1. Courage and fearless, the two are a contradiction in terms.

Only the unimagin ative are fearless, and only the keenly imaginative, capable of feeling fear in every fibre, ever scale the heights of true courage. 2. The measure of a man's worth is not to be found in a heroic impulse or a fine idea, but in the steadfast working out of either through weeks and months--when the glow has faded from the heights, when the inspiration of an illumined moment has passed into the unrecognised chivalry of daily life; 3. "White hands cling to the tightened rein, Slipping the spur from the booted heel, Tenderest voices cry 'Turn again!' Red lips tarnish the scabbarded steel. High hopes faint on a warm hearth-stone; He travels the fastest who travels alone." --KIPLING.

4. 'Good Life starts only when you stop wanting a better One' 5. I love walking in the rain because no one knows I'm crying. 6. I don't need any Money to lead a good life!! 7. When you look back at the years that have by gone do you repent or are you ha ppy with how things have gone so far. If you are happy then you have led a good life irrespective whether you don t have an shelter to stay, your pocket has been empty for most of the times and you went without food for several days. If you l ook back and you repent then it is obvious you missed the precious moments of yo ur life which is irrecoverable (whether you have expensive cars, tons of money, popularity doesn t count). No money or no popularity can bring those days back. No man in this planet gets a second chance in this case. 8. Ye realms yet unrevealed to human sight, Ye canes athwart the hapless hands that write, Ye critic chiefs,-permit me to relate The mystic wonders of your silent state! VIRGIL, AEneid, book vi. 9. "'Of all the griefs that harass the distrest, Sure the most bitter is a scornful jest!'" 10. He asked me to take a ride with him that night towards Hounslow. I did so, and found a purse." "How fortunate! Where?" "In a gentleman's pocket" 11. "All crime and all excellence depend upon a good choice of words. If you take money from the public, and say you have robbed, you have indubitably committed a great crime; but if you do the same, and say you have been relieving the necessities of the poor, you have done an ex cellent action. 12. To knock a man on the head is neither virtuous nor guilty, but it depends upon the language applied to the

till now." 19. "is the usual enemy of reason. There are two charming situations in life for a woman. 15. "Farewell. "'As leaves of trees the race of man is found. "To be loved and tended by the one I love. I did not grumble when I saw what fine houses and good strong boxes you gave to other men. save the parson. 'What can't be cured must be endured. and have a monopoly for performing nonsense gigantically! O houses of plaster. "Passion." said Augustus. which exclude comedy and comfort. did I feel how inexpressibly dear you were to me. the other. O generous London. now withering on the ground. but. 16. too small for parks. what I lose in you! O public charities! O public institutions! O banks that belie mathematical axioms and make lots out of nothing! O ancient constitution always to be questioned! O modern improvements that never answer! O speculations! O companies! O usury laws which guard against usurers. with a large jointure.action to make it murder or glory.'" More nice than starvation!' 17. foul fair. all Christian virtues abide within you! Charity is as common as smoke! Where. You gave riches to my neighbours. "'Hanging is 'nation . 21.--one. Now fresh with dew. in what corner of the habitable world. the first freshness of heiressship and beauty. Timon of Athens. No! I rejoiced at their prosperity. Why did she love him? Curious fool. Posterity does justice to those who really deserve fame. coolly. in your case it is the friend. you gave those neighbours to me! Magnificent streets. darling London. farewell! Where shall I ever find a city like you? Never. from benevolent credulity. 13. 14. 18. too enormous for houses. my beloved London. I delighted to see a rich man. by making as many as possible! O churches in which no one profits.' 22. be still! Is human love the growth of human will? To her he might be gentleness! LORD BYRON. with a dome in the middle. those superfluities to myself? Heaven only knows. my dear. What is here?-Gold? Thus much of this will make black white. "I would walk blind and barefoot over the whole earth!" 20.--my only disappointment was in stumbling on a poor one. youthful widowhood. in a low voice. built in a day! O palaces four yards high." said Clifford. dear. shall I find human beings with so many superfluities? Where shall I so easily decoy. You have been my father and my brother and my mistress and my tailor and my shoemaker and my hatter and my cook and my wine-merchant! You and I never misunderstood each other. and the old women that let pews of an evening! O superb theatres.

then. One hundred friends will wish you well. and. but for those I would never desert you. She speaks of that world as a place unsullied by sin--of that life. in a word. he leans on Hope's anchors. indeed. Immortality. Sickness affects him. and the mind of the mourner." 26. beaux. and then locks up the bridle! O sharpers. of heavenly hills all light and peace--of a spirit resting there in bliss--of a day when his spirit shall also alight there. Every successful man is more or less a selfish man. Our agony is great. and how can it end? We have broken the spring of our powers. which lets the mare be stolen. and time brings us on to the brink of the grave. Remember that the best and greatest among mankind are those who do themselves no worldly good. strained. but on which they love to repose--Eternity. and one enemy will do you ill. his energies. abused. wearing spectacles at twenty or earlier. we have plunged like beasts into sensual indulgence. again overstrained. houses private and public!---O LONDON. spirits. taverns. and O shopkeepers not worth a shilling! O system of credit by which beggars are princes. he takes patience--endures what he cannot cure. being filled with an image. and your fools be rich! May you alter only two things. and princes are beggars! O imprisonment for debt. and says.meant to be invisible! "O shops worth thousands. for if we rarely taste the fulness of joy in this life. The devoted fail. free and . another life. faint yet glorious. at last. NOVELISTS should never allow themselves to weary of the study of real life. we yet more rarely savour the acrid bitterness of hopeless anguish. But the man of regular life and rational mind never despairs. that in another world. life must be all suffering--too feeble to conceive faith--death must be darkness--God. Death takes from him what he loves.--your damnable tricks of transportation and hanging! Those are your sole faults. they would give us fewer pictures chequered with vivid contrasts of light and shade.. robbed of hope. dismal time. receive my last adieu! Long may you flourish in peace and plenteousness! May your knaves be witty. and tears violently away the stem round which his affections were twined--a dark. truly. "Well dear. Acute pain racks him.. destroyed our faculties for enjoyment. wrung together with pain. roused by the smart.. He loses his property--it is a blow--he staggers a moment. are at work to seek a remedy. Adieu!" 23. stimulated. and dissolution flings us in--a rag eaten through and through with disease. bubbles. religion can have no place in our collapsed minds. brothels. he shall meet his kindred again. activity soon mitigates regret. clubs. we may find ourselves without support. roots up. you are handsome enough for the kind of men you'll pick up in this generation--most of them bald at thirty. where linger only hideous and polluting recollections of vice. 24. stamped into the churchyard sod by the inexorable heel of despair. a frightful wrench--but some morning Religion looks into his desolate house with sunrise. they would seldom elevate their heroes and heroines to the heights of rapture--still seldomer sink them to the depths of despair. One hundred friends are too few against one enemy. as an era unembittered by suffering. 25. and in spite of the fuss they make about athletics breaking all to nervous bits about fifty. senators. then. If they observed this duty conscientiously. unless. his writhing limbs know not where to find rest. she mightily strengthens her consolation by connecting with it two ideas--which mortals cannot comprehend.

' If you are going to try cross-country skiing. Criticism is something we can avoid easily by saying nothing. they'll say. The only reason I would take up walking is so that I could hear heavy breathing again. AND Every time I start thinking too much about how I look. before my brain figures out what I'm doing.. I joined a health club last year. I just find a Happy Hour . Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise'. Haven't lost a pound. Apparently you have to go there. just getting over the hill. The Importance of Walking Walking can add minutes to your life. I have to walk early in the morning.. --Charlotte Bronte 27. My grandpa started walking five miles a day when he was 60.. I know I got a lot of exercise the last few years. The advantage of exercising every day is so when you die. especially when they are taken by people who annoy me.. she looks good doesn't she. I wash my mouth out with chocolate. and. start with a small country. because there's a lot more information in our heads. We all get heavier as we get older..disembodied--of a reunion perfected by love. though sadness may never lift her burden from his mind. This enables you at 85 years old to spend an additional 5 months in a nursing home at $7000 per month. and being nothing -Aristotle 28.. Hope will enable him to support it.. Now he's 97 years old and we don't know where he is. That's my story and I'm sticking to it. purified from fear--he takes courage--goes out to encounter the necessities and discharge the duties of life. I like long walks. spent about 400 bucks. 'Well. doing nothing.

" "no. for that feeling of self-preservation makes it a duty for them to do their best for the . all creatures have a determined and invincible propensity to destroy their enemies." "not if i need it more than you do." "that's stealing. Most gentle Sleep! Two nights I wooed in vain. "that to lead a blameless life you must curb your passions. They must propagate their respective species.. be annihilated--by the constant law of degradation. it's here in my hand and i'm going to take it with me. maybe i was there. human creatures would not perform the work of generation if they did not find pleasure in it. GOODBYE!" so the potential hunter turns to leave the cave with the spear in his hand and the spear owner hits him on the head with a ten pound jagged rock." "i don't need any more food--i'm a farmer.. would it have been like this: "Let me use your spear for the hunt and i'll return your spear plus half of the animal(s) i kill?" "half? i want more than half. decay and death. loan it to me and it will be earning you half the food i get with it. Augustine may say. whatever St. Thou wouldst not come to banish racking pain: For what is Sleep but Life in stone bound fast? Oblivion of the Present. then you don't need the spear at all. i don't think so. or attributed to fate." "but that's communism--taking things from me because i'm not using them and you need them. "Recollect. so give me the spear.. I wasn't around during caveman days. since without reproduction all would. 31." 32." "but you're not using it. I look just fine. by Francis Hard-30. which they feel pleasure in satisfying. and that whatever misfortune may befall you it cannot be ascribed by any one to a want of good luck.and by the time I leave." "okay. an absolute necessity which proves the wisdom of the Creator. but you can call it anything you want to. and if there was not in that great work an irresistible attraction for them. and to prevent that task from being insipid and tedious they have the agreeable sensation of appetite. but i'll take your word for it.and this is how morality and ethics and banking and borrowing all b egan." "but i'm risking my life--you're only risking a spear. and haven't seen any memoirs or histori es that detail the cro-magnon banking practices. There are three real wants which nature has implanted in all human creatures." "but i need it and you don't. what if you injure my spear?" "well." "well. ---After Two Nights of the Ear-ache." "actually it's socialism." "but it's MY spear. and it's not changed much.. Past. and it is certainly a very wise ordination. They must feed themselves. those words are devoid of sense. i'm risking my spear and you're not risking anything. i've all the food i need already.. and all the fault will rightly fall on your own head. 29. that's the chance you take." "NO! it's mine and i don't want to loan it to you." added the good father. gee." "but it's my only spear. In the third place. And. Future.

we delay the amorous enjoyment for the sake of making it more intense. "The Pyramids of Eg ypt were only built up stone by stone. but when the mind gives perfect equilibrium to those propensities. being. better adapted for keeping us up to the mark. She is. and satisfies his appetite only in a manner in harmony with his nature and his tastes. Those three operations are the work of the soul which. If he is sometimes more cruel than necessary. improves. and those are risks which we run most willingly. There's a disease called optical-rectalitiis. rejects with contempt lust and lewdness. and which we experience without being able to describe it. however. The voluptuous man who reasons. which can never be the case unless their love is mutual. and cannot be called pleasures. and hatred--are in animals the satisfaction of habitual instinct. for they can be so only in proportion to the intelligence of the individual. Man comes down to the level of beasts whenever he gives himself up to the three natural propensities without calling reason and judgment to his assistance. the sensations derived from them become true enjoyment. The three sensations: hunger. but he enjoys himself with the object of his love only when he is certain that she will share his enjoyment. because. with a characteristic nod. and that the creature we want to annihilate often escapes our revenge. an unaccountable feeling which gives us what is called happiness. It's where the optic nerve get s crossed with the rectal nerve and someone has a crappy outlook on life. and spurns the brutal revenge which is caused by a first movement of anger: but he is dainty. endowed with the sublime faculty of reason. to procure enjoyment for itself. and his revenge is sometimes so noble that he finds it in forgiveness. but at least there is the consolation of having arrived at a workable philosophy. if he is offended. for others an attitude of pleased contemplation. And her philosophy. becomes the agent of our passions. Each species obeys these laws in its own way. composes. At forty one has shed most illusions. We sometimes suffer from hunger in order to enjoy better the food which will allay it. and increases it by thought and recollection. and we put off the moment of our revenge in order to mike it more certain. he foresees enjoyment.They sa y it's of almost epidemic proportions 34." . "Only give us time. an age that is supposed to be the prime of life. he is amorous.destruction of whatever can injure them. Man alone is gifted with the perfect organs which render real pleasure peculiar to him. desire. Those of us who are married and without the philosophy of our own are fortunate in having one--if not several--provided by a wife. he consoles himself with the idea that he has acted under the empire of reason. It is true. 33. 35. leaning on the gate of a summer evening. is of much more value to the world than abstract thought. For some of us this philosophy may mean simple acquiescence. he does not care for revenge until he has calmly considered the best means to enjoy it fully. disdains greediness. though most of us would prefer to be ten years younger. like a yokel smoking his pipe. that we allow ourselves to be often deceived in love. grounded on practical common sense rather than a study of the metaphysicians. but perfection cannot be attained in anything. looks for it." said he. in short. forty. that one may die from indigestion.

"ashamed to admonish a drunken man?" 42. are very worthy persons when they are sober: for drink. and in Italy. everywhere the object of detestation and scorn. 38. that men who are ill-natured and quarrelsome when they are drunk. The answer which one Cleostratus gave many years ago to a silly fellow. indeed. But human nature is everywhere the same. the same wisdom which teaches them to know this. the same fraud. would be pertness in a woman. in theory only. the avaricious. 43. "The modesty and fortitude of men differ from those virtues in women. et sepulchri Immemor. in reality. and however sublimated and refined the theory of these may be. but the practice would be vexatious and troublesome. Horace: _Tu secanda marmora Locas sub ipsum funus. like a sloven. for t he fortitude which becomes a woman. teaches them to avoid carrying it into execution." ---Aristotle. 39. the amorous. that consists the difference: for though such great beings think much better and more wisely. To say truth. and consequently forces us to produce those symptoms. are in their cups heightened and exposed. and all other dispositions of men. 't is something. and this knowledge affords much delightful contemplation. It is. have art enough to conceal. which many. when sober. when he says "Who steals my purse steals trash. when a pickaxe and a spade are only necessary: and build houses of five hundred by a hundred feet. They know very well how to subdue all appetites and passions. the generous. and in the northern countries. 40. forgetting that of six by two. as we have before hinted." said Cleostratus. who asked him. In France. and. for there they will see at once all which they can discover in the several courts of Europe. struis domos. in short. therefore. . so that the angry temper. In Spain. and is easily acquired. if he was not ashamed to be drunk? "Are not you. nothing is more erroneous than the common observation." 37. Shakespear hath nobly touched this vice. It heightens and inflames our passions (generally indeed that passion which is uppermost in our mind). doth not reverse nature. and the modesty which becomes a man. "those who travel in order to acquaint themselves with the different manners of men might spare themselves much pains by going to a carnival at Venice. and not in practice. nothing. the good-humoured. these are equipped with much gravity.36. and to despise both pain and pleasure. they always act exactly like other men. with vast splendor. or create passions in men which did not exist in them before. The same hypocrisy. a knave is dressed like a fop. It takes away the guard of reason. Philosophers are composed of flesh and blood as well as other human creatures. the same follies and vices dressed in different habits. a little practical frailty is as incident to them as to other mortals._ "You provide the noblest materials for building. would be cowardice in a man.

"'Nothing that is can pause or stay. the coward and the b rave. The rain to mist and cloud again. Like to a little kingdom. if base fear his dast ard step withdraws." 44. "Of all the paths that lead to a woman's love."--_Appolodamus_. The mist and cloud will turn to rain. 49. "Death is a black camel that kneels at the gate of all. "This life of ours is a wild Aeolian harp of many a joyous strain. 47."--_Herodotus 60."--_Epictetus_."--_L ongfellow_. love flies out at the window. suffers then The nature of an insurrection. as of souls in pain.'Twas mine. "He who knows how to speak knows also when to speak. "The fire in the flint shows not till it be struck."--_Timon of Athens_. 52."--_B eaumont and Fletcher_." 48. she is a mother from her birth.Longfellow . 58. 'tis his."--_Plutarch_. From death he cannot fly: One common grave Receives."--_Abd-el-Kader_. 56. BUT MAKES ME POOR INDEED.'" --. `Who would not die in his dear country's cause? Since. "'Tis not enough to help the feeble up."--_Timon of Athens_. 51. But to support him after. "A bad beginning leads to a bad ending. And the first motion. and the state of man. 57. and hath been slave to thousands: But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that WHICH NOT ENRICHES HIM. But under them all there runs a loud perpetual wail. A woman does not become a mother. or a hideous dream. "Seek not that the things which happen should happen as you wish. ." 53. 50.Carmen S ylva 59. Shakespear "Between the acting of a dreadful thing. Pity's the straightest. To-morrow be to-day. "It is best to be cautious and avoid extremes. all the interim is Like a phantasma. at last. "A friend who is both intelligent and well-affected is the most valuable of all possessions. The moon will wax." 46."--_Plutarch_. "When poverty looks in at the door. 54. The genius and the mortal instruments Are then in council. the moon will wane.'" Horace 45. "For I am the only one of my friends that I can rely on.

at which you are so splendidly entertaining me to-night. Under the mezzotint hung Hoppner's miniature of that lovely and ill-starred girl. was not listening very attentively to the tale. as in the days when first he loved her--"Here's to Nellie O'Mora. they would have known him by his resemblance to the mezzotint portrait that hung on the wall above him. and how she drowned herself in a mill-pond. and her curls all astray from beneath her little blue turban. but. and had lived for him in a cottage at Littlemore. Whereas the English guests of the Junta. invisible to them. and he an undergraduate at Christ Church. as they appeared in the mezzotint. there was about him a certain air of high romance that could not be explained away by the fact that he was of a period not our own. in a voice audible to himself alone. whither he would ride. nor his hands so delicate. his. a seventh. Greddon. of Merton. and how Greddon was killed in Venice. and far better expressed. Then. Oover's moral tone. And the Duke was telling Mr. He had heard it told so often in this room. I hope I am not incognisant of the laws that govern the relations of guest and host. nor were his eyes so big. nor his lips so full. the fairest witch that ever was or will be!" He would have resented the omission of that toast. Yes. most days. Could the diners have seen him. even. He wore a pale brocaded coat and lace ruffles.70. silken stockings. He was not of their time. He had adored her. were of the American kind: far higher than ours. was an unmitigated scoundrel. But. Yet (bating the conventions of eighteenth-century portraiture) the likeness was a good one." Humphrey Greddon had sprung forward. as this gentleman took no notice. challenged the American to make good his words. whom he took to see her. and loudly. drawing his sword. It was right that she should always be toasted after dinner by the Junta." At the word "scoundrel. Privy to their doom. and his sense of chivalry. Oover her story--how she had left her home for Humphrey Greddon when she was but sixteen. Nellie had been beautiful. Mr. he wiped it . leaned moodily against the mantel-piece. watching them. he watched them. Duke. with her soft dark eyes. Nellie had been a monstrous pretty creature. founder and first president of the club. hard though the lines of the face were. While the six dined. and had done with her. And he. you damned psalm-singer and traducer! And so die all rebels against King George!"* Withdrawing the blade. when they heard the tale of Nellie O'Mora. You could understand the great love that Nellie O'Mora had borne him. with one clean straight thrust Greddon ran him through the heart. thereby broke her heart. would merely murmur "Poor girl!" or "What a shame!" Mr. They would have risen to their feet in presence of Humphrey Greddon. and he did not understand the sentiments of the modern world. His face was not so oval. Humphrey Greddon was not less well-knit and graceful than the painter had made him. I aver deliberately that the founder of this fine old club. shouting "Die. I say he was not a white man. melting looks that were always cast towards her miniature. His long brown hair was knotted in a black riband behind. He was loth that his Junta must die. to be with her. by God! she was always a dunce and a simpleton. Oover said in a tone of quiet authority that compelled Greddon's ear "Duke. a sword. broke his oath that he would marry her. two years later. by God! not to marry that fool Trailby. But he was sick of the pitying. How could he have spent his life with her? She was a fool. and how he tired of her. duelling on the Riva Schiavoni with a Senator whose daughter he had seduced. and.

" At the word "scoundrel. But he was sick of the pitying. He had adored her. His face was not so oval. a seventh. Yes. "But I shall meet you in Hell to-morrow. his. But. Nellie had been beautiful. would merely murmur "Poor girl!" or "What a shame!" Mr. He wore a pale brocaded coat and lace ruffles. And he. Yet (bating the conventions of eighteenth-century portraiture) the likeness was a good one. and how she drowned herself in a mill-pond. You could understand the great love that Nellie O'Mora had borne him. melting looks that were always cast towards her miniature. nor were his eyes so big. Oover said in a tone of quiet authority that compelled Greddon's ear "Duke." And Greddon remembered himself--remembered he was only a ghost. Could the diners have seen him. with unpunctured shirt-front. He was not of their time. Whereas the English guests of the Junta. watching them. He had heard it told so often in this room. It was right that she should always be toasted after dinner by the Junta. they would have known him by his resemblance to the mezzotint portrait that hung on the wall above him. was repeating "I say he was not a white man. thereby broke her heart. And the Duke was telling Mr. Humphrey Greddon was not less well-knit and graceful than the painter had made him. by God! she was always a dunce and a simpleton. I aver deliberately that the founder of this fine old club. He was loth that his Junta must die. was an unmitigated scoundrel. and her curls all astray from beneath her little blue turban. and his sense of chivalry. a sword. hard though the lines of the face were.While the six dined. drawing . And there he was wrong. and far better expressed. he watched them. Under the mezzotint hung Hoppner's miniature of that lovely and ill-starred girl. to be with her. at which you are so splendidly entertaining me to-night. with her soft dark eyes. when they heard the tale of Nellie O'Mora. invisibl e to them. and he an undergraduate at Christ Church. founder and first president of the club. and how he tired of her. and had done with her. nor his hands so delicate. by God! not to marry that fool Trailby. of Merton. I say he was not a white man. and. impotent. Nellie had been a monstrous pretty creature. even. It is quite certain that Oover went to Heaven. there was about him a certain air of high romance that could not be explained away by the fact that he was of a period not our own. How could he have spent his life with her? She was a fool. but. His long brown hair was knotted in a black riband behind. Oover's moral tone. most days. of no account. and he did not understand the sentiments of the modern world. Greddon. Mr.daintily on his cambric handkerchief. broke his oath that he would marry her. silken stockings. leaned moodily against the mantel-piece. two years later. Oover her story--how she had left her home for Humphrey Greddon when she was but sixteen. nor his lips so full. They would have risen to their feet in presence of Humphrey Greddon. Oover. and had lived for him in a cottage at Littlemore." he hissed in Oover's face. Privy to their doom. Duke. and how Greddon was killed in Venice. were of the American kind: far higher than ours. the fairest witch that ever was or will be!" He would have resented the omission of that toast. as they appeared in the mezzotint." Humphrey Greddon had sprung forward. whom he took to see her. I hope I am not incognisant of the laws that govern the relations of guest and host. duelling on the Riva Schiavoni with a Senator whose daughter he had seduced. impalpable. There was no blood. whither he would ride. was not listening very attentively to the tale. as in the days when first he loved her--"Here's to Nellie O'Mora. Mr.

the unforgettable thing. challenged the American to make good his words. Not the commission of some great crime: this can be atoned for by great penances. years after. but a thing done to him--some insolence or cruelty for which he could not. of no account. 71. and loudly. The unforgettable thing in his life is usually not a thing he has done or left undone. or did not. the one thing to be forgotten. and shakes his head. impalpable. impotent. . Mr. with unpunctured shirt-front. you damned psalm-singer and traducer! And so die all rebels against King George!"* Withdrawing the blade. he wiped it daintily on his cambric handkerchief. some little deadly act of meanness. Oover." And Greddon remembered himself--remembered he was only a ghost. with one clean straight thrust Greddon ran him through the heart. Maybe. avenge himself. In the lives of most of us is some one thing that we would not after the lapse of how many years soever confess to our most understanding friend. And there he was wrong. so that he clenches his hands. and thrusts itself suddenly into his waking thoughts. This it is that often comes back to him. in his dreams. in a voice audible to himself alone. was repeating "I say he was not a white man." he hissed in Oover's face. as this gentleman took no notice. There was no blood. some hole-and-corner treachery? But what a man has once willed to do. shouting "Die. It is quite certain that Oover went to Heaven. and the very enormity of it has a dark grandeur. Then.his sword. the thing that does not bear thinking of. and hums a tune loudly--anything to beat it off. his will helps him to forget. "But I shall meet you in Hell to-morrow.