1

TRAIN THE TRAINER
ADDITIONAL REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING IDEAS

DAN STEER

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

2

DESIGNING TRAINING OVERVIEW LEARNING CYCLE................................ ................................ ................................ 4 ASTD COMPETENCE MODEL................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 5 LEARNING DESIGN QUESTIONS ................................ ................................ ........................... 6 LEARNING OBJECTIVES ................................ ................................ ................................ ......... 7 LEARNING STYLES ................................ ................................ ................................ .................. 8 INFINITE LEARNING © POSSIBILITIES................................ ................................ ......... 9 MAKE LEARNING STICK: BEFORE AND AFTER................................ .............................. 10 ADAPT SITUATIONAL LEADERSHIP MODEL FOR TRAINERS................................ ....... 12

DELIVERING TRAINING HOW TO GIVE FEEDBACK................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 13 A GOOD INTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 14 INTONATION AND FLOW ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 15 ADAPTING CONTENT TO SUIT REPRESENTATIONAL SYSTEMS................................ .. 16 USING VISUAL SUPPORTS................................ ................................ ................................ ... 17 USING EXERCISES ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 19 MAXIMISE YOUR VOICE ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 20 USE OPEN QUESTIONS TO GET PEOPLE TALKING................................ ....................... 21 DEALING WITH PARTICIPANT QUESTIONS................................ ................................ ..... 22 WHY STRESS? ................................ ................................ ................................ ......................... 23 DEALING WITH STRESS AND CONFIDENCE................................ ................................ ..... 24

FINAL WORDS LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT POINTS................................ ................................ ............ 26 #LESTWEFORGETTRAINEES BY @DAN_STEER ................................ ................................ .. 27 YOUR TRAINER: DAN STEER................................ ................................ .............................. 28

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

3

DESIGNING TRAINING

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

4

OVERVIEW LEARNING CYCLE
The learning design cycle is like a project, starting with the definition phase and moving through implementation of the solution towards evaluation of success.

For more information on ADDIE, check this page http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/sat.html

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

5

ASTD COMPETENCE MODEL
The American Society for Training and Development is a reference point for learning and development professionals, providing best practices, support and learning.

This is their competence model for professionals and companies that wish to deliver effective learning and development.

http://tiny.cc/kx2dp

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

6

LEARNING DESIGN QUESTIONS
There are many things you can ask an organisation to be sure that learning is the right answer.

Here is a selection of categories of questions to ask, as discussed with Jan Laurijssen, Learning Solutions Manager, Kluwer:

y What is the actual problem? y Is learning really the answer? y Who are we dealing with? y What are our learning objectives? y What would be the most effective solution?

See which questions to ask in each stage/category (there are 22 in total ) http://tiny.cc/vpvje

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

7

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
It is important to correctly fix learning objectives. These should be linked to performance outcomes (and not to training content!). According to Bloom·s Taxonomy, there are different levels of learning, starting from remembering, moving toward the ability to create ² these can be reflected in your learning objectives:

Learn about Blooms Taxonomy http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html

Read this 4 page info-sheet on how to write effective learning objectives http://tiny.cc/gw2kt

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

8

LEARNING STYLES
Different people have different learning styles. There are different ways to train. You need to adapt and offer different approaches.

Wikipedia entry on learning styles, including KOLB / HONEY+MUMFORD http://tiny.cc/hc36z

...additionally, read about what the Facebook G eneration expects from learning http://tiny.cc/6x4gz

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

9

INFINITE LEARNING © POSSIBILITIES
According to the author, learning should not be restricted to classical training from an expert. Learning can happen at all moments, in all directions, with all methods and for all people.

Get a short introduction to Infinite Learning © here http://tiny.cc/axnd2

List of social media tools that can be used in social learning http://tiny.cc/hllpb

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

10

MAKE LEARNING STICK: BEFORE AND AFTER
There are many things that can be done to give training more impact. One thing is to involve different people during different phases. Enter the golden triangle!

What makes training stick the most? Before Learning provider This part is said to be the least important in the whole mix! During After

Learner This collaboration has the most impact on learning success

Manager

In second place of importance, it is imperative to transfer learning to the workplace

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

11

DELIVERING TRAINING

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

12

ADAPT SITUATIONAL LEADERSHIP MODEL FOR TRAINERS
Based on Blanchard and Hersey·s Situational Leadership model, trainers can adapt their own communication, leadership and training style to suit the development level and needs of participants.

Using SL styles in training S1 y y y y Tell and show Explain everything Give initial ideas only Ask for input and feedback y y y y Make participants do things and control behaviour closely Correct ineffective behaviour Set activities, proposing behaviour Debrief, allowing participants to adapt and integrate own learning points Ask lots of questions Help participants to figure things out for themselves Leave them to it! They can learn themselves!

S2

S3

y y y y

Discuss required outcomes Give no answers yourself Set desired outcome only Give no guidelines or answers

y y y y

S4

Read the Wikipedia entry on Situational Leadership http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Situational_leadership_theory

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

13

HOW TO GIVE FEEDBACK
Feedback to learning participants should be given in 4 steps in order to be effective:

State performance/behaviour/observation
eg: ´Your body language is not very positiveµ

Give an example or explanation
eg: ´For example, you are talking to the screen, not the audienceµ

Outline the impact or consequences
eg: ´People will fall asleep, your voice is lost and you are quite boringµ

Discuss next-steps
eg: ´Why don·t you try this ««««.µ

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

14

A GOOD INTRODUCTION
Your introduction needs to do several things, some of which concern being polite, some of which will get attention and some of which will create etiquette for what is to follow.

Be sure to at least include the following:

y Get their attention y Introduce yourself and the subject y Explain the purpose of the training y Preview contents, agenda and timing y Underline how interaction, questionsetccan and should take place y Give the ´WIIFMµ factor y Explain any handouts or supporting documentation you may give

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

15

INTONATION AND FLOW
Intonation is not just about voice. By removing monotony from your training structure, you can bring more flow and improve the participant experience.

Monotony looks like this:

A better training might already look like this:

Training like this would have lots of intonation:

There are lots of ways to create intonation in your training (exercises, storytelling, visual supports, interactivity«.).

Create intonation, balance and flow to combat training monotony.

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

16

ADAPTING CONTENT TO SUIT REPRESENTATIONAL SYSTEMS
According to NLP theory, different people represent and process information differently depending on their preference for either Visual, Auditive or Kinaesthetic stimuli.

The way we process information is different from one person to another ² some people like to see things (visual), some like to hear (auditive) and some like to touch, taste and feel (kinaesthetic).

Everyone is different and in given situations, we all have a preference for one or other rep system. According to NLP research, if you consider all possible situations and all possible people, the vast majority of people prefer visual stimuli:

Some advice? y y Use good imagery and visual support to help most people ´get the pictureµ Try to include something for everyone, even if it·s simply something to touch and feel!

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

17

USING VISUAL SUPPORTS
As you already saw, for the majority of people a visual support can really help make the difference. Here are some tips to help you use visual supports successfully.

Some visual supports you can use: y y y y Flipchart Overhead projector MS PowerPoint Handouts

Some general rules:

y Only use when you need to y Introduce them at the right moment y Make sure you don·t talk to the board or projected image y Use them to create dynamics and interaction in your training y Be aware of where the participants· attention is at all times y Only write down essential points and make it legible! y Avoid full sentences and ´written languageµ ² put the power in your points! y One sheet or one slide per idea y Be sure to title your slides and flipchart sheets! y Don·t talk and write y Allow a moment for people to read what you show/write

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

18

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

19

USING EXERCISES
Sometimes it can be useful to have an exercise included in your presentation.To get the most attention, recall and understanding from the audience, apply the following diamond structure to your exercise moment«

Much like during the rest of your presentation, you need to work to keep the audience·s attention and create recall of your message. Use this structure:

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

20

MAXIMISE YOUR VOICE
Make sure your voice is strong, clear and easy to listen to. Do you use VISA?

Some questions to consider: y Are you talking loudly enough for everyone?Are you shouting? y Do you vary the pitch and tone of your voice y Are you speaking slowly enough for the words to sink in? Are you so slow you are boring? y Do you pronounce words well and clearly so that people can understand you?

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

21

USE OPEN QUESTIONS TO GET PEOPLE TALKING
Sometimes participants have nothing to say. Sometimes they don·t dare to speak. (And sometimes they won·t shut up!). If you want to get people talking (instead of just nodding their heads!), you need to ask them the right kind of questions.

During the introduction of your training, it is good practice to underline how interaction and questions should take place. If you expect people to participate, tell them this up front!

«but that·s not always enough. If you would like to encourage them to speak up more, it helps to ask the right questions.

Use open questions to get them talking:

WHAT «..? WHY «.? HOW «.? WHEN «.? WHO «.? WHERE «.? WHICH «..?

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

22

DEALING WITH PARTICIPANT QUESTIONS
The results of a bad answering process: y y y y People regret having asked their question Other participants feel excluded The answer is not relevant You get stressed and/or answer badly

How to answer questions:

1 2 3 4 5 6

Recognise the person who asked the question Check your understanding before answering Involve the rest of the audience in the answer Ask if your answer was suitable Thank the person who asked you Rewind to bring the audience·s attention back to your story

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

23

WHY STRESS?
During several years of delivering training on ´Presenting with Impactµ, the author of this document has heard a lot of reasons for why people are stressed about their presentations. The same is true for some trainers. There are many solutions for dealing with this stress (mostly preparation) and the first step is to know: Why am I stressed?

Here is a non-exhaustive list of reasons why people stress when giving presentations and delivering training:

y Lack of preparation y Unclear message y Fear of talking in public, being in the spotlight y Perfectionism y Unknown audience y Known audience (e.g. ´my manager will be thereµ) y Experts in the room y Fear of judgement, lack of recognition y Bad memories (of the last presentation) y Things don·t go as planned, things don·t work y Not sure of what the outcome will be y Will they appreciate me? Believe me?

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

24

DEALING WITH STRESS AND CONFIDENCE
Your stress and confidence levels can certainly have an impact on your training. There are lots of ´little thingsµ you can do to deal with stress symptoms. Here you can see how stress and confidence have an impact on performance ... and how you can break the vicious circle!

During this training, we will not ask where your stress and confidence comes from; we will only look at the impact on your work and the behaviour we can implement to improve results.

The guiding principle is presented here in the confidence circle:

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

25

FINAL WORDS

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

26

LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT POINTS
Use this space to note what you learnt during your second training day and what you will implement in the future.

PARTICULAR LESSONS I LEARNT

WHAT I WILL IMPLEMENT IN THE FUTURE

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

27

#LESTWEFORGETTRAINEES BY @DAN_STEER
The last time your trainer followed a course himself, he shared his experience on www.twitter.com/dan_steer with the hashtag #LestWeForgetTrainees

Here is a selection of the tweets (in order of appearance): y Training day1. I'm wondering: What will I learn? How will it help me? And is it worth the time and money? y Intrigued and surprised by no tables, just a circle of chairs. Close contact and interactive I suppose! y Intro session very good for me. I am sold on the topic and approach to training. Wondering if everyone else is. y Had a moment of frustration when the conversation went off topic during training for "too long" y Proposition of 90min lunch seemed too much but it went quickly. Food was good; nice chance to chat amongst trainees. y Hard work after lunch. Tired and "fluffy". NEVER have that as a trainer, but I understand today how trainees have it. y Last 45 mins = long and tiring, especially having a cold. Hard to be attentive and deal with new stuff all day long. y My other question: How will the trainer help me to turn today's understanding and skill into long-term habits? y Day2: Expectations clear (not as "excited" as d1). Happy to have real results from day1. Ready for more. What next? y Trainer's time-management (alignment to commitments) is impeccable. How does she do it with all that flexibility? y 10.24 Frustrated when what is in workbook does not obviously correspond to what is on flipchart - I get a bit lost y 11.05 I worry from time-to-time if I take too much space in the group would be nice to get feedback on this y I see that some others don't seem to follow as quickl y as me when models and concepts are explained y ps Had a siesta in my car this lunch time - helped me relax, refresh and restart learning this afternoon

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

28

YOUR TRAINER: DAN STEER
DAN STEER is an independent training consultant.

Following completion of his philosophy degree at Reading University, Dan worked as a project manager in a European marketing agency delivering branding solutions for multinationals such as Vodafone, Philips, Unilever and Sony.

Since relocating to Belgium, he spent 7 years working as Training and Development Manager for 2 large international service companies. He was responsible for the creation and implementation of learning and development strategy and operational tools to support business mission and values.

Today·s activities include learning and development consultancy, personal coaching and delivery of training on a variety of subjects concerning: y y y Communication Management and leadership Personal effectiveness

For more support in your activities, you can contact DAN:

+32-(0)472 ² 346.226 mail@dansteer.com www.dansteer.com http://www.infinitelearning.be www.twitter.com/dan_steer www.linkedin.com/in/dansteer Ferme du Vigneron, Rue Vieille Maison 7, 5140 Sombreffe

© DAN STEER ²TRAIN THE TRAINER reference pack

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.