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Palette Reference
From ZBrushInfo
The subjects below give descriptions of the ZBrush palettes (menus) and the controls within them. Many of these descriptions include conceptual overviews and examples. Particularly large palettes have been split into sections. Alpha Palette Manages alphas, which are ZBrush intensity maps. This is an important palette because alphas can be used for many more operations than in other programs. Brush Palette Contains all of the 3D sculpting brushes. Color Palette Allows setting or selecting of colors, and also filling the canvas or an object with a selected color. Document Palette Provides document operations; opening, saving, resizing, etc. Draw Palette Controls and gives information on aspects of the currently selected tool. For example, Draw sets brush size. This is not an extremely complex palette, but it is important, and many of its controls are made available as shortcuts in the area surrounding the ZBrush canvas. Edit Palette Controls Undo and Redo operations. Layer Palette Layers allow you to organize a complex ZBrush scene into different layers; each layer contains part of the scene. Since ZBrush brush strokes contain depth information, layers provide a powerful scene management tool without the need to consider if elements of one layer might block elements of another. Layers can be made invisible to more easily work with other parts of a scene. Light Palette Controls scene lighting; this in turn affects rendering, both in interactive and batchrendered views. Macro Palette Allows easy recording of sequences of actions. This is particularly useful for recording

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Movie Palette Used to make mini-movies about ZBrush, for illustration and distribution to other users. As of ZBrush 3, can export to Quicktime .mov format. Picker Palette Controls how properties (material, color, depth, orientation) of the pixols underneath the mouse cursor affect the current brush stroke. For example, if you want to draw across part of a scene in such a manner that the pixols in that stroke are 'flattened' to the same Z-depth, but retain their original materials, you'd adjust the settings in this palette. Preferences Palette Allows setting of many, many user preferences. This includes UI configuration, tablet preferences, and configuration options having to do with several of the other palettes. Render Palette Controls ZBrush renders, both in the normal interactive mode, and in batch rendering mode. Stencil Palette Allows masking using 'stencils'. These can be not only stencils in the standard meaning of the word (the standard stencil is the 'french curve' drafting/drawing tool), but stencils that include gray scale intensity. Stroke Palette Controls how mouse strokes are applied. This is a powerful but sometimes overlooked feature of ZBrush, and well worth learning. Texture Palette Provides for texture management. Tool Palette Provides the tools (paintbrushes, models, filters, etc.) that can be used to draw in ZBrush, and many operations relating to those tools. This is one of the most important palettes in ZBrush, and its many submenus are described below. Transform Palette Contains operations for transforming 3D objects into different forms; sculpting,

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Allows a mesh to be considered as made up of many different parts. For example, a monster could have a weapon, clothing, etc. This also allows easy construction of full scenes. Tool:Layers Subpalette Allows multiple different sculpts of one model, and combining those sculpt in different ways. Tool:Geometry Subpalette A very important submenu, concerned with creating and working with multiple levels of subdivision. Tool:HD Geometry Subpalette Analogous to the Geometry submenu, but functions with the new very-high res (hundreds of millions of polygons) features of ZBrush. Tool:Preview Subpalette Allows one to redefine the model's default orientation and center point.

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be flipped. Tool:Import Subpalette Used to bring in 3D models from other file formats; .OBJ and so forth. Tool:Export Subpalette Used to save 3D models in other file formats; .OBJ and so forth.

The next two sub-palettes are specific to ZSpheres. Tool:Rigging Subpalette Controls rigging, which can be used both for modifying models, and as part of model retopoligization. Tool:Topology Subpalette Operations to do with mesh topology manipulation, primarily used when building a new topology atop an existing one. Retrieved from "http://www.zbrush.info/docs/index.php/Palette_Reference"

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Alpha Palette
From ZBrushInfo

In ZBrush, grayscale images used for masking are referred to as alphas. You'll probably be used to alphas from the notion of an "alpha transparency" in other painting or imaging programs, but in ZBrush, they can be used for far more than that

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4 Further Links

Selecting Alphas

The inventory of all alphas, which can be brought up by clicking on the large thumbnail in the Alpha Palette, or the large Alpha thumbnail to the left of the canvas.

Alphas can be selected from either the Alpha palette, or the large Alpha thumbnail on the left of the ZBrush canvas. In either case, click on the large thumbnail to bring up the full selection of alphas. Within the palette, you can also click one of the small thumbnails that show recently used alphas, to select it. The inventory of alphas works the same as others in ZBrush, such as those in the Tool and Material palettes. The active alpha is grayed out to indicate that it is already selected. ote: In the Alpha Palette, click one of the small thumbnails and then select an alpha from the resulting popup of the alpha inventory, to have the selected alpha replace the clicked thumbnail, rather than be added to the list of recently used alphas.

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DExporter : Exports an alpha using the currently selected options in DE Options. This differs from Export in that Export does not apply any of the options that can be set using DE Options. Brush : Slider that gives an alternative way of selecting alphas. R : As alphas are selected, they will be added to the "recently used" set of thumbnails that appears in the Alpha palette. In time, this may cause the palette to become too long for your preferences. Pressing R resets the recently used section of the palette to display its original number of thumbnails. Blur : Blurs the alpha image to smooth it. Negative values will sharpen. oise : Adds noise to the alpha image. Max : Maximizes tonal range of the current alpha. Like an auto-level setting, it adjusts the lightest part of the existing alpha to pure white and the darkest part to pure black. MidValue : When applying a displacement map, tells ZBrush what alpha intensity to use as the neutral (no displacement) value. This is useful when applying displacement maps that weren't created in ZBrush and don't conform to ZBrush's standard of 50% gray

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Flip H : (ZScript name is Flh ) Flips the alpha left-to-right. Flip V : (ZScript name is Flv ) Flips the alpha top-to-bottom. Rotate : (ZScript name is Rot ) Rotates the alpha 90 degrees per click. Invers : (ZScript name is Inv ) Produces an inverse image of the alpha.

Creating Polymeshes From Alphas
MRes : Sets the resolution of a mesh created using the Make 3D button. Higher values result in a greater level of detail at the price of a greater number of polygons and larger file size. MDep : Sets the thickness of a mesh created using the Make 3D button. MSm : Sets the smoothness of a mesh created using the Make 3D button. If this slider is set to 0, the mesh is created using Cubical Skinning, wherein the object appears to be composed of many tiny cubes. DblS : When pressed (the default), a 3D object created using Make 3D wll be mirrored along its Z axis. For example when using a radially faded alpha such as Alpha:Brush 01, setting this to on will produce an object that looks like a sphere or ovoid; with it off, the result would be an object like a flattened hemisphere with a flat bottom. Make 3D : Creates a 3D mesh skin from the currently selected alpha. The skin has symmetry along the Z axis, and is automatically assigned Adaptive UV Tiles coordinates.

Converting Between Alphas and Other Objects (Stencils, Textures, the Document, Other Alphas)
Make Tx : Creates a texture from the currently selected alpha and adds it as the active texture to the texture palette. Make St : Creates a stencil from the currently selected alpha and activates the stencil. Make Modified Alpha : Creates a new alpha which is derived from the original alpha by "baking in" the modifications made by AlphaAdjust. In other words, if you start with an adjusted alpha and do a Make Modified Alpha, the new alpha will look the same when AlphaAdjust is in its unadjusted (original) state, as the old alpha did with the adjustment applied. Cc : (Clear Color): This option works in conjunction with the CropAndFill button, and then only when the current alpha is the same size as the current drawing area. When it is on (the default), pressing CropAndFill will clear color information from the canvas, meaning that the resulting canvas will have depth but no color. If it is off, then the resulting canvas will have the same depth as when it is on, but pixols will assume any colors that were on the original canvas. If you CropAndFill a canvas with a differently sized alpha, then colors are always cleared. CropAndFill : When pressed, resizes the drawing area to the size of the currently

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selected alpha, and then adjusts the depth of the pixols on the canvas according to the intensity of the alpha at the corresponding points. If the alpha is the same size as the canvas, you have the options of preserving canvas colors; see Cc above. GrabDoc : Creates a new alpha the same size as the current canvas, with intensities determined by the depth of the pixols on the canvas. Alpha Depth Factor : This affects the intensity with which the CropAndFill operation is applied, causing alpha intensities to map to greater or lesser depth displacements according to this scaling factor. It is also of significant importance when generating displacement and bump maps using ZBrush, when it gives a number that is used in an external renderer as a scaling factor. See The Alpha Displacement Exporter for further details.

Related Controls in Other Palettes
Below are tools that appear in other palettes, but that relate to alphas in a significant way. Draw:Current Tool Preview : With the SimpleBrush selected in the Tool palette,you can view and rotate this preview to get an idea of the depth effect of the alpha. Tool:Masking : The Create Alpha and Alp buttons in this subpalette allow you to create an alpha from a mask on the current 3D object, or to apply an alpha as a mask. MRGBZ Grabber : This tool in the Tool Palette allows you to (among other things) grab a portion of the canvas and turn it into an alpha.

Further Links
Detailing Characters: ZBrush Alpha Library Highend3D: ZBrush in Production Pipeline Highend3D: Alpha Resources Retrieved from "http://www.zbrush.info/docs/index.php/Alpha_Palette"

This page was last modified 22:50, 28 April 2007.

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1.15 Mesh Insertion ■ 1.15.1 Mesh Insert Tutorials 2 Smoothing Controls 3 Gravity 4 Cavity Masking ❍ 4.1 Cavity Masking Controls 5 Curve Controls ❍ 5.1 Edit Curve (Brush Shape) 6 Other Controls

Brush Types
Basic Brushes
Std : The Std brush is the original basic ZBrush sculpting brush, and when used with its modifiers at their default values, it displaces outward the vertices over which it passes, giving the effect of adding clay to a sculpture. It can be used with all of the various brush modifiers, such as Strokes, Alphas, an edit curve, and so on. Pressing the Alt key causes the standard key to carve into, rather than build up, the model. Elastic : Elastic works similarly to the Std brush, but for some model types, is more accurate at maintaining the original shape of the surface as the surface is displaced. Experiment with both to see which is better for your work. udge : Moves (nudges) points along the surface of the model, without affecting the shape. Useful for changing the flow of geometry, preparatory to sculpting on the surface.

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As a result, Tweak is a convenient way of moving points simply by switching brushes, but you should familiarize yourself with Transpose to take full advantage of the power of the transpose features. Tweak : The Tweak brush moves points under the brush in the XY plane of the screen. The amount that points are moved depends on brush size and the edit curve. To move an entire model, you can simply increase brush size (or scale the model) so that the brush entirely covers the model. Tweak respects masks, meaning that unmasked vertices are moves, masked vertices are not moved, and partially masked vertices are moved

in proportion to their masking.

When Tweak is selected, simply click and drag on the model to move vertices.

Magnify Brush

The Magnify brush moves vertices away from the cursor, and optionally displaces them up or down; it's the inverse of the Pinch Brush. The name comes from the appearance of vertices as you move the brush around using the DragDot stroke; the vertices literally look as if they are being magnified. The magnifying (pushing out) and displacement (pushing up) effects can be controlled separately. For example, to 'expand out' the vertices in part of plane, without offsetting the surface, set the Magnify value to 0, and Z Intensity to a satisfactorily high value.

Magnify Controls
Magnify : When the magnify button/slider is selected, sculpting will cause a displacement to the surface, at the same time that vertices are pushed outward along the surface. A value of 0 will not change the surface elevation, but points will still be pushed outward along the surface. The slider intensity determines how much vertices are pushed outward from the surface. The standard Z Intensity setting controls the magnitude of the magnification effect.

Pinch Brush

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Pinch pulls vertices together; it is, roughly, the inverse of the Magnify brush. It is very useful for sinking in detail for creating clothing and wrinkles, and for adding hard edges to any form. The Pinch brush has been augmented with an elevation slider which allows the artist to pinch in and out along the surface of the model to really sink in detail or harden the edge. ote: As in the example shown here, Pinch is often used with LazyMouse to achieve smooth, precise ridges, even with multiple passes.

Pinch Controls
Pinch : When the Pinch brush is selected, sculpting will cause vertices under the brush to be pinched together along the surface. In addition positive values of the pinch slider will cause the pinched vertices to move outward from the surface, negative values will cause them to move inward. The standard Z Intensity control controls the magnitude of the pinching effect.

Blob Brush
Blob : The Blob brush is particularly good at producing certain organic effects very quickly. In contrast to other brushes, the uniformity of its stroke is affected by irregularities in the surface under the stroke, which means that it typically produces short, irregular blobs; hence the name. This won't be so apparent if it is used on smooth surfaces. The blob slider determines whether the brush pulls the surface out, or pushes it in.

Flatten Brush

The Flatten brush allows you to easily 'press down' parts of your model into planar surfaces. In addition, you can raise or lower the surface as you flatten it. Using the Flatten brush, you can add rough flattening to you model, such as enhancing the plane of a model's cheekbones. You can also achieve completely flat surfaces, for mechanical models, walls, etc. ote: To achieve completely flat surfaces, ensure you are working with a pure white alpha, and that the brush is set to

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The primary purpose of the Clay brush is to sculpt surfaces using alphas. While the other brushes may be used to do this, they can have side effects that come about as a result of their 'main' purpose. The clay brush is intended specifically for sculpting with alphas, and will not cause other side effects.

The Z Intensity and Clay slider values together affect the result of sculpting with the clay brush. See below.

Controls
Clay : The Clay brush is a general purpose brush for sculpting with alphas. The clay slider scales the alpha as a whole; this affects not only the intensity of the sculpt, but also the size (width and height) of the brush stroke. The standard Z Intensity control affects the magnitude of the alpha up/down displacement effect, but does not affect the size of the alpha.

In the image to the left, the Z Intensity settings (which differ horizontally across the image) affect only the 'bumpiness' of the sculpt. The Clay settings (differing vertically across the image) affect the 'size' of the sculpt. These two combine to determine the total displacement along the surface normal of the sculpt.

Morph Brush
Morph : The Morph brush is only active if the current model has a morph target set. In this case, the morph brush will brush the surface to which it is applied back toward the stored morph target surface.

Layer Brush
Layer : The Layer brush raises (or lowers, if ZSub is on) the surface on which it is used by a fixed amount, determined by the value of Z Intensity . The defining character of the layer brush is that when a stroke overlaps itself, the overlapping parts of the stroke do not undergo additional displacement. This makes the layer brush ideal for changing the displacement of an entire area by a fixed

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Select the SnakeHook brush with a Z Intensity of 100. Use the Dots stroke type to pull out a single extrusion. Drag on an area of the model. Extrusions will be pulled out underneath the brush. Extrusions will be pulled out in a direction perpendicular to the surface from which they start.

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ote: You can create spirals with SnakeHook by setting SnakeHook to a positive value, and pulling out from a surface facing you, using a circular motion of the mouse.

ZProject Brush
The ZProject Brush utilizes the Z axis of the canvas to transfer sculpting and texturing details either from the canvas or other from subtools.

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Your elevation is a mulitplier for how much depth you transfer. Put the elevation up to 100 to transfer 100% of the detail. Information is moved in the z-axis only, that is, in and out of the screen. Use the Transpose Action Line to clone from somewhere other than directly underneath the cursor.

Visit these Tutorials for more information: Tutorial:ZProject_Texturing Tutorial:ZProject_Bas-Relief Tutorial:ZProject_and_SubTools Tutorial:ZProject_and_Adjusting Photo Reference ZScript Tutorial: Basic ZProjection Sculpting Mastering the ZProject-Brush Thread (with PDF Tutorial by Rastaman)

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ZProject : When activated, sculpting will transfer color, geometry, or both from the canvas or another subtool to the active tool or subtool. Detail is transferred in the global Z-direction, and the slider controls how much of the displacement or color is transferred. As an example of how you might use this, you could place a face model over a picture of a similarly shaped face, and then use ZProject to transfer the skin texture to the model texture.

Smooth Brush
The smooth brush smooths details on a surface towards an 'average' level of that surface. This is simple enough, but:

The Smooth brush smooths a surface by averaging the displacement of vertices with the displacements of neighboring vertices. This means that the 'scale' over which smoothing takes effect depends almost entirely on the subdivision level of the model. (But see the reference for the Smooth slider for a slight exception. Details of how to use this ability are presented below.

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'Coarser' features, such as nose shape, are not affected. Increasing the intensity of the Smooth slider will will result in somewhat stronger smoothing, but only up to a point; ridges might be softened, but the overall shape will still not be affected.

Using Smooth in conjunction with ZBrush models sculpted at multiple levels of resolution (see Subdivision Modeling) allows you a tremendous amount of control of how your model is affected. You could, for example, choose to smooth down a mountain range, yet retain all of the fine detail that was sculpted in, such as creeks or rough terrain. The image below shows this in action. The process is very simple: 1. Set Tool:Geometry:SDiv to a level that gives a good representation of the features you want to affect, but doesn't show the finer details you want to leave unchanged. 2. Smooth at that level of detail. 3. Set Tool:Geometry:SDiv back to its highest value to view the result.

Smooth Controls
Smooth : This brush smooths the underlying surface, and its slider controls the 'direction' of the smoothing effect. If set to a positive number the brush will smooth the recesses of the form more strongly. If set to a negative number it will smooth the high points of the form more strongly. If set to 0, performs a full smooth. For example, set this to 100 to fill a valley containing mountains with silt; the tips of the peaks will be retained. Z Intensity controls how fast the smooth effect is applied; at a high intensity, a single pass with the brush will smooth a surface by a large amount, while at lower values, multiple passes of the brush will be needed to achieve the same effect. Use the smooth brush at different subdivision levels to smooth coarse or fine details.

Inflat Brush
Inflat : In contrast to the Std brush, which pulls or pushes geometry along the normal of the surface under the center of the brush, Inflat expands geometry by pushing vertices along their own normals. This can be particularly important when you are doing sculpts that displace the surface a large amount with just one or two strokes.

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In both cases, the all spikes were generated at the same time, with a single motion using the Spray stroke. Inflat spikes are perpendicular to underlying surface, Std spikes are all in the same direction.

Mesh Insertion
Mesh insertion is a convenient and easy way of adding a source mesh to a target mesh. To do this, you select a mesh to be inserted using the MeshInsert Preview button, and then used the specialized MeshInsert Std or MeshInsert Dot to add the selected mesh to the current mesh. MeshInsert Preview : Press to select a mesh for use with the mesh insertion operations; only Polymesh3D meshes may be selected, not primitives. Once a mesh has been selected, its thumbnail will show up in the MeshInsert Preview button. Press the button again at any time to select a different mesh. Once you've selected a mesh to insert, you'll still need to activate one of the two specialized mesh insertion brushes to perform insertions.

MeshInsert Fit : Inserts into the current model, an instance of the mesh selected by MeshInsert Preview , drawing the inserted mesh in the plane of the screen. The value of the slider determines if the new mesh will be drawn at, above, or below the level of the surface over which it is drawn. Positive values cause the mesh to be inserted above the surface, negative values below. In this example, we've selected a halo using MeshInsert Preview , and drawn it farther back on the head, to emphasize the fact that the slope of the skull didn't affect the inserted halo. The slider was set to a high value, so the halo appears above the head instead of intersecting it.

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Also check out the MeshInsert tutorial here.

Smoothing Controls
Smoothing is considered such an important operation that a special shortcut and controls apply to it. When using any brush, press and hold Shift to smooth what is under the brush. The controls in the 'smoothing' section of the brush menu apply specifically to smoothing in this way. Smoothing Curve : In ZBrush 3, you can quickly activate the smooth brush by holding down the Shift key while you paint; the idea is that Smooth is so important that it should always be quickly available. The smoothing curve affects only the smooth brush when invoked with Shift , and thus effectively makes the smooth brush a fully custom brush that can be invoked at any time. Alt Brush Size : This is a sibling of the Brush Size control, but affects the size of the smoothing brush that is in use when the Shift key is held down.

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The curve controls affect brush profiles.

Edit Curve (Brush Shape)

By default, ZBrush uses a shaped sculpting brush where the strength of the brush is strongest near the center, and drops off toward the outside of the brush. This is why the Std brush raises areas as a 'hill', not as a cylinder.

Changing the edit curve will change the effect of the brush. On the left you can see how an edit curve with multiple peaks can be used to sculpt in a specialized shape. Using such a shape can allow you to produce very specific shapes with little work.

With the ability of ZBrush 3 to use alphas while sculpting, the need to adjust the edit curve for special effects has lessened. However, remain aware of the way the standard edit curve fades a sculpt toward the edges of a stroke. EditCurve : The Edit Curve determines, and can modify, the brush's radial profile. The default edit curve is low at its left edge (corresponding to the outside of the brush), and high at its right edge (corresponding to the center of the brush), causing strokes to affect the model more strongly at the center of the brush, and less strongly at its edge. As with all curves, click the edit curve to expand it for modification, and click on Close to collapse it again. EditCurve:Close : The Close button collapses the Edit Curve into its minimized state. EditCurve:Copy : The Copy button copies this curve in preparation for pasting it here or elsewhere. EditCurve:Load : The Load button loads this curve from a saved disk file. EditCurve: oise : The oise slider adds random turbulence to this curve. A value of 0 adds no turbulence; the curve is smooth. EditCurve:Paste : The Paste button over-writes this curve with the most-recently copied one. Curves can be copied from here or from other interface items, and pasted here. EditCurve:Redo : Press the Redo button to repeat an undone curve-editing action. This button is only active if Undo has been pressed. EditCurve:Reset : The Reset button resets the shape of the curve to its original state. EditCurve:Save : The Save button saves this curve (its shape and Noise settings) to a disk file. EditCurve:Undo : Press the Undo button to undo the last curve-editing action.

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Other Controls
These controls are independent of other controls in the brush palette. Samples : This can change the sensitivity of certain brushes to properties of the surfaces to which they are applied. The effects of some brushes ( Flatten , for example) can be greatly affected by properties of the surface immediately underneath the cursor. (The default behavior for the flatten brush is to try to flatten to a plane tangent to the orientation of the plane under the cursor). If these properties change over short distances, such as might happen with finely detailed surfaces, the result can be brush strokes that are very difficult to control

Higher values of Samples indicate that a larger area around the cursor should actually be examined, and the properties of interest (such as surface orientation) averaged over that area. This gives more stable results as the brush moves over a surface. A value of 0 examines the smallest possible area under the cursor, and hence makes brushes very 'sensitive' to these sorts of changes. You can also achieve very precise control of certain aspects of brushes using the Picker Palette . EditDensity : Controls the percentage of the surface under the brush that is affected by a stroke. At its default number of 100, we get "normal" results. Lower values will give pores or bumps, and other similar effects. This can be a quick and easy way of achieving such effects in a uniform way across an area. More precisely, you can think of a setting of 100 (the standard) indicating that 100% of vertices under a stroke should be affected by it, 10 meaning 10% should be affected, etc. 0 means the stroke won't have any affect at all. The effect is akin to a uniform grainy alpha that can be adjusted as to density, and that scales itself to apply to individual vertices regardless of the subdivision level of the model. The best way to see this effect in action is to choose the Std brush, DragDot stroke, Z Intensity of 50 or so, and then drag strokes around on surfaces of various resolutions. AlphaTile : Allows sculpting with tilings of the current alpha, as opposed to the normal single alpha. At a setting of 2, the alpha will effectively be repeated in a 2x2 grid, and that tiled alpha will be used to affect the brush stroke. Higher values give 3x3, 4x4, etc. tilings. WrapMode : Values of WrapMode higher than 1 will be multiple copies of a stroke to be applied to a model at the same time. In some sense, it's a generalization of bilateral or other symmetrical modeling techniques. Wrap mode is normally best used with models that are symmetrical and simple in their rough form. A primary use is with planes, to permit quick production of tileable alphas from a plane mode (since a single brush stroke can be set to produce multiple strokes that preserve edge tileability, the amount of work required is reduced.) Experimentation with sculpting a plane at different values of WrapMode is one of the best ways to understand it. Retrieved from "http://www.zbrush.info/docs/index.php/Brush_Palette"

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Contents
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1 Using and Choosing Colors 2 Choosing a Color 3 Color Palette Controls 4 Related Controls in Other Palettes

Using and Choosing Colors

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The gray bar at the bottom of this area is a gray selector; it permits you to select a gray of any intensity with a single click. The small square at the top middle of the selector area (colored yellow in this image) is a swatch showing the current secondary color . Some color brushes make use of the secondary color, and some do not. The rectangle at the top right of this area is the main color swatch. All color brushes make use of the main color. (The Simple, Sphere, Alpha, Paint and Fiber brushes use both.)

Choosing a Color
You can choose a main or secondary color in various ways.

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R : Directly sets the red value of the currently selected main or secondary color. G : Directly sets the green value of the currently selected main or secondary color. B : Directly sets the blue value of the currently selected main or secondary color.

Fill Object : The Fill Object button is active only when you have a 3D object in 3D Edit mode (i.e. Transform:Edit is on). It fills all polygons of the 3D object with the main color, by assigning colors to the vertices. This does not use textures, and assigning a texture to your object will override any colors you've assigned with Fill Object. Fill Layer : The Fill Layer button fills the currently active canvas layer with the currently selected color and material. Due to the way material effects are computed, some materials show up only when applied to areas of differing depth, and so will not be apparent until you start painting with a depth-enabled brush. SysPalette : This allows you to choose a color by going through your operating system's color chooser. Clear : Clears the currently selected layer back to a neutral gray. Modifiers : Additional color chooser systems are available in the Modifiers sub-palette. All four pickers may be open and active at the same time.

Related Controls in Other Palettes
The Layer Palette is relevant to those of the Color Palette operations that apply to an entire area; FillArea and Clear . ● Within the Draw Palette, the M , Rgb , Mrgb , and Rgb Intensity controls affect if and how color is applied when painting. ● Within the Texture Palette, the Clear button clears the current texture and fills it with the current main color, and the Grad (Gradient Colorize) button uses the main and secondary colors to tint the current texture.

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Document Palette
From ZBrushInfo

The document palette contains buttons that allow you to load or save ZBrush documents, import background images, export output images, resize the canvas, and set the background color. The Document palette does not save or load 3D models. Use the Tool Palette for those operations.

Contents
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1 Opening, Saving, Creating, Exporting 2 Default Colors 3 Resizing 4 Other

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Import : Imports .bmp (Windows Bitmap), .psd (Photoshop), .jpg (JPEG), or PICT (Mac) as a background image. ZBrush will resize the image to fit the current canvas size. The currently selected Material will be applied to the image and if there are objects or paint strokes with depth present, they will be shaded with the imported image. ote: ZBrush relies on filename extensions. Any file that you wish to import using any of ZBrush’s palettes must end in an appropriate extension. For example, images must end in “.bmp”, “.jpg”, “.psd” or “.pct” to be recognized for import. Export : Exports .bmp (Windows Bitmap), .psd (Photoshop), or PICT (Mac) as a RGB bitmap output to be published or used in another application. ew Document : Opens a new document with default settings. If a document is open with unsaved changes, a warning will appear.

Default Colors
First, a bit about what these controls actually do. The area inside all of the controls is split into two parts; the border is just an empty area around the canvas , which is where drawing takes place. You can drag in the border to rotate your model or (with the appropriate modifier key pressed) do some other things, but aside from that, the border is basically a 'dead area'; it doesn't do much. At one point in time, you normally wanted to set your canvas size to be relatively small to take into account the limitations of the memory and CPU power that was available. Now you can often set the canvas size to be large enough that the border isn't visible any more. There are still advantages to having the border; if your model

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In ZBrush 3, the background of the canvas is no longer restricted to a single, monotone color. You can make quick adjustments to reflect the environment your model is likely to be viewed in. The following controls affect the canvas background color. Range : In ZBrush 3, the canvas background can be thought of as a vertical fade, from black, through an intermediate color, to white. However, not all of these intensities need be displayed. The Range setting determines the shade intensities over which the background will be displayed. A value of 1 means from black to white, while a value of 0 will give a monotone background. Other values will give a range from, for example, light blue to dark blue. Center : The Range control above sets the range of shades that will be displayed in the canvas' background. Center determines the vertical position at which this range will be halfway between white and black. For example, a higher setting for this control might make the top 2/3 of the canvas background darker, while a lower setting would make the

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example, if two strokes made with the SimpleBrush cross one another, the depth information at the intersection of the two will be changed more than in the other parts of the strokes. Pressing StoreDepthHistory alters this so that future brush strokes will interact with the depths on the canvas at the time StoreDepthHistory was activated, but will not interact with depth information from strokes painted after StoreDepthHistory was pressed.

DeleteDepthHistory : Reverses the action of StoreDepthHistory, returning ZBrush to its normal depth painting behavior. Retrieved from "http://www.zbrush.info/docs/index.php/Document_Palette"

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Draw Palette
From ZBrushInfo

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tool's size, shape, opacity, how new strokes interact with existing objects and strokes, and other functions. The Draw palette defines your interaction with the canvas. You can paint depth, color, material either individually or simulateously.

Controls
Draw Size : Sets the overall size of the brush, scaling it in all three dimensions simultaneously. The current brush size is reflected by the white or red circle attached to the mouse/tablet cursor in the image area. Default = 64. Range = 1 to 128. (maximum can be changed using the Preferences: Draw:Max Brush Size slider). ote: After you change the Draw Size setting, ZBrush automatically zooms the view in the preview window so that the brush fits in the window. This doesn't affect the brush size.

Focal Shift : Adjusts how fast the brush's effect "falls off" as it approaches the edge of the brush. This is really just a shortcut; for drawing tools it is the same as Focal Shift in Alpha:AlphaAdjust, and when modeling it is the same as Focal Shift in Transform:Edit Curve. Both of those curves can be adjusted manually for more control of brush shape.

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object. The lower the Z Intensity setting, the less the existing depth information is impacted by added strokes and objects. Thus, setting Z Intensity to 0% has the same effect as turning off the Z options (see ZAdd / ZSub / ZCut, below). Default = 100%. Range = 0% to 100%. In the illustration below, a 3D cube primitive was added with a high Z Intensity at the top of the sphere, and a low Z Intensity at the bottom.

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ote: When painting, think of ZAdd and ZSub simply as add and subtract operations; you don't need to use the more compute-intensive ZCut at all. However, when working with 3D objects, you should generally use ZCut for subtraction operations. Read on for further explanation of the differences between ZSub and ZCut. Alternatively, with no Z option on (click the active button to turn it off), you can paint

without impacting the depth information at all. Sphere painted with ZAdd (left side), ZCut (right ), and Z options off (bottom)

The effects of the Z settings vary depending on whether you're using a standard brush, such as the Simple brush, or working with a 3D object. If using a standard brush, the Z setting affects brush strokes you make after you change the setting. If working with an active 3D object, the Z setting affects how the object interacts with the rest of the image. This is primarily where ZSub and ZCut differ: With ZSub, any existing pixols in front of the rearmost pixols placed by the 3D object are removed. With ZCut, however, only pixols within the volume of the 3D object are removed. This is best illustrated graphically: The following shows the interaction of an active 3D object (the red cylinder) with existing pixols (the yellow sphere) using the various Z modes: ZAdd (left), Zsub (middle), ZCut (right)

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Current Tool Preview : The Current Tool Preview window shows the current drawing tool or object, and reflects the effect of changing the basic tool characteristics in real time. The exception is that, when using a 3D tool, such as Sphere 3D or Cube 3D, this window shows the current object. Thus, when you're using a brush, you can see it in the preview window, but when you're editing a 3D object, you can't. When you first start ZBrush, the Preview window depicts the Simple brush in its default state. You can rotate the view around the window contents by dragging the mouse inside the window. For example, if you drag a short distance toward the upper right, the window changes to a view from an angle. Current Tool Preview showing tool headon (left) and from an angle (right).

In the upper-left corner of the preview is a small curved-arrow icon. Clicking this icon toggles continuous rotation of the window view. While the continuous rotation option is active, you can change the direction and speed of the rotation by dragging inside the window. Also, you can temporarily halt the rotation by clicking in the window. At any time, click the curved-arrow icon

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Sphere brush with Width set to 40% (left), and with Height set to 30% (right).

Height : Sets the height of the brush. By default, Height is set to 100%; reducing it produces a brush that's wider than it is high. Range = 0% to 100%. ote: When adding a 3D object, you can control its width and height interactively. First drag in one direction to set the object's overall size, and then, without releasing the mouse button, drag in the opposite direction to decrease the width and height simultaneously.

Depth : Sets the size of the brush on the in-out axis. By default, Depth is set to 1.00. Reducing it gives a shallow brush, while increasing it produces a deep brush. Range = 0.00 to 10.00. Sphere brush with Depth set to .61 (left) and with Depth set to 2.24 (right).

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If you want to draw a cylinder sitting on the surface of another object, you need to set Imbed to -1.00, so that its end is above the plane. The following illustration shows two cylinders with different Imbed settings drawn onto a cube. The cylinder on the cube's top was drawn with Imbed set to .00 (the default), and the cylinder on the cube's side was drawn with Imbed set to -1.00.

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Refract / Blur : It is possible to simulate refractivity of transparent objects through these settings. To use this feature, a 3D object must be drawn with RGB Intensity of less than 100. Refract lets you control how strong the refractive effect is. Higher values result in more refraction. Range = 0 to 100. Default = 0. Blur lets you determine whether the refractive image is shown clearly through the object or with some blurriness. Range = 0 to 2. Default = 0. In the image below, a flattened Sphere3D was used as a lens. RGB Intensity was set to 20 and Intensity to 80. The GelShaderA material was used. The lower left lens Refract Intensity was at The upper right was at 50. The lower right was at 100 with a Refract Blur of 2.

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ote: Only unshaded color is refracted by this feature. If you have color that is created by a material (such as the blue background in the image above) and you wish to have that material-generated color be refracted, you must bake the layer before drawing the refractive object. See Layer:Bake. ote: Unlike material transparency, Refraction cannot see anything on another layer. It will only refract what is on the currently selected layer. (Transparency is an option available for materials in the Material:Modifiers settings.)

Channels
Infront / Behind : The controls in the Channels sub-palette provide additional painting, masking, and 3D options, but it's seldom necessary to modify them while creating artwork, as Infront is automatically turned on when you use ZAdd mode and Behind is automatically turned on when you use ZSub mode. These are basically masking operations that determine which pixols of a new object are drawn based on the object's pixol's depths, as compared to the pixols already on the canvas. There are four possible combinations of Infront and Behind: One on, both on, or neither on. These masking options can take effect when creating an object or in a Edit/Transform mode (Edit, Move, Scale, Rotate). When Infront and Behind are both off, no masking takes place and new pixols always appear in front of others—new objects always appear on top of previous objects.

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canvas pixols) or behind an existing pixol (but a blank canvas pixol will mask it, due to the reason given above.) The next three items cover all four combinations of Infront and Behind. ote: In the following illustrations, the cone was drawn first, and the cube was drawn second. Thus, the different options determine how the cone's pixols mask the cube's.

Behind off: Infront off (left) and on (right).

Behind on: Infront off (left) and on (right)

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sphere with three different Mat Overwrite settings: 2 (top), 50 (lower left), and 100 (lower right). As the Material Overwrite setting increases, the material is applied to successively fewer of the "lower" pixols produced by the brush. Creative use of this feature can produce endless combinations of bump mapping with materials.

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Edit Palette
From ZBrushInfo

The Edit palette controls undo and redo operations. It can actually undo or redo two types of operations seperately; edits on the canvas, or edits on tools.

Controls
U DO : Undoes drawing operations, i.e. operations that affect pixols on the canvas. If you are modeling, this control is not available. REDO : If you have just performed one or more Edit:U DO operations, REDO will let you cancel them. Tool:Undo : Allows you to undo operations on tools. This includes not only sculpting operations, but also changes made using settings such as those in Tool:Deformation . Tool:Redo : Allows you to cancel Edit:Tool:Undo operations. ote: The Undo and Redo operations may be hidden if neither can be applied.

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