DEAN’S MESSAGE

Spring & Summer 2010

Volume 26, Number 1

Time Travel
he next time you visit the School of Dentistry, please take a few moments to visit our new “exhibit.” It will be, literally, a trip down memory lane. Recently, nearly 200 class photos were placed in one location – on walls outside lecture rooms on the ground floor. Included are 132 dental class photos going back to 1876 and 63 dental hygiene class photos beginning around the middle of the 1940s. Two more class photos, of the dental and dental hygiene classes of 2010, have recently been added. Many of you recall that some of the class photos were displayed on the first floor for a number of years. But since our first class of dental students graduated 134 years ago, we ran out of room to display all the class photos. That’s no longer the case. Because of the efforts of Erica Hanss, our administrative officer; Dennis Lopatin, our senior associate dean; Diane McFarland, my administrative assistant; Shannon O’Dell, curator of the Sindecuse Museum; and Per Kjeldsen, our photographer, you can now take a trip through time and reminisce. I did that recently with leaders of the Alpha Omega International Dental Fraternity. As I discussed our School, its history, and showed them our facilities, we paused to look at many of the class photos. Seeing the faces brought back memories of our days in dental school and discussions about some of our classmates, faculty, and how the practice of dentistry has changed. If you’re a dental or dental hygiene alumnus, the class photos will do the same for you. As you share your experiences with a son, daughter, or friend, you may also be planting the seeds that will encourage them to pursue education here at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry.

DentalUM magazine is published twice a year by the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. Send comments and updates to: dentistry.communications@umich.edu or Director of Communications, School of Dentistry, Room B307, 1011 N. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1078 Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Polverini Director of Communications . . . . . . Sharon Grayden Writer & Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jerry Mastey Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Jung Editorial Review Board: Member publication Dennis Lopatin - Chair of the American Richard Fetchiet Association of Erica Hanss Dental Editors Lynn Johnson Sharon Grayden - ex officio The Regents of the University: Julia Donovan Darlow, Laurence B. Deitch, Denise Ilitch, Olivia P. Maynard, Andrea Fischer Newman, Andrew C. Richner, S. Martin Taylor, Katherine E. White, Mary Sue Coleman, ex officio University of Michigan School of Dentistry Alumni Society Board of Governors Terms Expire 2010: Samuel Bander, ’81 Grand Rapids, MI (Chair) Kerry Kaysserian, ’81 Traverse City, MI Jerry Booth, ’61 DDS, ’64 MS, Jackson, MI Josephine Weeden, ’96 DDS, ‘99 MS, Saline, MI Kathleen Early, ’77 DH, Lakeland, MI Terms Expire 2011: Jemma Allor, ‘00 DH, Mt. Clemens, MI Sondra Moore Gunn, ‘78 DDS, ‘80 MS, Ann Arbor, MI George Yellich, ‘72 DDS, ‘77 MS, Los Gatos, CA Michael Cerminaro, ‘86 DDS, Muskegon , MI John McMahon, ‘82 DDS, Grand Rapids, MI Terms Expire 2012: Metodi C. Pogoncheff, ’76 Lansing, MI Wayne Olsen, ’81 Traverse City, MI Sheree Duff, ’80 BSDH, Grand Blanc, MI David O. Cramer, ’93 Grand Rapids, MI Scott Schulz, ’96 Traverse City, MI Student Representative: Anh Pham (D2) Ex Officio Members: Peter Polverini, Dean Janet Souder Wilson, ‘73 DH, Northville, MI Alumni Association Liaison Steve C. Grafton , Executive Director, Alumni Assoc. Richard R. Fetchiet, Director of External Relations and Continuing Dental Education
The University of Michigan, as an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action. The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, disability, religion, height, weight, or veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions. Inquiries or complaints may be addressed to the Senior Director for Institutional Equity, and Title IX/Section 504/ADA Coordinator, Office of Institutional Equity, 2072 Administrative Services Building, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1432, (734) 763-0235, TTY (734) 647-1388. For other University of Michigan information call (734) 764-1817. Copyright © 2010 The Regents of the University of Michigan

Sincerely,

Peter J. Polverini, Dean

contents:

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Read more DentalUM on our Web site at www.dent.umich.edu

FEATURES
1 5 The Class Photo Project Alumni
A history of the U-M School of Dentistry in pictures Seven graduates recall their days at the School of Dentistry

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Future Plans Presented
Board of Governors hear about initiatives

14 Dr. H. Dean Millard Honored 17 Faculty Profile
Dr. Paul Edwards

18 New Oral Pathology Residency Program

DEPARTMENTS
9 14 19 23 25 29
Dental Hygiene Development Faculty News Students Research Alumni News

On the cover: Nearly 200 dental and dental hygiene class photos can be seen on walls along the ground floor at the School of Dentistry. Class Photo Project coordinator Erica Hanss is pictured with the School’s photographer Per Kjeldsen who has photographed the graduates for more than 30 years.

THE CLASS PHOTO PROJECT
Per Kjeldsen

You will smile. You will laugh. And then you will probably sigh and say, “I can’t believe it! Look at that! Where has the time gone?”
That much is guaranteed as you walk the hallways on the ground floor at the School of Dentistry and the Alpha Omega Student Forum and view the dental and dental hygiene class photos. Outside lecture rooms and the entrances to the Student Forum are 132 dental class photos beginning in 1876 along with 63 dental hygiene class photos starting around 1945. Go ahead…take your time. Look at some of them or all of them. No one will mind. Already a heavily-traveled area as dental and dental hygiene students scurry from one class to another, the ground floor in recent months has become much more — a “magnet floor” for alumni, their spouses, children and grandchildren, and visitors too — as many pause and search for their names and faces or the names and faces of classmates from yesteryear.

An Idea Becomes Reality
The thought of displaying all the class photos in one location was just an idea in the fall of 2008. But a few months later the initiative was becoming reality under the direction of Erica Hanss, administrative manager in the Dean’s Office. “I thought it was important for the School to showcase some of its history by displaying all the class photos in one location,” she said. “We were displaying some of the photos on the first floor, but there was limited space and no room to grow, so we had to find another location for all of them.”

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Shannon O’Dell, curator of the School’s Sindecuse Museum, and Diane McFarland, assistant to the dean, who were also involved with the project, display an original version of one class photo.

Hanss talked to Dean Peter Polverini and Dennis Lopatin, senior associate dean, and received the go ahead to find as many dental and dental hygiene class photos as possible and then find a single location to display all of them. Hanss enlisted the help of Shannon O’Dell, Sindecuse Museum curator; Diane McFarland, assistant to the dean; and photographer Per Kjeldsen to assist with the considerable detective work, planning, and follow up that was needed. The School’s Sindecuse Museum holds a print or original version of nearly ever y class photo. O’Dell organized the collection and stores the photos in an environmentally controlled area. But many of the original photos (preservation copies) are significantly larger than the 11- by 14-inch photos that are now displayed. O’Dell worked with an Ann Arbor vendor who took high-resolution digital photos of each class picture. “That gave us the flexibility to size each photo to fit the space that was available,” she said. O’Dell said three formats of each image were made – a print, a digital, and a transparency. One print went up on the wall, another was kept as a historical copy in the Museum, and a transparency was created since most of the originals were too big for a standard digital camera. Those digital files have been added to the Museum’s catalog database stored on highly secure ser vers. The Bentley Historical Library has agreed to maintain the archive of the class composites of each dental and dental hygiene class beginning with the first composite taken in 1876. These high-resolution photos

can be viewed and downloaded from the Bentley Web site at h t t p : / / b e n t l e y. u m i c h . e d u / exhibits/dental/index.php.

Making the Photos “Flow”
McFarland did some of the detective work. “I worked with Shannon to see what class photos we already had,” she said. “If we didn’t have a particular class photo, I worked with the Bentley Historical Library to see if they had them.” After determining that more than 200 class photos could be displayed on the ground floor, Hanss began working on photo placement. “The ground floor offered us the best of both worlds, a heavily traveled area and a central location. We also wanted the pictures to be arranged so that they would flow,” she said. To guide the installation and flow, she created a detailed diagram as to the placement of each class photo. The early years of the dental classes were placed on a wall at the west entrance to the Student Forum; the early years of the dental hygiene classes were placed on a wall on the east side. “Then, as people walk up a few stairs and turn the corner, the flow of the photos continues and shows the growth, evolution, and increase in enrollment over time,” Hanss said.

Customized, Secure Frames
Kjeldsen, School of Dentistr y photographer for more than 30 years, who began taking the class composite photos in 1985, remembered how taking them changed over time. He also had a few ideas about enhancing and securing the display. “It was interesting to go back and re-live how the photos were compiled,” he said with a smile. “Twenty years ago, it was primarily a manual process. Keary Campbell and I spent a lot of time taking individual photos, developing the negatives in a darkroom, making prints of each photo, cropping them, and then pasting each one of them onto a 32- by 40-inch board.” He said student names and the header were added, and afterwards, a photo was taken of all the pictures on that board. “The negative of that photo allowed the composite photo to be reduced to the 11 by 14 inch size that’s on the walls,” he said. A s te chnolo g y change d and computer software improved, “our

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Six of the nine members of the first class of the College of Dental Surgery had been in practice, including Walter H. Jackson, a well known dentist who had an office in Ann Arbor since about 1860. Jackson also filled the teaching role of “Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry” as he completed requirements to earn his DDS degree.

Jerry Mastey

Dean Peter Polverini and Alpha Omega International Dental Fraternity executives talk about changes to the curriculum at the U-M School of Dentistry since 1876. With him are (R to L): Dr. Daniel Uditsky, the organization’s president; Dr. Marvin Sonne (DDS 1973) and Detroit Chapter president of Alpha Omega; and Dr. Jamie Feldman, a member of the group’s Board of Directors and former classmate of Polverini’s at Marquette University.

methods shifted to digital photography,” Kjeldsen said. “Graphic artist Chris Jung has done a nice job compiling the individual photos into a class composite.” When the photos were originally installed on the first floor, Kjeldsen designed the frames – oak that was attractive and secure. “The result is a package of class photos that are inviting to look at as well as difficult, if not impossible, to remove,” he said. With the groundwork now in place, carpenters began removing class photos from the first floor and relocating them to the ground floor in February 2009. “As they did, faculty, staff, and students would stop and tell the dean, or me, or Diane what a great idea this was,” Hanss said.

From the Past
Looking at the photos, the most obvious changes are those in fashion. But the dental and dental hygiene class photos offer many interesting historical insights about the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. One immediately notices the small number of students enrolled in the first classes. For example, the first class of dental graduates, the Class of 1876, was so small that the name of every student is written in longhand. That’s the first and only time that has happened. Looking at the uniformity of the signatures, it’s safe to say the names were written by one person. Was it the School’s dean, Dr. Jonathan Taft? That’s a question that may never be answered conclusively. Other interesting notes about the dental and dental hygiene classes are noted on page 8.

Looking to the Future
But there’s something more that is apparent. Eleven frames, which can be seen on the wall opposite Rooms G322 and G310, will show composite photos of the Dental Classes of 2011 to 2021. Ten frames are available for photos of the Dental Hygiene Classes of 2011 to 2020. Truly, that is optimism on display about the future of the University of Michigan School of Dentistry.

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A Look Through Time: Dental Class Photos
Besides changes in hairstyling and clothing over time, the 132 dental class photos offer some interesting historical insights about the growth and evolution of the School of Dentistry since the first dental class graduated in 1876. Most apparent is the small size of early dental classes. Initially, there were nine or ten students, but by the late 1890s, there were two, three, and four dozen graduates. In 1880, the first female is seen in a class photo. Ten years later the first African American woman, Ida Gray, appears in her dental class photo. The first photo of a dental school building appears in the 1892 class photo. In 1898, a different building appears. In 1909, the photo of the dental school at its present location, on North University Avenue, appears (above right). In many early class photos, there is no one-to-one correlation of names and faces. It wasn’t until 1887 that the names of each dental student appeared beneath his or her picture. Because the dental school curriculum expanded from a three-year program to four years, there were no graduating dental students, hence no Class of 1904 photo. The Class of 1926 photo was the first class picture where the class president and vice president were listed. The following year, the titles of all class officers were listed – president, vice president, secretary, and treasurer – beneath the name of each leader. During World War II, there was no class photo for 1943. However, the next year, the military’s need for dentists was so acute that there were two graduating dental classes in 1944. In 1982, the Doctor of Dental Surgery degree, DDS, was listed after each name. That too would be the only time that has appeared in a class photo. Another interesting trend worth noting was that the dean of the dental school, faculty members, and even the president of the University of Michigan appeared in many of the early class photos.

Rising Enrollment
In the early- to mid-1950s, photos of administrators appeared on the top three rows of the class photos. Pictures of the students were beneath them. Legend has it that the placement was both symbolic and matter-of-fact to let students know who was in charge. Since 1973, however, no administrators or faculty have appeared in any class photos because the number of faculty and students was growing. Between 1973 and 1988, 100 or more dental students graduated annually. The Class of 1978 shows photos of 144 students. Pictures of seven other students do not appear, but their names are listed as members of that class, bringing the total number of graduates that year to 151, the most ever. The 1978 class photo was notable for another reason. It was the first class photo where pictures were taken in color. Since class photographs were taken from 1876 through 2009, approximately 10,000 faces have appeared in dental class photos at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry.

What’s the Official Name?
Did the School of Dentistry have difficulty trying to determine what its “official” name was? Looking at the photos, one might think so. In the early 1900s, the label was “University of Michigan Dental Surgery.” In 1923, the name changed to the “College of Dental Surgery.” Five years later, it was the “School of Dentistry” and was listed that way until 1932 when the name reverted to “Dental Surgery.” The “School of Dentistry” label returned in 1936 and has remained ever since. The photos also display some of the early buildings where dentistry was taught.

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Reflections from Alums...

1946

Now

1958

Now

1961

Now

Gerald Krause
(DDS 1946)

Donald Carlsen
(DDS 1958)

Daniel Balbach

(DDS 1961, MS orthodontics 1965)

My dental classes began in October 1943, while WWII was in progress. We were in an accelerated program that packed four years of training into two years and eight months. Since most of us were in the Army or Navy Special Training Program, there was additional pressure to succeed. My relationship with other dentists while serving in the Army Dental Corps after graduation helped me to appreciate my U of M dental school education. I have enjoyed my 40 years of practice and keeping up my professional skills with continuing education courses. My Michigan education provided me with a rewarding career as a dentist, as well as allowing me to enjoy life.

My most vivid memory of dental school was the beginning of the first semester when I walked into the gross anatomy lab and was greeted by the strong smell of formaldehyde. It’s a smell I’ll never forget. My dental degree from the University of Michigan had a strong, positive influence on my professional abilities and the desire to be ethical and successful in dentistry. My goal was to work with children, and with the recommendation of Dr. Robert Moyers I was fortunate to continue my education in orthodontics at the University of Iowa. I have thoroughly enjoyed my career and being able to help others, including those less fortunate.

Our classes during the 60’s were taught by nationally and internationally renowned leaders. Our professors wrote textbooks that were used worldwide. All were active and leaders in professional associations. We were among the last classes to share our dental school experiences and memories of the “old” dental school: • The closely monitored dress code – tie required unless in a clinic gown and no clinic or lab coats outside the building, unlike medical students. • 8:00 a.m. lectures in the upper and lower amphitheaters. • Stresses and strains endured in the freshman/sophomore technique lab. • Shared dental cubicles used by juniors Tuesday and Thursday and by seniors Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday in the often hot and humid dental clinic.

Metodi Pogoncheff
(DDS 1976)
1976 Now

I have two vivid dental school memories. First, there were only five women in my class. Today the class ratio is about 50/50 male-female. That is a major change. My other memory is of the great instructors we had and how many excellent ones there were throughout the School — Drs. Ash, Ramfjord, Lang, Charbeneau, Jaslow, Yohn, Yaman, Fusilier, McPhee, Kelsey, Snyder, Clayton, Avery, Asgar, Caffesse, Cartwright, Craig, Bagramian, Gobetti, Godwin, Kerr, Shipman, Hellman, Hayward, Kotowicz, Moyer, Richards, Rowe, Swartz, Upton, Shotwell. These are just a few of the names that bring back memories. All had brilliant minds and helped me and my classmates become the best dentists we could be. Whenever anyone asks me, “Where did you go to dental school?” I cannot feel any prouder when I say, “The University of Michigan!” Everyone respects that degree throughout the world and it all stems from the instructors who made the school.

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1980

Now

1982

Now

1992

Now

Joanne Dawley
(DDS 1980)

Julie Fattore

(BS dental hygiene 1982, DDS 2003)

Eric Hannapel

(DDS 1992, MS orthodontics 1996)

After earning a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Michigan in 1975, I was sure this was my highest achievement. First in my immediate family to earn a degree, this was an accomplishment my parents had supported since I was old enough to remember. One year later I was accepted at the U-M School of Dentistry as a first-year dental student. No words could explain all of the wonderful emotions, hopes, dreams and cautious optimism I experienced that day. I’m privileged to be an alumna of the University of Michigan. I am in a wonderful profession and practice in a business I own. For me, the Michigan Difference is simply a desire to make a difference. To this day I carry that optimism, and thanks to an outstanding academic experience, the ability to make a positive contribution.

My second four years of education at the School of Dentistry were memorable for several reasons. I attended my first football game as a dental student at the Big House on Labor Day weekend in 1999…the same weekend I turned 40. I also remember my oral surgery rotation on 9/11 and the concern I had for my children attending school in Ann Arbor. I wondered what I could do…or should do…for them. I knew, though, that I had to maintain my professional demeanor, remain calm, and treat the emergency patients. One of my happiest and proudest moments was helping to establish the first White Coat Ceremony in 2002. It was gratifying to help make the event a reality and to see the smiles on the faces of both my D4 classmates and the new D1 students. My dental education at Michigan was a defining period in my life. I was not a typical dental student, so studying for my dental degree was initially very stressful. But I thank God and everyone who supported my efforts for that amazing opportunity.

My most vivid memories are experiences I had in the pre-clinic with the ivory blocks and plastic teeth and Drs. Brandau and Avery peering over our shoulders to critique our preps. After persevering through the didactic course work, we began to do some dentistry. We were so proud using our newly purchased handpieces that we were melting plastic teeth. I also remember many instructors staying after clinic hours and offering guidance to us in fabricating gold crowns and denture setups as well as giving insights about life after dental school.

I am blessed and proud to have earned my dental and specialty degrees from the University of Michigan. To me, “the leaders and the best” and “it’s great to be a Michigan Wolverine” apply to more than the athletic teams.
Daniel Balbach

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Class Photos Impress Students
Students at the School of Dentistry say they often pause to look at the class photos. “I think I see my mother’s photo at least two or three times a day since it’s directly in front of my locker room,” fourth-year dental student Maciek Dolata said with a laugh as he talked about the class photos showing both his mother and father. Krystyna Dolata was one of only two U-M dental hygiene graduates in 1987. His father, Andrzej, earned his DDS from U-M in 1989. “Sometimes seeing her face, since she was one of two students in her dental hygiene class, is the inspiration I need. Other times, I can hear her voice reminding me that I should probably be studying a little more,” Dolata said. Since his father’s class photo is down the hall “I have to hunt to find him, but I enjoy looking at the photos. They remind me of how many people have succeeded and that I can too. But they also motivate me to work hard to live up to the reputation that my soon-tobe-colleagues have established,” added Dolata who said he is looking forward to seeing his photo and those of his classmates on the wall after graduation. “The pictures on the walls have come to life,” said fourth-year dental student David Schoonover. His father, William, earned his dental degree from Michigan in 1977. A brother, Andrew, earned his DDS from Michigan in 2005. “When I was a first-year student, I thought to myself, ‘I can’t wait to see my photo on the wall.’ But now that I
Fourth-year dental student Maciek Dolata looks at a photo of his mother, Krystyna, who was one of only two dental hygiene students to graduate from the School of Dentistry in 1987.
Jerry Mastey

am completing my studies, I realize that this is only the beginning of a long road my dad and brother have traveled. I’ve learned so much from both of them, including the way they have reached out to treat patients in Honduras. I can only image what more I will learn working with them.” Fourth-year dental student Sara Arnold said, “I enjoy looking at the composites lining the halls, especially seeing my dad’s picture.” Her father, Gary Arnold, earned his dental degree from U-M in 1975. “It’s fun to see all of his classmates and the many people who have mentored me through my dental school career,” she said. “I wonder what

students in 20 years will think of our haircuts,” she said with a laugh. Third-year dental student Evelyn Lucas-Perry agrees. “I love looking at the photos. Obviously, I am drawn to the class of 1980 since that was the year my mother, Dr. Patricia Lucas, graduated.” Lucas-Perry said that when she looks at other class photos, “I’m amazed at how the composition of dental classes has changed from year to year and decade to decade. Michigan has been at the forefront of diversity and opportunity and that is reflected in the class photos. It’s reassuring and gratifying to know that these are our principles.”

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Dr. Metodi Pogoncheff, a member of the School of Dentistry’s Alumni Society Board of Governors, smiles after locating his class photo and those of other classmates from 1976.

Fascinating Facts...from more than a century of photos
Dental class photos: • 1880: First female graduate pictured – Mrs. Alma Fuellgraff • 1904: No class photo as program went from three to four years. • 1916: Class identified as graduates from the “University of Michigan Dental Surgery” (before that was listed as “Dental Class”). • 1920: Break with tradition. Outdoor photo of mostly dental students wearing shirts and ties sitting on grass. Some faculty behind them standing wearing their white coats. • 1923: First time a time class photo label reads: “College of Dental Surgery.” • 1927: Class photo label: “University of Michigan School of Dental Surgery.” Also, first time all class officers noted – President, VP, Secretary, Treasurer. Dorothy Hard appears in faculty photo section with “DDS” after her name. • 1928: First time class photo label reads “University of Michigan School of Dentistry.” • 1936: “School of Dentistry” label appears on all class photos from this year forward. • 1944: Two classes graduated this year due to World War II. Dental hygiene class photos: • With the exception of the DH class of 1946 and 1947, DH students posed for class photos standing and wearing white caps and nurse’s dresses at the east entrance to the Kellogg Building. • Class of 1956 forward: All individual photos are head and shoulder pictures. • Class of 1977: First male in class photo, Christopher Simmons.

DENTISTS and DENTAL HYGIENISTS

Want a copy of your class photo?
View your class or download a free electronic image (jpeg) at: http://bentley.umich. edu/exhibits/ dental/index.php To buy a photo print click on the ‘order a print’ link and follow the instructions.

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DENTAL HYGIENE

Wendy Kerschbaum (right), director of the dental hygiene program, discusses some of the changes to the program with fourth-year dental hygiene student Sarah Hughes.

Jerry Mastey

Jerry Mastey

lthough we don’t have a photo of every graduating dental hygiene class, the photos that are on display give you a good idea about the history and the importance of our program,” says Professor Wendy Kerschbaum, director of the dental hygiene program. On the east side of the Alpha Omega Student Forum are 28 class photos beginning with those from around the middle of the 1940s. Thirty-five other class photos are displayed on walls outside Rooms G322 and G310. Although there are no class photos from the early years of the School’s dental hygiene program, eight students enrolled in the first class in 1921 and graduated the following year. The first director of the dental hygiene program was Dr. Dorothy Hard who earned her dental degree from U-M in 1922. “All early class photos show women wearing nurse’s caps and dresses,” Kerschbaum said. “The dean when the program was established, Dr. Marcus Ward, and Dr. Hard were disciplinarians who wanted the women students in the

program to realize from the moment they arrived that they were professionals and were expected to conduct themselves accordingly, both in their demeanor and in their appearance.” However, there were two exceptions to the early formal class pictures. One photo, perhaps the Class of 1946 (the year is not listed), shows women in the program seated informally wearing dresses. The photo for the following year (that year is also not listed), shows women wearing business suits.

Program Changes
In 1938, the length of the dental hygiene certificate program increased from one year to two years. Ten years later, in 1948, U-M Regents approved a four-year dental hygiene curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. The change allowed students to either enroll in the certificate program or to choose to pursue the bachelor’s option and complete two years of study in the College of Literature, Sciences, and the Arts followed by two years of study in the dental hygiene program.

The U-M School of Dentistry’s dental hygiene program was the only one in Michigan until 1950. Approximately three dozen women graduated from the program annually. But the numbers increased in the 1970s when the number of graduates in the dental hygiene program ranged from 73 to 77. Sharp increases in the number of students enrolled in the dental curriculum also occurred during the 1970s. Given the social climate, dental hygiene was predominantly a women’s profession. However, in 1977 Christopher Simmons became the first male to graduate from the program. In 1987 the certificate program was eliminated and all dental hygiene graduates henceforth earned a bachelor’s degree. The 1987 class photo notes that “there was no junior dental hygiene class of 1985 and, therefore, no graduates expected in May 1987.” The two women in the 1987 photo, Bridgette Forkin and Krystyna Dolata, completed the program as transfers. Forkin was a dental hygiene student in a baccalaureate program at West Virginia University when she transferred to U-M her junior year. Dolata, who earned a dental degree in Poland, became interested in dental hygiene when her family emigrated to the U.S. “Krystyna and Bridgette thus became the graduating Class of 1987,” the plaque notes. “Our program continues to attract high-caliber students,” Kerschbaum says. “And I’m confident about the future of the program. How can I not be? When you finish looking at the class photos, you’ll notice we have 12 frames for class photos from 2011 to 2020.”

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“I experienced professional growth as a result of my experiences in the e-learning program. …I see myself in a whole new light and how I can better serve as a dental hygienist as a result of those experiences,” said Jennifer Stanley, one of the first graduates in the School of Dentistry’s Degree Completion E-Learning Program. Stanley and six other women from Michigan and Illinois received a baccalaureate degree last December after successfully completing the distance learning program. The two-year program, launched in January 2008, offers dental hygienists an opportunity to continue their education and earn a Bachelor of Science degree. The online program also prepares them for leadership roles in their profession and community and provides expanded career opportunities. As part of the program, all dental hygiene students worked with agencies in their communities, such as nursing homes and homeless shelters, to develop oral health education programs. Read more news and watch the video on the School of Dentistry’s Web site: www.dent.umich.edu/news/2009/ december/1st-graduates-earnonline-degrees-from-UM-schoolDentistry For more information about the School of Dentistry’s Degree Completion E-Learning Program, visit www. dent.umich.edu/dentalhygiene/ education/dc.
Dental hygiene student Amy Parks inspired 87 of her colleagues to make gift bags that contained dental necessities for patients at a rehabilitation center.

First Dental Hygiene Online Graduates Praise E-Learning Program

The University of Michigan School of Dentistry’s student dental hygiene community is sharing its time, treasures, and talents with a community agency in need. All 87 students recently participated in the annual Winter Kick-Off. But the January event was especially meaningful for senior dental hygiene student Amy Parks. Parks is vice president of the local chapter of the Student American Dental Hygienists’ Association (SADHA). Her sister, Patty, was involved in an automobile accident one year ago and suffered brain and spinal cord injuries. Patty’s recovery has been slow, but remarkable. Recently, she left St. Joseph Mercy Hospital for the Rainbow Rehabilitation Treatment Center in Ypsilanti. “With all of the physical, mental, and emotional support the Rainbow Rehabilitation clients need, oral health is often not in the picture,” Amy said. So she has taken it upon herself to make sure her sister receives daily oral health care with hopes that Patty will once again be able to do so independently. However, Amy is taking her initiative one step further. She wants others at Rainbow Rehabilitation to have the same opportunity her sister has had.

U-M Dental Hygiene Students Help Colleague’s Sister…and 110 Others

Gifts for Residents and Caregivers
In January, all dental hygiene students worked in teams, creatively decorating individual oral health care tote bags for the 70 residents at Rainbow Rehabilitation. In the bags were letters to residents, power toothbrushes, toothpaste, and oral health information. Caregivers were also included. Forty of them received smaller bags with a toothbrush, toothpaste, floss, and information about how to provide daily oral health care to their special-needs patients. A team of students delivered the 110 bags in February. “The bags are awesome and the students did a great job making all of these gifts special for everyone at Rainbow Rehabilitation,” Parks said with a big grin. My sister was thrilled to know that this was a gift all of her friends received.”
Anne Gwozdek

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ALUMNI RELATIONS

“This is great! I’m glad the School of Dentistry did this,” said Dr. Sam Bander after he found his photo in the Class of 1981 composite. Bander chairs the School of Dentistry’s Alumni Society Board of Governors.

Jerry Mastey

Learn More
n update on revisions to the curriculum…new opportunities for dental students to participate in community outreach dentistry, including volunteering to provide oral health care at penal facilities in Michigan… major investments in upgrading technology infrastructure…and a new Web site were among the topics School of Dentistry administrators shared with members of the School’s Alumni Society Board of Governors during the Board’s meeting last October.

Curriculum Update
Dean Peter Polverini told the Board of Governors that the School successfully completed its accreditation review in March. However, he said, “even after such a positive accreditation report,” the School is revising its curriculum. “We know we can make the best program even better.” Under the direction of the Vision Implementation Committee, four teams “are creating bold and exciting new approaches to dental education.” The Science Foundation Team is designing a curriculum that empowers dental students to use scientific methods and evidence that will become the foundation for treatment planning and patient care decisions. The Clinical Foundation Team is developing a performance-based model that integrates patient care concepts from the first day a student is in dental school so they can more quickly progress to patient care activities in the clinics. The Clinical Implementation Team is developing a model where student teams will manage groups of patients, supervised by faculty, to ensure excellence in patient care. The Pathways Design Team is developing options to allow students to combine their dental curriculum with opportunities for research on campus or off site, such as at the National Institutes of Health and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

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Leading Discovery
Dr. Charlotte Mistretta, associate dean for Research and PhD Training, noted the School continues to be a leader in securing research funding. “We have ranked second in research funds received from NIH the past five years, and are in the top three in research funding from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research,” she said. The most recent statistics show the School of Dentistry now ranked first. [See story, page 25.] Mistretta told Board members the School “has a unified model of academic dentistry that incorporates research, teaching, and clinical care.” She noted that 17 faculty members have both a dental degree and a PhD that “enables our School’s mission to mirror that of the University’s which is to seek and discover new knowledge.”

information available in clinics. “Our four-and-a-half million dollar investment will allow students to send and receive digital radiographs,” she said. “That will give students more time to work with their patients in clinics.” Johnson said improvements to the School’s digital infrastructure should be completed by the time new first-year students arrive in August. Second-year dental student Anh Pham, the student representative on the Board of Governors, outlined how technology is changing dental education. “We use our portable listening devices after we have been in class to re-listen to a part of a lecture that’s important. We can also watch YouTube dental videos from the School of Dentistry,” she said.

About School’s Plans for the Future
Outreach Growing
Dr. Bill Piskorowski, director of outreach and community affairs, said the success of the School’s outreach program is sparking more requests for U-M dental students to provide care at other locations, including prisons. The School’s outreach program expanded significantly in 2000 when dental and dental hygiene students began working in clinics outside the dental school during the academic year. Currently, dental students are engaged in outreach for eight weeks at 19 sites in 14 different Michigan communities. “My hope is that, in the next two or three years, we can expand our community outreach program to 12 weeks from eight weeks now,” he said. During the 2008-2009 academic year, Piskorowski said fourth-year dental students recorded 13,806 patient visits and performed 25,493 procedures. By comparison, during the 2007-2008 academic year, 8,765 patient visits and 18,247 procedures were recorded. In addition to dental students providing oral health care at federally qualified health centers and community dental clinics, Piskorowski said he hopes to expand outreach to include three sites in the Upper Peninsula as well as private practice offices in Hart, Michigan, north of Muskegon, and the Detroit area. When later asked what she thought the biggest drawback to being a dental student was, Pham smiled and said, “It’s being super busy.” Her remarks brought laughter from Board members.

New Look for Web Site
The School’s recently redesigned Web site, www.dent. umich.edu, has added more functionality and content, according to Sharon Grayden, director of communications. The five tabs at the top of the homepage: Prospective Students, New & Current Students, Patients, Alumni & Friends, Faculty & Staff, “speak to our various audiences,” she said. Beneath those groups are stories that address major themes: Engaging the World, Making Discoveries, Leaders in Learning, and Impacting Lives. In addition, she said the Web site has incorporated social networking opportunities including YouTube, Facebook, iTunesU and others. The vertical menus on the left hand side of the homepage link to major content areas. Grayden also said that the School of Dentistry Bulletin from 1936 to 1980 and yearbooks from 1972 to 1996 are now available online. Those digitized collections are part of the Hathi Trust Digital Library (http://catalog.hathitrust.org) and searchable in the Hathi Trust catalog and Google Book Search. “It is important to make this information available online,” she said.

Upgrading Technology
Dr. Lynn Johnson, assistant dean for informatics and innovation, said the School is upgrading its digital technolog y infrastr ucture which will enhance the

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ALUMNI RELATIONS

The Alumni Society Board of Governors
Please take a moment to vote for candidates who will serve on the School of Dentistry’s Alumni Society Board of Governors. Choose four dentists and one dental hygienist who will serve a three-year term beginning September 2, 2010. Then clip and mail your ballot to the School of Dentistry at the address on the ballot. Envelopes with your ballot must be postmarked by August 1, 2010.

Ms. Julie Beutler earned a bachelor’s degree in dental hygiene from U-M in 2003 and works in a general dental office in Adrian, Michigan. A past director of the dental program at the Michigan girl’s training school in Adrian, she is the secretary for the U-M Dental Hygiene Alumnae Association’s Executive Board and is on the Education Advisory Committee for the dental aide program in Adrian. Dr. Jerry B. Booth * earned his dental degree from Michigan in 1961, completed the U-M oral and maxillofacial surgery training program and received his master’s degree in 1964. A Jackson, Michigan resident with a full-service oral and maxillofacial practice , he has been active in numerous professional organizations, including serving as president of the Michigan Society of Oral Surgeons and the Jackson District Dental Society. He was appointed as Chief of Surgery at Allegiance Hospital in Jackson and sits on the Finance Committee. Dr. John C. Cameron earned his DDS from U-M in 1956 and a master’s in orthodontics in 1962. A veteran of the U.S. Air Force with nearly 50 years of practice experience, he is a member of the ADA, MDA, AAO, and the U-M Alumni Presidential Society. He also is a spokesman for the Gift of Life – Michigan and the Henry Ford Hospital Transplant Institute. Dr. Janis Chmura-Duski, a 1989 graduate of the U-M School of Dentistry, was class president and received the Delta Dental Fund Student Leadership Award. In private practice with her husband since 1992 in Gaylord, Michigan, she was a captain in the U.S. Air Force Dental Corps and completed a one-year residency in advanced dentistry. She is a member of the ADA, AGD, MDA, and Vacationland District Dental Society in Gaylord.

BALLOT
* incumbent Vote for 4 dentists: Dr. Jerry B. Booth * Dr. John C. Cameron Dr. Janis Chmura-Duski Dr. Michel Crete Dr. Kerry Kaysserian * Dr. Jeffrey Smith Dr. David A. Susko Vote for 1 hygienist: Julie Beutler Kathleen Early * Jackie Bander Solberg
Envelope with ballot must be postmarked by August 1, 2010 Please mail your ballot to: University of Michigan School of Dentistry 540 E. Liberty, Suite 204 Ann Arbor, MI 48104-2210

Dr. Michael Crete, a 1986 graduate of the School of Dentistry, served on the Board of Governors (1996-1998). Involved at all levels of organized dentistry, including the ADA’s Commission of Young Professionals, he practices restorative and cosmetic dentistry in Grandville. He is an alumnus of the LD Pankey Institute and holds memberships in the AGA, AGD, and AACD. Ms. Kathleen Early * earned her BS in dental hygiene from U-M in 1977. In private practice in Brighton, she also is an adjunct clinical instructor at the School of Dentistry and teaches pharmacology to dental hygiene students. She served six years on the U-M Dental Hygiene Alumnae Association’s Executive Board and is a member of MDHA and WDDHS. Dr. Kerry Kaysserian * is a 1981 graduate of the U-M School of Dentistry and a 1976 graduate of the Michigan Business School. In private practice in Traverse City since 1981, he serves on the Board of Governors of the Dental PAC for the Michigan Dental Association and is president-elect of the Resort District Dental Society. He is a corporate member of the Delta Dental Plan of Michigan and the Delta Dental Foundation and is a director of the Delta Dental Plan of Ohio. Dr. Jeffery Smith earned his DDS from U-M in 1982 and a master’s degree from Michigan in periodontics in 1985. In graduate school he was a clinical instructor and received the Delta Sigma Delta Bull Award for teaching. An MDA delegate who is also a board member of the Michigan Dental Association’s PAC, he practices in Grandville. Ms. Jackie Bander Solberg graduated from the U-M School of Dentistry’s dental hygiene program in 1986. After working for a general dentist in Grand Rapids for four years, she moved to Chicago and worked for a periodontist. Ten years later she returned to Grand Rapids and was employed by Warner Lambert. She works part time in a dental office in Grand Rapids. Dr. David A. Susko, a 1988 graduate of the U-M School of Dentistry, owns two dental practices in east Detroit. He is past-president (2001-2002) and a current board member of the Michigan Academy of General Dentistry (since 1996). He is the committee chairman of the AGD’s PACE Program and president of the Southeast Michigan Dental Society Club.

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DEVELOPMENT

Carrie Towns

ormer students and colleagues came to the School of Dentistry in February to publicly praise Dr. H. Dean Millard for the extraordinary influence he had on them as students which enabled them to launch successful careers in dentistry. They gathered to celebrate the presentation of the first Dr. H. Dean Millard Endowed Scholarship to Angela Ritchie, a third-year dental student. Launched about six years ago by Drs. Jed Jacobson (DDS 1978, MS 1982) and Wayne Colquitt (DDS 1968, MS 1975), the $100,000 endowment is funded with gifts from Millard’s former students and friends. Colquitt, a professor emeritus, cited many of Millard’s achievements during a 37-year clinical and teaching career (1952-1989), including how Millard’s efforts enabled Colquitt to teach in Egypt in 1975. “His unique trait was his passion for pushing the envelope,” said Jacobson, senior vice president and chief science officer for Delta Dental of Michigan, said. “He was the first to earn a master’s degree in oral diagnosis in 1956, created a department of oral diagnosis, and helped Michigan gain international recognition with teaching programs he established in Egypt and with the World Workshops in Oral Medicine.” Turning to Ritchie and addressing her, Jacobson added, “We have something in common, a tie to Dr. Dean Millard.” Dr. Sharon Brooks, a professor of dentistry, said, “my career wouldn’t be what it is without the help of Dr. Millard. I recall him telling me one year that I was going to teach a graduate radiology course. When I protested and said I didn’t know as much as I should, he gently nudged me with two words of encouragement, ‘you’ll learn’.” Recalling her days as a third-year dental student Dr. Marilyn Woolfolk, assistant dean for student services, said, “I thought I was toast when he walked into my cubicle and began examining my write-up of my treatment plan for a patient. But he talked to me in a way I will always remember and have tried to emulate – praise loudly but criticize softly.” Drs. Donald and Sandra LaTurno expressed gratitude for Millard’s advice that enabled them to succeed during their careers. “You’re all great people,” Millard said after hearing the accolades. He also praised Delores (Dolly) his wife of more than 60 years, “or is it 61?” he asked her with a twinkle in his eye as the crowd laughed in affection. Speaking to Ritchie, Millard said, “I was fortunate because I could fund my dental education with help from the G.I. Bill. This scholarship, I’m sure, will help you as you pursue your studies.”

Angela Ritchie:
“Incredibly Honored”
Angela Ritchie, the first recipient of the Dr. H. Dean Millard Endowed Scholarship, said she came to Michigan from Munster, Indiana planning to become a general dentist after graduating next year. But that plan changed after taking her first oral pathology class. “I realized I enjoyed the field,” she said, “and after I began shadowing Dr. Kitrina Cordell, I decided to pursue a career in oral path.” Ritchie, a third-year dental student, said she enjoyed meeting Millard and his family. “I’m incredibly honored to receive this award,” she said. “It’s great this scholarship was created to encourage dental students to pursue a career in this fascinating field. The scholarship in Dr. Millard’s name has inspired me to continue pushing myself to achieve my goals.” After earning her dental degree, Ritchie said she hopes to teach at a dental school.

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DEVELOPMENT

DR. LOREN DEHAAN

“Dr. Millard Inspired My Gift”
“What has impressed me most about Dr. Millard, even now, more than three decades after earning my dental degree from Michigan, was how he treated us. From the day I first set foot in his class, he treated me and my classmates as though one day we would be his colleagues,” said Dr. Loren DeHaan (DDS 1975). “He was incredibly smart, but never flaunted it. That, his knowledge, and his leadership by example inspired my gift.” DeHaan, who has been practicing dentistry in Cadillac since 1978, has gifted $15,000, on behalf of Millard, that will be for faculty support. “There’s a big disparity between those teaching dentistry and those who are in private practice,” said DeHaan, who was a clinical instructor in Millard’s Department of Oral Diagnosis. “Dr. Millard gave me my first job in dentistry. Since I was a teacher myself, I hope this gift will help one or more faculty members in the years ahead.”
Dr. Daylene Jack-Min Leong (left) is the first recipient of the Benson Duff Endowed Graduate Periodontics Scholarship. Sheree Duff (right), presented the award named for her late husband.
Marty Bailey

School of Dentistry Awards 1st Duff Scholarship
A new scholarship that will help a U-M School of Dentistry student complete his or her studies in the master’s program in periodontics has been awarded to Dr. Daylene Jack-Min Leong. Now a second-year resident, Leong is the first student to receive the Benson Duff Endowed Graduate Periodontics Scholarship.

“I came to Michigan because it’s world-renowned in periodontics and boasts of a strong teaching faculty,” Leong said.
The award is named for the late Dr. Benson Duff who earned his bachelor’s degree in biology from Michigan in 1975, a dental degree from U-M in 1980, and a master’s in periodontics eight years later. Before his death in 2008 at age 54, Dr. Duff was a private practitioner and a member of the Dean’s Faculty and the Michigan Periodontal Alumni Board. His wife, Sheree, who initiated the scholarship with a $60,000 gift, earned a dental hygiene degree from U-M in 1980. She is associate dean of the Dental Science Programs at Baker College in Auburn Hills, Michigan, and is also a member of the School of Dentistry’s Alumni Society Board of Governors. Sheree’s gift was matched with a gift from U-M President Mary Sue Coleman’s Donor Challenge Program. The program leveraged gifts of up to $1 million with a contribution of 50 cents for every dollar gifted before December 31, 2008. The Fund was complemented by many gifts from family, friends, colleagues, and School of Dentistry faculty.

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Dr. Estee Wang (center) is the first Coghlan Craniofacial Fellow. Behind her are (left to right): Dr. Sunil Kapila, Suzi Coghlan, Michael Coghlan, and Dr. Katherine Kelly.

Jerry Mastey

Dr. Estee Wang Named 1st Coghlan Fellow
A first-year resident in the University of Michigan School of Dentistry’s graduate orthodontics program is the first Fellow in the School’s new craniofacial anomalies program. Dr. Estee Wang, who graduated magna cum laude from the Harvard School of Dental Medicine last June, was officially named the first Coghlan Family Craniofacial and Special Needs Orthodontics Fellow. Established with a generous gift from Michael and Suzi Coghlan, the specialized program will allow Wang to earn a master’s degree in orthodontics and craniofacial anomalies. A native of Palo Alto, California, Wang received a bachelor’s degree from the University of California-Berkeley where she majored in molecular cell biology and French literature. After earning her dental degree from Harvard, she spent a year conducting research with neurologist and geneticist Dr. Christopher Walsh under the auspices of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellows program that promotes the development of clinical scientists. “I am so thankful for the opportunity to be the first Coghlan Craniofacial Fellow that will allow me to receive the training necessary to effectively treat patients with craniofacial anomalies and become a resource for other orthodontists,” Wang said. “My goals are to provide care to those who need it the most and to improve access to care for these individuals.” In addition to meeting the requirements of the graduate orthodontics program, Wang will work with members of the U-M craniofacial team at Mott Children’s Hospital treating patients and also collaborate with a team of specialists, diagnosing and integrating orthodontic treatment plans with reconstructive surgery. The new specialized program was launched with a gift from the Coghlans who were impressed by the passion displayed by Dr. Katherine Kelly for patients with craniofacial anomalies. Kelly is an adjunct clinical assistant professor of dentistry in the Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry. “Dr. Wang’s strong qualifications for this fellowship are complemented by her enthusiasm for being a health care provider to this highly underserved group of patients,” Kelly said. Dr. Sunil Kapila, department chair, said, “We are thrilled to have a person as accomplished as Dr. Wang become our first Coghlan Craniofacial and Special Care Orthodontics Fellow. Given her solid clinical and research background and all around exceptional credentials, I believe that she is the ideal person to take on the extra responsibility that comes with being the first fellow in this demanding but fruitful endeavor.”

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FACULTY

PROFILE
The Road to Dentistry
Edwards earned a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry at Carleton University in Ottawa and was working toward a master’s degree in the same subject at the University of Toronto when his mentor told him he would be leaving Toronto to conduct research elsewhere. “That research fascinated me,” Edwards said, “because it focused on the expression of a cardiac gene in patients who were experiencing heart attacks. I was hoping to work with him longer to carry on that research, but that didn’t happen when he left to start his own company.” Twenty-three years old and now unsure of his future, Edwards had frequent conversations about dentistry with his roommate, who was a dental student. “He described many of the courses he was taking and some of the things he was doing in clinics,” Edwards said. “Dentistry sounded interesting and challenging, so I thought I’d give it a try.” As a first-year dental student in Toronto, Edwards was also completing his studies to earn a master’s degree in biochemistry. “It was challenging doing that and beginning my dental studies,” he said. After earning his dental degree in 1992, Edwards opened and ran a private practice for nine years in Carleton Place, a town of about 10,000 located 30 miles west of Ottawa.

Jerry Mastey

was familiar with the University of Michigan School of Dentistry’s reputation for excellence as a dental student in Canada and when I ran my own practice near Ottawa, and later when I was working for my certificate in oral and maxillofacial pathology in New York,” said Dr. Paul Edwards. “But what made me want to come to Ann Arbor was reading about the interesting bone biology research,” he continued. “So when the opportunity arose, I applied. I’m glad I did.” Now beginning his third year as a clinical associate professor of periodontics and oral medicine at U-M, Edwards is teaching in classrooms and clinics, assisting with the School’s oral pathology biopsy service, treating patients in the Dental Faculty Associates clinic and in the oral dermatology clinic at the Medical Center, and conducting research. His research interests focus on the pathophysiology of non-neoplastic lesions of the jaws. Edwards has also been extensively involved in helping the School launch its new oral pathology residency program. [See page 18.] The three-year program is scheduled to begin in July.

U.S.-Canadian Dental Education
Edwards said clinical and classroom education in Canada and the U.S. are “pretty much the same. Both are fouryear programs.” However, there are differences between the two countries, especially in how dentists market themselves and their services.

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“In Canada, it was different than in the U.S. When I opened my practice, I could only put a notice in the local newspaper announcing that I was opening a new office. The ad had to be a certain size and could only be displayed for a few weeks,” he said with a laugh. “The Royal College of Dentists, the dental governing body in Canada, allowed you to advertise in the papers and also display a sign outside your office, and that was pretty much it,” he said. During the first weeks his new practice was open, Edwards said he was “very busy, but then things seemed to slow down a bit after the pent-up demand for a new dentist was met. Fortunately, things picked up again.” Word of mouth advertising from patients he had treated previously and referrals from other dentists in town helped. In retrospect, Edwards said what the three other dentists in town told him before he opened his practice, that “we could use another dentist in this community,” proved correct.

After nine years in private practice, Edwards completed a three- year residency in oral and maxillofacial pathology at Long Island Jewish Medical Center on Long Island. For three years, beginning in 2004, he was an assistant professor of dentistry at Creighton University’s School of Dentistry in Omaha, Nebraska. There he taught oral pathology, general pathology, and oral diagnosis. He also directed the surgical oral pathology service. In addition to his classroom and clinical education and research activities at U-M, Edwards is editor of the clinicopathologic conference section of the Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology. He also serves on the editorial review board of the Journal of Dental Education and the research and scientific affairs committee of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. Edwards lives in Ann Arbor with his wife, Nancy, and their 7-year-old daughter, Sydney.
Jerry Mastey

Or a l P a t hol og y R e s id e n c y P r og ram
to Beg in Jul y 1 . . .
The School of Dentistry has been granted “initial accreditation” status by the Commission on Dental Accreditation to start an oral pathology residency program this summer. CODA is a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Department of Education with responsibility for establishing, maintaining, and applying standards that ensure the quality and continuous improvement of dental, advanced dental, and allied dental education programs. Beginning July 1, one individual will be accepted annually to the School’s three-year advanced education program. Graduates who successfully complete the program will receive a certificate in oral and maxillofacial pathology and also qualify to take the specialty board examination. “This new program builds on the outstanding expertise we have in oral pathology and will enable us to partner with our pathology partners at the Medical School,”said Dr. Laurie McCauley, chair of the Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine. “The breadth and depth of experiences graduate students will have will be unmatched.” Dr. Paul Edwards, director of the new program and a clinical associate professor of dentistry, said the program “is needed because many oral pathologists will be retiring in the next five to ten years, so there’s a pressing need to educate the next generation of specialists in this field.” The advanced program will offer a range of clinical, research, and microscopic training. In addition, residents will have opportunities to select courses and clinical electives, such as oral and maxillofacial radiology or orofacial pain, that complement their areas of special interest. Training in microscopic pathology will be provided both at the School of Dentistry and in the Department of Pathology at U-M Hospital. The program offers a broad exposure to all areas of microscopic pathology, although emphasis will be placed on rotations in head and neck pathology, dermatopathology, and oral and maxillofacial pathology. Residents will spend a minimum of 18 months at the U-M Hospital in Ann Arbor and rotate through various specialty areas of anatomic and clinical pathology and affiliated clinical departments. “They will be performing the same duties as their medical pathology residency counterparts,” Edwards said. Residents will also treat patients at the School of Dentistry, the Hospital Dentistry Clinic at U-M Hospital, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Ann Arbor.

Jerry Mastey

Drs. Paul Edwards and Sharon Brooks review the panoramic radiograph of a patient with a tumor of the mandible.

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FACULTY

NEWS
Lantz, Taichman Receive ADEA Awards
A School of Dentistry associate dean and professor and a professor and director of a leadership program received national awards from the American Dental Education Association during the organization’s annual session in Washington, D.C.

Giannobile New Editor of Journal of Dental Research
Dr. William Giannobile, a professor of dentistry at the U-M School of Dentistry and director of the Michigan Center for Oral Health Research, is the new editor-in-chief of the Journal of Dental Research. The monthly magazine is a major peer-reviewed scientific journal of the International Association for Dental Research, an organization with nearly 11,000 members worldwide. The journal disseminates new knowledge and information on all sciences relevant to dentistry and to the oral cavity. The worldwide publication is read by dentists; oral, dental, and craniofacial researchers and clinical scientists; oral and dental policy makers; dental educators; and research scientists. Giannobile, who began his five-year term in April, will be responsible for a range of editorial duties including reviewing and accepting manuscripts.

Dr. Marilyn S. Lantz
Dr. Marilyn S. Lantz, associate dean for academic affairs and professor in the Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, received the ADEA/William Gies Foundation Education Fellowship during the organization’s opening ceremony on February 28. During the three-month fellowship she will work with staff in the ADEA Center for Educational Policy and Research on a project that addresses important issues in dental education such as faculty recruitment, development, and retention; teaching strategies; competencies and their assessment; and accreditation and licensure.

Dr. Russell Taichman
Russell Taichman, a professor of dentistry in the Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, received the ADEA/Alpha Omega Foundation/Leonard Abrams Scholarship on March 1. The leadership development award recognizes an individual who exhibits excellence in teaching and upholds the highest ethical and professional standards. Taichman, who has been at U-M since 1992, is the director of the Scholars Program in Dental Leadership and an adjunct professor at the College of Literature, Sciences, and the Arts.

Taichman, Sweier Chosen for National Leadership Program
Two School of Dentistry faculty members have been selected to participate in the American Dental Education Association’s (ADEA) Leadership Institute. Dr. Russell Taichman and Dr. Domenica “Nikki” Sweier, will join 24 of the nation’s most promising dental educators, faculty, and administrators. The year long program, which began with an orientation session in Washington, D.C. in March, will give Taichman and Sweier and others opportunities to further develop their leadership skills. The program will also offer insights on legislative issues at national and state levels. Participants will apply what they have learned and collaborate to address a key issue in dental education.

Drs. Fei Liu and Won Oh New Diplomates
Two School of Dentistr y faculty members recently became Diplomates of the American Board of Prosthodontics. Dr. Fei Liu, an adjunct clinical lecturer and research fellow, and Dr. Won Oh, a clinical associate professor, successfully completed the American Board of Prosthodontics certification process. Liu and Oh have been with the School of Dentistry’s Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences since 2006.

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Kapila Co-Authors Orthodontics Textbook
Dr. Sunil Kapila, chair of the Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, has published his first textbook, Current Therapy in Orthodontics. The book describes contemporary and often novel approaches to orthodontic diagnosis, treatments, and patient management. “A substantial focus on treatment of adult and complex cases is one of the book’s major strengths,” Kapila said. Written with Dr. Ravi Nanda, chair of the Department of Orthodontics at the University of Connecticut, the textbook has 28 chapters written by prominent academics and clinicians including Drs. James McNamara, William Proffit, Vincent Kokich, Bjorn Zacchrison, Peter Ngan, and Greg King. “Although I have edited eight proceedings of meetings, including three Moyers Symposium monographs, this is my first textbook,” Kapila said. “It took about two years to complete from start to finish, including developing the idea, defining the objectives, and determining what to convey to readers.” The book is dedicated to Dr. Ram Nanda, who has made numerous contributions to research and dental education during his 50 years as an orthodontics educator. He mentored Kapila during his residency training at the University of Oklahoma (1984-1987). Drs. Ram Nanda and Ravi Nanda are brothers of the late Dr. Surender Nanda who was a full-time faculty member for 27 years at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry prior to his death in 2003.

Photo courtesy of Junro Yamashita

Foundation Gift Helps School of Dentistry Patient
A $10,000 gift from the Osseointegration Foundation enabled Dr. Junro Yamashita (left), an assistant professor in the Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, and fourth-year dental student Jung Ho Lee, to successfully restore the oral health functions of Elizabeth Hall, a 59-year-old patient who came to the School of Dentistry and received an implant-supported overdenture. Their work led to a functionally and aesthetically satisfactory result for Hall, who moved to southeast Michigan following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The Osseointegration Foundation provides grants of up to $10,000 which must be entirely spent on direct patient care and treatment in the domain of osseointegration.

Doerr New PAES Director
Jerry Mastey

Dr. Patricia Doerr (DDS 2000) is the new director of the School’s Patient Admitting and Emergency Services (PAES) Clinic. The Saginaw native earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from U-M in 1990 and a master’s degree in public health from Indiana University in Bloomington in 1996 before returning to Ann Arbor to work toward her dental degree. After receiving her DDS, Doerr, no relation to the School of Dentistry’s Dr. Robert Doerr who was interim dean from 1981 to 1982, practiced general dentistry for four years with the U.S. Army in South Korea and later at West Point. Following her tour of duty, she was a public health dentist in New York City. “I left New York City hoping to find a job when I returned to Michigan,” she said. “I was scanning newspaper ads and saw the School of Dentistry was searching for a clinician and decided to apply.” She began working in the PAES Clinic in April 2008. In October 2009, she was named director. “Since I knew Dr. David Jacobson when I was a dental student, and Drs. Vernon Rife and Juan Johnson, it’s been a relatively easy adjustment for me,” she said. Jacobson, PAES Clinic director since 1995, is helping Doerr with the transition.

Inglehart Receives Education Award
Dr. Marita Inglehart, an associate professor in the Depar tment of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, recently received an award for her creative approach to dental education. In December, Inglehart received the Harold Slavkin Oral Health Science Education Award for developing a Web site that helps kindergarten and elementary school teachers educate their students about ways to prevent common dental problems and achieve better oral health. The award was presented by Friends of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, a nonprofit organization.

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School of Dentistry Presents Service Awards
The University of Michigan School of Dentistry recognized 47 employees for their long-term service to the University last fall. The group included 28 staff members with 10 years of service, 12 with 20 years of service, six with 30 years of service and one with 40 years of service. Mary Anne Hibner, dental assistant, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Hospital Dentistry, was honored for 40 years of service. Those with 30 years of service included Julie Burton, clinical practice manager, Patient Services; Donna Irby, instrument and sterilizer processor, Patient Services; Chris Jung, graphic designer, Dental Informatics; Anita Lamb, patient care representative, Patient Services; Norma McDougall, central supply supervisor, Patient Services; and Debra Stults, dental hygienist, Patient Services. Twenty-year honorees included: • Robin Boshaw, radiology technologist, Patient Services. • Sylvia Bowman, Human Resources assistant, Dean’s Office. • Julie Breitenbach, research lab specialist, Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences. • Wendy Carbary, secretary, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine. • Thomas Goss, research laboratory technician, Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences. • Ruxandra Iacob, research associate, Dental Informatics. • Melody Schoolcraft, dental assistant, Department of Prosthodontics. • Dorothy Smith-Fesl, building manager. • Patricia Rodriguez, dental assistant, Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics. • Margaret Venema, business manager, Financial Services. • Denise Ziesmer, accountant, Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences. • Cynthia Zuccaro, research laboratory specialist, Office of Research. In addition, 220 faculty, staff, and students were lauded for their participation in the School’s “Thank You, You Make a Difference” program. Launched in 2008, the “Thank You” program commends individuals whose actions make the School of Dentistry a great place to work or learn. Faculty, staff, and students can be recognized by peers, co-workers, students, patients, or vendors for actions ranging from a job well done to great customer service or helping lost visitors.

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MCOHR-MICHR Form Partnership
The University of Michigan School of Dentistry’s Center for Oral Health Research (MCOHR) has entered into an agreement to become a program of the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR). Established in 2005, MCOHR takes the knowledge discovered in its research laboratories and applies it to improve oral, dental, and craniofacial health. “I’m very pleased with this new partnership because it will enable us, working together, to become more involved in clinical research and grow in ways we probably wouldn’t have been able to on our own,” said Dr. William Giannobile, MCOHR director. As part of the agreement, MCOHR will continue managing and holding full authority over its operations, staffing, and development processes. In addition, MCOHR will be able to leverage MICHR’s financial management, administrative resources, and clinical research support. MCOHR trainees, scholars, and students will have access to the MICHR curriculum and other resources for educational enrichment. “The University of Michigan has a goal of doubling the number of clinical trials that are being conducted across campus over the next five years,” Giannobile said. “With this partnership, both MCOHR and MICHR will be able to help the University work toward achieving that goal.” The Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research provides a comprehensive institutional source of support and infrastructure for those in clinical and translational research. The Institute’s mission is to increase the quality, quantity, and positive impact of clinical and translational research at U-M and to the communities it serves. “I am very pleased to have MCOHR on board as part of MICHR, said Dr. Ken Pienta, MICHR director. “This partnership is consistent with MICHR’s goal to better connect clinical research entities University-wide, so this is an excellent opportunity for us to be closely aligned with the School of Dentistry.”

School of Dentistry Launches Checkup Clinic for U-M Students
The U-M School of Dentistry has created a Checkup Clinic for U-M students who are unable to see their dentist to receive routine oral health care. Launched in late October, the Clinic is open on Thursday from 9:00 a.m. until noon. It’s located on the third floor of the School of Dentistry building at 1011 N. University Avenue. The Clinic, however, is closed on University-approved holidays and seasonal days. Students go online to the Checkup Clinic Web site (http://healthyteeth.umich.edu) to request an appointment. When the appointment is confirmed, they are asked to download PDF forms, complete a health questionnaire and registration form, and bring the items with them to their appointment. “Given how busy U-M students are and the importance of oral health care, there is a need for this type of service on the campus,” said Dr. Stephen Stefanac, associate dean for patient services. “The Checkup Clinic is a student’s dentist on campus, but it’s only for nonemergency care,” he added.
Jerry Mastey

Dr. Nejay Ananaba (right) talks to patient Jaimee Marsh about the results of an oral health exam conducted by dental hygiene student Kristen Strasser in the School’s Checkup Clinic.

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STUDENTS

t was fun participating last year, so I’m back again this year. The kids are great. And it’s a way for me to give something back to the community,” said second-year dental student Crystal Rosser as she talked about her reasons for participating in the annual Give Kids a Smile program. Rosser and other dental and dental hygiene students, along with faculty, residents, and staff from the U-M School of Dentistry participated in the February 6 event. The local effort was part of the American Dental Association’s annual nationwide program. Joining School of Dentistry volunteers were oral health care professionals from the Washtenaw District Dental Society and local dental offices. Rosser’s sentiments were echoed by her classmates, including dental student Luke Daining. “As a second-year student, I can do more for the kids than I could last year, and that’s rewarding,” he said. “During spring break, I’ll be going to Honduras with some other dental students to provide oral health care, so what I’m doing here today gives me more opportunities to develop my skills,” he added. Sixty-seven children between the ages of 5 and 12 received free oral health care services, including exams. Forty sealants were placed on teeth for 13 children. Thirty-eight children received fluoride treatments. Thirty-two had radiographs taken. Fourteen extractions were performed. Seventeen children will return to the School’s pediatric dental clinic for further examination and treatment.

Jerry Mastey

Seven-year-old Alysse Brendtke holds a mirror and watches as fourthyear dental hygiene student Kristen Strasser demonstrates the proper way to brush.

Jerry Mastey

Six-year-old Theodore Phillips giggles when second-year dental student Michael Wierenga turned on the air.

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Evelyn Lucas-Perry Receives ADEA Award
Jerry Mastey

Meggan Krause answers a question from first-year dental student Saroj Saha during the Give Kids a Smile program.

Krause: Keys to Success – Planning, Delegating, Teamwork
“I was very happy we were able to provide treatment opportunities for 67 children who otherwise may not have had access to dental care,” said third-year dental student Meggan Krause who organized both this year’s and last year’s Give Kids a Smile program at the School of Dentistry. Planning for the event began last fall. “I had help this year from my co-organizer, Abbie Walker (D3), and a small committee of interested underclassmen who also wanted to take on lead roles next year,” Krause said. “The biggest challenge was finding time to make all the phone calls, keep up with numerous daily e-mails about the event, and making sure everyone was on the same page,” she said. Krause said she “learned a lot about setting deadlines and delegating.” That was a major reason, she said, there were no surprises and “allowed me to sleep well Friday night before the event.” When asked how she found time for her studies, coordinating the February program, and other tasks, said, “I don’t know. I tend to say ‘yes’ a lot and take on roles in organizations I’m involved in. Yet, somehow I manage to pull through while still keeping up with my studies and patient management.” After earning her dental degree next year, Krause hopes to enter a pediatric dentistry residency program.

Evelyn Lucas-Perry, a third year dental student recently received an award from the American Dental Education Association during the organization’s annual session in Washington, D.C. in March. Lucas-Perry, who is also pursuing a master’s degree in public health, received an ADEA/Johnson & Johnson Healthcare Products Preventive Dentistry Scholarship. The scholarship supports predoctoral dental students who have demonstrated academic excellence in preventive dentistry. Lucas-Perry was nominated because she has a strong sense of personal accountability and insists on high standards of care for her patients. Her volunteer work in the community, active involvement in health initiatives, and service projects to help the underserved were also cited. Her attempts to help shape future oral health care strategies and interventions designed to improve dental education and health policy that benefit the underserved were also lauded.

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RESEARCH

U-M School of Dentistry #1 in Research Grants
or the second time in four years, the University of Michigan School of Dentistry is ranked first among the nation’s dental schools in the dollar amount of research grants awarded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. New figures from NIDCR show the School received more than $9.5 million during the federal government’s 2009 fiscal year that began October 1, 2008 and ended September 30, 2009. The NIDCR grants represented nearly 60 percent of total research awards exceeding $16 million that were received by the School of Dentistry during that time. During the past 10 years, the School has consistently ranked among the nation’s top three dental schools in awards for research. It also ranked first in NIDCR funding in FY 2006 when the School was awarded $10.6 million for research. Dean Peter Polverini said the awards from NIDCR “reinforce the School’s position as one of the leading research institutes in the nation.” Dr. Charlotte Mistretta, associate dean for research, added, “Few dental schools have been able to sustain such an active portfolio during a time of constrained budgets.” School of Dentistry research funding extends beyond NIDCR with FY 2009 research expenditures exceeding $16 million. Grants were also awarded to School faculty by other NIH institutes including the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; the National Cancer Institute; the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; the National Institute of General Medical Sciences; the National Institute of Heart, Lung, and Blood; the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Active NIH projects encompass a range of research endeavors in areas that include signaling pathways in palate formation, developing scaffolds to promote bone formation, inhibiting the growth of blood vessels in tumors, development of taste organs and central circuits, enamel formation, oral tissue graft development, and relationships between periodontal disease and diabetes. The National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, and nonfederal agencies also awarded grants for research initiatives. For 10 years the U-M School of Dentistry has been ranked among the top dental schools receiving NIDCR funding
12 Millions of Dollars 10 8 6 4 2 6 5 6 5 2 2 1 3 2 1

Lights Out: A Protein May Switch off Cancer Cells
By Laura Bailey, U-M News Service

A protein acting as a switch to activate the cell death process may prove to be an effective targeted treatment for killing cancer cells. University of Michigan researchers discovered that the protein called RIP plays a role in mediating both the life and death of squamous cell carcinoma cancer cells, said Yvonne Kapila, associate professor in the Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine at the School of Dentistry. This is key because cancer cells elude the normal cell death process. If that process could be activated artificially by a targeted introduction of RIP into cancer patients, those cells could be destroyed before they circulate out of control in the body, Kapila said. The findings are promising but still a long way from being used as a therapy, Kapila said. Researchers still need to show that introducing RIP is safe before it can be tested in humans.
Jerry Mastey

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Research and Discovery Important to Dentistry and Patient Care
Research is a crucial component of dental education, and dental schools that are a part of research universities, such as the University of Michigan School of Dentistry, make important contributions to the world that raise oral health care standards and improve the lives of patients. That was the message to a standing-room only gathering of faculty, students, and staff by Dr. Philip Stashenko (pictured above) in a keynote address during the School’s annual Research Day on February 9. Stashenko, president and chief executive officer of the Forsyth Institute in Boston and associate professor at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, has authored more than 200 scientific publications in immunology and bone biology. His research has contributed to a better understanding of the link between immune and inflammatory responses and bone metabolism.
Why Research Matters
“Research experience produces better clinicians, enhances critical thinking skills, and the ability to effectively evaluate scientific literature,” he said. “Research also leads to more effective teaching methods and better diagnosis, prevention and treatment that improves the lives of patients.” Nonetheless, Stashenko said research-focused dental schools face challenges, such as funding losses from outside sources. He noted that extramural funding awards from NIDCR to the nation’s dental schools are now approximately 50 percent compared to 70 percent a decade earlier. Complementing students and faculty at the School of Dentistry for their enthusiasm for research, Stashenko talked about his career and offered some advice. “Do what your passion is,” he said. “I’ve been fortunate. Since research is focused on discovery, each day has been an adventure. I never felt like I had to work a day in my life. And I see many opportunities in the future.”

• Genetics, genomics of human oral diseases • Oral/systemic disease connections • Novel anti-microbials and anti-inflammatories • Oral host/microbial interfaces • Biological tissue/organ regeneration • New models of prevention/health care delivery that reach the underserved

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– W I N N E R S –
Ninety-eight student researchers presented posters detailing their research initiatives. The winners are listed below.

Grand Prize – ADA Dentsply Award
Anne Ziegler (D2, Mentor: Russell Taichman) Erythropoietin couples hematopoiesis with bone formation

Second-year dental student Anne Ziegler receives an all expenses paid trip to the ADA/ Dentsply Student Clinician Research program this October. On the left is Dean Peter Polverini. Tyler Castor of Dentsply is on the right.

Undergraduate, DDS, DH, MS/Certificate – Clinical Application and Technique
First Prize Viraj Vora (MS/Certificate Student, Mentor: G. Rex Holland) Differences in number and type of research publications in dental disciplines Second Prize Lauren Sigler (D1, Mentor: James McNamara) Effect of RME/TPA treatment associated with deciduous canine extraction on the eruption of palatally-displaced canines: A two-center prospective study Third Prize (Tie) Lindsey Lalonde (D1, Mentor: Marita Inglehart and Maria Estrella) Children’s oral health, oral health-related and healthrelated quality of life Courtney Grady (D2, Mentor: Samuel Zwetchkenbaum) Oral complications associated with chronic graft versus host disease in post-allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation patients and its impact on quality of life Mike Barber, Robert Wiesen, Sara Arnold (D4, Mentor: L. Susan Taichman) Assessment of managing a dental practice pregraduation and post-graduation

Undergraduate, DDS, DH, MS/Certificate – Basic Science and Research
First Prize Robert Vander Broek (D1, Mentor: Nisha D’Silva) p38 regulates IL-1β-mediated cytokine secretion in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma Second Prize Laney Mai (D2, Mentors: James Simmer and Jan Hu) Altered enamelin phosphorylation site causes Amelogenesis Imperfecta Third Prize Ahmad Deebajah (MS/Certificate Student, Mentor: Geoffrey Gerstner) Glutamine and glutamate concentrations in the posterior insula in patients with temporomandibular disorders prior to and after pain stimulation demonstrated by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

PhD/Postdoctoral Fellow/Staff
First Prize Erica Scheller (PhD Student, Mentor: Paul Krebsbach) A critical evaluation of leptin’s peripheral actions on mesenchymal lineage cells in vitro and in vivo Second Prize Sudha Krishnamurthy (PhD Student, Mentor: Jacques Nör) Endothelial cells promote survival and self-renewal of head and neck cancer stem cells Third Prize (Tie) Yuhe Lu (PhD Student, Mentor: Jan Hu) Phenotypic rescue of Enam knockout mice by an enamelin transgene Elizabeth Van Tubergen (PhD Student, Mentor: Nisha D’Silva) Control of oral cancer-derived cytokines by Tristetraprolin

Dental Hygiene Award
First Prize Victoria Myers, Jennifer Myers, Adrienne Vasquez (DH4, Mentor: Carla Harrel) Subgingival irrigation as a method of plaque removal for geriatric patients Second Prize Jennifer Stanley (DH4, Mentor: Janet Kinney) Assessment of the skills and education necessary for a baccalaureate prepared dental hygienist to pursue an entry level role in clinical research Third Prize Sarah Hughes, Andrea Velardo, Lauren Rowinsky (DH4, Mentor: Carrie Bigelow-Ghaname) Caries risk assessment of Native American children at IHS in Rapid City, South Dakota

Audience Choice Award
Courtney Grady (D2, Mentor: Samuel Zwetchkenbaum) Oral complications associated with chronic graft versus host disease in post-allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation patients and its impact on quality of life

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U-M Dental Students Win Major AADR Research Awards
U-M School of Dentistry dental students earned major awards during the annual meeting of the American Association for Dental Research in March in Washington, D.C. Chad Novince, a sixth-year dual degree DDS/PhD student, won the First Place AADR/Johnson & Johnson Oral Health Products Hatton Award for his oral and poster presentation, “Proteoglycan-4, a Novel Immunomodulator of Parathyroid Hormone Anabolic Actions.” His work was based on his dissertation research conducted in the laboratory of his mentor, Dr. Laurie McCauley. Novince, who said he “hopes to become a prominent basic translational research scientist in bone biology,” will compete in the International Association for Dental Research/Unilever Hatton Awards Competition during the IADR’s annual meeting in July in Barcelona, Spain. Maria Athanassiou-Papaefthymiou, a post-doctoral student in the laboratory of Dr. Petros Papagerakis, earned Second Place in the AADR/Johnson & Johnson Oral Health Products Hatton Award postdoctoral category for oral and poster presentation, “Clonal Expansion of Epithelia Stem Cells from Human ERM.” She too will participate in the IADR competition in Barcelona. • Jae Shin, D1, Yvonne Kapila, “Cleavage of CD44 in Modulating Anoikis Resistance in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.” • Robert Vander Broek, D1, Nisha D’Silva, “p38 Regulation of Cytokine Secretion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.” • Dmitry Vodopyanov, D1, Jacques Nör, “Role of Endothelial Cell Initiated Signaling on Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype.” The School also received the AADR’s National Student Research Group Award for the most student abstracts that were accepted for the annual meeting. Thirty-eight student research abstracts were accepted. Dr. Daniel Chiego, associate professor in the Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics, accepted the certificate of award and the $300 prize.

Research Fellowships
Six dental students received AADR Student Research Fellowships designed to encourage dental students to consider careers in oral health research. Each student received $2,100; each mentor received $300. The students, their mentors, and their projects are: • Daniel Clark, D1, Brian Clarkson, “Evaluation of Synthetic Enamel Coated Stainless Steel Crowns for Use in Clinical Dentistry.” • Lindsay Harbron, D1, Petros Papagerakis, “Circadian Control of Enamel Formation.” • Laney Mai, D2, James Simmer, “Mutation Analysis of Kindreds with Amelogenesis Imperfecta.”

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ALUMNI

NEWS
After 43 years, Larry Leddy (DDS 1966, MS 1968), of Saginaw, Michigan, retired from his orthodontics practice on Dec. 31, 2009. “My thanks go out to family, friends, medical and dental associates, and staff for 43 wonderful years,” he said. “How fortunate to have helped create so many smiles in the community.”

Richard R. Frazier (DDS 1989), of
Alamogordo, New Mexico, is now the chief of dental services at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico following three years at the Royal Air Force Base in Lakenheath, England. Lakenheath is host to the largest U.S. Air Force base in the United Kingdom. “It’s an honor to serve and represent the University of Michigan all over the world,” wrote Frazier, who was recently promoted to the rank of colonel in the U.S. Air Force.

George Goodis
(DDS 1964) was recently named secretary of the American A ss o c i at ion o f Endodontists. A private practice endodontist in Grosse Pointe Woods, Michigan, he is also director of the Michigan Association of Endodontists. He has served on AAE committees, including chairing the organization’s Membership Services, Governmental Affairs, Federal Dental Health Services, and Continuing Education committees. He spoke at the School of Dentistry’s White Coat Ceremony in the fall of 2004 when he was president of the Michigan Dental Association.

Joseph Chasteen (DDS 1967), of
Brier, Washington, retired March 1 as founding editor of the Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice. With a master’s degree in educational radio and television from U-M, he leveraged his dental, media, and teaching experiences and published two textbooks, 50 journal articles, and produced more than 40 instructional videos. Ten years ago, Chasteen established JCDP, an online journal, to offer oral health care professionals opportunities to stay abreast of scientific and technical developments that affected them and their patients. “My education at the University of Michigan provided me with an excellent foundation for a successful academic career,” he wrote. “I have been honored to be a part of the creation of this international journal and to watch it grow beyond all expectations.” Chasteen said he and his wife, Donna, will enjoy their retirement home in Ocala, Florida, and plan to travel, including “boating, fishing for crabs and salmon in the Puget Sound area,” and volunteering.

Dick Shick (DDS 1954, MS 1960)
and his wife, Rose Marie, were recently honored when Mott Community College in Flint, Michigan, named a dental hygiene clinic for them. Shick earned an associate degree from MCC, formerly known as Flint Junior College, in 1949 before receiving his DDS and master’s degree in periodontics from U-M.

Allan Jacobs
(DDS 1974, MS endodontics 1978) has been e l e c te d to t h e Board of Directors of the American A ss o ci ation o f Endodontists. He will represent AAE District IV which includes Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia. Jacobs, a past president of the Michigan Association of Endodontists, practices in Waterford and Clarkston, Michigan, and is an adjunct assistant professor of dentistry in the Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics at U-M.

Tim Reaume (DDS 1989), of Cadillac, Michigan, and a group of 16 volunteers recently traveled to the Himalayan highlands in northern India where they provided dental services to more than 600 children, many of whom had never before received dental care. The initiative was organized by the Himalayan Dental Relief Project, which takes dental professionals to India, Nepal, Vietnam, and Guatemala so they can provide direct dental care to children.

What’s New with You?
Your classmates want to know! E-mail news about your latest personal or professional achievement, award, or honor along with a picture to: jmastey@umich.edu.

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In Memoriam
’40 Dr. Jules Flax February 17, 2010 Jeffersonville, New York Before retiring in 2004, Dr. Flax practiced dentistr y in Jeffersonville for 63 years (DentalUM, Spring & Summer 2005, pages 74-75). “Some of his happiest years were at the dental school and everyone he met knew that. Even at 92, he never stopped learning and enjoyed new challenges,” said Judy Pearl, one of his three daughters. ’46 Dr. Francis C. Wehr January 13, 2010 Ypsilanti, Michigan ’48 Dr. Sidney Weber June 26, 2009 Bloomfield Hills, Michigan ’49 Dr. Louis “Lou” Vand der Walt Fourie December 23, 2009 Rockford, Illinois After graduation from the School of Dentistry and serving in the U.S. Army Dental Corps, Dr. Fourie practiced dentistry in Rockford until his retirement in 1988. During his dental career, he was president of the Winnebago Country Dental Society and the Illinois State Dental Society. ’51 Dr. Milton Panzer MS, pediatric dentistry October 9, 2009 Greensboro, North Carolina After earning his dental degree from Temple University, Dr. Panzer joined the staff at The Mott Children’s Health Center in Flint, Michigan. An advocate of water fluoridation and secretary of the Genesee District Dental Society, he received the Tuuri Award of Distinguished Service from the Mott Children’s Health Center in 1993 and the Clement Alfred Humanitarian Award from the Community Foundation of Greater Flint in 2002. ’61 Dr. Eugene Huget October 18, 2009 Ellicott City, Maryland ’01 Dr. Matthew Uday December 14, 2009 Trenton, Michigan “Dr. Uday was one of my students in the 2 Green Clinic. Diagnosed with testicular cancer two years ago after the birth of his son, Matt courageously underwent several rounds of chemotherapy, ran a marathon last summer, met Lance Armstrong, and felt he could beat the odds. Matt was a member of the Michigan Dental Foundation and chaired the Scholarship Committee.” Grace Curcuru
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine

Debbie Stambaugh A long-time staff member who worked in the Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dent istr y, Debbie Stambaugh, died unexpectedly March 1. “This was a shock and loss to not only our department and clinic, but to the School as a whole,” said Dr. Sunil Kapila, department chair. The School of Dentistry has established a fund in her honor to support the care of patients with craniofacial anomalies, one of her most loved services. Those wishing to make a gift may make their check payable to the University of Michigan and forward it to the School’s Development Office, 540 E. Liberty Street, #204; Ann Arbor, MI 481092210. Please note “Stambaugh Fund” on the memo line. Dr. Patricia A. O’Connor Associate professor of dentistry who was with the Department of Educational Resources (19701988), passed away April 14, 2010, in Ann Arbor. Much of her career involved conducting research on achievement motivation, curiosity, and theories of education and learning. She also led efforts to design and develop materials that improved clinical teaching. “Pat touched many lives and was a highly respected colleague and loyal friend of the School,” said Patti Eddlemon, administrative associate who worked closely with O’Connor for nine years.

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ALUMNI

Thursday, October 14
Emeritus Pinning Ceremony Time: 11:30 a.m. Location: Room G390 Emeritus Class Picture Time: 12:30 p.m. Location: Foyer staircase, first floor, Kellogg Building Emeritus, Hall of Honor and Alumni Awards Luncheon (by invitation only) Time: 1:00 p.m. Location: Sindecuse Atrium Hall of Honor Induction Ceremony Time: 1:45 p.m. Location: Sindecuse Atrium
Call Photography

Friday, October 15
Morawa Lecture – (P300) Speakers & Topics: Common to the Unusual, Benign to Life Threatening… Lesions of the Oral Cavity
Dean Peter Polverini, DDS, DMSc; Dean, School of Dentistry

Updates in Treatment of Common Oral Infections; Painful Ulcerative Conditions
Kitrina Cordell, DDS, MS; Clinical Associate Professor

Time: Registration - 7:30 a.m. Course - 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Location: Kellogg Auditorium, School of Dentistry For more information, including a complete course description, please visit the School of Dentistry Web site: www.dent.umich.edu/cde Homecoming Dinner Celebration Honoring Dental and Dental Hygiene classes with graduation years ending in 0 and 5 Doors open and registration begins: 6:00 p.m. Cocktail Reception: 6:00 p.m. Dinner: 7:00 p.m. Location: Four Points Sheraton 3200 Boardwalk, Ann Arbor

Saturday, October 16
Time: 2 hours before kickoff

Alumni Association Go Blue! Tailgate Football Game - University of Michigan vs. Iowa Time: Check Web site (www.dent.umich.edu) for further information Location: The Big House
Dental Hygiene Class of 1959 Emeritus Alumnae (L to R): Ms. Nancy Bell Ristow, Mrs. Ellen Voss, Dr. Ann Dinius.

The way we were...
Follow the link to your graduation photo on the homecoming Web page!

For homecoming information go to:

www.dent.umich.edu/ alumnirelations/home/homecoming

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G O B LUE

ONLINE!
University of Michigan School of Dentistry Continuing Dental Education is going PAPERLESS. BLUE goes GREEN ALL CE course registrations MUST be completed online and paid by credit card only. Visit our Web site at: www.dent.umich.edu/alumni/cde If you have any questions, please call 734-763-5070

Upcoming Continuing Dental Education Courses
Practice Management
(New Course) September 10, 2010 (Friday) This course focuses on how to run your practice like a business. Taught by Melissa Evans, president and CEO of The Broshe Group of Kennesaw, Georgia, those who attend will learn how to take charge, set goals, assess your strengths and weaknesses, and more. A master business coach and project management professional, Evans provides business consulting, corporate mentoring, and executive coaching services to well-known companies worldwide.

Innovations in Restorative Dentistry
(New Course) October 22, 2010 (Friday) The School of Dentistry’s Drs. Stephen Bayne, Dennis Fasbinder, Jacques Nör, and Peter Yaman will outline new developments in restorative dentistry. Topics that will be addressed include digital dentistry, tissue engineering, ceramics and cements, and a five-year look into the future as to how these developments may affect your practice and your patients.

www.dent.um ich.edu/alumni/cde
For more information about these and other continuing dental education courses contact:
University of Michigan School of Dentistry Office of Continuing Dental Education 1011 N. University Ave. Room G508 Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1078 Call 734-763-5070 or 734-763-5171

www.dent.umich.edu/alumni/cde

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