WI N DOWS VI S TA AN D 7: AR E YOU IGNO RI NG THE IN EV ITABLE ?

By Omer Qureshi

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Ignoring the inevitable?
When  it  comes  to  deploying  a  new  OS  (whether   at  the  Data  Centers  or  for   the  end  users  con-­‐ sump<on)  the   IT   Pros  tend  to  take  a  more  cau<ous  'wait  and  see  approach'.   So   the  ques<on   begs,  why  should  the  new  opera<ng  system  from  the  soGware  giant   get  any  beHer  treatment,  is   Windows  Vista  any  beHer  than  its  predecessors  such  as  Windows  95,  NT,  98,  2000,  XP,  in  simple   words  the  answer  is  a  bold  and  resounding  "HELL  YEAH!!!" Migra<ons  to  the  Windows  Vista  is  inevitable  for   the  enterprise  across  the  globe,  delaying  the   planning  and  tes<ng  the  OS  in  limited  manner  would  only   cause  substan<al  issues  in  the  future   and   could   also   lead   to   user   dissa<sfac<on,   not   mee<ng   the   SLA,   and   other   business   compe<<ve/security  issues. Imagine   that   in   2008   and   if   you   are   running/suppor<ng   ancient   OS   like   Windows   2000   (launched  8+  years  ago)  or   XP  (7+  years  ago),   OEMs  and  device  manufacturers  and  ISVs  or   soG-­‐ ware  vendors  would  con<nue  to  limit   their   support   for  these  older  OS  and  at  the  same  <me  you   would  be  missing  out  on  all  the  great  features  and  cost  savings  that  Windows  Vista  has  to  offer.

Know the facts: 
The  facts  around  the  development,  tes<ng  and  adop<on  speak  for  themselves: When  developing  Windows  Vista,  MicrosoG  set  out  to  provide  higher  levels  of  produc<vity,  mo-­‐ bility,  and  security,  with  lower  costs.  AGer  more  than  six  months  of  broad  availability  and  usage,   it's  evident   that   these  investments  are  improving   the   Windows  compu<ng  experience.  For   ex-­‐ ample,  in  the  first  six  months  of   use,  Windows  Vista  had  fewer  security  issues  than  Windows  XP   (Windows  Vista  had  only   12   issues,  and  Windows  XP  had  36).  According  to  the  Windows  Vista  6-­‐ Month  Vulnerability  Report  by  Jeffery  R.  Jones,  Windows  Vista  had  fewer  security  issues  than  all   the  popular  opera<ng  systems  he  studied. • • • • Over  60  Million  sold  thus  far Adop<on  rate  faster  than  predecessors Device  Coverage  Con<nues  To  Grow  Rapidly;   700K  New  Device  Types  Added  Since  No-­‐ vember  2006 Over  2.2  million  devices   are  supported  by  Windows  Vista,  between  In-­‐Box  and  WU  drivers,  suppor<ng  the   vast  majority  of  devices 2

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Number  of  Logoed  Devices  exceeds  10,000  and  growth  is  outpacing  Windows  XP Over  20   Reliability   and  Compa<bility   updates  delivered  to  all  users  using   Windows  Up-­‐ date

What's Cooking in Windows Vista SP1: 
So  what's  the  whole  big  fuss  about  Windows  Vista  SP1,  should  the  IT  Pros  and   end-­‐users  really   expects  some  elaborate  feature  sets  or  a  big  "SHOCK  ‘n  AWE  ".    The  straight   answer  for   that  is   also  not  really.  Let's  talk  about  what  is  Windows  Vista  SP1: • • •         • Windows  Vista  SP1  Is  Another  Vehicle  To  Improve  Experience Built  and  tested  to   enable  smooth  transi<ons  for  applica<ons  from  Windows  Vista  RTM   to  Windows  Vista  SP1 What  to  expect -­‐          Improved  Applica<on  Compa<bility -­‐          Device  Driver  Improvements -­‐          Security,  Reliability  and  performance -­‐        Administra<ve  Experience Customers  can  choose  which  updates  they   want,  and  install  them  with  the  technology   best   for   their   organiza<on.   This  includes  Windows   Update   (WU),   Windows  Server   Up-­‐ date  Services  (WSUS),  and  System  Center  Configura<on  Manager  or  3rd  party  tools

Wait or not to Wait?
Organiza<ons  do  not  need  to  wait  for  SP1   to  deploy  Windows  Vista;  they  are  encouraged  to  be-­‐ gin  their  Windows  Vista  evalua<on  and  deployment  now: Organiza<ons  currently   evalua<ng  and   deploying  Windows  Vista  should  con<nue  their  evalua-­‐ <on,   pilot   programs,  and  deployment  on  the  ini<al  ("Gold")   Windows  Vista   release.   MicrosoG   provides  the  tools  and  guidance  needed  to  deploy   Windows  Vista  today   and  will  provide  addi-­‐ <onal  guidance,  tools  and  support  for  moving  to  SP1  when  the  service  pack  is  released. Organiza<ons  just  star<ng  to  evaluate  Windows  Vista  should  plan  a  pilot  program,  targe<ng  the   PCs  that  gain  the  most   business  value  from  Windows  Vista  (for  example,  many  organiza<ons  will   find  that  mobile  PCs  get  the  most  benefits)   and  present  the  simplest  upgrade  from  the  gold  re-­‐ lease  of   Windows  Vista  to  SP1  (How  to  Start  a  Windows  Vista  Pilot  Deployment  describes  best   prac<ces  for  running  a  pilot). 3

Organiza<ons  wai<ng   for   Windows  Vista  SP1  should  start  their   compa<bility  tes<ng  on  the  gold   release  of   Windows  Vista   now,   and  then  begin  their   evalua<on  and  pilot   programs  on   the  re-­‐ lease  candidate  of  Windows  Vista  SP1  when  it  is  released.  Windows  Vista  includes  architectural   changes  rela<ve  to  Windows  XP   that  improve  security   and   reliability.   These  changes  can  cause   some  applica<ons  which  work  on   Windows  XP   not  to   work  on  Windows  Vista.  However,   these   architectural  changes  are  also  part   of  Windows  Vista  SP1.  For   this  reason,  tes<ng  applica<ons   on  Windows  Vista  today  will  be  a  very  good  proxy  for  compa<bility  with  Windows  Vista  SP1.

What are the consequences for delaying the adoption of SP1?
Well,  Windows  Vista  was  made  available  to  Business  Customers  Nov  of  2006,  with  the  adop<on   picking  up  in  the  enterprise  segment  it's  likely  that  the  new  apps  and  support  for  new  hardware   devices  coming  from  ISVs  and  OEMs  will  favor  Vista  (Vista  is  6   years  old  OS  and  as  the  <me  goes   on,  the  support  will  diminish). Windows  Vista  has  host  of  advancements  and   even  without   SP1,   it   makes   complete  sense  to   start   the  evalua<on  and  POCs  etc  to  get  your  shop  ready.   Scoping  plans  for  hardware  and  app   compact  issues  and  sketching  plans  would  only  help  the  organiza<ons  move  close  to  inevitable.

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