“A Study of the Factors influencing the Retail  Experience of the Brand‐Jealous 21”  Manipal University 

 
Research project submitted to the Manipal University in partial completion of  III Semester, MBA in Advertising & Marketing Communications    By  Ms. Pooja S      Under the guidance of   Prof. Asha Nadig                    DIVISION OF MEDIA AND ENTERTAINMENT  MANIPAL UNIVERSITY  BANGALORE CAMPUS         

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................................... 8 OVERVIEW.......................................................................................................................................... 10 SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PROJECT ................................................................................................... 12 OBJECTIVES ....................................................................................................................................... 12 LIMITATIONS OF THE PROJECT ..................................................................................................... 14 LITERATURE REVIEW ....................................................................................................................... 15 EXPLANATION- CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK ........................................................................... 25 RETAIL EXPERIENCE ....................................................................................................................... 25 DIMENSIONS OF RETAIL EXPERIENCE ........................................................................................ 26 CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MANAGEMENT .................................................................................. 33 DIMENSIONS OF EXPECTATION .................................................................................................... 36 CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MAP ...................................................................................................... 37 MEASURING EMOTIONS IN CUSTOMER EXPERIENCES IN RETAIL STORE ENVIRONMENTS ............................................................................................................................... 38 METHODOLOGY ADOPTED .............................................................................................................. 42 RESEARCH DESIGN........................................................................................................................... 42 METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION................................................................................................ 42 SAMPLING METHODS ADOPTED ................................................................................................... 45 DATA COLLECTION TOOLS ............................................................................................................ 46 QUESTIONNAIRE DESIGN ............................................................................................................... 46 VALIDITY & RELIABILITY .............................................................................................................. 49 DATA ANALYSIS ................................................................................................................................... 50 ASSUMPTIONS ................................................................................................................................... 51 DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS ................................................................................................................. 51 USE OF STATISTICAL TOOLS ......................................................................................................... 69 RESEARCH FINDINGS & CONCLUSION......................................................................................... 78 FINDINGS & DISCOVERIES ............................................................................................................. 78 ANALOGIES & CONCLUSION ......................................................................................................... 80 RECOMMENDATIONS ...................................................................................................................... 83 OVERALL OUTCOME OF THE STUDY ........................................................................................... 87 BIBILIOGRAPHY .................................................................................................................................. 88 BOOKS & JOURNALS ........................................................................................................................ 88 REPORTS ............................................................................................................................................. 90 WEBSITES ........................................................................................................................................... 90 ANNEXURE- QUESTIONNAIRE......................................................................................................... 91

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LIST OF TABLES
TABLE 1 Factors influencing Retail Experience in General perception.............................63 TABLE 2 Extent of influence of factors in General Perception...........................................63 TABLE 3 Factors influencing Retail Experience of Jealous 21 stores.................................65 TABLE 4 Opinion about Jealous 21 stores.........................................................................65

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LIST OF GRAPHS

Bar Graph 1: Window Display comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21.......................50 Bar Graph 2: Ranking of different Jealous 21 showrooms on Window display...................................50 Bar Graph 3: Ambience comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21.................................51 Bar Graph 4: Background Music comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21...................52 Bar Graph 5: Staff comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21..........................................53 Bar Graph 6: Colour & Lighting comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21....................54 Bar Graph 7: Store layout & Arrangement comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21...55 Bar Graph 8: Ranking of different Jealous 21 showrooms on Store layout & arrangement..................55 Bar Graph 9: Choice & Variety comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21......................56 Bar Graph 10: Ranking of different Jealous 21 showrooms on Choice & variety.................................56 Bar Graph 11: Offers & promotions comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21...............57 Bar Graph 12: Trial Room experience comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21............58 Bar Graph 13: Customer profile comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21......................59 Bar Graph 14: Ranking of different Jealous 21 showrooms on Customer profile.................................59 Bar Graph 15: Billing procedure comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21.....................60 Bar Graph 16: Parking comparison between General Perception & Jealous 21....................................61 Bar Graph 17: Ranking of different Jealous 21 showrooms on parking facilities.................................61 Bar Graph 18: Summary of all factors influencing Retail Experience in the General Perception.........62 Bar Graph 19: Summary of all factors influencing Retail Experience in Jealous 21 stores...................64 Bar Graph 20: Overall ranking of Jealous 21 on all Retail aspects........................................................66 Line Graph 1: Consolidated plotting of all averages of all factors.........................................................69 Line Graph 2: Correlation of all factors & Overall Rank.......................................................................70  Line Graph 3: Regression equation of Staff & Overall Ranking of Jealous 21......................................73  Line Graph 4: Regression equation of Ambience & Overall Ranking of Jealous 21..............................73 Line Graph 5: Regression equation of Parking & Overall Ranking of Jealous 21..................................74

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DECLARATION

I do hereby declare that this project work entitled “A Study of the factors influencing the Retail Experience of the Brand- Jealous 21” submitted by me for the partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of Master In Business Administration (MBA) in Advertising & Marketing Communications, to Manipal University is a record of my own research work.

The report embodies the finding based on my study and observation and has not been submitted earlier for the award of any degree, diploma, fellowship or any other similar title or prize to any Institute or University.

Date: 22.Nov.2010 Place: Bangalore

Pooja. S Roll No: 092517002

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CERTIFICATE FROM THE GUIDE
 

DIVISION OF MEDIA AND ENTERTAINMENT
MANIPAL UNIVERSITY BANGALORE CAMPUS

This is to certify that the project report entitled
A Study of the factors influencing the Retail Experience of the Brand- Jealous 21

submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Business Administration of Manipal University

Ms. Pooja S 092517002

has worked under my supervision and guidance and that no part of this report has been submitted for the award of any other degree, diploma, fellowship or other similar titles or prizes and that the work has not been published in any journal or magazine.

Date: 22.Nov.2010 Place: Bangalore

Certified by Prof. Asha Nadig

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
 

It is really a great pleasure to have this opportunity to describe the feeling of gratitude imprisoned in the core of my heart.

I convey my sincere gratitude to the Head-Marketing & Visual Merchandising of Indus Leauge Clothing Mrs. Shibani Mishra for giving me the opportunity to prepare my project work on the Retail Experience of Jealous 21. I express my sincere thanks to Mr. Balaji. B, Assistant Manager-Jealous 21 and the staff members of the Exclusive Brand Outlets of Jealous 21 who have co-operated with me and answered my innumerable questions.

I am thankful to Prof. Asha Nadig for her guidance during my project work and sparing her valuable time for the same.

I express my sincere obligation and thanks to all the faculties of Manipal Institute of Media & Entertainment for their valuable advice in guiding me at every stage in bringing out this report.

I am also thankful to my family, friends and all the patrons who patiently filled out my questionnaire and for their kind co-operation.

Pooja. S

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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
Kishore Biyani in his book, It happened in India says; the one crucial thing that has helped has him is his ability to be able to think in terms of mass customer base and focus on a single minded pursuit of growth. His biggest fear is losing touch with the public. He is most paranoid about it. His business is therefore entirely dependent on observing people, understanding their emotions and catering to their needs; it has been his imperative as a mass player. (pg.47) Getting information and feedback from customers has been the main agenda of the entire business that he runs. Even though he was much against the methodologies of his then run family business, Kishore Biyani says that he has learnt one important thing from it. In his words; “At our shop in Kalbadevi, we would sit on gaddis- thick mattresses supported by round pillows. Well, it wasn’t just the comfortable gaddis that I liked; I admired the basic structure of the setup. The Seth or owner squatted on the gaddi in a corner and was surrounded by the munim (chief accountant) and his deputies. The deputies could talk directly with the Seth whenever they wanted, accounts were written without vouchers on the statements itself and the Seth could directly interact with his clients & customers. This ensured a direct flow of information, insights & knowledge from the customer front. Modern day businesses are structured in a way that most of the critical details of the ground level are lost in the multiple layers of the organisation. We make grand presentations & have long meetings just to share

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data. Often, the only outcome of these meetings is deciding when to meet next. By the time the data reaches the top, it’s either been misinterpreted or has become irrelevant. Organisations that allow insights & information to flow freely will be the ones to come up with the best ideas. As of now, we have 5 layers or bands within our company- and I don’t see any reason why we can’t do with just 3- the information gathering layer, the knowledge creation layer & the strategy layer. Reducing to just 2 layers like the Seth’s may not be possible, but building a seamless organisation is going to be one of my primary objectives over the next 10 years.” My project on “A study of the factors influencing the Retail experience of the Brand-Jealous 21” is thus, one of the ways to help the information gathering layer of the business to get valuable feedback from their customers. The Objectives of my study, I believe are perfectly in line with Kishore Biyani’s thoughts itself. In his book, It Happened in India he says, his strength lies in understanding the needs & aspirations of the Indian customer. The Indian customer both challenges & intrigues him and as an organisation they still do not completely understand each section of the population. Their focus has been & will continue to be on watching, evaluating & capitalising the domestic consumption space.

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OVERVIEW
JEALOUS 21 is one of the famous Brand Names under Indus-League, a new generation lifestyle brand marketing company It is part of India’s biggest Retail giant, Future Group (Pantaloons). Pantaloons Retail India Ltd. is one of India’s largest organized modern-format retailers promoted by Mr. Kishore Biyani. From the beginning in 1987, PRIL has today evolved as one of the leading manufacturer-retailer and are among the pioneers in setting up a nation-wide chain of large format stores in India. PRIL is entrepreneur driven, professionally managed focused on meeting the customer requirements for a large component of their spend across fashion, food, general merchandise, home in both value and lifestyle segments. Jealous 21 is a brand of Casual, Stylish & Trendy clothing from the house of IndusLeague Clothing Ltd. Jealous 21 is the first brand in India to be known for their “Hip Fit” jeans- that ensures every woman the perfect fit. It offers 3 hip sizes for each waist size. Jealous 21 also offers ranges of clothing in Party, Casual & Denim. Also available are a vast variety of accessories including Bags, Leggings, Belts & Jewellery. Jealous 21 is positions as a brand for the YOUNG GIRL, in the age group of 17-24. Jealous 21 encourages every girl to be an individual, to set trends, speak her mind and follow her dreams. It is a store focusing on providing a value for money proposition as it provides quality fashion products at an affordable price as compared to the competitors.

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Collection at the Jealous 21 stores Pastel Denim Jealous 21 offers a range of jeans in pastels. Whether in peachy ice, indigo bleach, breezy blue or grey rush- its the perfect trend for anyone to have fun with. The long body tees available in light shades go perfectly with pastel denims. Demolition Denims Ripped, shredded and distressed denim are red hot in fashion and Jealous 21 has taken on this trend too. It is not the most polished look but sure is “sexy” and “strong”. The light and distressed jeans can provide a fun and stylish look to a casual and even a dressy outfit. Jeggings A pair of jeans that fits like a dream is what every girl wants- so Jealous 21 offers them Jeggings- jeans in the form of leggings. Its cool and absolutely comfortable to wear. It has the feel of denim but the comfort & fit of leggings. Jealous 21 makes available the digital viscose tops with digital face prints in monochromes and neutral shades. The scooter gurl range Jealous 21 has launched the scooter girl range for all those girls who love their bikes and enjoy their freedom. The range is fun and stylish for the girl who is out and about in the city. The cool print tees teamed up with the perfect fitting hip fit jeans, plus a casual jacket or glam waistcoat completes this look. A range of accessories that includes vibrant coloured scarves/bandanas, funky printed buffs or the fun handbags makes shopping at Jealous 21 a treat for every scooter girl.

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SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PROJECT
Even with all the money spent in managing the communications around a brand, so much of a consumer’s sense of a brand comes through the brand experience. This is particularly true in a retail environment where ensuring brand consistency can be more challenging than with the manufacturing of products. Since the Research Project is backed by the corporate, its results will be used within the company to help in marketing strategies. The research will enable me to gain specialised knowledge in Retail, Consumer Behaviour and Brand Building & Positioning to a large extent.

OBJECTIVES
• • • To understand the various dimensions of Retail Experience To study about customer preferences and experience of shopping. To understand the impact of various retail aspects and their effect on shopping experience • • • To learn about the impact of the retail experience on a brand To understand the customer’s expectation from retail service provider. To find out the consumer mapping of Jealous in comparison with competitors like Levis, Lee, Wrangler, Calvin Klein, Diesel etc.... • Learn about youth (girls) consumer buying behaviour

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LIMITATIONS OF THE PROJECT

The research is conducted only in the Exclusive Brand Outlets of Jealous 21 and not in the other retail formats such as Pantaloons, Central mall and Brand Factory where the brand is also available.

The sample size chosen is limited to 200 only because of time and financial constraint.

• •

Data collected may not be a representation of the entire population. This study was limited to the capabilities and willingness of the respondents in appropriately answering the questions and information given by respondents may be correct or may not be correct.

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CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW
“Retail is a simple business. …..At the very basic retail is about buying and selling – something human beings have been doing since they started living in societies. All one needs to be successful in retail, is common sense. Unfortunately, common sense is not that ‘common.’(Kishore Biyani, It Happened in India, p.g 154)

Customer experience encompasses every aspect of a company’s offering—the quality of customer care, of course, but also advertising, packaging, product and service features, ease of use, and reliability. Yet few of the people responsible for those things have given sustained thought to how their separate decisions shape customer experience. To the extent they do think about it, they all have different ideas of what customer experience means, and no one more senior oversees everyone’s efforts.

Some companies don’t understand why they should worry about customer experience. Others collect and quantify data on it but don’t circulate the findings. Still others do the measuring and distributing but fail to make anyone responsible for putting the information to use.

Although few companies have zeroed in on customer experience, many have been trying to measure customer satisfaction and have plenty of data as a result. The problem is that measuring customer satisfaction does not tell anyone how to achieve it. Customer satisfaction is essentially the culmination of a series of customer experiences or, one could say, the net result of the good ones minus the bad ones. It occurs when the gap between customers’ expectations and their subsequent experiences has been closed. To
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understand how to achieve satisfaction, a company must deconstruct it into its component experiences. Customer experience is the internal and subjective response customers have to any direct or indirect contact with a company. Direct contact generally occurs in the course of purchase, use, and service and is usually initiated by the customer. Indirect contact most often involves unplanned encounters with representations of a company’s products, services, or brands and takes the form of word-of-mouth recommendations or criticisms, advertising, news reports, reviews, and so forth.

Observation is the key and the best way to understand customers. “I do that every day. We are trained to do that. So, while we are at the airport we are watching people, and then at the stores and the malls. We observe people anywhere and everywhere.” (Kishore Biyani, It Happened in India, p.g 143)

Retail Design In today’s experience economy, design has gained status in retail management. Retail design specifically focuses on several aspects that need to be considered when creating retail stores. Firstly, retail design entails an understanding of what will work aesthetically in a retail environment. This involves a comprehension of the importance customers in general attribute to tangible (material) and intangible (atmospheric) design elements. Secondly, retail design also includes an understanding of how different store dimensions will perform functionally and commercially. Thirdly, retail designers evidently have to reflect on the question how the store’s design can be built to budget. Finally, the design also has to meet regulations concerning the use of a public space
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(Kindleysides, J. (2007) An Introduction to Retail Design). When customers visit a retail store, they immediately make an association between the products sold in the store, their price, the store’s ‘tone of voice’ and ambience and the retailer’s presence and identity. As a result, retail design and retail branding cannot be disconnected from each another (any more). Since design of retail store environments nowadays needs to provide inspiration to customers (Bäckström, K. & Johansson, U. (2006). Creating and Consuming Experiences in Retail Store Environments: Comparing Retailer and Consumer Perspectives, Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, vol. 13, pp 417), retailers and designers need to be on the same wavelength as their target group. Knowing what customers value as important is necessary information for retailers, because in that way, they not only can understand what appeals emotionally to the target group, but moreover, what functionalities they appreciate (Inman, J. & Winer, R. (1998) Where the Rubber meets the Road: A Model of in-store Consumer Decision making, Marketing Science Institute report, Cambridge.). Retailers in turn can transfer this knowledge to designers, which can try to translate this knowledge into design practice. Thinking about how retailers and designers can understand what appeals functionally and emotionally to customers, brings us to concepts of ‘customer experience’ and ‘experience economy’.( Underhill, P. (1999) Why we buy what we buy, Simon & Schuster, New York.)

Customer experiences The concept ‘customer experience’ was formulated in 1982 by Holbrook and Hirschman as a new experiential approach to consumer behaviour. Until then, the customer was considered to be a rational decision-taker, who tried to purchase the best product from an available selection of products at a reasonable price (Fiore, A. & Kim,

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J. (2007) An Integrative Framework capturing Experiential and Utilitarian Shopping Experience, International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35, no. 6, pp 421-442.). Holbrook and Hirschman (Holbrook, M. & Hirschman, E. (1982), The Experiential Aspects of Consumption: Consumer Fantasies, Feelings and Fun, Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 9, pp 132-140.), however, stated that in contrast to this rational and utilitarian approach, some consumption activities were better explained by an experiential approach. A customer’s interaction with a product, service (and / or shopping environment) can be intrinsically satisfying, without thinking about a product or service’s utilitarian functionality (Holbrook, M. & Hirschman, E. (1982). The Experiential Aspects of Consumption: Consumer Fantasies, Feelings and Fun, Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 9, pp 132-140.). The publications of Holbrook and Hirschman brought attention to the importance of certain variables (more specifically, emotions) which were largely neglected until then.

Experience economy The ‘experience’ concept came to the fore in the management discipline with the publication in 1999 of Pine & Gilmore’s book on the Experience Economy (Pine, J. & Gilmore, J. (1999) The Experience Economy. Work is Theatre and Every Business a Stage, Harvard Business School Press, Boston). Pine & Gilmore present experiences as a new economic offering, which emerges as the next phase after an economy of commodities, goods and services. According to their viewpoint, managers from now on need to focus on creating and directing memorable customer experiences. Therefore, they describe six different features of an experience. First of all, experiences need to be worth remembering. Secondly, experiences need to be focused on an appropriate theme, which characterizes the company and appeals to customers. Thirdly, negative elements

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which can divert customers’ attention from the experience, need to be removed. Fourthly, experiences need to appeal to as many customers’ senses as possible. Fifthly, since every experience is the consequence of an interaction between an organized ‘event’ and the (emotional, mental, physical …) condition of the customer at the time of the interaction, every experience is personal. Finally, Pine & Gilmore state that customers need to pay for experiences. According to their viewpoint, as long as a company does not ask a price for an experience, the experience cannot be considered as a proper economic offering. In the years after Pine & Gilmore’s publication, several other authors focused their attention on customer experiences as a new lever for value creation (Gentile, C., Spiller, N. & Noci, G. (2007) How to Sustain the Customer Experience: an Overview of Experience Components that Co-Create Value with the Customer, European Management Journal, vol. 25, no. 5, pp 395-410). At the beginning of the 21st century however, the original conceptualization of the experience economy was criticized. One of the main points of criticism in literature which stresses the potential significance of creating customer experiences is the lack of empirical support (Verhoef, P., Lemon, K., Parasuraman, A., Roggeveen, A., Tsiros, M. & Schlesinger, L. (2009) Customer Experience Creation: Determinants, Dynamics and Management Strategies, Journal of Retailing, vol. 85, no. 1, pp 31-41). Until today, a lot of existing experience design has come forth from conventional wisdom. Empirical support, and scholarly verification and research in general, however, is indispensable for guiding the design of a retail store environment. Given that different authors agree on the importance of emotions in customer experiences, this paper focuses on a related question: are the methodologies used by different scientific disciplines for measuring emotions applicable for measuring emotions in customer experiences in retail store environments?

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Measuring emotions in customer experiences in retail store environments Trying to measure emotions, triggered by consumption activities in general, has proven not to be an easy task. Authors who tried to measure emotional states that occurred during consumption have most frequently used emotion measurement instruments developed by emotion theorists. However, the question which is the appropriate way to measure these kinds of emotional states is still a matter of debate (Sörensen, J. (2008) Measuring Emotions in a Consumer Decision-Making Context – Approaching or Avoiding. Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies, Aalborg). By working according to the principles of ‘Research In Design’ (Horvath, I. (2008) Differences between ‘Research In Design Context’ and ‘Design Inclusive Research’ in the Domain of Industrial Design Engineering, Journal of Design Research, vol. 7, no. 1, pp 61-83), the authors studied emotion measurement methods from background disciplines such as marketing, psychology and design sciences. The last decades, authors in these disciplines have tried to capture the mediating role of emotions on consumer responses in general (Desmet, P. (2002). Designing Emotions. Doctoral Dissertation, Technische Universiteit Delft, Delft.). For that reason, they can deliver valuable input for studying human behavior in a retail context. Given the multitude of existing emotion measurement instruments, it was necessary to set up criteria for selecting three research methods. First of all, the measurement instrument should have demonstrated an ability to yield plausible results. Second, the selected instrument needed to measure emotions in a format consistent with research practice, since the goal of the pilot study was to combine different emotion measurement methods. Third, the selected instrument needed to be applicable in a holistic retail setting. Consequently, the authors selected (i) the PAD framework1, frequently used in marketing (Pine, J. & Gilmore, J. (1999) The

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Experience Economy. Work is Theatre and Every Business a Stage, Harvard Business School Press, Boston) (ii) the Product Emotion Measurement Instrument (PrEmo), developed in the product design discipline and (iii) a free report task, which consists of asking customers to describe in their own words the emotions they experienced while visiting a store. (Desmet, P. (2002). Designing Emotions. Doctoral Dissertation, Technische Universiteit Delft, Delft). Before presenting the selected methods and the results of the pilot study, the authors already want to acknowledge here that next to the selected methods, various other emotion measurement instruments exist. In the Spring of 2009 the Verde Group, The Jay Baker Retailing Initiative at the Wharton School of Business and the Retail Council of Canada conducted research to explore the “WOW” shopping experience. This study, which is the sixth in Verde/Wharton’s series of retail experience studies, surveyed 1,006 North American shoppers to explore what constitutes “WOW” shopping experiences – those retail interactions that are particularly great, that surprise and delight the customer, and that build long term loyalty to a retailer. Specifically, it explored: • • • • How do shoppers define great Retail Experience How frequently do they occur? Do they vary by gender, age, country or store type? Which great experiences matter most to loyalty and a store’s bottom line?

Findings by Verde Group • Over 50% of shoppers have had a great shopping experience at some time. Great shopping experiences bring back shoppers

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75% of shoppers who have enjoyed a great experience with a specific retailer definitely intend to return to that retailer the next time they need a similar product or item. When shoppers encounter merely “standard” experiences at a store, their likelihood to return drops by over 65%.

Great shopping experiences drive store advocacy When a shopper enjoys great shopping, they are almost 80% more likely to definitely recommend the store to their friends and associates than those shoppers who experience “standard shopping.”

Shoppers talk about their great experiences Nearly 80% of shoppers who enjoy a great shopping experience will talk about it with their friends and associates. When they talk, they talk widely: on average, they’ll tell between four and five other people about their experience. And volume makes a difference. The higher the number of elements in a shopper’s great shopping experience, the more people they tell about the experience.

Which great experiences should a Retailer focus on in order to drive shopper loyalty?

Loyalty depends on “brand experience” and “engagement” Only two of the five great shopping experience categories – “Brand Experience” and “Engagement” – have a meaningful impact on shopper loyalty. Of these two, “Brand Experience” is the more important factor by nearly 40%.

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Retailers under-deliver on “brand experience” Although “Brand Experience” elements are by far the most important for creating shopper loyalty, they are less frequently experienced by shoppers. Retailers do a much better job at delivering “Engagement” experiences.

Age, gender and country of shopper define a great shopping experience. Older shoppers are harder to “wow”

The older the shopper, the less likely they are to report having great shopping experiences. And it takes more to deliver great shopping to older shoppers. On average, shoppers over 60 years of age require more than 11 great shopping elements to create a single great shopping experience – nearly 30% more than their younger counterparts.

Great has less impact on young shopper loyalty Although it is easier to “WOW” younger shoppers – particularly those 18 to 30 – delighting these shoppers has a lower loyalty payoff. In general, delivering great shopping to this age segment has a 25% lower loyalty return than does delivering great shopping to older shoppers.

Men talk more about ‘Great’ than Women When it comes to spreading the word about great shopping experiences, gender makes a difference. Although male and female shoppers are equally likely to tell someone when they’ve enjoyed great shopping, male shoppers talk more widely. On average, they will tell nearly 50% more people about their shopping experience.

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Women care more about ‘Great’ then men While great shopping experiences inspire men to speech, they inspire women to action and loyalty. Female shoppers who enjoy great shopping are 30% more loyal than their male counterparts, and are 25% more likely to return to the store where they enjoyed their great experience. • When a shopper enjoys a great shopping experience, store loyalty increases dramatically. •
                                   

Not all great shopping experiences are equal

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CHAPTER 3 EXPLANATION- CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
RETAIL EXPERIENCE
Experience design (XD) is the practice of designing products, processes, services, events, and environments with a focus placed on the quality of the user experience and culturally relevant solutions, with less emphasis placed on increasing and improving functionality of the design. An emerging discipline, experience design draws from many other disciplines including cognitive psychology and

perceptual, linguistics, cognitive design, hepatics, hazard design, architecture, analysis, product ethnography, brand

science, architecture and environmental design, theatre, information design, service

strategy, interaction

design, storytelling, heuristics, and design thinking. Experience design is not driven by a single design discipline. Instead, it requires a cross-discipline perspective that considers multiple aspects of the

brand/business/environment/experience from product, packaging and retail environment to the clothing and attitude of employees. Experience design seeks to develop the experience of a product, service, or event along any or all of the following dimensions: • • • Duration (Initiation, Immersion, Conclusion, and Continuation) Intensity (Reflex, Habit, Engagement) Breadth (Products, Services, Brands, Nomenclatures,

Channels/Environment/Promotion, and Price) • • Interaction (Passive < > Active < > Interactive) Triggers (All Human Senses, Concepts, and Symbols)
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Significance (Meaning, Status, Emotion, Price, and Function)

While it's unnecessary (or even inappropriate) for all experiences to be developed highly across all of these dimensions, the more in-depth and consistently a product or service is developed across them — the more responsive an offering is to a group's or individual's needs and desires (e.g., a customer) it's likely to be. Enhancing the affordance of a product or service, its interface with people, is key to commercial experience design.
 

DIMENSIONS OF RETAIL EXPERIENCE

Customer Service Store Design and Display Retail Experience Merchan dise Assortme nt

Pricing

Location

Communi cation Mix

 
Source: Gentile, C., Spiller, N. & Noci G

a) Store location The location of a retail store occupies an important place in retail strategy. It not only conveys the image of the store, but also influences the merchandise mix and the interior layout of the store. While the merchandise mix can be changed and prices can be adjusted, it is difficult to change the decision on store location.
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Traffic The traffic – pedestrian as well as vehicular – that passes the site is an important determinant of the potential sales that can be generated from a store. Accessibility of the market Accessibility of a market is defined in terms of the availability of public transport and road/local trains connections to the markets. It also takes into the frequency of the corresponding bus/train services and connectivity to the different parts of the city. All the exclusive outlets of Jealous 21 in Bangalore are located in busy areas, accessible easily to all public. Further the easy availability of transport facilitates makes the location really accessible for shopping. Visibility Jealous 21 is situated on main roads or very close to the main roads. To enhance the visibility it has put its sign board on the top of the building. The creative window displays, takes the visibility to the next step. Amenities Available The availability of basic amenities such as washrooms, trial rooms, drinking water, ample parking space (a factor slated to be gaining utmost importance recently) etc. plays an important role for attracting customers. Product Mix Offered The kind of product mix to be offered by the retailer is another important consideration. As mentioned earlier the main product line of Jealous 21 in clothing and other

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accessories comprising a vigilant mix of casual, stylish & trendy aspects. The shopping ambience of Jealous 21 reiterates the advantages of the location.
                                                                  HIGH VARIETY    LOW ASSORTMENT                                                                                           HIGH ASSORTMENT                                                           LOW VARIETY 

b) Pricing Since Jealous 21, being part of Future Group provides products to a potentially large number of customers at affordable prices; it falls in the High Turnover - Low Margin Category. Its offerings are made affordable to its target group- teenagers and college students.
                                                                  HIGH TURNOVER                LOW MARGIN                                                                                           HIGH MARGIN                                                           LOW TURNOVER   

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c) Layout Exterior Store Design The location of the buildings is very prominent. It has a modern look which is further enhanced by the silver finish as well as the pink/red colour appropriately resembling the brand. The name Jealous 21 at the top of the buildings further enhances the store’s visibility. The important considerations of a store design are; the clothes and accessories available in the store should be nicely put up at the windows of the building. At night the building should be brightly lit up. The focus should be largely on the name plate at the top. The entrance must have an automatic door closing system. There should always be someone to greet the customers entering the shop. At the entrance must be the baggage counter& also a wheel chair for the disabled. As one proceeds, there should be a customer grievances desk and a counter for loyalty card members. A couch must also be placed near the desk, which is really comforting in case of a queue. Interior Store Design Flooring and Ceiling The interior layout generates good brand associations through appropriate color combinations. The white colour of the walls and floor coupled with the Pink colour of the visual merchandise helps in portraying the brand effectively. Graphics and Sign gages The store must have clearly put up signage to various sections such as the new arrival section, the sale area, the washroom, the trial room, grievance section etc...Even the
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promotional schemes must be displayed in a manner to attract the customers and provide clarity of information. Atmospherics: • Lighting Good lighting in a store involves more than illuminating space. Lighting is used to highlight merchandise, sculpt face and capture a mood feeling that enhances the store image. White lighting has been majorly used in the store so that the customers can identify the requisite colours of the apparels. • Sound type and density Instrumental music is played over loud music in the store making the shopping environmental more serene and calm. Latest songs that connect more to the TG should be played in the store to enhance the Retail shopping experience of customers, as the TG of Jealous 21 is the youthful audience who usually hum along with the tunes in the background. • Odour type and density Like sound, odour too has a negative or positive impact on the atmosphere of the store. The strength (density) of the odour is also important. This is because, even if the odour is right but too strong or intense, the ultimate impact generated by it is negative. A girly smell in the store would go along with the pink theme and also appeal to the girly customers. The Ambience also includes any other factors that enhance the mood and spirit of the place for example, during Diwali: lamps; Christmas: Christmas Tree etc....

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d) Visual Merchandising Merchandise Type and Density One can come across campaign graphics in the store with merchandise places near them. Mannequins are displayed with accessories to generate impulse purchases. Spot lights are also focused on the visual merchandise so as to gain the attention of the customers. Jealous 21 focuses on the latest fashion apparels. No rack is kept empty as it may create a negative impression in the minds of the customers. E.g. Concerning the T shirts department, one t shirt of a particular colour or design is displayed, while next to it, on a shelf the same T shirt but with different colours is displayed.

Fixtures Detachable fixtures with smooth edges are maintained in the store for flexibility and easy change.

Packaging The Products purchased by the Customers are packed in pink coloured recyclable plastic bags.

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e) Services and Personal selling An organization may charge a high price for the high level of service it provides to the customers or it may charge a low price for a low quality of service provided by the same. High service – Low Price and Low Service – High Price aspects are not seen as they epitomize competitive failure. Concerning Jealous 21, the service is of a very high quality. The prices may be considered as medium to high depending upon the kind of product one wants to avail of. However as compared to the competitors, the brand definitely has a distinct advantage in terms of service. A myriad of services are offered by pantaloons, some of them are discussed below: Payment Facilities Every shopper is allowed to make payments for their purchases by Credit Cards, debit cards as well as cash. All Major Credit Cards and Debit Cards are accepted in the store. Gift Packaging At the entrance of the store, near the Customer Service desk, there is a gift wrapping counter which provides the service of gift packing Alterations and home delivery If any alterations are to be made in the clothes purchased, the same is carried out at absolutely no cost. If the customer is a green card holder or a member of Club 21, the apparels are delivered at his/her place subject to certain conditions.

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CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MANAGEMENT
Customer experience is the sum of all experiences a customer has with a supplier of goods or services, over the duration of their relationship with that supplier. It includes awareness, discovery, attraction, interaction, purchase, use, cultivation and advocacy. It can also be used to mean an individual experience over one transaction; the distinction is usually clear in context. The goal of customer experience management (CEM) is to move customers from satisfied to loyal and then from loyal to advocate. Traditionally, managing the customer relationship has been the domain of Customer Relationship Management (CRM). However, CRM strategies and solutions are designed to focus on product, price and enterprise process, with minimal or no focus on customer need and desire. The result is a sharp mismatch between the organisation’s approach to customer expectations and what customers actually want, resulting in the failure of many CRM implementations. Where CRM is enterprise-focused and designed to manage customers for maximum efficiency, CEM is a strategy that focuses the operations and processes of a business around the needs of the individual customer.

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How Jealous 21 can achieve effective CEM s t St trategic CE – Strat EM tegic CEM allows co ompanies to develop a customer o r-centric str rategy by u understandin key drive of custo ng ers omer satisfac ction. TNS helps organ nisations im mprove thei overall bu ir usiness performance and achieve long-term customer retention a e r by listening to their c y customers. Aligning business pro b ocesses to match the overall e cu ustomer ex xperience w with the c customer expectation helps to ensure lo e ong-term pr rofitability and sustain nability. St trategic CE is cruci as it en EM ial nsures a su uccessful on ngoing rel lationship by taking a broad g der view on all t touch poin nts and in nterdependencies. Ta actical CEM – Tactic CEM i a rich re M cal is esource allowing you to get im u mmediate fe eedback from your cust m tomers and quickly rea on a one act e-to-one clie basis. TNS uses ent T fe eedback fro complai managem om int ment progr rammes as well as inf formation collected c from custom interactions with va mer arious touch points. In addition t enabling a quick n to re esponse to d dissatisfied or defectin clients, it allows the business to pinpoint and fix ng i t pr rocesses.

So ource: Philip K Kotler, Marketing Management (13th Edition) e m i

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One of the key features of successful CEM implementations is their ability to manage multi-channel interactions. Customer experience solutions address the cross-channel (contact centre, Internet, self service, mobile devices, brick and mortar stores), crosstouch point (phone, chat, email, Web, in-person), and cross-lifecycle (ordering, fulfilment, billing, support, etc.) nature of the customer experience process. By contrast, CRM solutions tend to offer point solutions for specific customer-facing functions such as, but not limited to, sales force automation, customer analytics, and campaign management.

What When How Monitored Who Uses the Information Relevance to Future Performance

CEM

Captures and distributes what a customer thinks about a company

At points of customer interaction: “touch points”

Surveys, targeted studies, observa tional studies, “voice of customer” research

Business or functional leaders, in order to create fulfillable expectations and better experiences with products and services Customer-facing groups such as sales, marketing, field service, and customer service, in order to drive more efficient and effective execution

Leading: Locates places to add offerings in the gaps between expectations and experience

CRM

Captures and distributes what a company knows about a customer

After there is a record of a customer interaction

Point-of-sales data, market research, Web site clickthrough, automated tracking of sales

Lagging: Drives cross selling by bundling products in demand with ones that aren’t

Source: Philip Kotler, Marketing Management (13th Edition)

CEM=Customer Experience Management CRM= Customer Relationship Management There are three patterns of customer experience information, each with its own pace and level of data collection.

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DIMENSIONS OF EXPECTATION
There is an interesting aspect which is worth mentioning when target segment expectations are discussed. There may be a few situations where the retail outlet may cater to a broad segment (a typical example could be McDonald's outlets all over the world). Such a situation is possible when a brand with a specific expectation appeals to a large segment. For example, McDonald's is known all over the world for its value, cleanliness and convenience. These expectations have been built over a period of time and hence, it draws consumers from all income groups, age groups and lifestyle groups. Even a brand like McDonalds today offers a variety which could appeal to distinctive segments.

An outlet should research the target segment and identify specific dimensions which could be developed to attract consumers. Convenience for a fast food outlet, fast checkout during peak hours for a departmental store and variety for a music store are some dimensions which could be important. In a context where the lifestyle is fast-paced and complex with several kinds of pressures, an emerging dimension is the need to enjoy atmospherics and shop at leisure. Shoppers' Stop has positioned itself on this dimension. It highlighted the total enjoyable shopping experience in its visuals and this was backed up by an ambience covering a large space (apart from product variety and attention to consumers). The expectations from a shopping experience were conveyed powerfully by advertisements which were executed in black and white (unlike the visual colour ones). There were also advertisements in which customers talked of their experience. After having created an association with enjoyable shopping experience (to be the first in the retail ladder on this aspect), the outlet also takes care to ensure that this association does not get diluted. For instance, when a sale is planned, it is conducted
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through an event and not labelled as a sale. Fountainhead, the Chennai-based book store, has also positioned itself as a leisurely shopping experience - a differentiator among several other book stores.

Expectations grow and change with changes in the environment. The concept of outlet malls (normally situated on the outskirts of the city) is another point-of-purchase retailing option which is becoming popular in western markets. These malls have outlets managed by manufacturers which offer good shopping experience apart from offering merchandise (not damaged ones) at a discounted price. Large layouts, open spaces and comfortable car parks apart from lower prices attract a specific segment to these outlets.

CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MAP
There are six dimensions and three components of experience the map should capture. These represent important reference points for features of the service design – e.g. how the service is found, who uses it, what they’re looking for, what information they use, who and what is of most help etc. By capturing these experiential aspects we ensure the customers’ voice is represented as the service is designed and implemented. 6 Dimensions: These dimensions help extract content for the map and generate conversation during the mapping. The responses help in considering what is to be recommended in the design. (Amber Lindholm) 1. Time/duration 2. Interactivity 3. Intensity 4. Breadth/consistency 5. Sensoral/cognitive triggers
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6. Siginificance/meaning 3 components: These represent the key content of the map itself. Simply put what people: 1. Think 2. Do 3. Use

MEASURING EMOTIONS IN CUSTOMER EXPERIENCES IN RETAIL STORE ENVIRONMENTS
Trying to measure emotions, triggered by consumption activities in general, has proven not to be an easy task. Authors who tried to measure emotional states that occurred during consumption have most frequently used emotion measurement instruments developed by emotion theorists. However, the question which is the appropriate way to measure these kinds of emotional states is still a matter of debate. By working according to the principles of ‘Research In Design’, the authors studied emotion measurement methods from background disciplines such as marketing, psychology and design sciences. The last decades, authors in these disciplines have tried to capture the mediating role of emotions on consumer responses in general. For that reason, they can deliver valuable input for studying human behaviour in a retail context. Given the multitude of existing emotion measurement instruments, it was necessary to set up criteria for selecting three research methods. First of all, the measurement instrument should have demonstrated an ability to yield plausible results. Second, the selected instrument needed to measure emotions in a format consistent with research practice, since the goal of the pilot study was to combine different emotion measurement methods. Third, the selected instrument needed to be applicable in a holistic retail setting. Consequently, the authors selected (i) the PAD framework1, frequently used in marketing (ii) the Product Emotion Measurement

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Instrument (PrEmo), developed in the product design discipline and (iii) a free report task, which consists of asking customers to describe in their own words the emotions they experienced while visiting a store. Before presenting the selected methods and the results of the pilot study, the authors already want to acknowledge here that next to the selected methods, various other emotion measurement instruments exist

PAD model (Pleasure, Arousal, Dominance)

During the last decennia, research on ‘atmospherics’ [14] has made clear that isolated environmental cues in retail store environments can evoke emotional responses in customers, and that such emotional responses can, in turn, influence customer’s retail patronage and store loyalty [21]. Hence, marketing researchers adopted different methodologies for measuring emotions from the discipline of psychology. This section focuses on the ‘Pleasure- Arousal-Dominance’ paradigm of Mehrabian & Russell (1974), since this framework has been frequently employed in the study of effects of environmental cues in retail stores on emotions. Based on the Stimulus (S) – Organism (O) – Response (R) model, Mehrabian & Russell [15] proposed a model which relates features of the environment (S) to behavioural responses within the environment (R), which are mediated by the individual’s (O) emotional states induced by the environment.

Source: Mehrabian & Russell, 1974

Mehrabian & Russell stated that three basic emotional dimensions (Pleasure, Arousal and Dominance) provide a general description of emotions, generated by (stimuli in) an environment. ‘Pleasure’ is considered as the degree to which a person feels good, joyful
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or happy, whereas ‘arousal’ is defined as the degree to which a person feels excited, stimulated, alert or active. ‘Dominance’ is described as the degree to which the person feels unrestricted or in control of the situation. Mehrabian & Russell hypothesize that these emotional states mediate a person’s approach or avoidance responses to the environment, whereby ‘approach responses’ imply that individuals react positively to the environment (eg. desire to stay longer in the retail store). ‘Avoidance responses’ on the other hand are characterized by an aversion to the environment (eg. desire to leave the store). The PAD scale was designed to capture information concerning the pleasure, arousal and dominance dimensions, underlying emotional states. Therefore, it does not allow a researcher to identify specific emotional states, as experienced by research participants. In 1982, Donovan & Rossiter implemented Mehrabian & Russell’s framework into retailing and service settings. Since then, the PAD framework has been widely used in marketing and consumer research. In practice, the PAD measure consists of three separate dimensions (pleasure, arousal and dominance), which are assessed using six semantic differential items. Every item from the different dimensions is measured on a 7-point scale. For the purpose of this study, the authors used the translated version of the PAD questionnaire, developed by Brengman.

The Product Emotion Measurement Instrument (PrEmo)

The Product Emotion Measurement Instrument (or ‘PrEmo’) was specifically designed to measure emotions, elicited by the appearance of a product. It is a visual self-report emotion measurement instrument, which uses animated puppets to portray a wellconsidered selection of 14 emotions. PrEmo was developed ‘to combine the advantages of existing verbal and non-verbal self-report instruments’. Different from the dimensional PAD scale, PrEmo measures respondents’ distinct and mixed emotions without obliging respondents to verbalize their emotions. Next to this requirement for
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the instrument, Desmet also stipulated that PrEmo needed to be intuitive, fast and pleasurable.
Open-ended questionnaire

The third measurement instrument which the authors selected for the present study consisted of asking customers to describe in their own words the emotions they experienced while visiting the selected stores. Similar to the PAD scale, an open-ended questionnaire can be classified as a verbal self-report instrument for measuring emotions. In contrast to the PAD questionnaire, however, this measurement instrument allows participants to formulate an answer in their own terminology.

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CHAPTER 4 METHODOLOGY ADOPTED
RESEARCH DESIGN
Causal research seeks to find cause and effect relationships between variables. It accomplishes this goal through laboratory and field experiments. In this particular research the cause and effect relationship can be understood through the following equation:

Y= a+bx

Where Y= Impact on Brand Jealous 21 a= constant X= various dimensions of Retail Experience b= co-efficient of x

METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION
The study is relied on primary as well as secondary data. 

Secondary Data: Before going through the time and expense of collecting primary data, one should check for secondary data that previously may have been collected for other purposes but that can be used in the immediate study. Secondary data may be internal to the firm, such as sales invoices and warranty cards, or may be external to the firm such as published data or commercially available data. The government census is a valuable source of secondary data. Secondary data has the advantage of saving time and reducing data
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gathering costs. The disadvantages are that the data may not fit the problem perfectly and that the accuracy may be more difficult to verify for secondary data than for primary data. Some secondary data is republished by organizations other than the original source. Because errors can occur and important explanations may be missing in republished data, one should obtain secondary data directly from its source. One also should consider who the source is and whether the results may be biased.There are several criteria that one should use to evaluate secondary data.

• Whether the data is useful in the research study.

• How current the data is and whether it applies to time period of interest.

• Errors and accuracy - whether the data is dependable and can be verified.

• Presence of bias in the data.

• Specifications and methodologies used, including data collection method, response rate, quality and analysis of the data, sample size and sampling technique, and questionnaire design.

• Objective of the original data collection.

• Nature of the data, including definition of variables, units of measure, categories used, and relationships examined.

The secondary data for this project was obtained from the marketing division of Pantaloons, Future Group- Indus League Pvt. Ltd, previous research projects and their findings.

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Primary Data Often, secondary data must be supplemented by primary data originated specifically for the study at hand. Some common types of primary data are: • demographic and socioeconomic characteristics • psychological and lifestyle characteristics • attitudes and opinions • awareness and knowledge - for example, brand awareness • Intentions - for example, purchase intentions. • motivation - a person's motives are more stable than his/her behaviour,

Primary data can be obtained by communication or by observation. Communication involves questioning respondents either verbally or in writing. This method is versatile, since one needs only to ask for the information; however, the response may not be accurate. Communication usually is quicker and cheaper than observation. Observation involves the recording of actions and is performed by either a person or some mechanical or electronic device. Observation is less versatile than communication since some attributes of a person may not be readily observable, such as attitudes, awareness, knowledge, intentions, and motivation. Observation also might take longer since observers may have to wait for appropriate events to occur, though observation using scanner data might be quicker and more cost effective. Observation typically is more accurate than communication. Customer oriented Surveys through Questionnaires and Observation techniques in Exclusive Jealous Brand outlets, Pantaloons & Bangalore Central format stores have been used to design the questionnaire and complete this study. Customer surveys and observation techniques in other branded jeans outlets
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Universe The research work was accomplished in only the exclusive Brand outlets of Jealous 21 in Bangalore City only. Sample Size Sample size was 200 respondents.

Statistical Tools Used 
For the purpose of data analysis, Percentage Method is used for calculation and result was  interpreted.                                                    No. of Respondents                          Percentage =   ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐×100                                             Total Respondents            

SAMPLING METHODS ADOPTED
Company Selection- This case study is aimed at exploring the brand identity of Jealous 21, a brand of Jeans pants for teenage girls. The reason for choosing Jealous 21 is because it is a popular brand within the TG and an established label under Pantaloons Retail, a wing of Future Group. Respondent Selection- This research will be limited to the geographic boundaries of Bangalore City. Girls between the age group of 15 and 28 will be approached for the surveys. Interviews will also involve store managers, rigorous shoppers etc... Convenience sample selection will be used due to time constrains.

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DATA COLLECTION TOOLS
• • • Focus Group Discussions Observation Questionnaires

QUESTIONNAIRE DESIGN
The questionnaire is an important tool for gathering primary data. Poorly constructed questions can result in large errors and invalidate the research data, so significant effort has been put into the questionnaire design. The questionnaire was tested thoroughly prior to conducting the survey. Measurement Scales Attributes can be measured on nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio scales: • Nominal numbers are simply identifiers, with the only permissible mathematical use being for counting. Example: social security numbers. • Ordinal scales are used for ranking. The interval between the numbers conveys no meaning. Median and mode calculations can be performed on ordinal numbers. Example: class ranking • Interval scales maintain an equal interval between numbers. These scales can be used for ranking and for measuring the interval between two numbers. Since the zero point is arbitrary, ratios cannot be taken between numbers on an interval scale; however, mean, median, and mode are all valid. Example: temperature scale

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Ratio scales are referenced to an absolute zero values, so ratios between numbers on the scale are meaningful. In addition to mean, median, and mode, geometric averages also are valid. Example: weight

Attitude Measurement Many of the questions in a marketing research survey are designed to measure attitudes. Attitudes are a person's general evaluation of something. Customer attitude is an important factor for the following reasons: • • • • • Attitude helps to explain how ready one is to do something. Attitudes do not change much over time. Attitudes produce consistency in behavior. Attitudes can be related to preferences. Attitudes can be measured using the following procedures:

Self-reporting - subjects are asked directly about their attitudes. Self-reporting is the most common technique used to measure attitude. Observation of behaviour - assuming that one's behaviour is a result of one's attitudes, attitudes can be inferred by observing behaviour. Indirect techniques - use unstructured stimuli such as word association tests. Performance of objective tasks - assumes that one's performance depends on attitude. Physiological reactions - subject's response to stimuli is measured using electronic or mechanical means. While the intensity can be measured, it is difficult to know if the attitude is positive or negative.

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Multiple measures - a mixture of techniques can be used to validate the findings, especially worthwhile when self-reporting is used. The self reporting & observation techniques have been used for this study. There are several types of attitude rating scales: • Equal-appearing interval scaling - a set of statements are assembled. These statements are selected according to their position on an interval scale of favorableness. Statements are chosen that has a small degree of dispersion. Respondents then are asked to indicate with which statements they agree. • Likert method of summated ratings - a statement is made and the respondents indicate their degree of agreement or disagreement on a five point scale (Strongly Disagree, Disagree, Neither Agree Nor Disagree, Agree, Strongly Agree). • Semantic differential scale - a scale is constructed using phrases describing attributes of the product to anchor each end. For example, the left end may state, "Hours are inconvenient" and the right end may state, "Hours are convenient". The respondent then marks one of the seven blanks between the statements to indicate his/her opinion about the attribute. • Stapel Scale - similar to the semantic differential scale except that 1) points on the scale are identified by numbers, 2) only one statement is used and if the respondent disagrees a negative number should marked, and 3) there are 10 positions instead of seven. This scale does not require that bipolar adjectives be developed and it can be administered by telephone.

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Q-sort technique - the respondent if forced to construct a normal distribution by placing a specified number of cards in one of 11 stacks according to how desirable he/she finds the characteristics written on the cards.

A modified version of the Likert scale has been used for the questionnaire. The modification is due to the fact of making the questionnaire more interesting amongst the target group of youngsters. 

VALIDITY & RELIABILITY
The validity of a test is the extent to which differences in scores reflect differences in the measured characteristic. Predictive validity is a measure of the usefulness of a measuring instrument as a predictor. Proof of predictive validity is determined by the correlation between results and actual behaviour. Construct validity is the extent to which a measuring instrument measures what it intends to measure. Reliability is the extent to which a measurement is repeatable with the same results. A measurement may be reliable and not valid. However, if a measurement is valid, then it also is reliable and if it is not reliable, then it cannot be valid. One way to show reliability is to show stability by repeating the test with the same results. The validity of this survey is proved as there is perfect correlation between the actual behaviour and the results of this study. Also the data collected and the results are reliable as there is high level of stability in the survey undertaken.

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CHAPTER 5 DATA ANALYSIS
Research in retail is very essential, as customer preferences and choices are dynamic and change frequently, the retail company needs to understand these before redesigning its processes for enhancing business and many more. Since customer interaction takes place at the store and near store, there is a big opportunity to gather first hand information and feedback from customers through research and survey. Research is carried out at the retail level for concept testing, business feasibility analysis, identification of the right product mix, target customer and market potential. The major objectives of analysis of data are:• • • • • To evaluate and enhance data quality Describe the study population and its relationship Examine effects of other relevant factors Seek further insight into the relationship observed or not observed Evaluate impact and importance

Before analysis could be performed, the raw data was transformed into the right format. First, it was edited so that errors could be corrected or omitted. The data was then coded; this procedure converted the edited raw data into numbers or symbols.

Finally, the data was tabulated to count the number of samples falling into various categories. Simple tabulations count the occurrences of each variable independently of the other variables. Cross tabulations, also known as contingency tables or cross tabs, treats two or more variables simultaneously.

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ASSUMPTIONS
• • • All online respondents have been considered as customers of Bangalore Data collected over the period of 3 weeks, which includes the Diwali Weekend. General Perception of customers is considered to be the opinions they have formed about retail experience by visiting other retail showrooms, i.e, competitors of Jealous 21, such as Levis, Lee, Wrangler etc…. • • 200 respondents are considered as the Population for the purpose of this survey. Where ever outlet specific analysis is not done, it is assumed that there is a std facility/activity observed in all the outlets. Eg: Music, Colour & Lighting, Billing procedure etc… • The following phrases from the questionnaire are considered to mean the same for the purpose of this study: Rank 1 2 3 4 5 = = = = = General Perception No, Not at all Doesn’t make a difference Yes to some extent Yes to a large extent Definitely, without doubt = = = = = Jealous 21 Kinda Ok Ok Hmmm, Not Bad Pretty Cool Damn Neat Superb

DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS
Descriptive statistics describe the main features of a collection of data quantitatively. Descriptive statistics are used to describe the basic features of the data in a study. They provide simple summaries about the sample and the measures.

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1. Window Displays enhancing the Shopping experience o y n p r
Rank  R 1  2  3  4  5  All values are expressed in n terms of % Rank  R Brigade  B Jay yanagar  2.5 5 8 3.5 2 General Per rception  2 13 49.5 27.5 8 Jealous 21  11 19.5 49.5 12.5 7.5

CMH 2.5  3.5  20  3  1 

Cosmos Mall  a 2 2 9.5 2.5 3

1  4 2  9 3  12 4  3.5 5  1.5 All values are expressed in n terms of %
.5% 49.5% 49.

5 50 4 45 4 40 3 35 3 30 2 25 2 20 1 15 1 10 5 0 1

50 45 40 35 Ge eneral  Perception Jea alous 21 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 Cosmos Mall CMH Jayanagar Brigade

2

3

4

5

   Bar Graph h 1        Ba ar Graph 2 

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: B Graph 1 shows th in gener custom Bar hat ral, mers voted r rank 3 for window di isplays, and Jealous 21 has also scored the highest res d sponse as ra 3. Bar graph 2 ank de enotes that within rank 3, the CM road sho k MH owroom ran highest, with 20% share in nks , window display. w

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e 2. Ambience effect on Retail experience
Rank  R Gen neral Percep ption  2.5 14.5 30 34 19 Jealous 21 12 21.5 47.5 12.5 6.5

1  2  3  4  5  All values are expressed in n terms of %  
47 7.5%

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1 2

34%

General Perception Jealous 21

3

4

5

  Bar Grap ph 3 

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: F From Bar G Graph 3, it is noted that the gen t neral percep ption of cu ustomers re egarding Am mbience hav ving an effe on Shopp ect ping Experi ience is to a large exten (Rank nt 4) However Jealous 2 scores h ). r, 21 high on Ra 3 (Prett Cool) an lags beh ank ty nd hind the ge eneral expec ctation of cu ustomers.

3. Conne of TG w Backgr ect with round Mus that enh sic hances Shop pping Experience e
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Rank  R 1  2  3  4 

Gen neral Percep ption  2.5 14.5 30 34 4 19

Jealous 2 21  12 21.5 47.5 25 13

5  All values are expressed in n terms of %

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1 2

47.5%

34% %

Ge eneral Percept tion Jea alous 21

3

4

5

Bar Grap ph 4 

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: F From Bar G Graph 4, it is noted that the gen t neral percep ption of cu ustomers re egarding Ba ackground M Music havi an effec on Shop ing ct pping Exper rience is to a large o ex xtent (Rank 4) with 34 Howeve Jealous 21 scores 4 k 4%. er, 47.5% on R Rank 3 (Pret Cool) tty an lags behi the gene expecta nd ind eral ation of cust tomers.

4. Effect of Staff on the Retail Experienc of Shopp t n l ce pers
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Rank  R 1  2  3  4 

General Perce eption  2 14.5 32 35.5 16

Jealous 21 1  14 23.5 31.5 20 11

5  All values are expressed in n terms of %
40

35.5%
35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1 2 3 4 5
General Perception Jealou us 21

31.5% 3

Bar Grap ph 5 

So ource: Prim mary Data ption of cu In nference: F From Bar G Graph 5, it is noted that the gen t neral percep ustomers re egarding the staff at the showroom having an effect on th Shopping Experience; is to a e e m he g la arge extent ( (Rank 4) with 35.5% r respondents voting on it. However, 31.5% of Jealous s f 21 customers rank the staff with Rank 3 (P 1 s Pretty Cool) and lags behind the general ) ex xpectation o customers. of
 

5. Colou & Lighting effect o Retail ex ur on xperience

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Rank  R 1  2  3  4 

Genera al Perception n  0.5 0 12 2.5 46 4 26 6.5 14 4.5

Jealous s 21  7.5 14.5 36 20.5 21.5

5  All values are expressed in n terms of %

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1 2

46%

36%

Gener ralPerception Jealou us 21

3

4

5

  Bar Grap ph 6   

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: F From Bar Gr raph 6, it is noted that the general perception of 46% cu s l n ustomers sa that colo & lighti in the sh ays our ing howroom has an effect on their Sh t hopping Experience to some extent (Rank 3) Jealous 2 also scor highest on Rank 3 (Pretty Coo when o ). 21 res ol) 36 of the c 6% customers r ranked the p pink theme and lightin in the st ng tores. Howe ever, the av verage ranki is a bit l ing lower than t custome expectations. the er

6. Store Layout & A Arrangeme of Merc ent chandise im mpacting R Retail Experience
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Gen neral Percep ption  1  2  3  4  5  All values are expressed in n terms of % Rank  R

Rank  R

Jealous 21 1  0 13.5 46 6 27.5 13 5 27 38 19.5 10.5

Brigade e  Ja ayanagar  1  2.5 2  11.5 3  10 4  7.5 5  2.5 All values are expressed in n terms of %

CMH H  0 7.5 6 3 3 1.5  3.5  16  4.5  2 

Cosmos Mall  a 1 4.5 6 4.5 3

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1 2

46 6% 38%

General  Perception Jealous 21

40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5
Brig gade Cos smos  Ma all CM MH

16%

Jay yanagar

3

4

5

0 1 2 3 4 5

  Bar Graph h 7     

  Bar Graph h 8 

 

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: B Graph 7 shows that in general customers v Bar t voted rank 3 for store layout & l ar rrangement of merchan ndise, and Jealous 21 has also s scored the h highest resp ponse as ra 3 but w an aver ank with rage ranking difference of 8%. Ba graph 2 denotes tha within g e ar at ra 3, the C ank CMH road s showroom r ranks highe with 16 share in the store layout & est, 6% n l ar rrangement aspects.

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7. Impac of Choice & Va ct ariety of Merchandise in appropriate sizes on s p Shopp ping experi ience
Rank  R Gen neral Percep ption  0 2 29 9.5 24 44 4.5 Jealous s 21  14 12 51 11 12

1  2  3  4  5  All values are expressed in n terms of % Rank  R Brig gade 

Jayanagar  J 4 2 12.5 1.5 1

CM MH  2.5 5  2 2  16.5 5  2.5 5  5.5 5 

Cosmos Mall  0 2 11.5 2.5 3

1  7.5 2  6 3  10.5 4  4.5 5  2.5 All values are expressed in n terms of %

60 51% 50 40 30 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 Ge eneral  Pe erception Jea alous 21 44. .5%

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 16.5% Cosmos s Mall CMH Jayanag gar Brigade e

   Bar Graph h 9      Bar Graph h 10 

 

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: F From Bar G Graph 9 we can understand that e even though 51% resp h pondents ha ranked Jealous 21 as Pretty C ave Cool (Rank 3) on Choic & variety of mercha 3 ce y andise, it is short of th general p he perception th is 44.5% who expe Rank 5. Bar Graph 10 says hat % ect h th the maximum proportion (16% of rank 3 for choice & variety is availabl in the hat %) y le CM road sh MH howroom.
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8. Placem ment of Of ffers, Prom & othe commun mos er nication material in the store a h that h an impa on Reta Experien has act ail nce
Rank  R Gen neral Percep ption  1 11 35 5.5 32 2.5 20 Jealous s 21  19.5 19.5 33 22 6

1  2  3  4  5  All values are expressed in n terms of %
40 4

35.5%
35 3 30 3 25 2 20 2 15 1 10 1 5 0 1 2 3 4 5
Gene eral Perception n Jealo ous 21

33% %

 

Bar Grap ph 11 

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: F From Bar Gr raph 11, it i noted that the genera perception of custom says is t al n mers th placement of offers and promo in the sh hat s os howroom ha an effect on their Shopping as t S Ex xperience to a large ex o xtent (Rank 3). Jealous 21 also sc s cores highes on Rank 3 (Pretty st Cool) when customers were asked to rank th positioni of the offers, prom d he ing motions, co ontests and other comm munication m material. Ho owever, the average ra e anking is a bit lower b th the custo han omer expec ctations, by a mere 2.5% %.

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9. Trial Room experience effecting Shopping experience e e p r
Rank  R Gen neral Percep ption  2.5 9.5 43 27.5 17.5 Jealous 21 1  4.5 9.5 34.5 38 13.5

1  2  3  4  5  All values are expressed in n terms of % 43% %

45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1 2

38%

General Perc ception Jealous 21

3

4

5

 

Bar Graph 12 

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: Bar Graph 12 denote that the Trial Room experience of custo h es m omers at Je ealous 21 ex xceeds the general per rception by an astound y ding 10.5% Jealous 21 scores %. Rank 4 (Dam Neat) w 38% o responden voting, while the general imp mn with of nts portance gi iven to trial room expe l erience is on Rank 3 (affects to some exten with 43% voting nly nt) % fo the same. or

  60   

10. The effect Fellow customers have on the retail experience f w r
Gen neral Percep ption  1  2  3  4  5  All values are expressed in n terms of % Rank  R Brig gade  Rank  R Jealous 21 25.5 38.5 17.5 18.5 0 15.5 23.5 42 12.5 6.5

Jayan nagar  4 11 18 6 3

CMH  8 10 15 5 2

Cosmos Mall  5 4 16 7 6

1  14  2  22  3  35  4  7  5  2  All values are expressed in n terms of %

45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1

42% 38.5 5%

90 9 80 8 70 7 60 6
General  Per rception Jea alous 21 Co osmos  Mall CM MH Jayanagar Br rigade

50 5 40 4 30 3 20 2 10 1 0

35%

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

  Bar Graph h 13       Bar Graph h 14 

  

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: F From Bar G Graph 13 w can infer that the Fellow custo we r omers at Jea alous 21 stores are aw warded Rank 4 by 42% customers whereas the general pe k w e erception say that it ys matters only to a small extent (R m l Rank 3). Also, it is no ote-worthy that some 6.5% of re espondents have actual rated Je lly ealous 21 at Rank 5. Bar Graph 14 shows that the a hi ighest propo ortion of the votes (35% go to the Brigade ro showroom for its customer e %) e oad c pr rofile.

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11. Billing Procedure having an impact on the shopping experience g r p i
Rank  R 1  2  3  4  5  All values are expressed in n terms of % Gen neral Percep ption  8 30 38 19 5 Jealous 21 12.5 25 42.5 14 6

45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1 2

42 2.5% 38%

Genera al Perception Jealous s 21

3

4

5

  Bar Graph 15 

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: B Graph 1 denotes t the bill Bar 15 that ling experie ence of custo omers at Jealous 21 sc cored Rank 3 (Pretty C Cool) accord ding to 42.5% of the cu ustomers wh is very close to hich th general p he perception of custome It however oversh the gen ers. hot neral percep ption by 4.5%.

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12. Impact of Parking on the Retail Experience c n
Rank  R Gen neral Percep ption  12.5 18 42 9.5 18 Jealous 21 36.5 28 16.5 16 3

1  2  3  4  5  All values are expressed in n terms of % Rank  R Brigade 

Jayanagar  J 7.5 6 3 3.5 1

CM MH  6.5  6.5  3.5  2.5  0.5 

1 20 2 10.5 3 4.5 4 3 5 0.5 All values are expressed in n terms of %

Cosmos Mall  2.5 5 5.5 7 1

45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1 2 36.5%

42%

Ge eneral  Perception 16.5% Jea alous 21

3

4

5

 

40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 7% Cosmo os Mall CMH Jayana agar Brigad de

  63   

 

Bar Graph 16 

 

 

 

Bar Graph 17 

Source: Primary Data Inference: From Bar Graph 16 we can infer that the Parking facilities at Jealous 21 stores is not good as 36.5% voted on Rank 1, whereas the general perception of 42% customers; think Parking facilities affect their retail experience to quite an extent (Rank 3). Bar Graph 17 shows that 7%, of Rank 4 goes to the showroom in Cosmos Mall on parking facility aspects. The parking facility on Brigade Road has scored the lowest ranking. 13. Summary of all factors of Retail Experience in the General Perception
Influence of Factors Window Display Background Music Colour & Lighting Store Layout Offers & Promotions Trial Room Other Customers Billing Procedure

Ambience

Staff

Parking

No, Not at all Doesn’t make a difference Yes, to some extent Yes, to a large extent Definitely, Without doubt

2

0

2.5

2

0.5

0

1

2.5

25.5

8

12.5

13

0.5

14.5

14.5

12.5

13.5

11

9.5

38.5

30

18

49.5

37.5

30

32

46

46

35.5

43

17.5

38

42

27.5

41

34

35.5

26.5

27.5

32.5

27.5

18.5

19

9.5

8

21

19

16

14.5

13

20

17.5

0

5

18

All values are expressed in terms of % 

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100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

41% 49.5%

% 34% 35.5% 38.5% 46% 46% % 35.5% 43%

38% 3

42%

Definite ely, Without d doubt Yes, to a large extent t Yes, to some extent Doesn’t t make a difer rence No, Not t at all

  Bar Graph 18 

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: T Genera Perceptio of all the factors of Retail expe The al on e erience, rep presented in Bar Graph 18 is summ n h marized in T Table 1 & 2 below.

Table 1 Factor influencing Re F etail Exper rience Window Disp W plays Ambience A Background M Music St taff Colour & Lig ghting St tore Layout t xtent of Inf fluence Ex Ye to some Extent es, Ye to a larg extent es, ge Ye to a larg Extent es, ge Ye to a larg Extent es, ge Ye to some Extent es, Ye to some Extent es,

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Offers & Promotions Trial Room Other Customers Billing Procedure Parking

Yes, to some Extent Yes, to some Extent Doesn’t make a difference Yes, to some Extent Yes, to some Extent

Table 2 Extent of Influence Definitely, Without Doubt Yes, to a large extent Yes, to some extent Factor Influencing Retail Experience Ambience Staff & Background Music Window Displays, Colour & Lighting, Store Layout, Trial Room, Parking & Offers & promotions Doesn’t make a difference No, Not at all Billing Procedure Other Customers

14. Summary of all factors of Retail Experience at Jealous 21
Window Display Background Music Colour & Lighting Store Layout Offers & Promotions Trial Room Other Customers Billing Procedure

Rank Kinda Ok Hmm Not Bad Pretty Cool Damn Neat

Ambience

Staff

Parking

11

21

12

14

7.5

5

19.5

4.5

15.5

12.5

36.5

19.5

7

21.5

23.5

14.5

27

19.5

9.5

23.5

25

28

49.5

55

47.5

31.5

36

38

33

34.5

42

42.5

16.5

12.5

17

12.5

20

20.5

19.5

22

38

12.5

14

16

Superb

7.5

0

6.5

11

21.5

10.5

6

13.5

6.5

6

3

All values are expressed in terms of % 

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10 00 90 9 80 8 70 7 38% % 55% 42% 33% % 60 6 47.5% 49.5% 38% 31.5% 50 5 2.5% 42 40 4 3 36% 30 3 20 2 36.5% 10 1 0

Superb Damn Nea at Pretty Coo ol Hmm Not t Bad Kinda Ok

  Bar Graph 19 

So ource: Prim mary Data In nference: T Genera Perceptio of all the factors of Retail expe The al on e erience, rep presented in Bar Graph 19 is summ n h marized in T Table 3 & 4 below.

Table 3 Factor inf fluencing R Retail Experience Window Displays W Ambience A Background Music B d Staff S Colour & Lighting C Opinion of Jealous 21 Custom mers Pretty Cool P Pretty Cool P Pretty Cool P Pretty Cool P Pretty Cool P

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Store Layout Offers & Promotions Trial Room Other Customers Billing Procedure Parking

Pretty Cool Pretty Cool Damn Neat Pretty Cool Pretty Cool Kinda Ok Table 4

Opinion about Jealous 21 Superb- Rank 5 Damn Neat- Rank 4 Pretty Cool- Rank 3

Factor Influencing Retail Experience Colour & Lighting Trial Room, Offers & Promotions Ambience, Window display, Background Music, Billing Procedure

Hmmm, Not Bad- Rank 2 Kinda Ok- Rank 1

Staff & Other Customers Parking

15. Overall Rating of Jealous 21 on all Retail aspects
Rank  1  2  3  4  5  All values are expressed in terms of %  % of Respondents  5.5 4.5 18.5 10 11.5

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18 8.5%

1

2

3

4

5

  Bar G Graph 20  So ource: Primary Data  Inference:  Fro Bar  Grap 20,  we  ca note  that Jealous  21  scores  an  o om  ph  an  t  overall  Rank  of  3,  i.e.  Pr retty cool in terms of the e target custo omers, who are youth gir rls.   18 8.5%  have  ra anked  Jealou 21  as  Pre Cool,  11 us  etty  1.5%  as  Superb,  10%  as  Damn  Neat,  5.5%  as  e , Kinda Ok and 4 4.5% as Not Bad.       

USE U OF ST TATISTIC CAL TOO OLS
1. Avera ages

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Wind dow Displays
26 3.2 2.8 86

St taff
3.49 2.91

Genera al  Perception

Jealous 21

General  Jealous 21 Perception

Ambienc A ce
82 3.8 2.6 68

Colour & C & Lighting

3.42

3.34

Genera al  Perception

Jealous 21

General  Perception

Jealous 21

Backg ground Music

Store L Layout & &  Arrangement t
3.40

52 3.5

2.80 2

3.03

Genera al  Perception

Jealous 21

General  Jealous 21 Perception

70   

Choi ice & Va ariety

Other C O Customers e

4. .11

2.95 2 Jealous s 21

2.29

2.71

General  tion Percept

General  Jealous 21 Perception

Offers & &  Promotio P ons
3. .60 2.76 Jealou us 21

B Billing P Procedu ure

2.83

2.76

Gener ral  Percept tion

General  Perception

Jealous 21

Trial Ro oom
3.4 48 3.36

Parking g Facility

3.02

2.21

General Per rceptionJealou us 21

General  Perception

Jealous 21

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Factors  F Window Disp W plays  Ambience  A Background M B Music  Staff  S Colour& light C ting  Store Layout  S Choice & Var C riety  Offers & Prom O mos  Trial Room  T Other Custom O mers  Billing Proced B dure  Parking  P

Ge eneral Percep ption  Je ealous 21  3.26 3.82 3.52 3.49 3.42 3.40 4.11 3.60 3.48 2.29 2.83 3.02

2.86 2.68 2.80 2.91 3.34 3.03 2.95 2.76 3.36 2.71 2.76 2.21

Averag ges
4.5 50 4.0 00 3.5 50 3.0 00 2.5 50 2.0 00 1.5 50 1.0 00 0.5 50 0.0 00

General Perception n

Jealo ous 21

Line Gra 1 aph

In nference: T average ranking of Jealous 21 on various retail aspec is lower than the The cts General Perc G ception in m most cases e except with the custom profile of the store Even h mer es. th Trial Room, Colour & lightin & Billing Procedur are almo at par with the he r ng res ost w ge eneral perce eption. How wever, the other factors must be en s nhanced to b able to secure an be ov verall high r ranking for Jealous 21. .
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2. Bivariate Correlation r e Th Bivaria Correlat he ate tions proce edure com mputes Pear rson's corre elation coe efficient. Correlations measure h how variables or rank orders are related. B Before calcu ulating a co orrelation coefficient, the data is screened for outliers (which can cause mi f n isleading re esults) and evidence o a linear relationshi Pearson correlation coeffici of ip. n's ient is a measure of li m inear association.

Overall rank Pe earson Cor rrelation
Window Disp W plays  Ambience  A Background M B Music  Staff  S Colour& light C ting  Store Layout  S Choice & Var C riety  Offers & Prom O mos  Trial Room  T Other Custom O mers  Billing Proced B dure  Parking  P Co orrelation is significant at t the 0.01 lev vel (1‐tailed) ).  0.28 0.30 0.33 0.64 0.28 0.28 0.68 0.27 0.29 0.26 0.11 0.43

S (1-taile Sig. ed)
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.06 0.00

Ov verall rank Pear rson Correlation
0.80 0.70 0.60 0.50 0.40 0.30 0.20 0.10 0.00

Line Grap 2 ph
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Inference: The Pearson's correlation is used to find a correlation between at least two continuous variables. The value for a Pearson's can fall between 0.00 (no correlation) and 1.00 (perfect correlation). The Choice & Variety, Staff and parking facilities have higher correlation with the overall ranking of Jealous 21. This means that there is a strong relationship between the either variable with Overall ranking. That is, changes in one variable are strongly correlated with changes in the second variable. However for factors such as Billing procedures and other customers, there is a weak relationship between the two variables with the overall ranking. This means that changes in one variable are negligibly correlated with changes in the second variable.

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3. Regression In statistics, regression analysis includes any techniques for modelling and analyzing several variables, when the focus is on the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. More specifically, regression analysis helps in understanding how the typical value of the dependent variable changes when any one of the independent variables is varied, while the other independent variables are held fixed. Most commonly, regression analysis estimates the conditional expectation of the dependent variable given the independent variables — that is, the average value of the dependent variable when the independent variables are held fixed. A) Equation for Staff and Overall Ranking

Regression Model   R  0.64  Predictors: (Constant), Staff  R  Square  0.41 Adjusted R Square  0.41 Std. Error of the Estimate  0.96

Inference: Since R square is 0.41 i.e., closer to 1, the model is good.
y  a  Overall Rank  Constant  2.09 2.75 3.41 4.07 4.74 b1  Beta/Coefficient of x  1.43 1.43 1.43 1.43 1.43 0.66  0.66  0.66  0.66  0.66  x1  Staff  1 2 3 4 5

Overall Rank= (0.66) x Staff Ranking+1.43

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6.00 5.00 4.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 0.00 1 2 3 4 5 Overall Rank Staff

Line Gra 3 aph In nference: If the staff is ranked 1, the overall rank would be 2.08, i Staff is ra f s l if anked 2, th the ove hen erall rank w would be 2.75 and so on. Thus, if Jealous a aims to get a good t ov verall rank t they must a aspire for a g good staff ranking. B) Equation for Ambience and Over Rankin r e rall ng
y  y a  2.3 34 2.3 34 2.3 34 2.3 34 2.3 34 b1  Beta/Co oefficient of x  0.38  0.38  0.38  0.38  0.38  x1  x Ambience  A 1 2 3 4 5

Overall Rank O k  Constan nt  2.7 72  3.0 09  3.4 47  3.8 85  4.2 22 

Overall Rank (0.38) x A k= Ambience R Ranking +2 2.34

6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 Ambie ence Overall Rank

Line Gra 4 aph
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In nference: If the ambie f ence of jealo 21 stores is ranked 1, the ove ous d erall rank would be w 2.72, if Amb bience is ran nked 2, then the overall rank wou be 3.09 and so on. Thus, if n uld ealous aims to get a goo overall r od rank they mu aspire fo a good am ust or mbience ran nking. Je C) Equation for Parking and Overall Ranking r l
y  y a  2.36 2 2.36 2 2.36 2 2.36 2 2.36 2 b1  Beta/C Coefficient of x  o 0.45  0.45  0.45  0.45  0.45  x1  Parking  1 2 3 4 5

Overall Rank O k  Constan nt  2.8 81  3.26  3.7 70  4.15  4.60 

Overall Rank (0.45) x P k= Parking Ran nking +2.36 6

6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 Pa arking Ov verall Rank

Line Graph 5 G In nference: If the parking facility of jealous 21 stores is ra f g f anked 1, the overall ran would e nk be 2.81, if pa e arking is ran nked 2, then the overa rank wou be 3.26 and so on. Thus, if all uld Je ealous aims to get a g s good overal rank they must aspi for goo ranking for their ll y ire od pa arking facili ities.

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CHAPTER 6 RESEARCH FINDINGS & CONCLUSION
FINDINGS & DISCOVERIES
1. 2. Window displays of Jealous 21 stores are at par with customer expectations. The ranking for ambience of Jealous 21 is lower than customer expectations and competitor’s ambience. 3. Connect with the Background Music at Jealous 21 stores is lower than what customers expect. 4. The general expectation regarding staff, their behaviour, knowledge and helpfulness is way beyond what Jealous 21 offers. 5. The colour & lighting of Jealous 21 is one of the most appreciated aspects at the store. 6. The store layout and arrangement of Jealous 21 stores is also almost at par with the general customer expectations. 7. The choice and variety of merchandise available in appropriate sizes is high in Jealous 21 store but not up to the expectations of customers. 8. Placement of Offers, Promos & other communication material in the Jealous 21 store is almost at par with the expectations of customers. 9. The Trial Room experience at the Jealous 21 stores is way better than what customers expect. 10. Shoppers at Jealous 21 connect with fellow customers more than they expected. 11. The billing procedure of Jealous 21 is at par with customer expectations and in fact scores better too.

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12. Parking facilities which is considerably important in influencing a customer’s shopping experience is ranked very low for Jealous 21 stores except for the store in Cosmos Mall, thanks to the Mall Parking facility. 13. Overall the top 3 factors that influence a customer’s retail experience are: Choice & Variety, Ambience and Offers & Promotions in the stores. The least important factors are: Other customers, Billing procedures and Parking facilities. 14. The 3 aspects of Retail Experience where Jealous 21 ranks highest are: Customer Profile, Billing Procedures and Colour & Lighting. 15. The aspects of Retail Experience where Jealous 21 ranks lowest are: Choice & variety, Ambience, Offers & Promos and Parking facilities. 16. The overall ranking of Jealous 21 is Rank 3; Pretty cool which is not bad but there is definitely scope for improvement.

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ANALOGIES & CONCLUSION
1. About 50% of customers think that Window displays influence Retail Experience to a considerable extent. 2. The CMH road Window displays are most visible compared to other stores. 3. Ambience of stores is an important factor in influencing the retail experience of customers at a store. 4. Not only background music, but the connect of the type of music, the genre, the volume, the latest hits and timing of music plays an important role in influencing the shopping experience of customers. Jealous 21 ranks pretty high on these terms but is definitely not up to the mark of customers. 5. Staff behaviour, their product knowledge and helpful attitude shape the overall retail experience for customers shopping at a store. Even though Jealous 21 ranks high on these terms, they have scope for improvement. 6. Jealous 21 has made sure it maintains the lighting and colour of the brand (pink) in the store as well as in its merchandise & branding and thus, scores high on these terms, as it connects with its TG. 7. The store layout and arrangement of apparel & accessories in the showrooms have an effect on the shopping experience of customers as it makes shopping more easy. Jealous 21 is almost at par with its competitors and the expectations of customers. 8. Jealous 21 offers a wide variety of choice and assortment in its product to customers. In fact its signature positioning itself talks about 3 hip sizes for every waist and they live up to making this offer in their merchandise. However, they still score much below the average expectations of customers.

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9. Jealous 21’s innovative in-store property of the “Oomph-meter” helps customers gauge their waist and hip sizes which enhances their shopping experience, by helping them chose the appropriate fit in apparel from the wide assortment. 10. Not only the creative offers and promotions such as the 21% off on 21st of every month, the Hip-Fit sister’s Glam contest etc....but also the communication of these offers & promos in the stores, have caught the attention of the TG to a large extent and they rank Jealous 21 high on these terms. 11. Even though the Trial Room experience is not a very strong influencing factor in retail experience, Jealous 21 secures a high rank and it is like an added advantage to the Brand. 12. Jealous 21 has done a good job in attracting the right customers. Also, customers who shop at Jealous 21 feel younger and the spirit of the retail store emits energy to all “supposedly” 21-year olds. Thus, the customer profile of these stores is ranked high and customers are influenced by their friends, peer and similar people shopping at their favourite stores. 13. Jealous 21 offers easy billing procedures with options to pay in cash or card. There are never long billing queues and this has a positive effect on the shopping experience of customers. 14. Parking is a major concern for the Exclusive Brand Outlets of Jealous 21 as they are located in prime shopping locations where parking facilities are minimum and sometime nil. Even though they offer Valet service, they secure very low ranks on this aspect. 15. The 3 aspects of Retail Experience where Jealous 21 ranks highest are: Customer Profile, Billing Procedures and Colour & Lighting. However, out of

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those factors that really matter, Jealous 21 ranks highest with its Colour & Lighting, Store Layout & Arrangement of merchandise and Window Displays. 16. Highest level of improvement is required on aspects such as Choice & variety, Ambience, Offers & Promos and Parking facilities. 17. Jealous 21 scores an overall rank of 3 on a 5 point rating scale. This means that even though the positioning of the brand is pretty good in the minds of the TG, there is vast scope for improvement.

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RECOMMENDATIONS
1. All factors discussed in this project have to be given considerable importance to deliver an effective retail experience to customers at any Jealous 21 Exclusive Brand outlet. 2. The Window Displays at the Brigade Road showroom, Cosmos Mall showroom and Jayanagar showroom must be made more appealing to the shoppers. Any obstructions such as buildings, billboards, poles etc must be dealt with in a proper manner to increase visibility. 3. Dressing up the mannequins with the latest trends and changing the attire as per the fashion trends, and colours is very important. For example, the girls today would definitely enter the store if they knew Jealous was selling “Jeggings”, when they see them on the mannequins. 4. The ambience of Jealous 21 stores must be revamped so as to lighten the mood and increase the spirit of the shoppers. The music, odour, lighting, special decor etc must be done with creativity and passion so as to connect with the young girls who shop at these stores. 5. The music at the Jealous 21 stores is considerably good in terms of the shoppers but in order to maintain this ranking, the store managers must be aware of the latest hits, the songs in different language, the trends of the music industry, the blockbuster tunes and must also play them with the right volume and timing of the day in the stores. For example heavy rock music in the mornings would be a mismatch. 6. Staff at Jealous 21, even though are well behaved and professional, must be trained better to understand the product they are offering. They must be pro active to customer’s demands and requirements. For example, after analysing

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the taste of the customer, they should volunteer to offer apparel in similar colours, styles & sizes. 7. It would also make a great difference if the customers could connect to the staff better, in terms of age and fashion choices. For example: On the lines of Levis stores, where the staff are younger, smarter and fashion conscious. 8. Also, the staff must be constantly updated about any new marketing communications, advertisements and contests. They should know what the customers are looking for. For example, the staff at the CMH showroom don’t know anything about the “Oomph-meter” which is a unique property of Jealous 21 itself. 9. The colour scheme and the lighting of the Jealous 21 stores have been ranked pretty high. However, to maintain this ranking, they have to be creative in their lighting, false roofs, spot lights and colour schemes of the walls, podiums, fixtures & furniture. 10. The arrangement of apparel & accessories in the stores is very creative, such as the t-shirts with matching hair-bands, bags etc...but the store manager and other staff can make such arrangements more creative and enhance the shopping experience of customers. Colour co-ordinated arrangements can be made, the Casual, Trendy and Stylish apparel can be positioned separately etc... 11. The CMH showroom has been ranked highest on showroom layout & arrangement. It is important for Jealous 21 to figure out how to improve the layout & arrangement of the other showrooms and follow those tactics that have been useful in the store on CMH road. 12. Customers expect a wide variety in terms of colour, size, styles, fits etc.....and it is important for Jealous 21 stores to offer this to them. Even though they offer a

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vast assortment of merchandise, they must make sure all the showrooms have adequate stock of the same. For example, advertisements and even the Jealous 21 website talks about Jeggings being the new fashion statement, but these aren’t available at the Brigade showroom. 13. It is important to send across the right message, at the right time to the right people. Jealous 21 has been doing a good job with its in-store marketing communication, offers and promotions. In fact this is what attracts a large percentage of its customers. However, they must strive to bring about their message more creatively and effectively, using the right media. For example they can use their Facebook community to a better extent with offers, promotions & contests. 14. Such communication must also be placed outside the stores so as to attract people to walk in. This is the best way to increase walk-ins to the store. For example, not many people are aware of the 21% discount on the 21st of every month as it is never displayed outside the stores. 15. Trial Room experience for young girls is an important factor that has an impact on the overall shopping experience. Jealous 21 ranks pretty high on this aspect however other ideas could be implemented to make this trial room experience more exhilarating. For example, clicking Polaroid photograph once the apparel is bought, getting customers to write their comments on a “wall of fame” etc can be done in the trial room section. 16. Young girls are definitely victims of peer pressure. They like shopping with girls of their age, their mind-set and fashion quotient. Thus, other customers in the store and their purchases affect their own purchases and their overall shopping experience. Jealous 21 must understand this and attract similar customer profiles

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by communicating effectively to the right TG. They may also hire young college girls to spread the message through viral marketing and word of mouth techniques. 17. The shoppers are well satisfied with the Billing procedures at Jealous 21, and it is important for them to continue being ranked high on this regard and not dilute their payment options. 18. Parking is a serious problem for Jealous 21 as all their customers complain of not having adequate parking facilities. Many customers hesitate to shop at a store because of the difficulty of parking. The only solution to this is to rent a plot or parking garage nearby and provide valet service to customers; and also communicate to them regarding the same. For example, many showrooms include ‘parking available’ in their advertisements & other communications. 19. In order to secure an overall high ranking for the Brand Jealous 21, each factor influencing the retail experience must be enhanced and a good rating or each of these factors must be aspired for.

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OVERALL OUTCOME OF THE STUDY
The outcome of this study is that the various factors that influence the retail experience of a customer in the apparel showrooms has been understood to a large extent. The project has also helped in learning about the extent of impact each of these dimensions of Retail experience have on the customer as well as the brand. In the course of this study the customer preferences and expectations from a brand in the retail aspect have been thrown light upon. The customer’s point of view is what is highlighted in this study. This study has been able to compare the brand positioning and overall perception of the brand Jealous 21 in the minds of customers, with other competitors in the market and their offerings in the similar league. This study has helped, to a large extent to understand the consumer behaviour of young girls within the age group of 17 to 28, their preference, opinions, fashion styles etc which will help readers in future to use this information for any marketing related activities targeted towards this age group.
                 

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BIBILIOGRAPHY
BOOKS & JOURNALS
1. Kishore Biyani, It Happened in India, Rupa & Co., New Delhi, 2007. 2. Kindleysides, J. An Introduction to Retail Design, Design Council, London, 2007. 3. Bäckström, K. & Johansson, Creating and Consuming Experiences in Retail Store Environments: Comparing Retailer and Consumer Perspectives, Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, 2006, vol. 13. 4. Underhill, why we buy what we buy, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1999. 5. Fiore, A. & Kim J, An Integrative Framework capturing Experiential and Utilitarian Shopping Experience, International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, 2007, vol. 35. 6. Holbrook M & Hirschman E, The Experiential Aspects of Consumption: Consumer Fantasies, Feelings and Fun, Journal of Consumer Research, 1982, vol. 9. 7. Gentile, C., Spiller, N. & Noci G, How to Sustain the Customer Experience: an Overview of Experience Components that Co-Create Value with the Customer, European Management Journal, 2007, vol. 25. 8. Verhoef P., Lemon K., Parasuraman A, Roggeveen, A., Tsiros, M. & Schlesinger, L. Customer Experience Creation: Determinants, Dynamics and Management Strategies, Journal of Retailing, 2009, vol. 85. 9. Horvath I, Differences between ‘Research In Design Context’ and ‘Design Inclusive Research’ in the Domain of Industrial Design Engineering, Journal of Design Research, 2008, vol. 7.

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10. Desmet P, Designing Emotions. Doctoral Dissertation, Technische Universiteit Delft, Delft, 2002. 11. Fiore A. & Kim J, An Integrative Framework capturing Experiential and Utilitarian Shopping Experience, International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, 2007. 12. Richins M, Measuring Emotions in the Consumption Experience, Journal of Consumer Behavior, 1997, vol. 24. 13. Donovan, R. & Rossiter J, Store Atmosphere: an Experimental Psychology Approach, Journal of Retailing, 1982, vol. 58. 14. Kotler P, Atmospherics as a Marketing Tool, Journal of Retailing, 1973, vol. 49. 15. Van Tongeren M, Retail Branding. From Stopping Power to Shopping Power, BIS Publishers, Amsterdam, 2003. 16. Van Tongeren M, Retail Branding. In R. van Amerongen & H. Christiaans (Eds.), Retail & Interior Design, Episode Publishers, Rotterdam, 2004. 17. Philip Kotler, Keller, Koshy and Jha, Marketing Management (13th Edition), Pearson Education, New Delhi, 2009. 18. Philip Kotler and Gary Armstrong, Principles of Marketing (11th Edition), Pearson Education, New Delhi, 2003. 19. C.R. Kothari, Research Methodology Methods and Technique, Wiley Eastern Limited, New Delhi, 2008. 20. A.J. Lamba, The Art of Retailing, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 2003,

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REPORTS
1. Inman, J. Winer, Where the Rubber meets the Road: A Model of in-store Consumer Decision making, Marketing Science Institute report, Cambridge, 1998. 2. Pine, J. & Gilmore J, The Experience Economy. Work is Theatre and Every Business a Stage, Harvard Business School Press, Boston, 1999. 3. Sörensen J, Measuring Emotions in a Consumer Decision-Making Context – Approaching or Avoiding, Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies, Aalborg, 2008. 4. Mehrabian A & Russell J, An Approach to Environmental Psychology, MIT Press, Cambridge, 1974. 5. Brengman M, The Impact of Color in the Store Environment An Environmental Psychology Approach. Doctoral Dissertation, Universiteit Gent, Gent, 2002.

WEBSITES
1. www.jealous21.com 2. www.indusleague.com 3. www.pantaloons.com 4. www.rpggroup.com 5. www.indiaretailing.com 6. www.retailindustry.com 7. www.indiamba.com
8. www.hinduonnet.com   

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ANNEXURE- QUESTIONNAIRE
Name: Age: Outlet: 1 Sl No. Rank the following as per your opinions (Tick the appropriate boxes) No, Not at all 2 Doesn’t Make a difference 3 Yes to some extent 4 Yes to a large Extent 5 Definitely, Without doubt

1

The window displays attract me to a store and enhance my shopping experience… Ambience of a retail apparel store is important…… When I’m shopping background music is required….. The staffs in the retail store usually have an effect on my shopping experience…. There’s an impact and influence of the colour scheme and lighting while I'm shopping…. The store layout and arrangement has an impact on my shopping experience…. The Staff at Jealous 21 have an effect on my shopping experience coz they are.... My shopping experience is entirely dependent on the choice and variety of apparel in my size Placement of offers and promotions attracts my attention to that section of the store…. The trial room experience is what defines my entire shopping experience at a store…. Other customers in the store play an important role in my shopping experience… My shopping experience is impacted by the billing procedure to a large extent….

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

12

Parking of my vehicle influences my shopping experience at any store

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1 Rank Jealous 21 on the following parameters (Tick the appropriate boxes) 13 I got into the Jealous 21 store with a glimpse of the Window displays that were….. The overall ambience of the Jealous 21 store makes my shopping experience…. Maybe I'd humm along with the Music at the Jealous 21 store coz it’s…. I think the Pink colour scheme and the lighting in the Jealous 21 store makes my shopping experience… The arrangement and store layout of apparel & accessories at Jealous 21 is….. The choice, variety & availability of apparel, in my size at Jealous 21 are…. The Staff at Jealous 21 have an effect on my shopping experience coz they are.... The discounts, offers, contests, fresh arrival displays at Jealous 21 are positioned in a way that is…. The trial room experience at Jealous 21 influences my shopping experience here coz its … I feel the fellow shoppers at the Jealous 21 are… Billing and payment procedure at the Jealous 21 store is…. I think the Parking facility outside Jealous 21 is…. The Rank that I would award Jealous 21 as a Brand on Exclusive brand outlet aspects is…. In one word describe your shopping experience at Jealous 21 Kinda Ok Ok

2 Hmmm, Not Bad

3 Pretty Cool

4 Damn Neat

5 Superb

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17

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19

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

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