Digital Steganography using stochastic modulation

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we present a new steganographic paradigm for digital images in raster formats. Message bits are embedded in the cover image by adding a weak noise signal with a specified but arbitrary probabilistic distribution. This embedding mechanism provides the user with the flexibility to mask the embedding distortion as noise generated by a particular image acquisition device. This type of embedding will lead to more secure schemes because now the attacker must distinguish statistical anomalies that might be created by the embedding process from those introduced during the image acquisition itself. Unlike previously proposed schemes, this new approach, that we call stochastic modulation, achieves oblivious data transfer without using noise extraction algorithms or error correction. This leads to higher capacity (up to 0.8 bits per pixel) and a convenient and simple implementation with low embedding and extraction complexity. But most importantly, because the embedding noise can have arbitrary properties that approximate a given device noise, the new method offers better security than existing methods. At the end of this paper, we extend stochastic modulation to a content-dependent device noise and we also discuss possible attacks on this scheme based on the most recent advances in steganalysis.

1.2.

ORGANIZATION PROFILE

SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS
EdwareUK Ltd is an IT solution provider for a dynamic environment where business and technology strategies converge. Their approach focuses on new ways of business combining IT innovation and adoption while also leveraging an organization’s current IT assets. Their work with large global corporations and new products or services and to implement prudent business and technology strategies in today’s environment.

EdwareUK LTD ’S RANGE OF EXPERTISE INCLUDES:
• Software Development Services • Engineering Services • Systems Integration • Customer Relationship Management • Product Development • Electronic Commerce

• Consulting • IT Outsourcing We apply technology with innovation and responsibility to achieve two broad objectives: • Effectively address the business issues our customers face today. • Generate new opportunities that will help them stay ahead in the future.

THIS APPROACH RESTS ON:
• A strategy where we architect, integrate and manage technology services and solutions - we call it AIM for success. • A robust offshore development methodology and reduced demand on customer resources. • A focus on the use of reusable frameworks to provide cost and times benefits. They combine the best people, processes and technology to achieve excellent results - consistency. We offer customers the advantages of: SPEED: They understand the importance of timing, of getting there before the competition. A rich portfolio of reusable, modular frameworks helps jumpstart projects. Tried and tested methodology ensures that we follow a predictable, low - risk path to achieve results. Our track record is testimony to complex projects delivered within and evens before schedule.

EXPERTISE: Our teams combine cutting edge technology skills with rich domain expertise. What’s equally important - they share a strong customer orientation that means they actually start by listening to the customer. They’re focused on coming up with solutions that serve customer requirements today and anticipate future needs.

A FULL SERVICE PORTFOLIO: They offer customers the advantage of being able to Architect, integrate and manage technology services. This means that they can rely on one, fully accountable source instead of trying to integrate disparate multi vendor solutions. SERVICES: EdwareUK LTD is providing it’s services to companies which are in the field of production, quality control etc With their rich expertise and experience and information technology they are in best position to provide software solutions to distinct business requirements.

INTRODUCTION
PURPOSE OF THE SYSTEM The purpose of the system is to hide the very presence of communication by embedding messages into innocuous looking covering objects such as digital images. SCOPE OF THE SYSTEM In this system we present a new steganographic paradigm for digital images in raster formats.

ABOUT THE PROJECT
The purpose of steganography is to hide the very presence of communication by embedding messages into innocuous-looking cover objects, such as digital images. To accommodate a secret message, the original cover image is slightly modified by the embedding algorithm to obtain the stego image. The embedding process usually incorporates a secret stego-key that governs the embedding process and it is also needed for the extraction of the hidden message.

In contrast to watermarking when the embedded message has a close relationship to the cover image supplying data, such as sender or receiver information, authentications codes, etc., in steganography, the cover image is a mere decoy and has no relationship to the hidden data. The most important requirement for a steganographic system is undetectability: stego images should be statistically indistinguishable from cover images. In other words, there should be no artifacts in the stego image that could be detected by an attacker with probability better than random guessing, given the full knowledge of the embedding algorithm except for the stego-key (Kerckhoff’s principle).

The early steganographic schemes focused on introducing as little distortion in the cover image as possible utilizing the seemingly intuitive heuristics that the smaller the embedding distortion is, the more secure the steganographic scheme becomes. However, recent advances in steganalysis clearly showed that this is not the case. The Least Significant Bit embedding (LSB) with sequential or random message spread has been successfully attacked even for very short messages. In essence, the LSB embedding is so easily detectable because it introduces distortion that never naturally occurs to images and creates an imbalance between appropriately defined statistical quantities. A better approach is to replace the operation of flipping the LSBs by randomly adding 1 or –1 to pixels (+– 1 embedding) and extracting the message bits from LSBs as in the classical LSB embedding. This is the embedding algorithm of Hide8 and it has also been accepted (in a slightly different version) for steganography in the JPEG

format10. It turns out that this simple modification of the LSB embedding paradigm is, in fact, much more difficult to detect.

1.3

SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS
HARDWARE SPECIFICATION
The hardware used for the development of the project is: Processor Ram Monitor Hard Disk : : : : Pentium Dual core 1 GB 15” Color 80 GB

SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS

The software used for the development of the project is: Language Operating system Technology Backend : : : : Java (JDK1.5.0_06) Windows family Java Swing MS-Access

PROBLEM ANALYSIS EXISTING SYSTEM
In the current software to design steganographic schemes that embed messages by adding Gaussian noise to the image. Marvel et describe a highcapacity method for embedding message bits in uncompressed raw image formats. A special non-linear transformation together with the message bits is used to generate a Gaussian signal that is added to the cover image. The purpose of the transformation is to maximize the separation between two samples of a random Gaussian variable that encode a 0 and a 1. The message detector first applies an adaptive Wiener filter to the image to estimate the noise component. The noise component then determines the embedded bit via the inverse embedding function. The amplitude of the added Gaussian signal, however, must be large enough to minimize the errors during bit extraction. This forces the user to increase the amplitude of the added noise, which in turn decreases the security of the steganographic method. Error correction is also a necessity to guarantee error-free bit extraction even when no distortion is present. This further decreases the capacity of the method. We acknowledge that this work was focused on the capacity-robustness issue rather than security.

PROPOSED SYSTEM In this software we describe a steganographic technique that embeds high payloads (up to 0.8 bpp for grayscale images) by adding a small-amplitude noise of specified properties to the image pixels. Because the probability distribution of the noise can be arbitrary, the communicating parties have the flexibility to mask the embedding distortion as superposition of a particular device noise. Thus, this embedding paradigm will provide better security than embedding that uses somewhat arbitrary operations, such as flipping the LSBs or adding a fixed-amplitude noise to the image (+–1 embedding).

MODULES

1. Authentication. 2. Embed Encrypted data with image. 3. Decompress image.

Module Description: Authentication :

In authentication module user should enter username and password. This information is sent to database table to verify whether valid user or not, Only the valid user can access the resource.

Embed Encrypted Data with Image:

Steganography is the science of hiding information. Whereas the goal of cryptography is to make data unreadable by a third party, the goal of steganography is to hide the data from a third party. In this article, I will discuss what steganography is, what purposes it serves. Before discussing how information is hidden in an image file, it is worth a fast review of how images are stored in the first place. An image file is merely a binary file containing a binary representation of the color or light intensity of each picture element (pixel) comprising the image.

In this we are encoding the data with digital image ,for that user has to select the image file and enter data in text area. The data will be automatically embed with the image ,and user has to generate a secret key for security purpose. Then save the file in desired location.

Decompression of Image:

In this module select the image file loation to decrypt the image file.Enter the secret key to decompress the image file,if the key is not matched user can’t access the encryption message. The key should be matched to get the encrypted message.once the key matched user will get encrypted data in the text Area.

SYSTEM ANALYSIS FEASIBILITY SYSTEM
Depending on the results of the initial investigation the survey is now expended to a more detailed feasibility study. “FEASIBILTY STUDY” is a test of system proposal according to its workability, impact of the organization, ability to meet needs and effective use of the resources. Steps in feasibility analysis: Eight steps involved in the feasibility analysis are:  Form a project team and appoint a project leader.  Enumerate potential proposed system.  Define and identify characteristics of proposed system.  Determine and evaluate performance and cost effective of each proposed system.  Weight system performance and cost data.  Select the best proposed system.  Prepare and report final project directive to management.

Three key considerations involved in the feasibility analysis are  ECONOMICAL FEASIBILITY  TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY  SOCIAL FEASIBILITY ECONOMICAL FEASIBILITY This study is carried out to check the economic impact that the system will have on the organization. The amount of fund that the company can pour into the research and development of the system is limited. The expenditures must be justified. Thus the developed system as well within the budget and this was achieved because most of the technologies used are freely available. Only the customized products had to be purchased.

TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY

This study is carried out to check the technical feasibility, that is, the technical requirements of the system. Any system developed must not have a high demand on the available technical resources. This will lead to high demands on the available technical resources. This will lead to high demands being placed on the client. The developed system must have a modest requirement, as only minimal or null changes are required for implementing this system.

SOCIAL FEASIBILITY The aspect of study is to check the level of acceptance of the system by the user. This includes the process of training the user to use the system efficiently. The user must not feel threatened by the system, instead must accept it as a necessity. The level of acceptance by the users solely depends on the methods that are employed to educate the user about the system and to make him familiar with it. His level of confidence must be raised so that he is also able to make some constructive criticism, which is welcomed, as he is the final user of the system.

3. SOFTWARE PROFILE
Java Technology Java technology is both a programming language and a platform. The Java Programming Language The Java programming language is a high-level language that can be characterized by all of the following buzzwords:            Simple Architecture neutral Object oriented Portable Distributed High performance Interpreted Multithreaded Robust Dynamic Secure

With most programming languages, you either compile or interpret a program so that you can run it on your computer. The Java programming language is unusual in that a program is both compiled and interpreted. With the compiler, first you translate a program into an intermediate language called Java byte codes —the platform-independent codes interpreted by the interpreter on the Java platform. The interpreter parses and runs each Java byte code instruction on the computer. Compilation happens just once;

interpretation occurs each time the program is executed. The following figure illustrates how this works.

FIGURE 2- WORKING OF JAVA You can think of Java bytecodes as the machine code instructions for the Java Virtual Machine (Java VM). Every Java interpreter, whether it’s a development tool or a Web browser that can run applets, is an implementation of the Java VM. Java bytecodes help make “write once, run anywhere” possible. You can compile your program into bytecodes on any platform that has a Java compiler. The bytecodes can then be run on any implementation of the Java VM. That means that as long as a computer has a Java VM, the same program written in the Java programming language can run on Windows 2000, a Solaris workstation, or on an iMac. The Java Platform A platform is the hardware or software environment in which a program runs. We’ve already mentioned some of the most popular platforms like Windows 2000, Linux, Solaris, and MacOS. Most platforms can be described as a combination of the operating system and hardware. The Java platform differs from most other platforms in that it’s a software-only platform that runs on top of other hardware-based platforms. The Java platform has two components:

• •

The Java Virtual Machine (Java VM) The Java Application Programming Interface (Java API) You’ve already been introduced to the Java VM. It’s the base for the

Java platform and is ported onto various hardware-based platforms. The Java API is a large collection of ready-made software components that provide many useful capabilities, such as graphical user interface (GUI) widgets. The Java API is grouped into libraries of related classes and interfaces; these libraries are known as packages. The next section, What Can Java Technology Do?, highlights what functionality some of the packages in the Java API provide. The following figure depicts a program that’s running on the Java platform. As the figure shows, the Java API and the virtual machine insulate the program from the hardware.

FIGURE 3- THE JAVA PLATFORM Native code is code that after you compile it, the compiled code runs on a specific hardware platform. As a platform-independent environment, the Java platform can be a bit slower than native code. However, smart compilers, well-tuned interpreters, and just-in-time bytecode compilers can bring performance close to that of native code without threatening portability.

What Can Java Technology Do? The most common types of programs written in the Java programming language are applets and applications. If you’ve surfed the Web, you’re probably already familiar with applets. An applet is a program that adheres to certain conventions that allow it to run within a Java-enabled browser. However, the Java programming language is not just for writing cute, entertaining applets for the Web. The general-purpose, high-level Java programming language is also a powerful software platform. Using the generous API, you can write many types of programs. An application is a standalone program that runs directly on the Java platform. A special kind of application known as a server serves and supports clients on a network. Examples of servers are Web servers, proxy servers, mail servers, and print servers. Another specialized program is a servlet. A servlet can almost be thought of as an applet that runs on the server side. Java Servlets are a popular choice for building interactive web applications, replacing the use of CGI scripts. Servlets are similar to applets in that they are runtime extensions of applications. Instead of working in browsers, though, servlets run within Java Web servers, configuring or tailoring the server. How does the API support all these kinds of programs? It does so with packages of software components that provide a wide range of functionality. Every full implementation of the Java platform gives you the following features:

The essentials: Objects, strings, threads, numbers, input and output, data structures, system properties, date and time, and so on. Applets: The set of conventions used by applets.

Networking: URLs, TCP (Transmission Control Protocol), UDP (User Data gram Protocol) sockets, and IP (Internet Protocol) addresses. Internationalization: Help for writing programs that can be localized for users worldwide. Programs can automatically adapt to specific locales and be displayed in the appropriate language. Security: Both low level and high level, including electronic signatures, public and private key management, access control, and certificates. Software components: Known as JavaBeansTM, can plug into existing component architectures. Object serialization: Allows lightweight persistence and

communication via Remote Method Invocation (RMI).

Java Database Connectivity (JDBCTM): Provides uniform access to a wide range of relational databases.

The Java platform also has APIs for 2D and 3D graphics, accessibility, servers, collaboration, telephony, speech, animation, and more. The following figure depicts what is included in the Java 2 SDK.

FIGURE 4 – JAVA 2 SDK

Swings
The Swing toolkit includes a rich set of components for building GUIs and adding interactivity to Java applications. Swing includes all the components you would expect from a modern toolkit: table controls, list controls, tree controls, buttons, and labels. Swing is far from a simple component toolkit, however. It includes rich undo support, a highly customizable text package, integrated internationalization and accessibility support. To truly leverage the cross-platform capabilities of the Java platform, Swing supports numerous look and feels, including the ability to create your own look and feel. The ability to create a custom look and feel is made easier with Synth, a look and feel specifically designed to be customized. Swing wouldn't be a component toolkit without the basic user interface primitives such as drag and drop, event handling, customizable painting, and window management. Swing is part of the Java Foundation Classes (JFC). The JFC also include other features important to a GUI program, such as the ability to add rich graphics functionality and the ability to create a program that can work in different languages and by users with different input devices.

Networking TCP/IP stack The TCP/IP stack is shorter than the OSI one:

FIGURE 5 – TCP/IP STACK TCP is a connection-oriented protocol; UDP (User Datagram Protocol) is a connectionless protocol. IP datagram’s The IP layer provides a connectionless and unreliable delivery system. It considers each datagram independently of the others. Any association between datagram must be supplied by the higher layers. The IP layer supplies a checksum that includes its own header. The header includes the source and destination addresses. The IP layer handles routing through an

Internet. It is also responsible for breaking up large datagram into smaller ones for transmission and reassembling them at the other end. TCP TCP supplies logic to give a reliable connection-oriented protocol above IP. It provides a virtual circuit that two processes can use to communicate. Internet addresses In order to use a service, you must be able to find it. The Internet uses an address scheme for machines so that they can be located. The address is a 32 bit integer which gives the IP address. This encodes a network ID and more addressing. The network ID falls into various classes according to the size of the network address. Network address Class A uses 8 bits for the network address with 24 bits left over for other addressing. Class B uses 16 bit network addressing. Class C uses 24 bit network addressing and class D uses all 32. Subnet address Internally, the UNIX network is divided into sub networks. Building 11 is currently on one sub network and uses 10-bit addressing, allowing 1024 different hosts.

Host address 8 bits are finally used for host addresses within our subnet. This places a limit of 256 machines that can be on the subnet. Total address

FIGURE 6 - IP ADDRESSING The 32 bit address is usually written as 4 integers separated by dots. Port addresses A service exists on a host, and is identified by its port. This is a 16 bit number. To send a message to a server, you send it to the port for that service of the host that it is running on. This is not location transparency! Certain of these ports are "well known". Sockets A socket is a data structure maintained by the system to handle network connections. A socket is created using the call socket. It returns an integer that is like a file descriptor. In fact, under Windows, this handle can be used with Read File and Write File functions.

#include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/socket.h> int socket(int family, int type, int protocol); Here "family" will be AF_INET for IP communications, protocol will be zero, and type will depend on whether TCP or UDP is used. Two processes wishing to communicate over a network create a socket each. These are similar to two ends of a pipe - but the actual pipe does not yet exist.

Servlets:
Servlets are server side components that provide a powerful mechanism for developing server side programs. Servlets provide component based, platform-independent methods for building Web-based applications, without the performance limitations of CGI programs. Unlike proprietary server extension mechanisms (such as the Netscape Server API or Apache modules), servlets are server as well as platform-independent. This leaves you free to select a "best of breed" strategy for your servers, platforms, and tools. Using servlets web developers can create fast and efficient server side application which can run on any servlet enabled web server. Servlets run entirely inside the Java Virtual Machine. Since the Servlet runs at server side so it does not checks the browser for compatibility. Servlets can access the entire family of Java APIs, including the JDBC API to access enterprise databases. Servlets can also access a library of HTTP-specific calls, receive all the benefits of the mature java language including portability, performance, reusability, and crash protection. Today servlets are the popular choice for building interactive web applications. Third-party servlet containers are available for Apache Web Server, Microsoft IIS, and others.

Servlet containers are usually the components of web and application servers, such as BEA WebLogic Application Server, IBM WebSphere, Sun Java System Web Server, Sun Java System Application Server and others. Servlets are not designed for a specific protocols. It is different thing that they are most commonly used with the HTTP protocols Servlets uses the classes in the java packages javax.servlet and javax.servlet.http. Servlets provides a way of creating the sophisticated server side extensions in a server as they follow the standard framework and use the highly portable java language. HTTP Servlet typically used to: Priovide dynamic content like getting the results of a database query and returning to the client. Process and/or store the data submitted by the HTML. Manage information about the state of a stateless HTTP. e.g. an online shopping car manages request for multiple concurrent customers. ODBC Microsoft Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) is a standard programming interface for application developers and database systems providers. Before ODBC became a de facto standard for Windows programs to interface with database systems, programmers had to use proprietary languages for each database they wanted to connect to. Now, ODBC has

made the choice of the database system almost irrelevant from a coding perspective, which is as it should be. Application developers have much more important things to worry about than the syntax that is needed to port their program from one database to another when business needs suddenly change. Through the ODBC Administrator in Control Panel, you can specify the particular database that is associated with a data source that an ODBC application program is written to use. Think of an ODBC data source as a door with a name on it. Each door will lead you to a particular database. For example, the data source named Sales Figures might be a SQL Server database, whereas the Accounts Payable data source could refer to an Access database. The physical database referred to by a data source can reside anywhere on the LAN. The ODBC system files are not installed on your system by Windows 95. Rather, they are installed when you setup a separate database application, such as SQL Server Client or Visual Basic 4.0. When the ODBC icon is installed in Control Panel, it uses a file called ODBCINST.DLL. It is also possible to administer your ODBC data sources through a stand-alone program called ODBCADM.EXE. There is a 16-bit and a 32-bit version of this program, and each maintains a separate list of ODBC data sources.

From a programming perspective, the beauty of ODBC is that the application can be written to use the same set of function calls to interface with any data source, regardless of the database vendor. The source code of the application doesn’t change whether it talks to Oracle or SQL Server. We only mention these two as an example. There are ODBC drivers available

for several dozen popular database systems. Even Excel spreadsheets and plain text files can be turned into data sources. The operating system uses the Registry information written by ODBC Administrator to determine which low-level ODBC drivers are needed to talk to the data source (such as the interface to Oracle or SQL Server). The loading of the ODBC drivers is transparent to the ODBC application program. In a client/server environment, the ODBC API even handles many of the network issues for the application programmer. The advantages of this scheme are so numerous that you are probably thinking there must be some catch. The only disadvantage of ODBC is that it isn’t as efficient as talking directly to the native database interface. ODBC has had many detractors make the charge that it is too slow. Microsoft has always claimed that the critical factor in performance is the quality of the driver software that is used. In our humble opinion, this is true. The availability of good ODBC drivers has improved a great deal recently. And anyway, the criticism about performance is somewhat analogous to those who said that compilers would never match the speed of pure assembly language. Maybe not, but the compiler (or ODBC) gives you the opportunity to write cleaner programs, which means you finish sooner. Meanwhile, computers get faster every year. JDBC In an effort to set an independent database standard API for Java, Sun Microsystems developed Java Database Connectivity, or JDBC. JDBC offers a generic SQL database access mechanism that provides a consistent interface to a variety of RDBMSs. This consistent interface is achieved through the use of “plug-in” database connectivity modules, or drivers. If a

database vendor wishes to have JDBC support, he or she must provide the driver for each platform that the database and Java run on. To gain a wider acceptance of JDBC, Sun based JDBC’s framework on ODBC. As you discovered earlier in this chapter, ODBC has widespread support on a variety of platforms. Basing JDBC on ODBC will allow vendors to bring JDBC drivers to market much faster than developing a completely new connectivity solution. JDBC was announced in March of 1996. It was released for a 90 day public review that ended June 8, 1996. Because of user input, the final JDBC v1.0 specification was released soon after. The remainder of this section will cover enough information about JDBC for you to know what it is about and how to use it effectively. This is by no means a complete overview of JDBC. That would fill an entire book. JDBC Goals Few software packages are designed without goals in mind. JDBC is one that, because of its many goals, drove the development of the API. These goals, in conjunction with early reviewer feedback, have finalized the JDBC class library into a solid framework for building database applications in Java. The goals that were set for JDBC are important. They will give you some insight as to why certain classes and functionalities behave the way they do. The eight design goals for JDBC are as follows: 1. SQL Level API The designers felt that their main goal was to define a SQL interface for Java. Although not the lowest database interface level possible, it is at a low

enough level for higher-level tools and APIs to be created. Conversely, it is at a high enough level for application programmers to use it confidently. Attaining this goal allows for future tool vendors to “generate” JDBC code and to hide many of JDBC’s complexities from the end user. 2. SQL Conformance SQL syntax varies as you move from database vendor to database vendor. In an effort to support a wide variety of vendors, JDBC will allow any query statement to be passed through it to the underlying database driver. This allows the connectivity module to handle non-standard functionality in a manner that is suitable for its users.
3. JDBC must be implemental on top of common database interfaces

The JDBC SQL API must “sit” on top of other common SQL level APIs. This goal allows JDBC to use existing ODBC level drivers by the use of a software interface. This interface would translate JDBC calls to ODBC and vice versa. 4. Provide a Java interface that is consistent with the rest of the Java system Because of Java’s acceptance in the user community thus far, the designers feel that they should not stray from the current design of the core Java system. 5. Keep it simple This goal probably appears in all software design goal listings. JDBC is no exception. Sun felt that the design of JDBC should be very simple, allowing for only one method of completing a task per mechanism. Allowing duplicate functionality only serves to confuse the users of the API.

6. Use strong, static typing wherever possible Strong typing allows for more error checking to be done at compile time; also, less error appear at runtime. 7. Keep the common cases simple Because more often than not, the usual SQL calls used by the programmer are simple SELECT’s, INSERT’s, DELETE’s and UPDATE’s, these queries should be simple to perform with JDBC. However, more complex SQL statements should also be possible.

TABLE DESIGN

 Tables are logical structures maintained by the database manager. Tables are made up of columns and rows.
 At the intersection of every column and row is a specific data

item called a value. A column is a set of values of the same type or one of its subtypes. A row is a sequence of values arranged so that the nth value is a value of the nth column of the table.  An application program can determine the order in which the rows are populated into the table, but the actual order of rows is determined by the database manager, and typically cannot be

controlled. Multidimensional clustering (MDC) provides some sense of clustering, but not actual ordering between the rows.  When designing tables, you need to be familiar with certain concepts, determine the space requirements for tables and user data, and determine whether you will take advantage of certain features, such as space compression and optimistic locking. When designing partitioned tables, you need to be familiar with the partitioning concepts, such as:
• • • •

Data organization schemes Table partitioning keys Keys used for distributing data across data partitions Keys used for MDC dimensions

4. SYSTEM DESIGN

Use case diagram:
A use case diagram in the Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a type of behavioral diagram defined by and created from a Use-case analysis. Its purpose is to present a graphical overview of the functionality provided by a system in terms of actors, their goals (represented as use cases), and any dependencies between those use cases.

The main purpose of a use case diagram is to show what system functions are performed for which actor. Roles of the actors in the system can be depicted.

Class Diagram:
Class diagrams are the mainstay of object-oriented analysis and design. Class diagrams show the classes of the system, their interrelationships (including inheritance, aggregation, and association), and the operations and attributes of the classes. Class diagrams are used for a wide variety of purposes, including both conceptual/domain modeling and detailed design modeling.

Sequence Diagram:

A sequence diagram in Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a kind of interaction diagram that shows how processes operate with one another and in what order. It is a construct of a Message Sequence Chart. Sequence diagrams are sometimes called Event-trace diagrams, event scenarios, and timing diagrams. A sequence diagram shows, as parallel vertical lines (lifelines), different processes or objects that live simultaneously, and, as horizontal arrows, the messages exchanged between them, in the order in which they occur. This allows the specification of simple runtime scenarios in a graphical manner.

Collaboration Diagram:
Collaboration diagrams belong to a group of UML diagrams called Interaction Diagrams. Collaboration diagrams, like Sequence Diagrams, show how objects interact over the course of time. However, instead of showing the sequence of events by the layout on the diagram, collaboration diagrams show the sequence by numbering the messages on the diagram. This makes it easier to show how the objects are linked together, but harder to see the sequence at a glance.

Activity Diagram:

Activity diagrams are typically used for business process modeling, for modeling the logic captured by a single use case or usage scenario, or for modeling the detailed logic of a business rule. Although UML activity diagrams could potentially model the internal logic of a complex operation it would be far better to simply rewrite the operation so that it is simple enough that you don’t require an activity diagram. In many ways UML activity diagrams are the object-oriented equivalent of flow charts and data flow diagrams (DFDs) from structured development.

5. TESTING AND IMPLEMENTATION 5.1 TESTING PROCESS
The purpose of testing is to discover errors. Testing is the process of trying to discover every conceivable fault or weakness in a work product. It provides a way to check the functionality of components, sub assemblies, assemblies and/or a finished product It is the process of exercising software with the intent of ensuring that the Software system meets its requirements and user expectations and does not fail in an unacceptable manner. There are various types of test. Each test type addresses a specific testing requirement.

TYPES OF TESTS
UNIT TESTING Unit testing involves the design of test cases that validate that the internal program logic is functioning properly, and that program input produces valid outputs. All decision branches and internal code flow should be validated. It is the testing of individual software units of the application .it is done after the completion of an individual unit before integration. This is a structural testing, that relies on knowledge of its construction and is invasive. Unit tests perform basic tests at component level and test a specific business process, application, and/or system configuration. Unit tests ensure that each unique path of a business process performs accurately to the documented specifications and contains clearly defined inputs and expected results.

INTEGRATION TESTING Integration tests are designed to test integrated software components to determine if they actually run as one program. Testing is event driven and is more concerned with the basic outcome of screens or fields. Integration tests demonstrate that although the components were individually satisfaction, as shown by successfully unit testing, the combination of components is correct and consistent. Integration testing is specifically aimed at components. FUNCTIONAL TESTING Functional tests provide systematic demonstrations that functions tested are available as specified by the business and technical requirements, system documentation and user manuals. Functional testing is centered on the following items: Valid Input Invalid Input Functions Output Systems/Procedures : identified classes of valid input must be accepted. : identified classes of invalid input must be rejected. : identified functions must be exercised. : identified classes of application outputs must be exercised : interfacing systems or procedures must be invoked. exposing the problems that arise from the combination of

Organization and preparation of functional tests is focused on requirements, key functions, or special test cases. In addition, systematic coverage pertaining to identify Business process flows; data fields, predefined processes, and successive processes must be considered for

testing. Before functional testing is complete, additional tests are identified and the effective value of current tests is determined. SYSTEM TESTING System testing ensures that the entire integrated software system meets requirements. It tests a configuration to ensure known and predictable results. An example of system testing is the configuration oriented system integration test. System testing is based on process descriptions and flows, emphasizing pre-driven process links and integration points.

BOX TESTING
White Box Testing is a testing in which the software tester has knowledge of the inner workings, structure and language of the software, or at least its purpose. It is used to test areas that cannot be reached from a black box level. BLACK BOX TESTING Black Box Testing is testing the software without any knowledge of the inner workings, structure or language of the module being tested. Black box tests, as most other kinds of tests, must be written from a definitive source document, such as specification or requirements document, such as specification or requirements document. It is a testing in which the software under test is treated, as a black box .you cannot “see” into it. The test provides inputs and responds to outputs without considering how the software works.

UNIT TESTING
Unit testing is usually conducted as part of a combined code and unit test phase of the software lifecycle, although it is not uncommon for coding and unit testing to be conducted as two distinct phases. TEST STRATEGY AND APPROACH Field testing will be performed manually and functional tests will be written in detail. Test objectives • All field entries must work properly. • Pages must be activated from the identified link. • The entry screen, messages and responses must not be delayed. • Features to be tested • Verify that the entries are of the correct format • No duplicate entries should be allowed • All links should take the user to the correct page. Integration Testing Software integration testing is the incremental integration testing of two or more integrated software components on a single platform to produce failures caused by interface defects.

The task of the integration test is to check that components or software applications, e.g. components in a software system or – one step up – software applications at the company level – interact without error. Acceptance Testing User Acceptance Testing is a critical phase of any project and requires significant participation by the end user. It also ensures that the system meets the functional requirements. Test Results All the test cases mentioned above passed successfully. No defects encountered.

IMPLEMENTATION AND MAINTANANCE

Implementation is the stage of the project when the theoretical design is turned out into a working system. Thus it can be considered to be the most critical stage in achieving a successful new system and in giving the user, confidence that the new system will work and be effective. The implementation stage involves careful planning, investigation of the existing system and it’s constraints on implementation, designing of methods to achieve changeover and evaluation of changeover methods. Implementation is the process of converting a new system design into operation. It is the phase that focuses on user training, site preparation and file conversion for installing a candidate system. The important factor that should be considered here is that the conversion should not disrupt the functioning of the organization.

6. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE SCOPE
In this paper, we describe a steganographic technique that embeds high payloads (up to 0.8 bpp for grayscale images) by adding a small-amplitude noise of specified properties to the image pixels. Because the probability distribution of the noise can be arbitrary, the communicating parties have the flexibility to mask the embedding distortion as superposition of a particular device noise. Thus, this embedding paradigm will provide better security than embedding that uses somewhat arbitrary operations, such as flipping the LSBs or adding a fixed-amplitude noise to the image (+–1 embedding). Compared to previously proposed methods that embed messages by adding Gaussian noise1,7, stochastic modulation can embed bigger payloads without using error correction schemes or denoising algorithms at the receiving end, which makes the algorithm significantly simpler and faster. Because the noise distribution can be arbitrarily adjusted, the new method provides much greater flexibility than previous methods. This paper also pays close attention to practical implementation issues, such as the issue of having to communicate the parameters of the added stego noise and the necessity to use different noise signals for each image due to security. In Section 6, we show that the concept of stochastic modulation can be extended to stego noise that depends on the image content.The security of

data hiding by adding noise to the cover image has been recently addressed ,These attacks, however, do not work well for grayscale images and may produce a significant rate of false positives for color scans of natural photographs and resampled images. Future directions include steganalysis of the proposed steganographic paradigm. In particular, it appears that distinguishing stego images embedded using stochastic modulation from color scans or resampled images is of paramount importance. Analyzing the difference between these image classes appears to be the key part in building reliable detection algorithms.

7. APPRNDICES
7.1 SCREENS:

7.2 SAMPLE CODING

import java.awt.Component; import java.awt.Container; import java.awt.Dimension; import java.awt.Font; import java.awt.Insets; import java.awt.LayoutManager; import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import java.awt.event.ActionListener; import java.awt.event.WindowAdapter; import java.awt.event.WindowEvent; import java.io.Serializable; import java.sql.Connection; import java.sql.DriverManager; import java.sql.ResultSet; import java.sql.Statement; import javax.swing.JButton; import javax.swing.JDialog; import javax.swing.JFrame; import javax.swing.JLabel; import javax.swing.JOptionPane; import javax.swing.JPasswordField; import javax.swing.JTextField; import javax.swing.UIManager;

public class Login extends JFrame implements ActionListener,Serializable { JLabel label1; JLabel label2; JTextField textfield1; JPasswordField passwordfield2; JButton button1; JLabel label3; public Login() { LoginLayout customLayout = new LoginLayout(); getContentPane().setFont(new Font("Tahoma", Font.PLAIN, 12)); getContentPane().setLayout(customLayout);

label1 = new JLabel("Login Name"); getContentPane().add(label1); label1.setFont(new Font("Bookman Old Style",Font.BOLD,20)); label2 = new JLabel("Password"); getContentPane().add(label2); label2.setFont(new Font("Bookman Old Style",Font.BOLD,20)); textfield1 = new JTextField(); getContentPane().add(textfield1); textfield1.setFont(new Font("RockWell",Font.PLAIN,18)); passwordfield2 = new JPasswordField(); getContentPane().add(passwordfield2); passwordfield2.setEchoChar('*'); passwordfield2.setFont(new Font("SansSerif",Font.BOLD,20)); //ImageIcon icon1 = new ImageIcon("r1.jpg"); button1 = new JButton("LOGIN"); getContentPane().add(button1); button1.addActionListener(this); button1.setFont(new Font("Engravers MT",Font.BOLD,20)); //ImageIcon icon = new ImageIcon("r1.jpg"); //label3 = new JLabel("",icon,JLabel.LEFT); //getContentPane().add(label3);

setSize(getPreferredSize()); addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter() { public void windowClosing(WindowEvent e) { System.exit(0); } }); } public static void main(String args[]) { Login window = new Login(); window.setTitle("Stegnography Implementation"); window.pack(); window.show();

JFrame.setDefaultLookAndFeelDecorated(true); JDialog.setDefaultLookAndFeelDecorated(true); try { UIManager.setLookAndFeel("com.sun.java.swing.plaf.windows.WindowsLookAnd Feel"); // javax.swing.UIManager.setLookAndFeel("com.birosoft.liquid.LiquidLookAndFeel "); } catch (Exception ex) { System.out.println("Failed loading L&F: "); System.out.println(ex); } } public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { String cmd; cmd=e.getActionCommand(); if(cmd.equals("LOGIN")) { String user=textfield1.getText().trim().toLowerCase(); String password=passwordfield2.getText().trim().toLowerCase(); try { System.out.println("test"); String driver = "sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbcDriver"; String url = "jdbc:odbc:pavan"; String DBusername ="admin"; String DBpassword = "admin"; Class.forName(driver); Connection connection = DriverManager.getConnection(url,DBusername,DBpassword); Statement statement = connection.createStatement(); String query = "SELECT * FROM pavan WHERE LoginName='"+user+"' AND Password='"+password+"'"; System.out.println(query);

ResultSet rs = statement.executeQuery(query); boolean recordfound = rs.next(); if (recordfound) { dispose(); Stegno en = new Stegno(); en.pack(); en.show(); en.setTitle("Steganography Implementation - Main Menu"); } else { JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,"!!! ***Username and password do not match*** !!!","Error",JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE); textfield1.setText(""); passwordfield2.setText(""); } rs.close(); } catch(Exception sqle){ sqle.printStackTrace(); } } } class LoginLayout implements LayoutManager { public LoginLayout() { } public void addLayoutComponent(String name, Component comp) { } public void removeLayoutComponent(Component comp) { } public Dimension preferredLayoutSize(Container parent) { Dimension dim = new Dimension(0, 0); Insets insets = parent.getInsets(); dim.width = 650 + insets.left + insets.right; dim.height = 400 + insets.top + insets.bottom;

return dim; } public Dimension minimumLayoutSize(Container parent) { Dimension dim = new Dimension(0, 0); return dim; } public void layoutContainer(Container parent) { Insets insets = parent.getInsets(); Component c; c = parent.getComponent(0); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+150,insets.top+100,136,32);} c = parent.getComponent(1); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+150,insets.top+150,136,32);} c = parent.getComponent(2); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+280,insets.top+100,154,35);} c = parent.getComponent(3); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+280,insets.top+150,154,35);} c = parent.getComponent(4); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+276,insets.top+216,160,48);} //c = parent.getComponent(5); //if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+0,insets.top+0,700,600);} } } }

import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.*; import javax.swing.*; import java.util.*; import java.math.*; import javax.imageio.ImageIO; import java.io.File; import java.io.FileInputStream; import java.io.FileOutputStream; import java.io.IOException; import javax.swing.event.*; import javax.swing.filechooser.*; import java.beans.*; import java.awt.event.ActionListener; import java.sql.*; import java.lang.*; import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import java.awt.font.*; import java.lang.String; import java.awt.Component; import java.awt.geom.*; import javax.swing.text.EditorKit; import javax.swing.event.MouseInputAdapter; import java.awt.image.BufferedImage; import javax.swing.text.*; import javax.crypto.Cipher; import java.security.*; import java.lang.Exception; import java.io.DataOutputStream; import java.io.DataInputStream; import java.io.Serializable; import java.io.UnsupportedEncodingException; import java.security.InvalidKeyException; import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException; import java.util.Random; //import javax.crypto.BadPaddingException; //import javax.crypto.IllegalBlockSizeException; //import javax.crypto.NoSuchPaddingException; import java.io.FilterInputStream; import javax.crypto.*; //import java.security.AlgorithmParameters; import java.math.BigInteger; //import java.security.interfaces.*;

//import java.security.KeyException; import java.io.BufferedReader; import java.io.BufferedWriter; import java.io.InputStream; import java.io.OutputStream; import javax.crypto.spec.*; import java.security.spec.*; import java.applet.*; import java.net.*; import java.net.SocketException; import java.net.BindException; import java.net.URL; import javax.swing.Timer; import javax.swing.TransferHandler; public class Encryption extends JFrame implements ActionListener,Serializable{ JLabel label1; JLabel label2; JLabel label3; JButton button1; JButton button2; JTextField textfield1; JTextArea textarea2; JScrollPane sp_textarea2; JPasswordField passwordfield3; JButton button3; JButton button4; JButton button5; JButton button6; JFileChooser filechooser; File f,tempfilename,Ofilename,Sfilename; int Copened,Cencrypt,Csave; InetAddress ipaddress; String name,Ekey,address; String chosenFile; InputStream ins; OutputStream outs; Thread t; public Encryption() { EncryptionLayout customLayout = new EncryptionLayout(); getContentPane().setFont(new Font("Helvetica", Font.PLAIN, 12));

getContentPane().setLayout(customLayout); //getContentPane().setBackground(Color.LIGHT_GRAY); label1 = new JLabel("SOURCE"); getContentPane().add(label1); label1.setFont(new Font("Garamond", Font.BOLD, 16)); label2 = new JLabel("MESSAGE"); getContentPane().add(label2); label2.setFont(new Font("Garamond", Font.BOLD, 16)); label3 = new JLabel("KEY"); label3.setVisible(false); getContentPane().add(label3); label3.setFont(new Font("Garamond", Font.BOLD, 16)); button1 = new JButton("BACK"); getContentPane().add(button1); button1.addActionListener(this); button1.setFocusable(true); button1.setRolloverEnabled(true); button1.setContentAreaFilled(true); button1.setBorderPainted(true); button1.setVerifyInputWhenFocusTarget(true); button1.setFont(new Font("Garamond", Font.BOLD, 16)); button2 = new JButton("NEXT"); getContentPane().add(button2); button2.setFocusable(true); button2.setContentAreaFilled(true); button2.setBorderPainted(true); button2.setRolloverEnabled(true); button2.setVerifyInputWhenFocusTarget(true); button2.addActionListener(this); button2.setFont(new Font("Garamond", Font.BOLD, 16)); textfield1 = new JTextField(""); getContentPane().add(textfield1); textfield1.setEditable(false); textfield1.setBackground(Color.LIGHT_GRAY); textfield1.setToolTipText("Choose the image file to be encrypted"); textarea2 = new JTextArea(""); getContentPane().add(textarea2); textarea2.setFocusable(true);

GraphicsEnvironment.getLocalGraphicsEnvironment(); textarea2.setAutoscrolls(true); textarea2.setWrapStyleWord(true); textarea2.setBackground(Color.LIGHT_GRAY); textarea2.setToolTipText("Enter the message to be embedded with image"); sp_textarea2 = new JScrollPane(textarea2); getContentPane().add(sp_textarea2); passwordfield3 = new JPasswordField(""); getContentPane().add(passwordfield3); passwordfield3.setVisible(false); passwordfield3.setToolTipText("Enter a 6 digit KEY"); button3 = new JButton("BROWSE"); getContentPane().add(button3); button3.addActionListener(this); button3.setFocusable(true); button3.setContentAreaFilled(true); button3.setBorderPainted(true); button3.setRolloverEnabled(true); button3.setVerifyInputWhenFocusTarget(true); button3.setFont(new Font("Garamond", Font.BOLD, 16)); button4 = new JButton("CLEAR"); getContentPane().add(button4); button4.setFocusable(true); button4.setContentAreaFilled(true); button4.setBorderPainted(true); button4.setToolTipText("Clears the Textarea"); button4.setRolloverEnabled(true); button4.setVerifyInputWhenFocusTarget(true); button4.addActionListener(this); button4.setFont(new Font("Garamond", Font.BOLD, 16)); button5 = new JButton("SAVE"); getContentPane().add(button5); button5.setFocusable(true); button5.setContentAreaFilled(true); button5.setBorderPainted(true); button5.setToolTipText("Saves the Encrypted image file"); button5.setRolloverEnabled(true); button5.setVerifyInputWhenFocusTarget(true); button5.addActionListener(this); button5.setFont(new Font("Garamond", Font.BOLD, 16));

button6 = new JButton("SEND"); getContentPane().add(button6); button6.setFocusable(true); button6.setContentAreaFilled(true); button6.setBorderPainted(true); button6.setToolTipText("Sends the Encrypted image file to the remote machine"); button6.setRolloverEnabled(true); button6.setVerifyInputWhenFocusTarget(true); button6.addActionListener(this); button6.setFont(new Font("Garamond", Font.BOLD, 16)); button6.setVisible(false); Copened=0; Cencrypt=0; Csave=0; filechooser=new JFileChooser(); filechooser.setFileSelectionMode(JFileChooser.FILES_ONLY); setSize(getPreferredSize()); addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter() { public void windowClosing(WindowEvent e) { System.exit(0); } }); } public static void main(String args[]) { Encryption en = new Encryption(); en.setTitle("Encryption"); en.show(); en.pack(); JFrame.setDefaultLookAndFeelDecorated(true); JDialog.setDefaultLookAndFeelDecorated(true); try {

UIManager.setLookAndFeel("com.sun.java.swing.plaf.windows.WindowsLookAnd Feel"); //javax.swing.UIManager.setLookAndFeel("com.birosoft.liquid.Liqui dLookAndFeel");

} catch (Exception ex) { System.out.println("Failed loading L&F: "); System.out.println(ex); } } public void Imageencrypt(String message,File file,int key) throws java.io.IOException { byte b[]=new byte[2]; BigInteger Abi,Mbi; int k,k1; DataInputStream ins=new DataInputStream(new FileInputStream(file)); DataOutputStream outs=new DataOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(new File("1.jpg"))); for(int c=0;c<key;c++) { int ch=ins.read(); outs.write(ch); } int len=message.length(); byte mess[]=new byte[2]; char chmess[]=new char[len+1]; k=k1=0; for(int i=0;i<=len;i++) { message.getChars(0,len,chmess,0); if(i==0) { BigDecimal bd=new BigDecimal(len); BigInteger Blen=bd.toBigInteger(); String Slen=Blen.toString(2); char Clen[]=new char[Blen.bitLength()]; Slen.getChars(0,Blen.bitLength(),Clen,0); for(int j=0;j<=7;j++) { if(j==0) { for(k=0;k<8-Blen.bitLength();k++) { int n=ins.read(b); Abi=new BigInteger(b); String Aby=Abi.toString(2);

int Alen=Abi.bitLength(); if(b[0]<0) Alen++; char Ach[]=new char[Alen+1]; Aby.getChars(0,Alen,Ach,0); if(b[0]==0) { } else { if(Ach[Alen-1]=='1') { if(Alen==Abi.bitLength()) { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("1111111111111110",2); BigInteger big=Abi.and(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } else { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("-1",2); BigInteger big=Abi.subtract(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } } outs.write(b); } } //for loop k j=j+k-1; } // if of j else { int n=ins.read(b); Abi=new BigInteger(b); String Aby=Abi.toString(2); int Alen=Abi.bitLength(); if(b[0]<0) Alen++; char Ach[]=new char[Alen+1]; Aby.getChars(0,Alen,Ach,0); if(b[0]==0) { Alen=1; } if(Clen[j-k]=='0' && Ach[Alen-1]=='1')

{ if(Alen==Abi.bitLength()) { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("1111111111111110",2); BigInteger big=Abi.and(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } else { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("-1",2); BigInteger big=Abi.subtract(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } } else if(Clen[j-k]=='1' && Ach[Alen-1]=='0') { if(Alen==Abi.bitLength()) { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("1",2); BigInteger big=Abi.add(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } else { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("-1",2); BigInteger big=Abi.add(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } } outs.write(b); } // end else } // for loop j } // end of if else { String slen=String.valueOf(chmess[i-1]); byte blen[]=slen.getBytes(); BigInteger Blen=new BigInteger(blen); String Slen=Blen.toString(2); char Clen[]=new char[Blen.bitLength()]; Slen.getChars(0,Blen.bitLength(),Clen,0); for(int j=0;j<=7;j++)

{ if(j==0) { for(k1=0;k1<8-Blen.bitLength();k1++) { int n=ins.read(b); Abi=new BigInteger(b); String Aby=Abi.toString(2); int Alen=Abi.bitLength(); if(b[0]<0) Alen++; char Ach[]=new char[Alen+1]; Aby.getChars(0,Alen,Ach,0); if(b[0]==0) { } else { if(Ach[Alen-1]=='1') { if(Alen==Abi.bitLength()) { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("1111111111111110",2); BigInteger big=Abi.and(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } else { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("-1",2); BigInteger big=Abi.subtract(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } } } outs.write(b); } //for loop k j=j+k1-1; } // if of j else { int n=ins.read(b);

Abi=new BigInteger(b); String Aby=Abi.toString(2); int Alen=Abi.bitLength(); if(b[0]<0) Alen++; char Ach[]=new char[Alen+1]; Aby.getChars(0,Alen,Ach,0); if(b[0]==0) { Alen=1; } if(Clen[j-k1]=='0' && Ach[Alen-1]=='1') { if(Alen==Abi.bitLength()) { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("1111111111111110",2); BigInteger big=Abi.and(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } else { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("-1",2); BigInteger big=Abi.subtract(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } } else if(Clen[j-k1]=='1' && Ach[Alen-1]=='0') { if(Alen==Abi.bitLength()) { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("1",2); BigInteger big=Abi.add(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } else { BigInteger bi=new BigInteger("-1",2); BigInteger big=Abi.add(bi); b=big.toByteArray(); } } outs.write(b); } // end else } // for loop j

} // end of else } // for loop i while(true) { int i=ins.read(); if(i==-1) break; outs.write(i); } ins.close(); outs.close(); } public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { try { String cmd; cmd=e.getActionCommand(); if(cmd.equals("BACK")) { dispose(); Stegno s = new Stegno(); s.show(); s.pack(); s.setTitle("Main Menu - Implementation of Steganography"); } if(cmd.equals("CLEAR")) { textarea2.setText(""); } if(cmd.equals("SAVE")) { if(Copened==1 && Cencrypt==1) { int r=filechooser.showSaveDialog(this); Sfilename=filechooser.getSelectedFile(); FileInputStream in=new FileInputStream("1.jpg"); FileOutputStream out=new FileOutputStream(Sfilename); Ofilename=Sfilename;

textfield1.setEditable(true); textfield1.setText(Sfilename.getPath()); textfield1.setEditable(false); while(true) { int i=in.read(); if(i==-1) break; out.write(i); } in.close(); out.close(); JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,"\nYour image file has been encrypted and saved successfully\n","message",JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE); } else { String m; if(Copened==0) m="File not Opened"; else if(Cencrypt==0) m="Not Encrypted"; else m="Not Decrypted"; JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,m,"Error",JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAG E); } } if(cmd.equals("NEXT")) { if(Copened==1) { Ekey=JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Enter 4 digit Key For Encryption"); //String type if(Ekey==null) { JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,"Enter only 4 Digit key","Error",JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);

} if(Ekey.trim().length()<4) { JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,"Enter only 4 Digit key","Error",JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE); } if(Ekey.trim().length()>4) JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,"Enter only 4 Digit key","Error",JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE); else { // encrypt the message int key=Integer.parseInt(Ekey); Imageencrypt(textarea2.getText(),Ofilename,key); Cencrypt=1; } } else { JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,"File NotOpened","Error",JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE); } } if(cmd.equals("BROWSE")) { int r=filechooser.showOpenDialog(this); tempfilename=filechooser.getSelectedFile(); //File type if(r==JFileChooser.CANCEL_OPTION) JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,"FileNotSelected","Error",JOptionPane .ERROR_MESSAGE); else { String name=tempfilename.getName(); if((!name.endsWith(".jpg")) && !name.endsWith(".gif") && ! name.endsWith(".bmp")&& !name.endsWith(".jpeg")) JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,"Select Only Image file","Error",JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE); else {

Copened=1; Ofilename=tempfilename; textfield1.setText(name); textfield1.setText(tempfilename.getPath()); textfield1.setFont(new Font("Century",Font.PLAIN,15)); textfield1.setBackground(Color.LIGHT_GRAY); textfield1.setEditable(false); } } } } // end try catch(Exception xe) { //xe.printStackTrace(); JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,xe,"Error",JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAG E); } } // end of actionperformed } // End of class class EncryptionLayout implements LayoutManager { public EncryptionLayout() { } public void addLayoutComponent(String name, Component comp) { } public void removeLayoutComponent(Component comp) { } public Dimension preferredLayoutSize(Container parent) { Dimension dim = new Dimension(0, 0); Insets insets = parent.getInsets(); dim.width = 700 + insets.left + insets.right; dim.height = 400 + insets.top + insets.bottom; return dim; } public Dimension minimumLayoutSize(Container parent) { Dimension dim = new Dimension(0, 0);

return dim; } public void layoutContainer(Container parent) { Insets insets = parent.getInsets(); Component c; c = parent.getComponent(0); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+75,insets.top+74,112,32);} c = parent.getComponent(1); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+75,insets.top+170,112,32);} c = parent.getComponent(2); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+88,insets.top+160,112,32);} c = parent.getComponent(3); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+145,insets.top+294,124,38);} c = parent.getComponent(4); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+300,insets.top+294,124,38);} c = parent.getComponent(5); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+158,insets.top+74,390,32);} c = parent.getComponent(6); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+158,insets.top+120,390,150);} c = parent.getComponent(7); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+200,insets.top+160,284,52);} c = parent.getComponent(8); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+558,insets.top+74,114,35);} c = parent.getComponent(9); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+558,insets.top+173,114,35);} c = parent.getComponent(10); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+450,insets.top+294,124,38);} c = parent.getComponent(11); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+559,insets.top+204,114,35);} } }

import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.*; import javax.swing.*; import java.util.*; import javax.swing.Icon; import java.lang.*; import java.util.*; import java.text.*; import javax.swing.Icon; import java.awt.event.ActionListener; import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import java.io.Serializable; public class Stegno extends JFrame implements ActionListener,Serializable{ JLabel label1; ButtonGroup cbg; JRadioButton radio1; JRadioButton radio2; JButton button1; JTextField timeField; JTextField dateLongField; JMenuBar menuBar=new JMenuBar(); JMenuItem TopicsItem=new JMenuItem("Topics"); JRadioButton radio3;

public Stegno(){ StegnoLayout customLayout = new StegnoLayout(); getContentPane().setFont(new Font("Helvetica", Font.PLAIN, 12)); getContentPane().setLayout(customLayout);

//getContentPane().setBackground(Color.LIGHT_GRAY); label1 = new JLabel("DIGITAL SECURITY USING STEGANOGRAPHY"); getContentPane().add(label1); label1.setFont(new Font("RockWell", Font.BOLD, 27));

cbg = new ButtonGroup(); radio1 = new JRadioButton("ENCRYPTION", false); cbg.add(radio1); getContentPane().add(radio1); radio1.setFocusable(true); radio1.setRolloverEnabled(true); radio1.setVerifyInputWhenFocusTarget(true); radio1.addActionListener(this); radio1.setFont(new Font("Engravers MT", Font.BOLD, 20));

radio2 = new JRadioButton("DECRYPTION", false); cbg.add(radio2); getContentPane().add(radio2); radio2.addActionListener(this); radio2.setFocusable(true); radio2.setRolloverEnabled(true); radio2.setVerifyInputWhenFocusTarget(true); radio2.setFont(new Font("Engravers MT", Font.BOLD, 20));

button1 = new JButton("EXIT"); getContentPane().add(button1); button1.addActionListener(this);

button1.setFocusable(true); button1.setRolloverEnabled(true); button1.setVerifyInputWhenFocusTarget(true); //button1.setSelected(true); button1.setFont(new Font("Engravers MT", Font.BOLD, 18)); timeField = new JTextField(5); showSysTime(timeField); timeField.setFont(new Font("TimesRoman",Font.BOLD,12)); // timeField.setForeground(Color.GRAY); timeField.setEditable(false); getContentPane().add(timeField); dateLongField = new JTextField(18); dateLongField.setText(showTodayDate()); getContentPane().add(dateLongField); dateLongField.setEditable(false); //dateLongField.setForeground(Color.GRAY); dateLongField.setFont(new Font("TimesRoman",Font.BOLD,12)); JMenu helpMenu=new JMenu("Help"); helpMenu.setMnemonic('h'); TopicsItem.addActionListener(this); helpMenu.add(TopicsItem); menuBar.add(helpMenu); setJMenuBar(menuBar); radio3 = new JRadioButton("SEND IMAGE", false); cbg.add(radio3);

getContentPane().add(radio3); radio3.setFocusable(true); radio3.setRolloverEnabled(true); radio3.setVerifyInputWhenFocusTarget(true); radio3.addActionListener(this); radio3.setFont(new Font("Engravers MT", Font.BOLD, 20));

setSize(getPreferredSize()); addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter() { public void windowClosing(WindowEvent e) { System.exit(0); } }); } public void showSysTime(final JTextField tf) { final SimpleDateFormat timef = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss"); javax.swing.Timer timer = new javax.swing.Timer(1000, new ActionListener() { public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { String s = timef.format(new Date(System.currentTimeMillis())); tf.setText(s); } }); timer.start();

} public String showTodayDate() { Date dt = new Date(); System.out.println(dt.toString()); SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("EEE, MMM d, yyyy"); return sdf.format(dt).toString(); }

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { String cmd; cmd = e.getActionCommand(); if(e.getSource() == radio1) { dispose(); Encryption en = new Encryption(); en.setTitle("ENCRYPTION"); en.pack(); en.show(); } if(e.getSource() == radio2) { dispose(); Decryption dn = new Decryption(); dn.setTitle("DECRYPTION"); dn.pack();

dn.show(); } if(e.getSource()==radio3) { dispose(); SendImage si=new SendImage(); si.setTitle("Uploads the encrypted image"); si.show(); si.pack(); } if(e.getSource()==TopicsItem) { try { Runtime run= Runtime.getRuntime(); run.exec("notepad help.txt"); } catch(Exception ee) { System.out.println("Error: "+ ee); } } if(cmd.equals("EXIT")) { int res; res = JOptionPane.showConfirmDialog(this, "R U SURE U WANT TO EXIT"); switch(res) {

case JOptionPane.OK_OPTION: System.exit(0); break; case JOptionPane.NO_OPTION: break; } } } public static void main(String args[]){ Stegno s = new Stegno(); s.setTitle("Main Menu"); s.pack(); s.show(); JFrame.setDefaultLookAndFeelDecorated(true); JDialog.setDefaultLookAndFeelDecorated(true); try {

UIManager.setLookAndFeel("com.sun.java.swing.plaf.windows.WindowsLookAnd Feel"); // javax.swing.UIManager.setLookAndFeel("com.birosoft.liquid.LiquidLookAndFeel "); }

catch (Exception ex) { System.out.println("Failed loading L&F: "); System.out.println(ex); } } } class StegnoLayout implements LayoutManager { public StegnoLayout() { } public void addLayoutComponent(String name, Component comp) { } public void removeLayoutComponent(Component comp) { } public Dimension preferredLayoutSize(Container parent) { Dimension dim = new Dimension(0, 0); Insets insets = parent.getInsets(); dim.width = 700 + insets.left + insets.right; dim.height = 400 + insets.top + insets.bottom; return dim; } public Dimension minimumLayoutSize(Container parent) {

Dimension dim = new Dimension(0, 0); return dim; } public void layoutContainer(Container parent) { Insets insets = parent.getInsets(); Component c; c = parent.getComponent(0); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+45,insets.top+30,648,42);} c = parent.getComponent(1); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+235,insets.top+108,240,48);} c = parent.getComponent(2); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+235,insets.top+170,240,48);} c = parent.getComponent(3); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+260,insets.top+310,184,48);} c = parent.getComponent(4); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+536,insets.top+378,58,22);} c = parent.getComponent(5); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+593,insets.top+378,105,22);} c = parent.getComponent(6); if (c.isVisible()) {c.setBounds(insets.left+235,insets.top+232,240,48);} } }

8. REFERNCE F. Alturki and R. Mersereau, A Novel Approach for Increasing Security and Data Embedding Capacity in Images for Data Hiding Applications. Proc. of ITCC, Las Vegas, Nevada, 2001, pp. 228–233. 2. S. Dumitrescu, Wu Xiaolin, and Z. Wang, “Detection of LSB Steganography via Sample Pair Analysis. Preproceedings 5th Information Hiding Workshop, Noordwijkerhout, Netherlands, Oct. 7−9, 2002. 3. J. Fridrich, M. Goljan, and R. Du, “Detecting LSB Steganography in Color and GrayScale Images”, Magazine of IEEE Multimedia, Special Issue on Security, October-November issue, 2001, pp. 22–28. 4. J.J. Harmsen and W. A. Pearlman, “Steganalysis of Additive Noise Modelable Information Hiding”, Proc. SPIE Electronic Imaging, Santa Clara, January 21–24, 2003. 5. G.E. Healey and R. Kondepudy, Radiometric CCD Camera Calibration and Noise Estimation. IEEE Trans. on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, Vol. 16(3), March 1994, pp. 267–276. 6. M. Holliman, N. Memon, and M. M. Yeung, “On the Need for Image Dependent Keys for Watermarking”, Proc. Content Security and Data Hiding in Digital Media, Newark, NJ, May 14, 1999. 7. L.M. Marvel, C.G. Boncelet, and C.T. Retter, Reliable Blind Information Hiding for Images. In: D. Aucsmith (eds.): Information Hiding: 2nd International Workshop, LNCS, Vol. 1525. Springer-Verlag, New York, 1998, pp. 48–61. 8. T. Sharp, “An Implementation of Key-Based Digital Signal Steganography”, In: I. S. Moskowitz (eds.): 4th International Workshop on Information Hiding, LNCS 2137, Springer-Verlag, New York, 2001, pp. 13–26. 9. A. Westfeld and A. Pfitzmann, Attacks on Steganographic Systems. In: A. Pfitzmann (eds.): 3rd International Workshop on Information Hiding. LNCS, Vol.1768. Springer-Verlag, New York, 2000, pp. 61−75. 10. A. Westfeld, High Capacity Despite Better Steganalysis (F5–A Steganographic Algorithm). In: Moskowitz, I.S. (eds.): 4th International Workshop on Information Hiding, LNCS, Vol. 2137. Springer-Verlag, New York, 2001, pp. 289–302. 11. A. Westfeld, Detecting Low Embedding rates. In: Petitcolas et al. (eds.): Preproceedings 5th Information Hiding Workshop. Noordwijkerhout, Netherlands, Oct. 7−9, 2002.