The Geometry of Packing

Mathematics 10 Advanced Ms. Barnaby 2010-2011 Name: _________________ DUE: March 11, 2011 QUIZ: March 17, 2011

..............6 Activity 1 – Measuring Shapes and Calculating Volume........9 Activity 4 – Regular Polygons & Applications.......................….....................12 Activity 7 – Real World Applications....5 Regular Polygons.........................1 Table of Contents………………………………………………………………….11 Activity 6 – Investigating Economy Rate....................................................Table of Contents Title page………………………………………………………………………………............ and Surface Area................2 Outcomes for Chapter 6…………………………………………………………3 Formulas……………………………………………………………………………….................13 ................ Perimeter......................................8 Activity 3 – Working with Cones........………..……………………………............4 Types of Prisms...7 Activity 2 – Packaging Tennis Balls………..............10 Activity 5 – Investigating Area.....................5 Definitions……………………………………………………………………………................

and volume. Explore properties of. and apply relationships between perimeter and area. and making conjectures. including the use of angles of elevation. when given a logical argument. and between surface area. discover. developing properties. Apply trigonometric functions to solve problems involving right triangles. surface area.and three. and volume. Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of surface area and volume. D10 D11 D12 D13 E1 E2 E8 E9 . Solve problems involving polygons and polyhedra. if it is valid. Use deductive reasoning to construct logical arguments and be able to determine. area. Determine and apply relationships between the perimeters and area of similar figures and between the surface areas and volumes of similar solids. Determine and apply formulas for perimeter. two.Outcomes for Chapter 6 Outcome A3 C36 D1 D5 Description of Outcome Demonstrate an understanding of the role of irrational numbers in applications. Explore. Explore.dimensional figures. and apply properties of maximum area and volume. and make and test conjectures about. Use inductive reasoning when observing patterns. Solve problems using the trigonometric ratios. determine.

FORMULAS (http://math.com) .about.

PRISMS REGULAR POLYGONS .

DEFINITIONS Perimeter _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Area _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Volume _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Surface Area _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Capacity _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Prism _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Regular Polygon _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ Economy Rate _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ .

ACTIVITY 1 Measuring Shapes and Calculating Volume Outcomes D1. Measure all units in centimetres. D7 There are 3 shapes that you will need to find in order to complete this activity. CONE (Actual object used: ________________________) Appropriate Volume Formula [1 point] Proper measurements [2 points] Calculation of volume using measurements [2 points] CYLINDER (Actual object used: ________________________) Appropriate Volume Formula [1 point] Proper measurements [2 points] Calculation of volume using measurements [2 points] SQUARE-BASED PYRAMID (Actual object used: ________________________) Appropriate Volume Formula [1 point] Proper measurements [2 points] Calculation of volume using measurements [2 points] . Final answers should contain proper units and be rounded to the nearest hundredths. Using the appropriate formulas. You will need to take the appropriate measurements according to the volume formulas. please calculate the volume for each shape. Please use 4 decimal places for all calculations until you reach your final answer. D13.

1. Calculate the surface area of the box and its lid. The arrangement of the balls in the box is shown below. A box. [3 points] 3. [2 points] 5. [2 points] 2. which has a lid.5 cm. [3 points] . Final answers should contain proper units and be rounded to the nearest hundredths. D7 Tennis balls have a radius of 3. What percentage of the box is empty once the tennis balls are in it? [1 point] 4. is just big enough to contain 6 tennis balls.ACTIVITY 2 Packaging Tennis Balls Outcomes D1. Calculate the surface area and volume of a cylindrical tube that would be just big enough to hold 3 tennis balls. Find the volume of the empty space in the box when the six balls are in it. Calculate the volume of the box. D13.

D13. Assume that the same amount of soap powder was poured into a cylindrical container with the same height (10 cm) and a base diameter (8 cm) as the cone.ACTIVITY 3 Working with Cones Outcomes D1. in centimetres. It has a diameter of 8cm and a height of 10cm. Calculate the height of the powder. 1. when the radius of the soap powder in the scoop is 3cm. D7 The diagram below represents a measuring scoop used for measuring soap powder for a washing machine. HINT Similar Triangles should help.[3 points] 2. What percentage of the cylinder would the soap powder fill? [3 points] .

Calculate the surface area of the regular polygon below. a) A parallelogram and a rectangle [2 points] b) A rhombus and a square [2 points] c) A rhombus and a rectangle [2 points] 2. [5 points] 6m 3. Use a diagram to support your answer.ACTIVITY 4 Regular Polygons & Applications Outcomes E2. You may find it useful to draw three lines of symmetry through the vertices to create 6 equal triangles. E8 1. D1. E8. explain the differences between the following shapes. Calculate the volume of a regular decagonal prism with each base side of the decagon measuring 12 cm and the height of the prism measuring 76 cm [10 points] . E2. Keeping symmetry in mind.

a) Complete the following table. He wonders if this large block will melt more slowly than 27 cubes kept separate from each other. [3 points] Width (m) 1 2 Length (m) 64 32 Perimeter (m) 130 b) What perimeter results in the least expensive design? [1 points] 2. Suppose you were a contractor and you needed to build a house with a main floor area of 64 square meters.ACTIVITY 5 Investigating Area. a) How many faces will there be on 27 cubes kept separate? [2 points] b) If they are made into the large block. E8. D12. E2. C36. Perimeter. how many of those faces are exposed? [2 points] 3. D5. Suppose a chunk of ice contains 20 L of water. Merle uses 27 small cubes of ice to build a large block measuring 3 x 3 x 3. D11 1. What would the best dimensions be to minimize the speed of melting? [3 points] . Two factors that influence the cost of building a house are the floor area and the perimeter of the house. and Surface Area Outcomes D1.

making it less economical. making it a more economical design. D1. much of it going to the landfill. What are the most efficient dimensions of a tuna can that maximize the economy rate? [5 points] 2. ER has led to some interesting discussions in the marketplace and has contributed to the miniaturization of packaging of many products in our stores. E2. Calculate the volume and surface area of the following 4 objects. If it is a low number too much material is being used to make the package. A typical can of tuna holds about 200mL. D11. 1. ER = Volume Surface Area If this ratio is high. Economy Rate is the ratio of Volume to Surface Area.ACTIVITY 6 Investigating Economy Rate Outcomes C36. Place them in order of most economical to least economical. [15 points] . that means the package has more volume than surface area. E1. This is something to consider when you are buying and wrapping packages. E8 Another way to apply geometry is to calculate the Economy Rate (referred to as ER). An excessive amount of packaging is thrown out after birthdays and holidays.

The diameter of this tornado is 82 m and its height is 860 m. A tornado is a narrow funnel shaped cloud similar to a cone. Calculate the area of material needed to produce the sails for this boat. A rectangular field is 18 m long and 7 m wide. Calculate the volume of the funnel of the tornado.ACTIVITY 7 Real World Applications All Outcomes 1. [4 points] 3.75 m2. [4 points] 8m 8m 4m 6m . Calculate the cost of putting grass on the field if sod costs $10. [3 points] 2.

assuming that the door does not exist. The total height of the building is 8m. again assuming that the door does not exist. [2 points] b) Find the surface area of the pyramid. They are getting quite old. Road salt and sand is stored in dome-shape storage facilities. The Great Pyramid at Giza measures 146 m in height.5m and a diameter of 10m. When you pour salt or sand.4. . [4 points] (HINT – You may need Pythagoras’ help) 5. so it has been decided that a coat of protective varnish might help protect this square-based structure. a) Find the surface area of the storage facility. [2 points]. it forms a cone! The base is a cylinder with a height of 1. The pyramids in Egypt have held great mysteries for centuries. and makes it easier to load it into the storage area. The cone-shape evenly distributes the pressure from the weight of the salt or sand. a) Find the volume of the pyramid. This is because road salt and sand is quite heavy and the shape of the cone prevents unnecessary pressure points for breakage (such as corners!). [4 points] b) Find the volume of the storage facility. and has a base-perimeter of 550 m.