Thayer Consultancy

ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: The South China Sea: Chinese Hegemony or Peaceful Settlement? Carlyle A. Thayer June 10, 2011

[client name deleted]  1. In your view, what will happen if China totally controls all of the East Sea shipping  routes?  If  this  happens,  how  will  it  impact  on  East  Asia  and  the  Asia‐Pacific  economically?  ANSWER: There is no possibility of China totally controlling all the East Sea sea lines  of communications (SLOCs) within the next three to five decades. “Sea control” is a  military term meaning dominance. The Chinese Navy will never be strong enough in  the three to five year time frame to prevent United States warships from travelling  through the East Sea.  All the economies of East Asia are dependent on SLOCs through the East Sea. Also,  all major trading nations, like Australia, are also dependent on these routes. If China  attempted  to  disrupt  international  trade  it  would  be  threatening  the  life  blood  of  Japan, South Korea, Australia, and the United States.   Controlling the SLOCs is a different matter from China exercising hegemony over the  island archipelagoes in the South China Sea. The SLOCs run to the east and west of  the Spratly Islands. If China were able to exercise hegemony over the islands in the  East Sea it could enforce its laws. China could prevent the littoral states – Vietnam,  the Philippines and Malaysia – from exploiting the natural resources (oil and gas) and  fish  stocks  in  this  area.  This  would  be  crippling  to  the  economies  of  Vietnam  and  Philippines. China would benefit from control over the East Sea’s resources.  The scenario of Chinese hegemony could come about only if the United States and  other major powers acquiesced. This is highly unlikely.   2. Why does China choose to act now but not at some other time?  ANSWER: China is responding to the diplomatic setbacks it suffered in 2010. In 2008  it targeted U.S. and other western oil companies and warned them against assisting  Vietnam  in  exploiting  the  oil  and  gas  resources  in  the  East  Sea.  The  U.S.  reacted  strongly  both  publicly  and  privately.  China  has  shifted  target  to  the  oil  exploration  vessels of the Philippines and Vietnam.   China  is responding  to the  legal  challenges  to  its  9  dash line U‐shaped  map  and to  increased oil exploration activities by Vietnam and the Philippines. In order to claim 

2 “indisputable  sovereignty”  over  the  East  Sea  China  has  decided  to  “manage  the  South China Sea” and exercise its jurisdiction. It has assigned modern civilian China  Maritime Surveillance ships to perform this task.   China  knows  that  ASEAN  unity  is  fragile  and  that  some  of  its  members  can  be  induced if not intimidated into preventing a strong united front from being formed.  China also knows that in seven months Indonesia will no longer be chair of ASEAN.  For the next four years ASEAN will be led by states with no direct interest in the East  Sea (Brunei, Cambodia, Myanmar and Laos).  Finally, China is acting in such an assertive manner to pre‐empt the agenda of ASEAN  summit  and  related  meeting  to  be  held  later  this  year.  By  showing  a  strong  hand  now China hopes to prevent them from taking united action. This is a test of ASEAN  unity  and  United  States  commitment.  China  knows  there  is  little  appetite  among  ASEAN  members  to  confront  China  or  take  sides.  China  is  calculating  that  under  political pressure Vietnam and the Philippines can be isolated to a certain extent and  forced  to  but  bilateral  deals  with  China.  In  this  case,  China  will  press  for  joint  development on terms favourable to itself.   3. What do you think the responses of the major powers will be? Do you think China  has already thought through the reactions of other world powers' before making its  decision to act?  ANSWER:  China  views  the  United  States  as  its  main  obstacle.  It  knows  that  the  United States will not take sides in specific territorial disputes. It also knows that the  U.S.  offer  to  facilitate  a  process  to  peacefully  resolve  the  East  Sea  issues,  while  welcomed  by  some  ASEAN  members,  also  caused  concern  by  other  members.  As  long as China does not interfere with the freedom and safety of navigation through  the South China Sea U.S. material interests are not directly threatened. The U.S. can  only respond using diplomatic means and symbolic shows of military strength.  The other major powers in the region will follow U.S. leadership rather than take on  a  leadership  role  themselves.  The  U.S.  is  most  effective  if  its  supports  ASEAN,  a  divided ASEAN plays into China’s hands. China calculates that the major powers will  respond by urging a peaceful settlement of the dispute. China will continue to insist  that  only  the  parties  directly  involved  should  negotiate  –  bilaterally  –  with  China.  ASEAN  policy  at  the  moment  is  for  bilateral  discussions  on  bilateral  issues,  and  multilateral  discussions  where  the  interests  of  third  parties  are  involved.  In  other  words, the major powers can only intervene diplomatically. As long as the People’s  Liberation  Army  Navy  refrains  from  intervention,  the  major  powers  will  have  t  exercise restraint.  4.  In  your  view,  what  should  Vietnam  do  to  resolve  the  South  China  Sea  disputes  peacefully? What should ASEAN do to maintain peace and stability?  ANSWER:  Vietnam  must  strengthen  itself  by  ensuring  unity  at  home  and  by  continually  developing  the  capacity  to  exercise  sovereignty  over  its  Exclusive  Economic Zone. Vietnam must engage in high‐level discussions with Chinese leaders  to  work  out  an  interim  to  prevent  matters  from  further  escalating.  Vietnam  must  forge  a  close  political  relationship  with  the  Philippines,  Malaysia  and  Indonesia  to  present  a  united  front.  Vietnam  should  support  Indonesia’s  leadership  as  ASEAN 

3 Chair  in  mapping  out  a  diplomatic  strategy  to  respond  to  Chinese  assertiveness.  Vietnam must continually lobby the major powers for their political and diplomatic  support.  In  all  these  activities,  Vietnam  must  develop  an  effective    information  strategy to win over the support of the international community.   5.  In  own  view,  what  is  the  long‐term  mutual‐benefit  and  peaceful  solution  for  all  countries involved in the South China Sea dispute?  ANSWER: If all the concerned countries to agree to shelve territorial disputes, uphold  the  status  quo,  and  adhere  to  the  2002  Declaration  on  Conduct  of  Parties  in  the  South  China  Sea  that  would  be  a  major  step  in  reducing  tensions.  The  parties  concerned  should  enter  into  both  bilateral  negotiations  where  direct  interests  are  involved, and multilateral negotiations when the interests of three or more parties  are  involved.  In  the  longer  term  ASEAN  could  draft  a  treaty  open  to  accession  by  outside powers that would make the South China Sea a Zone of Peace, Cooperation  and  Development.  In  the  immediate  term  and  longer‐term  the  states  concerned  could explore joint development and sharing of resources. The least difficult area is  joint management of fisheries.  6. If you were a Vietnamese, what would you do now?  ANSWER: If I were a Vietnamese citizen I would want to express my concern to the  government  about  the  threat  to  national  sovereignty  posed  by  Chinese  actions.  I  would want my government to provide reassurance that it has a strategy to defend  Vietnam’s  sovereignty  and  to  gain  the  sympathy  and  support  of  the  world  community.  I  would  like  to  see  the  Prime  Minister,  Foreign  Minister  and  Defence  Minister give public speeches in the major cities outlining their views. These should  be broadcast on television and radio and printed in the media.  As  a  Vietnamese  citizen  I  would  keep  myself as  fully  informed  on  developments  in  the South China Sea by reading as much as possible. I would  want my government  to  provide  information.  Because  this  is  a  complex  issue  I  would  want  to  know  the  pros and cons of various policy options.  If  I  were  a  student,  I  would  want  my  lecturers  to  discuss  this  issue.  I  would  like  to  know the views of leading Vietnamese and foreign scholars. If I had friends overseas  I would want to exchange views with them. Above all I would want to know what is  motivating China and how a peaceful resolution to this issue can be achieved.   

Thayer Consultancy
ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: China’s Strategy in the South China Sea and Prospect for Armed Conflict Carlyle A. Thayer June 12, 2011

[client name deleted]  In  light  of  the  second  cable  cutting  incident  between  a  Chinese  fishing  boat  and  a  Vietnamese exploration ship, we would like your assessment of the following:  1‐  What  is  your  assessment  of  Chinese  actions?  How  serious  is  it?  Can  we  expect  more assertiveness like this from the Chinese?  ANSWER:  Chinese  actions  represent  a  new  wave  of  aggressive  assertion  of  sovereignty  over  the  East  Sea.  China  is  establishing  a  legal  basis  for  demonstrating  that  it  “manages  the  South  China  Sea”  and  has  administrative  jurisdiction  over  it.  China’s actions are serious because they are not based on common understanding of  international  law.  The  are  even  more  serious  because  China  refuses  to  make  clear  precisely  what  it  is  claiming.  China’s  claims  are  ambiguous  and  thus  open  to  misinterpretation.  Chinese actions will undoubtedly increase. It is stepping up the construction of more  China Surveillance Vessels.  And it has  launched  a massive oil exploration rig that it  says  will  explore  in  the  South  China  Sea.  Bit  by  bit  China  is  establishing  hegemony  over  the  waters  within  its  9  dash  line  U‐shaped  map.  China’s  claim  cuts  directly  in  the Exclusive Economic Zones of Vietnam and the Philippines. China’s actions have to  potential to disrupt if not halt exploration activities by Vietnam and the Philippines  that are part of their economic develop programs.  2‐ What is the likelihood of a clash between Vietnamese and Chinese naval forces?  What attitude does the international community take on these developments? What  action do you expect Vietnam to take?  ANSWER: So far China has used civilian China Maritime Surveillance vessels. A clash  between naval forces is possible if present tensions are not addressed and continue  to  escalate.  Vietnam  has  sent  the  Binh  Minh  02  back  to  sea  to  continue  exploring.  This time it was accompanied by eight escorts. If China tries to disrupt their activities  Vietnam will be forced to respond.   Vietnam has announced it will conduct live firing exercises in the East Sea. China also  stated  it  will  conduct  naval  exercises  in  the  South  China  Sea.  There  is  always  the 

2 danger  of  misunderstanding  and  an  incident  should  these  forces  encounter  one  another.   At  the  moment  Vietnam  has  experienced  two  incidents  where  the  cables  of  exploration  ships  have  been  cut.  The  Philippines  to  have  recorded  up  to  seven  incidents  of  Chinese  encroachment  into  its  waters,  including  shooting  at  its  fishermen.  Chinese  construction  on  one  rock  and  intimidation  of  one  of  its  exploration vessels. All these incidents are bilateral between China and the country  concerned. They do not threaten safety or freedom of navigation.  The  international  community  will  look  to  the  countries  concerned  to  resolve  this  dispute in the first instance. The leadership role of the United States is crucial. It the  U.S. take a leading role its allies will follow.   The  key  is  ASEAN  and  whether  or  not  it  can  reach  consensus  on  a  policy  towards  China.  If  ASEAN  can  present  a  united  front  it  will  get  the  support  of  the  U.S.  and  other major powers such as Japan, India, Australia and South Korea.  Vietnam  needs  to  maintain  unity  on  the  home  front  and  demonstrate the  exercise  sovereignty  over  its  Exclusive  Economic  Zone.  Vietnam  must  be  firm  but  not  provocative.  In  the  longer  term  Vietnam  needs  to  develop  and  deploy  appropriate  ships and aircraft to monitor and maintain surveillance over its EEZ.   Vietnam  should  form  close  political  relations  with  the  Philippines,  Malaysia  and  Indonesia  and  develop  a  common  policy.  Vietnam  should  support  Indonesia’s  leadership as Chair of ASEAN in building consensus of all its ten members.   Vietnam needs to lobby all relevant powers with an interest in the South China Sea  and secure their support for ASEAN. The major powers will look to ASEAN first and  then they will look to the United States.   Vietnam needs to pressure China for high‐level meetings to preserve the status quo  and to lower tensions.  Vietnam’s  entire  strategy  is  dependent  on  being  viewed  as  the  victim.  If  Vietnam  becomes to assertive or provocative in relations with China, it will be seen as “part of  the problem.” This will cause ASEAN to lose its unity.  3‐  Does  China  have  a  grand  strategy  behind  this  assertiveness?  Is  China  seeking  to  establish sovereign control over all maritime territory within its U shaped line?  ANSWER: China’s long term strategic plan is to build up naval power to deter the U.S.  Navy from operating in the so‐called “first island chain” off its east coast from Japan  to  Indonesia.  China’s  strategic  plan  is  to  develop  naval  power  to  protect  its  commercial interests and sea lines of communication from the Middle East to China  through the South China Sea.  China will become increasingly dependent on imported sources of energy – oil and  gas.  China’s strategy is to establish as much control over hydrocarbon resources in  the  South  China  Sea  as  it  can.  This  means  establishing  hegemony  over  the  islands  and  waters  within  its  9  dotted  line  U‐shaped  map.  Recent  Chinese  assertiveness  is  aimed  at  preventing  Vietnam  and  the  Philippines  from  exploiting  these  resources  and drawing in foreign oil companies to develop oil and gas. In China’s view, if they  do not act now, China’s claim to “indisputable sovereignty” will be undermined. 

Thayer Consultancy
ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: South China Sea: Explaining China’s Cable Cutting Tactic Carlyle A. Thayer June 12, 2011

 [client name deleted]  With the new development in the East Sea on June 9 (China's fishing boat deployed a  "cable cutting device" and got it trapped in a network of underwater cables in use by  a ship hired by Vietnam), I would like your assessment of the following:  1‐ How do you assess China's new action in the East Sea? Many experts forecast that  China will step up this kind of activity; how serious is it in the short‐term?  ANSWER:  Chinese  actions  represent  a  new  wave  of  aggressive  assertion  of  sovereignty  over  the  East  Sea.  China  is  establishing  a  legal  basis  for  demonstrating  that  it  “manages  the  South  China  Sea”  and  has  administrative  jurisdiction  over  it.  China’s actions are serious because they are not based on common understanding of  international  law.  The  are  even  more  serious  because  China  refuses  to  make  clear  precisely  what  it  is  claiming.  China’s  claims  are  ambiguous  and  thus  open  to  misinterpretation.  Chinese actions will undoubtedly increase. It is stepping up the construction of more  China Surveillance Vessels.  And it has  launched  a massive oil exploration rig that it  says  will  explore  in  the  South  China  Sea.  Bit  by  bit  China  is  establishing  hegemony  over  the  waters  within  its  9  dash  line  U‐shaped  map.  China’s  claim  cuts  directly  in  the Exclusive Economic Zones of Vietnam and the Philippines. China’s actions have to  potential to disrupt if not halt exploration activities by Vietnam and the Philippines  that are part of their economic develop programs.  2‐  Do  you  see  the  possibility  of  a  clash  between  Vietnam's  navy  and  China's  naval  forces? What will be the attitude of the international community if conflict erupts?  What should Vietnam do when this occurs?  ANSWER: So far China has used civilian China Maritime Surveillance vessels. A clash  between naval forces is possible if present tensions are not addressed and continue  to  escalate.  Vietnam  has  sent  the  Binh  Minh  02  back  to  sea  to  continue  exploring.  This time it was accompanied by eight escorts. If China tries to disrupt their activities  Vietnam will be forced to respond.   Vietnam has announced it will conduct live firing exercises in the East Sea. China also  stated  it  will  conduct  naval  exercises  in  the  South  China  Sea.  There  is  always  the  danger  of  misunderstanding  and  an  incident  should  these  forces  encounter  one  another.  

2 At  the  moment  Vietnam  has  experienced  two  incidents  where  the  cables  of  exploration  ships  have  been  cut.  The  Philippines  to  have  recorded  up  to  seven  incidents  of  Chinese  encroachment  into  its  waters,  including  shooting  at  its  fishermen.  Chinese  construction  on  one  rock  and  intimidation  of  one  of  its  exploration vessels. All these incidents are bilateral between China and the country  concerned. They do not threaten safety or freedom of navigation.  The  international  community  will  look  to  the  countries  concerned  to  resolve  this  dispute in the first instance. The leadership role of the United States is crucial. It the  U.S. take a leading role its allies will follow.   The  key  is  ASEAN  and  whether  or  not  it  can  reach  consensus  on  a  policy  towards  China.  If  ASEAN  can  present  a  united  front  it  will  get  the  support  of  the  U.S.  and  other major powers such as Japan, India, Australia and South Korea.  Vietnam  needs  to  maintain  unity  on  the  home  front  and  demonstrate the  exercise  sovereignty  over  its  Exclusive  Economic  Zone.  Vietnam  must  be  firm  but  not  provocative.  In  the  longer  term  Vietnam  needs  to  develop  and  deploy  appropriate  ships and aircraft to monitor and maintain surveillance over its EEZ.   Vietnam  should  form  close  political  relations  with  the  Philippines,  Malaysia  and  Indonesia  and  develop  a  common  policy.  Vietnam  should  support  Indonesia’s  leadership as Chair of ASEAN in building consensus of all its ten members.   Vietnam needs to lobby all relevant powers with an interest in the South China Sea  and secure their support for ASEAN. The major powers will look to ASEAN first and  then they will look to the United States.   Vietnam needs to pressure China for high‐level meetings to preserve the status quo  and to lower tensions.  Vietnam’s  entire  strategy  is  dependent  on  being  viewed  as  the  victim.  If  Vietnam  becomes to assertive or provocative in relations with China, it will be seen as “part of  the problem.” This will cause ASEAN to lose its unity.  3‐  In  your  opinion,  are  recent  developments  part  of  China’s  strategic  plan?  How  much preparation and time has China put into  its strategy? Why have they chosen  this moment to turn their U‐shaped map into a reality?  ANSWER: China’s long term strategic plan is to build up naval power to deter the U.S.  Navy from operating in the so‐called “first island chain” off its east coast from Japan  to  Indonesia.  China’s  strategic  plan  is  to  develop  naval  power  to  protect  its  commercial interests and sea lines of communication from the Middle East to China  through the South China Sea.  China will become increasingly dependent on imported sources of energy – oil and  gas.  China’s strategy is to establish as much control over hydrocarbon resources in  the  South  China  Sea  as  it  can.  This  means  establishing  hegemony  over  the  islands  and  waters  within  its  9  dotted  line  U‐shaped  map.  Recent  Chinese  assertiveness  is  aimed  at  preventing  Vietnam  and  the  Philippines  from  exploiting  these  resources  and drawing in foreign oil companies to develop oil and gas. In China’s view, if they  do not act now, China’s claim to “indisputable sovereignty” will be undermined. 

Thayer Consultancy
ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: South China Sea: Is China on a Collision Course? Carlyle A. Thayer June 13, 2011

 [client name deleted]  I've seen some analysts say that tensions are rising in the South China Sea, and I've  seen some of the official Vietnamese complaints about China's actions. I also noticed  there were public protest demonstrations in Vietnam on this issue. How serious is it?  Could you please provide an assessment?  ANSWER:  I  am  tempted  to  reply  that  everything  is  normal.  China  has  indisputable  sovereignty  over  the  Nansha  islands  and  adjacent  waters  from  the  Han  dynasty  to  the present. Despite erroneous reports and false information, even rumours spread  by  the  Philippines  and  Vietnam,  China  is  effectively  managing  the  South  China  Sea  and  exercising  its  sovereign  jurisdiction.  All  accusations  against  China  are  untrue.  China will never use force and wishes for a peaceful resolution of territorial disputes  to be settled bilaterally by the countries directly concerned. In the meantime China  will  conduct  routine  naval  exercises  in  the  western  Pacific  later  this  month.  A  new  mega  oil exploration  rig  will  explore  for  oil  and  gas  somewhere  in  the  South  China  Sea.  In  reality  a  series  of  unilateral  actions  by  China  have  raised  serious  tensions  and  potentially  set  China  on  a  collision  course  with  Vietnam  and  the  Philippines.  China  actions will test not only ASEAN unity but the US‐Philippines alliance.  The  Philippines  alleges  that  China  has  instigated  between  five  and  seven  incidents  this year. On February 25th  a Jianghu‐V Class missile frigate, Dongguan 560, ordered  Filipino fishermen to leave contested waters and hurried them along by firing three  shots  off  the  bow  of  one  boat.  On  March  2nd  two  Chinese  Maritime  Surveillance  boats  ordered  a  Philippines  oil  exploration  ship  to  leave  the  Reed  Bank  area.  They  threatened  to  ram  the  ship.  In  another  incident,  Chinese  boats  deposited  construction  material  on  an  uninhabited  reef  and  left  markers  and  a  buoy.  The  Philippines protested all of the incidents except the February 25th one.  As for Vietnam, China once again imposed its annual unilateral fishing ban. Nothing  new here, Vietnam reports Chinese fishermen have been encroaching on its fishing  grounds in larger numbers than before. More seriously, on May 26th and June 9th,  Chinese  boats  cut  the  cables  of  Vietnamese  seismic  ships  operating  well  within  Vietnam’s EEZ. Vietnam put the ship involved in the May 26th incident back to sea  with an eight‐vessel escort. Vietnam has protested each and every Chinese action. 

2 While  all  this  was  going  on  China  launched  a  mega  oil  exploration  rig  and  said  it  would  explore  for  oil  in  the  South  China  Sea.  On  June  9th  China  warned  the  Philippines and Vietnam to stop oil exploration and announced that it would conduct  routine naval exercises in the western Pacific.   China’s  actions  have  provoked  two  rounds  of  public  protests  in  Vietnam,  with  separate demonstrations in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City. Vietnam has been subject  to hundreds of cyber attacks on its websites, including government ones. Vietnam’s  Prime Minister has given a public speech with a strong defence of sovereignty. And  most significantly, Vietnam will be conducting nine hours of naval live firing exercise  off its central coast today.  China and the claimant states of Southeast Asia are on a potential collision course.  China’s  assertion  of  indisputable  sovereignty  over  the  Nansha  islands  and  adjacent  waters, when married with its 9 dotted line U‐shaped map, cuts deep into the EEZs  declared by Vietnam and the Philippines. China has never made clear exactly what it  is claiming to there is ambiguity over precisely which areas are in dispute.   So  far  the  PLAN  has  not  been  involved.  All  the  reported  incidents  have  involved  China  Maritime  Surveillance  ships  and  possible  Fishery  Administration  boats.  The  Philippines and Vietnam do not always make clear what Chinese ships were involved.  But the May 26th incident is well documented.  Up  to  these  incidents  China  and  ASEAN  were  quietly  working  on  a  formerly  moribund Joint Working Group to Implement the Declaration on Conduct of Parties  in  the  South  China  Sea.  They  were  hung  up  on  guidelines  for  the  working  group.  ASEAN  and  to  meet  first,  establish  a  common  position,  and  then  negotiate  with  China. China wants bilateral discussions with the countries directly concerned. There  were  hopes  that  a  more  legally  binding  code  of  conduct  for  the  South  China  Sea  would eventuate. The DOC’s tenth anniversary falls in November next year.  China’s new wave of assertiveness will place the South China Sea back on the agenda  for a series of ASEAN‐related summits and meetings to be held in July and the East  Asia Summit in October.  China  will  not relish the intervention by the US and other  parties who have no direct claim to the South China Sea. It is possible the EAS could  be  a  casualty  if  China  objects  to  any  discussion  on  the  South  China  Sea.  China  is  already  out  numbered  in  the  EAS  and  in  Beijing’s  view  this  might  not  be  a  bad  outcome.  All in all recent tensions in the South China Sea will test ASEAN unity and cohesion,  U.S.  resolve  and  engagement  in  Southeast  Asia,  and  the  US‐Philippines  mutual  security treaty. Sino‐Vietnamese relations will experience strains and if neither side  blinks a naval clash is likely outcome. 

Thayer Consultancy
ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: South China Sea: What Are U.S. Interests? Carlyle A. Thayer June 13, 2011

[client name deleted]  Some  observers  have  speculated  that  the  involvement  of  the  US  in  the  dispute  would hinge on how its own interest would be affected in this regard. What is your  assessment of this?  ANSWER: Of course the United States will act on its national interest. It has declared  that safety and freedom of navigation in the South China Sea is a national interest.  China  is  at  pains  not  to  interfere  with  this  interest.  If  China  did  it  would  be  confronted with U.S. naval and air power.  The United States has higher interests in developing a good relationship with China  including  a  working  military‐to‐military  relationship.  The  U.S.  does  not  want  to  be  entrapped – drawn in – to taking sides in territorial disputes in the South China Sea.  U.S. relations with Vietnam and the Philippines differ. The Philippines is a treaty ally  through  the  1951  mutual  security  treaty.  This  was  signed  before  the  Philippines  declared  the  Kalayaan  Island  Group  in  the  South  China  Sea.  The  U.S.  argues  the  treaty  does  not  cover  territory  acquired  after  the  treaty  was  signed.  However,  the  U.S. has indicated it would meet its treaty obligations to consult with Manila if the  armed  forces  of  the  Philippines,  including  navy  ships,  were  attacked.  The  United  States has no such relationship with Vietnam and defence ties are minimal.  The United States has a more general interest in maintaining peace and stability in  the  South  China  Sea  and  in  seeing  ASEAN  play  a  central  role.  The  U.S.  will  provide  political  and  diplomatic  support  if  China  attempts  to  intimidate  or  bully  regional  states.  The bottom line is that the Philippines and Vietnam must look first to themselves to  defend their sovereignty in their Exclusive Economic Zones.  

Thayer Consultancy
ABN # 65 648 097 123

Background Briefing: South China Sea Tensions: Is a Resolution Possible? Carlyle A. Thayer June 14, 2011

[client name deleted]  Q1. What is your assessment of the latest upping of tensions in the South China Sea?  ANSWER: Both China and Vietnam are heading for a collision course if they do not  stop upping the ante in response to each other. Vietnam has countered the actions  by civilian China Maritime Surveillance vessels in cutting cables by send out escorts  to accompany its oil exploration vessels. If China sends in further ships to enforce its  jurisdiction  there  is  every  likelihood  of  an  incident  such  as  a  collision  or  even  exchange of gun fire depending on the provocation.  China’s  response  has  been  hostile  from  the  beginning.  China  did  not  even  offer  to  investigate  any  of  the  incidents.  Chinese  behavior  has  the  potential  to  scupper  negotiations  underway  between  China  and  ASEAN  over  adopting  guidelines  to  implement the 2002 Declaration on Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea (DOC)  and thus set back plans for a more legally binding Code of Conduct.  These  recent  incident  in  the  South  China  Sea,  involving  the  Philippines  as  well,  means  that  territorial  disputes  will  feature  in  July  when  ASEAN  meets  to  hold  its  annual  summit  and  related  meetings.  International  pressure  will  build  up  on  all  parties, China in particular, to cease provocations and to negotiate a peaceful modus  vivendi.  If  China  reacts  negatively  this  could  impact  on  the  East  Asia  Summit  scheduled  for  Jakarta  in  October  when  the  United  States  is  expected  to  attend  for  the first time.  Q2.  How  do  you  see  this  panning  out  now  that  Vietnam  has conducted  its  live‐fire  drill?  ANSWER:  Vietnam’s  live  fire  drills  were  something  of  an  anti‐climax.  The  involved  live  firing  by  coastal  artillery  during  the  day  and  naval  gun  fire  in  the  evening.  No  anti‐ship  missiles  were  test  fired.  The  area  concerned  stretched  from  the  coast  to  Hon  Qng  island  40  kilometres  away.  The  exercise  were  not  conducted  anywhere  near where the two cable cutting incidents took place. And they were conducted so  close to land that there was no possibility of any Chinese ships being involved.  China reacted predictably – hysterically and over the top. China, in fact, announced  that  it  would  be  conducting  naval  exercises  in  the  Western  Pacific  before  Vietnam  announced its live firing drill. Chinese ships will only be threatened if they intrude on 

2 Vietnam  territorial  waters  and  contiguous  zone,  and  not  the  outer  reaches  of  its  Exclusive Economic Zone.  Q3. The foreign media has said that Vietnam has called for international mediation  and wants the US to help. Last year the US said a resolution of the South China Sea  dispute was in its "national interests" ‐‐ What exactly are those interests?  ANSWER: Vietnam’s position was announced in response to a question by a reporter  at a Foreign Ministry press conference. It was not a new initiative.  U.S.  interests  are  to  maintain  the  safety  and  freedom  of  navigation  in  the  international shipping lanes that traverse the South China Sea. The US has a national  interest to see that US‐owned ships and those of its allies and friends and ships that  carry cargo to and from the United States are not molested.   The US has also declared it has an interest in preventing any country from exerting  hegemony  over  the  South  China  Sea.  But  the  US  will  not  take  sides  in  territorial  disputes.  Q4. Realistically, what kind of resolution can there be to this issue? It seems to have  gone on for so long that a "resolution" will be extremely difficult to achieve.  ANSWER: Settling territorial disputes in the South China Sea may never be possible.  China’s  claims  to  indisputable  sovereignty  over  most  of  the  South  China  Sea  is  not  grounded  in  international  law  and  are  thus  not  amenable  to  negotiation.  China’s  claims cuts deeply into the Exclusive Economic Zones declared by the Philippines and  Vietnam.  In  the  meantime,  current  tensions  could  be  addressed  by  getting  all  the  parties  concerned  to  agree  to  refrain  from  the  threat  or  use  of  force  and  to  maintain  the  status  quo,  and  completing  negotiations  on  the  guidelines  to  implement  the  DOC.  This  would  bring some  measure  of  stability  and  predictability  to  relations  between  China and littoral states. This is the best that can be hoped for because the DOC has  already  been  agreed  by  China  and  ASEAN  members.  The  various  suggestions  for  cooperative  action  in  the  DOC  could  be  implemented  both  as  practical  and  confidence building measures.  In  the  longer  terms  sovereignty  disputes  could  be  shelved  and  the  countries  concerned could agree on joint development of the region’s natural resources. They  could also adopt a more stringent code of conduct but for this to be legally binding it  would have to have the force of a treaty.   

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful