[wa|¦anu|.uov¦.nz
º Lncvc|oµed|a o[ New Zea|and !e Ara. www.¦eara.uov¦.nz
º New Zea|and h|s¦orv 0n||ne. www.nz||s¦orv.ne¦.nz.
To learn about Maori language (Te Reo), go to:
º Korero Vaor|. www.|oreromaor|.co.nz.
Te Ao o te Maori - Maori culture
31
Haere mai (Welcome)

Moving to another country is a big step. We understand this
and want to help you and your family settle and enjoy your
new life in New Zealand.
This booklet has practical information to help you and your family settle
quickly in New Zealand.
The first few months can be busy and challenging and life in New Zealand
may be quite different from the life you are used to. For some people,
settling into a new country is comparatively easy; for others it can be a much
slower and more difficult process, and they may not feel “at home” for a
period of years, rather than weeks or months.
The New Zealand Government is committed to assisting and supporting
newcomers in settling quickly and successfully. A key part of the Government’s
settlement strategy is the Settlement Support New Zealand initiative.
Once you’ve arrived in New Zealand we recommend you get in touch with
the Settlement Support New Zealand network. The network currently has
initiatives in 19 locations throughout the country. Settlement Suport
Co ordinators work with local government and other local agencies to
provide newcomers to New Zealand with expert guidance on how to access
local services. For an outline of the type of services available and contact
information, refer to the section Helping you and your family settle in New
Zealand on page 4 of this guide.
We look forward to helping you make your way in New Zealand and wish you
well in your new life here.
Welcome to New Zealand
Your feedback
We welcome your feedback on this booklet. If you would like to provide us with
feedback please email us on settlementinformation@dol.govt.nz.
Disclaimer: Any agency or organisation mentioned in this booklet has been
included because it provides access to information that may be useful for
newcomers to NewZealand. Immigration NewZ ealand does not intend to imply
any endorsement of that organisation.
All information current at the time of publication: November 2007.
Freepost 95124
LINKZ
Department of Labour
PO Box 3705
Wellington 6140

Contents

Page
Important things to do Emergencies Helping you and your family settle in New Zealand Accommodation Employment (including tax) Money Health Education (early childhood, primary, secondary and tertiary) English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and interpreting services Transport Utilities (electricity, gas, water) Communications (phone, mail, internet) Government, city councils and district councils Legal Te Ao o te Maori - Maori culture 1 3 4 6 9 13 15 17 20 22 24 25 27 29 31
1

Important things to do

Before you leave home
1. Ensure you have all the necessary documents for you and your family. Your first few days in New Zealand are more likely to be problem—free if you arrive with the following documents:

All documents should be originals, not copies. If documents are not in English they should be accompanied by a certified translation.

1

See page 17. 5. 4. See page 4. 2. Make contact with organisations that can help you find work. Enrol your children in school. 3.Once you arrive in New Zealand 1. Contact Settlement Support New Zealand in your area. See page 9. Apply for a driver’s licence. See page 22. See page 15. 2 . Register with a local doctor.

50. the highest rate for a medical emergency call out is $67.Emergencies DIAL 111 for ambulance. In Wellington services are free. phone Healthline free on 0800 611 116 for advice. community-based services. 3 . in other centres there may be a part-charge for emergency call outs. For other emergencies refer to the front section of the local telephone book White Pages. If your injury or medical condition is not an emergency. fire or police. Ambulances are provided by non-profit. if you are unsure. make an appointment to see your local doctor or. Charges vary according to location.

4 . There are 19 locations around the country and Settlement Support New Zealand is your first point of contact for information and services in the area where you live. To find your nearest Settlement Support New Zealand location: your call will be directed to the Settlement Support New Zealand office nearest to you. you can access the Multi-lingual Information Service.Helping you and your family settle in New Zealand North Shore Waitakere Auckland Manukau Whangarei Tauranga Settlement Support New Zealand is a national support network set up to direct newcomers and their families to services they might need during their first years in New Zealand. a service of the Citizens Advice Bureau. This national telephone service is available free of charge if accessed through Settlement Support New Zealand. Hamilton New Plymouth Palmerston North Wellington Porirua Hutt Christchurch Invercargill Dunedin If you go to your local Settlement Support New Zealand office and are not comfortable speaking English.

The magazine deals with topics of general interest to newcomers and is designed to make the process of settling here just that little bit smoother. you are welcome to view LINKZ 5 . If you would like to receive LINKZ. please complete the form at the back of this brochure and post it to us. Alternatively. Postage is free if mailed in New Zealand.LINKZ magazine LINKZ is available free-of-charge to newcomers during the first two years of their residence in New Zealand.

heat pumps.Accommodation Organising accommodation when first arriving in New Zealand Some newcomers arrange to stay with family or friends when they first arrive in New Zealand. Prices have risen sharply in recent years due to high demand. wood burners. 6 . Most houses are heated by open fires. Central heating and double-glazing are not common. Most New Zealand houses are stand-alone wooden buildings. Newer houses are insulated but older houses may have minimal insulation. For others it is best to arrange initial accommodation before leaving for New Zealand. or electric or gas heaters. These include: Housing in general Property styles and prices vary widely by area. There are many websites that provide information on accommodation in New Zealand.

co. You can find out more about renting in New Zealand from: www. go to: www. To find properties.govt.nz.yellowpages. Tenants need to sign a tenancy agreement and pay a bond and rent in advance. but you should insure your belongings and insure against accidental damage to the property.Rental housing Most newcomers rent for a period of time and New Zealand has good systems in place to protect the rights of tenants. The landlord is responsible for property insurance.nz 7 .tenancy.

Most properties in New Zealand are sold through real estate agents who are paid a commission by the seller. For information about buying a house. usually on weekends. and they may also be able to assist with finance. You can visit any open home or contact any real estate agent to view properties they have listed. when the house is open and anyone can view. go to: 8 . tender or negotiation. go to: To find properties. In addition. Properties can be sold by auction. owning your own home is becoming increasingly more expensive. many banks offer specialist services for migrants. An open home is a brief period of time. go to: on their websites.Buying a house As in many parts of the world. You can find For information about property values. Real estate agents will be able to give you an indication of prices in your area.

It is recommended that you check For information on professional or trade registration. go to: 9 . If you do not have employment arranged before you arrive in New Zealand it may take you time and persistence to get a job. While there is low unemployment many employers value local New Zealand work experience. apply for professional or trade registration.Employment New Zealand has low unemployment and needs skilled workers to help build the economy.

press. www.co.trademejobs.nzherald.nz www.co.nz.co. or go to: 10 . contact a Chamber of Commerce.yellowpages.co.To find jobs.nz If setting up your own business in New Zealand.nz and The Press (Canterbury region) www. city or local council in your region.nz and The Dominion Post (Wellington region) www.dompost. go to: in The New Zealand Herald (Auckland region) www.co.

you will be automatically enrolled with KiwiSaver though you can choose to opt out. go to: 11 .KiwiSaver KiwiSaver is a voluntary work-based savings initiative which started in July 2007. To join KiwiSaver you must meet certain conditions. including being a New Zealand citizen or being entitled to live in New Zealand indefinitely. For more information. When you start a job in New Zealand. It aims to encourage long-term saving and asset accumulation by New Zealanders who want to enjoy more than a basic standard of living in their retirement.

To apply for an IRD number and for more information on tax. go to: Tax You must pay tax on all income you receive. sickness. go to: For information about workplace health and safety. If there is no collective agreement. Usually your employer deducts tax from your salary or wages. whether generated in New Zealand or overseas. For information about the rights and obligations of employees and employers. Adults over 18 years must be paid a minimum hourly rate and holiday. so you will need an Inland Revenue Department (IRD) number before you start working. Employees can also negotiate extra conditions. which you can seek advice on.Employment agreements You can choose to join a union and. your employer must make a written offer. bereavement and parental leave. where there is one. Tax rates vary depending on the amount of income earned. go to: 12 . become part of the collective employment agreement. Women and men doing the same work must be paid the same amount.

30pm. To find banks. Banking hours may vary by location. credit unions and building societies. 13 .Money Bank accounts Banking services are available at registered banks. Many have specialist migrant banking teams and staff who can speak languages other than English. You may be able to open your account before you come to New Zealand.00am and 4. though banks are usually open Monday to Friday between 9. To open an account you will need photo identification and proof of your usually open within 10 days. go to: Using money in New Zealand shopping and internet and telephone banking are common.

you may be eligible for Working for Families and tax credits.nz. For information about Working for Families. Temporary permit or visa holders or those unlawfully in New Zealand are not eligible. Working for Families is available for low to middle income families with children aged 18 years or younger who are not financially independent and are living at home.workingforfamilies. go to: 14 . Pensions on whether there is a social security agreement between New Zealand and your home country (and the terms of any such agreement).Financial support for families If your family income is below a certain level. go to: www. The Ministry of Social Development can provide detailed guidance on which provisions may apply. For detailed information. Pension transfers can be complex and it is advisable to seek expert advice well before arriving in New Zealand.govt.

15 .co.co. Pharmacists are trained to give advice on medicines and some health problems.Health Your family doctor or general practitioner (GP) will probably be your first contact with the health system.whitepages. There is a charge for each prescription item although subsidies may be available. but you may be eligible for government subsidies. your GP will give you a written prescription to take to a pharmacy to collect. You must pay a charge for each GP visit. It is recommended that once you decide where you are going to live you register with a GP in your area. It is free to register with any GP of your choice.whitepages.nz. For after-hours advice or treatment: at www. A friend or support person can stay with you during most medical examinations. Outside normal trading hours medicine is available from urgent pharmacies.nz If you need medicine. and this advice is usually free. To find a GP: www.

you need to be a New Zealand citizen. go to: www. PlunketLine. residents and temporary visitors to New Zealand. mobile clinics and a free phone service. To be eligible for public healthcare. Plunket is a free service that helps families with children under five years through branches nationwide. Non-residents may have to pay for some hospital services. Dentists are listed in the Yellow Pages Children’s health Many health services for children are free as are most medicines for children under six years of age. go to: 16 .co. the holder of a two-year work permit or a refugee.To find an urgent pharmacy. To get help if you are injured. For more information. Basic dental care for children is free from birth until the end of year 13 (end of secondary school). a New Zealand resident.whitepages. Take your passport and immigration documents with you if you need medical services. For information about ACC personal injury cover: Dental treatment charges vary widely.nz. but you will not be refused emergency care if you cannot pay. Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) provides personal injury cover to New Zealand citizens.

nz www. go to: www.cab. Some state secondary schools offer single-sex education.whitepages.nz or free phone 0800 367 222 or www. with classes of both boys and girls.yellowpages.00am and finishes about 17 .co.Education Early childhood education You can enrol your child in the early childhood service that best suits you and your child. Fees vary widely and there may be a waiting list.nz For information about early childhood education. State schools are co-educational at primary and intermediate level. but most start school when they turn five. You can visit schools and meet the principal and staff before enrolling your child. the Correspondence School and home-based schooling.co. You can apply to enrol your child at any state school as long as there is no enrolment scheme in place. To find early childhood services. go to: Primary and secondary school education School is compulsory for children between their sixth and sixteenth birthdays.org. boarding schools. Most children go to a state school. The school day usually begins at 9. but there are also private schools.

go to: 18 . Meals are not provided and most children take lunch to school with them.00pm.3.30pm for secondary schools. You will need to buy stationery and uniforms (if the school has a uniform) and you may be asked to pay some other costs. or 3. For information about primary and secondary education. You are legally responsible to make sure your children go to school every day. Residential special schools provide teaching and live-in care for children with major difficulties. education classes. You are also responsible to ensure they travel to and from school safely. Children with special education needs are enrolled with other children in ordinary classes whenever possible and specialist support services are available.

Tertiary education Tertiary study is available at universities. Costs vary depending on the type and level of course. polytechnics. Most tertiary institutions ask students to prove their English language skills. wananga (tertiary organisation focused on Maori culture) and private training establishments. institutes of technology. The academic year usually starts in February and application forms are available from each tertiary institution. Student loans are available to permanent residents or refugees entitled to live in New Zealand indefinitely. go to: 19 . colleges of education. For more information.

To find an ESOL provider. go to: Adult and Community Education classes are available in most areas throughout New Zealand. For more information about courses. ESOL Home Tutors—the national network of volunteer home tutors—may be able to help. If you cannot attend formal language classes. New Zealand. universities and secondary schools offer ESOL tuition for adults across a range of levels. go to: 20 .English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Private language schools and most polytechnics.

govt.Interpreting services A number of government agencies and local city or district councils use the Government interpreting service—Language Line. If you are phoning or visiting a government office and do not feel comfortable using English. Go to the listing for Interpreters in the Yellow Pages or at www. Language Line is available Monday to Friday from 9am to 6pm.languageline.nz.yellowpages.nz.co. please ask for Language Line—www. 21 . If you go to a local Settlement Support New Zealand office or Citizens Advice Bureau. interpreters are available through the Multi-Lingual Information Other interpreters may be available in your area.

especially outside the main cities. Approved safety helmets are 22 . Driving You can drive for up to one year with a current and valid driver’s licence from another country or an International Driving Permit. If your driver’s licence is not in English. out about rules and conditions before you drive. Bargaining and tipping are not common.co. go to: www.Transport Public transport Air. Plunket has a rental service for children’s safety restraints. you should apply for a New Zealand driver’s licence as soon as possible. Drivers and passengers must wear seatbelts or approved safety restraints at all times. you must carry an English translation or have an International Driving Permit.lgnz.nz. If you plan to stay longer than one year. Taxis are clearly marked and must have reliable meters with the driver’s identification card and fare schedule displayed. To find out about transport services and timetables. train and bus services may be limited.

The Automobile for mechanical problems for a fee. Speeding and drink driving are serious offences with heavy penalties. monthly Warrant of Fitness inspection.landtransport. For information.govt.nz.plunket. go to: 23 . For information on buying a car. Buying a car Second hand cars are sold by car dealers or private sellers. go to: To book a Warrant of Fitness (WOF) inspection.org.nz www. Sellers and buyers must both notify Land Transport New Zealand of a vehicle’s change of ownership within seven days. go to: free phone 0800 822 422 (driver licences) or www.compulsory for all cyclists and motorcyclists. go to: To register vehicles.

Utilities Electricity and gas Your landlord can tell you the name of the electricity or gas supplier for your property. Water supplies are managed by your city council or district council. based on usage. Gas is available in most areas either using LPG cylinders or piped natural gas. 24 . go to: www. Fluoride is added as a dental health practice in most areas.nz.co. To find electricity and gas suppliers. In some parts of the country there is a charge for water.yellowpages. Water All New Zealand tap water is safe to drink.

Mobile phones are sold at electronic goods shops or specialist phone shops. and you are charged higher rates than standard calls. there may be other providers. 25 . Directory assistance is available on 018 for a charge. Public phones in town centres and suburban areas use pre-paid phone cards which are available from supermarkets. vary widely.Communications Phones Home phones can be set up by either Telecom or TelstraClear. 0900 numbers are used for services including donations to charities. or dairies (small local shops). Calls to phone numbers beginning with 0800 or 0508 are free. newsagents. There may be a phone at the property when you move in or you can buy one from an electronic goods shop or phone company. Pricing plans vary widely. surf and weather reports. competition or chat lines.

Mail A postal box is acceptable as your official address until you have a permanent address. go to: 26 . To find internet providers. go to: To find public internet access. To set up a postal box you can visit your local PostShop or Books & More outlet or go to: Internet There are a number of internet providers offering broadband and dial-up plus a range of mobile and wireless services.

your landlord pays the rates. Services are funded mainly by property rates. These are identified by a prominent logo. To find the city council or district council in your area. go to: food.Government. If you buy a property. you will be sent a rates account four times a year. noise control. 27 . libraries. If you rent a property. water supply. dog control. and visitor information centres. city councils and district councils City councils and district councils provide services including rubbish collection and recycling. parks. cultural and sporting events. tourist attractions and entertainment is available from Information Centres.

are a New Zealand citizen or permanent resident. you are not a permanent resident for electoral purposes and do not have to enrol. but voting is optional. and have lived in New set date (such as student or visitor permit holders).Enrolling and voting You must enrol on the Parliamentary Electoral Roll if you are 18 years or older.nz 28 . Enrolling to vote is compulsory in New Zealand. For information or enrolment forms.nz. Information on this site is available in several languages Dog ownership Dogs must be registered every year at your city council or district council and most dogs must also be micro-chipped. go to: www.elections. go to: www.org. Dog control bylaws are set and enforced by the city council or district council.co.lgnz. For information about dog ownership.

The New Zealand Police are respected members of New Zealand communities and it is their job to enforce the law and investigate incidents that are reported to them. Police You can approach the police at any time to talk or ask for help. Most wear a police uniform but they should be able to show you their police identification card and tell you which station they are from. For police help: government section of the White Pages or www.co. 29 . It is against the law for anyone to steal or damage your property and it is against the law for anyone to deliberately attempt to injure you or anyone in your family.govt.nz For safety information in several languages.Legal Newcomers to New Zealand have the same rights and obligations under New Zealand law as any other person living here.whitepages. Police officers do not normally carry guns. Firearms and guns must be licensed at your local police station. go to: www.police.nz.

public transport.fish. Smoking malls. Breaches of these limits are treated very seriously. Alcohol is available from supermarkets and liquor outlets seven days a week. For information about fishing limits.Fishing and collecting seafood There are limits for many fish and shellfish species to prevent over-fishing. 30 . bars and restaurants. pubs. Bylaws in some areas prevent drinking alcohol in public places.govt. Alcohol when purchasing alcohol. Drinking and driving is a serious offence with heavy penalties.nz. go to: www.

Te Ao o te Maori . go to: To learn about Maori language (Te Reo). go to: 31 .Maori culture Maori are the tribal people indigenous to Aotearoa (New Zealand) and make up about 16 percent of the total population. Maori culture and the Treaty of Waitangi—an agreement between Maori and the Crown—are important in New Zealand society. To learn more about Maori culture. Many Maori words are part of everyday Kiwi language.

For an outline of the type of services available and contact information. and they may not feel “at home” for a period of years. for others it can be a much slower and more difficult process. A key part of the Government’s settlement strategy is the Settlement Support New Zealand initiative. refer to the section Helping you and your family settle in New Zealand on page 4 of this guide. Disclaimer: Any agency or organisation mentioned in this booklet has been included because it provides access to information that may be useful for newcomers to New Zealand.nz. For some people. Immigration New Z ealand does not intend to imply any endorsement of that organisation. rather than weeks or months. The New Zealand Government is committed to assisting and supporting newcomers in settling quickly and successfully. Settlement Suport Co ordinators work with local government and other local agencies to provide newcomers to New Zealand with expert guidance on how to access local services. Once you’ve arrived in New Zealand we recommend you get in touch with the Settlement Support New Zealand network. All information current at the time of publication: November 2007. Freepost 95124 LINKZ Department of Labour PO Box 3705 Wellington 6140 .Welcome to New Zealand Haere mai (Welcome) Moving to another country is a big step. The network currently has initiatives in 19 locations throughout the country. Your feedback We welcome your feedback on this booklet. If you would like to provide us with feedback please email us on settlementinformation@dol. The first few months can be busy and challenging and life in New Zealand may be quite different from the life you are used to. We understand this and want to help you and your family settle and enjoy your new life in New Zealand.govt. This booklet has practical information to help you and your family settle quickly in New Zealand. settling into a new country is comparatively easy. We look forward to helping you make your way in New Zealand and wish you well in your new life here.

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