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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE
A historic building B museum and heritage C historic site D scenic attraction E flora and fauna F stories and anecdotes G famous people H art and craft I entertainment and sport J walks

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

LOCATOR MAP
Llangranog Aberporth Gwbert on Sea Sarnau Gorsgoch St Dogmael's Ffostrasol Pontgarreg Temple Bar Cribyn Bettws Bledrws Beulah

Cardigan
Llechryd

Rhydlewis Penrhiw-pal

Lampeter
Llanwrtyd Wells Pumsaint Crugybar Llansawel Abergorlech

Nevern Eglwyswrw Newport Brynberian Crymych

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Newcastle Emlyn
Saron

Rhydowen Llandysul

Llanybydder Cilycwm

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9 10 11

3

Pentre-cwrt Rhos

Llanllwni Pencader

21

2

14 12 13

Cynghordy

Llandovery

PEMBROKESHIRE
Glandwr

Alltwalis Trelech Cwmduad Cynwyl Elfed Bronwydd

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CARMARTHENSHIRE
Maerdy Rhydargaeau

Llanwrda Myddfai Llangadog Twynllanan Trecastle Defynnog Crai

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Llandeilo
Llanarthne

Llandissillio

Llanboidy Meidrim

Carmarthen

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Llanddarog

15 16 17 18
Llandybie Brynaman Abercraf Glyntawe

Robeston Wathen

Commercial

Whitland

Narberth

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St Clears

5
Laugharne

Cwmffrwd Pontantwn

Porthyrhyd Tumble

Ammanford

Llansteffan

Templeton Kilgetty Broadmoor Pendine Llanmiloe Saundersfoot Pembury

Pontyberem Kidwelly
Pontyates Carway

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Gwaun-CaeGurwen
Ystalyfera
GlynNeath

Pontarddulais

Pontardawe
Resolven

Tenby

Llanelli

Burry Port

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Gowerton

SWANSEA

NEATH PORT TALBOT
Birchgrove

Treherbert
Cymer

Glyncorrwg

Swansea

Neath

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ADVERTISERS AND PLACES OF INTEREST Accommodation, Food and Drink
1|Waverley Health Stores & Vegetarian Restaurant, Carmarthen 3|Tarfarn Llwyndafydd Inn, Saron, nr Llandysul 4|Acorn Hedge Cottage, Betws, nr Ammanford 6|Plash Inn, Llanfallteg, nr Whitland 7|Cilford Cottage, Cenarth, nr Newcastle Emlyn 10|Gwesty’r Emlyn Hotel, Newcastle Emlyn 13|Cwmgwyn Farm Bed & Breakfast, Llandovery 14|Neuadd Fawr Arms, Cilycwm, nr Llandovery 20|Stangwrach Cottage & Ash Tree Lodge, Llanfynydd, nr Carmarthen 21|Brunant Arms, Caio, nr Llanwrda 22|Llwyn Hall Hotel, Llwynhendy, nr Llanelli pg 4 pg 7 pg 10 pg 14 pg 16 pg 18 pg 20 pg 22 pg 27 pg 28 pg 29

Antiques and Restoration
12|Brambles, Llandovery 15|The Works Antique Centre, Llandeilo pg 20 pg 23

Arts and Crafts
2|Makepeace Cabinet Making, Pentre-cwrt, nr Llandysul 5|West Wales Crafts, St Clears 12|Brambles, Llandovery 15|The Works Antique Centre, Llandeilo 16|PINC, Llandeilo 19|The Tapestry Kit Collection, Abergorlech pg 6 pg 13 pg 20 pg 23 pg 24 pg 26

Fashions
12|Brambles, Llandovery 18|Eve’s Toy Shop, Llandeilo pg 20 pg 25

Activities
8|The Bay Tree, Newcastle Emlyn 11|Rainbow Crystals, Newcastle Emlyn 19|The Tapestry Kit Collection, Abergorlech pg 16 pg 19 pg 26

Gifts
5|West Wales Crafts, St Clears 8|The Bay Tree, Newcastle Emlyn pg 13 pg 16

A historic building B museum and heritage C historic site D scenic attraction E flora and fauna F stories and anecdotes G famous people H art and craft I entertainment and sport J walks

Looking for somewhere to stay, eat, drink or shop?
11|Rainbow Crystals, Newcastle Emlyn 12|Brambles, Llandovery 16|PINC, Llandeilo pg 19 pg 20 pg 24

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12|Brambles, Llandovery 16|PINC, Llandeilo

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

Places of Interest
8|The Bay Tree, Newcastle Emlyn 11|Rainbow Crystals, Newcastle Emlyn pg 16 pg 19 pg 26

Home and Garden
2|Makepeace Cabinet Making, Pentre-cwrt, nr Llandysul 8|The Bay Tree, Newcastle Emlyn 12|Brambles, Llandovery 16|PINC, Llandeilo 18|Eve’s Toy Shop, Llandeilo pg 6 pg 16 pg 20 pg 24 pg 25

19|The Tapestry Kit Collection, Abergorlech

Specialist Food and Drink Shops
1|Waverley Health Stores & Vegetarian Restaurant, Carmarthen 9|Paned Un, Newcastle Emlyn 17|J H Cooper Family Butcher, Llandeilo 19|The Tapestry Kit Collection, Abergorlech pg 4 pg 17 pg 24 pg 26

Jewellery
5|West Wales Crafts, St Clears pg 13

Carmarthenshire
One of Carmarthenshire’s major attractions is its coastline. More than 50 miles long, it includes the award-winning Pembrey Country Park and beach, and Pendine, whose long stretch of sand saw many land speed world records established. The Museum of Speed here celebrates drivers such as Sir Malcolm Campbell. Of the seaside villages, Laugharne is certainly the most famous, due mainly to the fact that it is the place where Dylan Thomas lived for the last years of his short life in a house overlooking the bay. The village also boasts one of the country’s most handsome castles. There are other strongholds at Carreg Cennen and Kidwelly, abbey ruins at Talley and Whitland, and the famous rugby and industrial centre of Llanelli. An area where myths and legends still resonate, Carmarthenshire has remained essentially Welsh in most aspects. Inland lies Carmarthen, the county town, whose origins date from Roman times, but, which has developed as a centre for the agricultural communities of West Wales. To the east is an area associated with the enduring legends and mysteries of Merlin the magician. Also in this part of Carmarthenshire is one of the country’s most recent important projects - the National Botanic Garden of Wales. Dedicated to conservation, horticulture, science and education, and boasting the largest singlespan glasshouse in the world, this is one of the country’s newest gardens. Close by lies Aberglasney, one of the oldest botanical centres, first mentioned in 1477. Evidence of the Roman occupation of Carmarthenshire is most striking at the Dolaucothi Goldmines, to the northwest of Llandovery, where visitors can try their hand at panning for gold. At Cenarth, visitors can see salmon fishermen on the River Teifi still using the coracle, a tiny round boat whose origins are lost in the mists of time. A fascinating museum tells the story of these distinctive little craft.

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Carmarthen
A Carmarthen Castle A Guildhall A Trinity College A Parish Church of St Peter C Caer Mari Unum B Carmarthen Heritage Centre C Merlin’s Hill C Picton Monument H Oriel Myrddin

Carmarthen (Caerfyrddin in Welsh) boasts the distinction of having a higher proportion of Welsh speakers than anywhere else in the country. It also lays claim to being the oldest town in Wales with a history going back to Roman times when it was the most westerly of their forts. It is now the county town of Carmarthenshire and lies at the centre of the West Wales agricultural community. The name means “fort of Myrddyin”, and some people have linked this Myrddyin with

Merlin the Magician. One particular story associated with the town has, thankfully, so far turned out not to be true. Carmarthen’s inhabitants are eternally grateful that, when Merlin’s Oak was removed during a road widening scheme, the town remained unharmed, and the prophecy, “When Merlin’s Oak shall tumble down, then shall fall Carmarthen town” was not realised. According to another tradition, the magician is said still to live in a cave on Merlin’s Hill (Bryn Myrddin) just outside Carmarthen where he is kept in perpetual enchantment by Vivien, the lady to whom he taught all his spells. The historic old part of Carmarthen grew up around Carmarthen Castle, which was originally built around 1109 by Henry I. Overlooking the River Tywi, little remains of the castle today except a stretch of wall and

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

WAVERLEY HEALTH STORES & VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT 23 Lammas Street, Carmarthen SA31 3AL Tel: 01267 236521
Waverly Stores is one of the main stockists in the region of health products, organic fruit and vegetables and eco-friendly beauty preparations. Susan Anderson is a fine advertisement for the benefits of a healthy lifestyle, as she not only runs the business that her parents started 30 years ago but has also raised four children at the same time. The food on display includes organic fresh fruit and vegetables, free-range eggs, organic chocolate, bara brith and other specialities, nuts and dried fruits, organic milk and yoghurt and a range of dairy and gluten-free items. There’s also an amazing range of supplements, tonics, pills and beauty products. At the back of the shop is a restaurant with an excellent menu of vegetarian dishes freshly prepared each day by Susan and two chefs; the dishes are available to eat in or to take away. Shop hours are 9am to 5pm Monday to Saturday and the restaurant is open from 10am - 3pm. Lunches are served from 11.30 - 2pm. Upstairs there si a gallery displaying a large amount of work by Welsh Artists.

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Merlin’s Hill, Carmarthen

the squat early 15th-century gatehouse with its two round towers. The Guildhall, which was built in 1767 to replace the hall of 1583, is in Nott Square – named after Major General Sir William Nott, victor of the First Afghan War in the 1840s and a native of Carmarthen. A bronze statue of the general stands in the centre of the square. One of the town’s most impressive buildings is Carmarthen County Hall overlooking the River Tywi. It was designed by the renowned architect John Nash, son of a Welsh millwright. The town’s Victorian Old Art College has, since 1991, been the home of Oriel Myrddin, a contemporary craft gallery and regional art venue. Focusing on the present and the future, the work of some of the most innovative and interesting craftspeople in Wales is displayed here. In the retail area, there is a wide range of crafts for purchase. By contrast, housed in a new development on the banks of the River Tywi, is the Carmarthen Heritage Centre, which, through displays, multi-media and video presentations, tells the story of the town from the time of the Roman occupation in AD75 through to the present day.

Carmarthen is home to Trinity College, which, since 2005, has been part of the University of Wales. After Lampeter, it is the second oldest higher education institution in the country. It was originally a teacher training college, but has now widened its curriculum. The Ivy Bush Royal Hotel in Carmarthen has notable literary connections. A stainedglass window and stone circle commemorate the 1819 eisteddfod, when Iolo Morganwg introduced the Gorsedd (society of bards) to the eisteddfod. The essayist and dramatist Sir Richard Steele stayed at the Ivy Bush in the later years of his life. Steele is best known for his periodical essays and for his collaboration with Joseph Addison. Educated, like Addison, at Charterhouse and Oxford, Steele published his first work in 1701, when he was 28. It had the far from catchy title of The Christian Hero: An argument proving that no principles but those of religion are sufficient to make a great man. Steele had two wealthy wives and several children. Bad health and pressing debts forced him to move to Wales, and he died in Carmarthen in 1729. A brass plaque on the wall of the Parish Church of St Peter commemorates him. This church, which dates back to the 12th century, has many interesting features, including an organ thought to have been built in the reign of George III for Windsor Palace. There’s also an impressive tomb of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, who led an army to fight for Henry Tudor at the Battle of Bosworth Field, where Richard III was killed and Henry crowned as King Henry VII on the battlefield.

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

MAKEPEACE CABINETMAKING Derw Mill, Pentre-cwrt, Llandysul, Carmarthenshire SA44 5DB Tel: 01559 362322 Fax: 01559 363627 e-mail: enquiry@makepeace-furniture.com website: www.makepeace-furniture.com
‘Individual Kitchens for True Individuals’ Makepeace Cabinetmaking are specialists in high-quality, bespoke fitted and free-standing kitchen and other furniture. Over more than 20 years the business has increased its reputation and seen its clientele grow throughout the United Kingdom and far beyond. Environmental awareness is a watchword, and the beautiful hardwoods used by Makepeace are sourced from sustainable forests around the world, with FSC certified hardwood only used. The oils for the wax finishes contain no polluting chemicals, thus ensuring the natural look, the hardwearing qualities and the beautiful appearance that owners can be really proud of. From initial consultation to final installation, clients can look forward to friendly, personal service from designers and craftsmen who offer a combination of quality, style and unbeatable value for money. Kitchens are the first speciality, and the firm offers many style options: contemporary and traditional using Oak, Maple. Walnut and Ash in particular. The Makepeace effect does not stop at kitchens, as they also design and make furniture of the very highest quality for every room in the house, including study, bedroom, bathroom and freestanding furniture, for example Welsh dressers, settles and tables. Makepeace Cabinetmaking is located in a late-19th century wool mill set in attractive grounds with woods and a stream. The premises are divided into a number of areas for each stage of production, from the timber store to the machinery area, the assembly room, the spray shop and the showroom. Pentre-cwrt lies by the A484 north of Carmarthen and east of Newcastle Emlyn. Opening hours are 9am to 5.30pm Monday to Friday, otherwise by appointment.The team’s superior craftsmanship and quality can also be seen at the Royal Welsh Show at the Glamorgan Hall, Builth Wells – every July.

Our aim is to provide you with fine furniture for life
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The Picton Monument at the west end of the town commemorates Sir Thomas Picton (1758–1815) who was killed at the Battle of Waterloo. He had the rank of Lieutenant General, and was the Member of Parliament for Pembroke. His body lies in St George’s Church, Hanover Square, London. Carmarthen has a thriving food market, where one of the local specialities on sale is Carmarthen ham, which is air-dried, sliced and eaten raw, like the Spanish Serrano ham.

Around Carmarthen
DREFACH FELINDRE 12 miles N of Carmarthen off the A484
B National Woollen Museum C Woollen Mill Trail

Many of the water-driven mills of this area

still continue to produce flour and distinctive woollen goods, and this important part of the region’s industrial heritage is explored in the National Wool Museum, housed in the historic former Cambrian Mills. One of the most traditional and rural industries, the processes involved in the spinning, weaving and dyeing of wool are explained here, and there are also demonstrations of clothmaking and dyeing carried out on 19thcentury machinery. As well as trying their hand at spinning, visitors can stroll around the sites of the old woollen mills in the village, which still produce flannel cloth and tweeds, and follow all or part of the Woollen Mill Trail through the scenic Teifi Valley. There are 24 miles of waymarked trails from the museum, the longer ones taking in the seven so-called flannel villages.

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

TARFARN LLWYNDAFYDD INN Saron, Llandysul SA44 5DR Tel: 01239 710435 e-mail: llwyndafyddinn@yahoo.co.uk website: www.llwyndafyddinn.co.uk
Situated in the rural village of Saron, which is roughly 5 miles from the market town of Newcastle Emlyn is where visitors will find the popular Tarfarn Llwyndafydd Inn. New owners Clive and Jackie took over the reins here in 2010, and have since given it a new lease of life, welcoming customers old and new. The bar area has a friendly atmosphere with an open fire and flat screen tv, perfect to accompany a beverage from the well stocked bar. The food here is second to none, and according to the locals the home-made steak and ale pie is the best in the area. The menu includes dishes such as battered cod fillet, vegetable lasagne, chicken korma and plenty more. On Sunday there is the added bonus of a delicious roast lunch to enjoy. The dessert options are equally as tempting with delights such as sticky toffee pudding, banoffi cream pie, apple pie and hot chocolate fudge cake. The inn also has a very large carpark, which allows for those driving large lorries and coaches to visit. Disabled access isn’t a problem and there is also a disabled toilet. Open Monday - Friday 10am - 11pm, Saturday 11am - 11pm and Sunday 12noon - 10pm.

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PONTARSAIS 5 miles N of Carmarthen on the A485
H Gwili Pottery

here, the Bronwydd Arms. A plaque now marks the spot.

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

The village is best known as the home of Gwili Pottery, which has been creating domestic pottery for more than 25 years. All the items are characterised by bold, individual designs and since every piece is hand-thrown and hand-crafted no two items are identical. To the west of the village lies Llanpumpsaint, whose name literally means “the church, or enclosure, of the five saints”. The five saints are Ceitho, Celynen, Gwyn, Gwyno and Grynnaro, who all lived in the 6th century, and were all brothers from the semiroyal Cunedda family. However, the present parish church is dedicated to just one saint – St Celynyn.

ABERGWILI 1½ miles E of Carmarthen off the A40
B Carmarthenshire County Museum B Merlin’s Hill Centre

Carmarthenshire County Museum occupies a lovely old house that was a palace of the bishop of St David’s up until 1974, and visitors can still see the bishop’s peaceful private chapel. Concentrating on Carmarthenshire’s past, the museum’s displays range from Roman gold through to Welsh furniture, and there is also a reconstruction of a school room. The palace’s grounds, too, are open to the public, and the delightful parkland is ideal for a stroll and a picnic. Occupying land that has been farmed for BRONWYDD ARMS over 2000 years, the Merlin’s Hill Centre at 2 miles N of Carmarthen on the A484 Alltyfyrddin Farm explains the history and legends of the surrounding area and its C Gwili Steam Railway connections with Merlin the Magician. As well From Bronwydd Arms Station (just off the as listening out for the wizard’s wailings – he is A484 Carmarthen to Cardigan road) the Gwili supposed to be imprisoned under an Iron Age Steam Railway offers visitors the opportunity hill fort on the farm – visitors can also explore to step back in time and take a short steam this dairy farm and learn about farming, past train journey through the Gwili Valley on part and present. of the old Great Western Railway line connecting Carmarthen to Aberystwyth. This LLANARTHNE line originally opened in 1860 and, although it 7½ miles E of Carmarthen on the B4300 finally closed in 1973, it has been run by A Paxton’s Tower A Parish Church of St David volunteers since the late 1970s. Trains run on C Caercastell Cross timetabled days between April and October E National Botanic Garden of Wales and in December. The station has a souvenir shop and sells hot and cold refreshments. To the southwest of the village stands Visitors can enjoy the train journey through a Paxton’s Tower, designed by SP Cockerell beautiful wooded valley, and the other end of and built in the early 19th century on the the line, Llwyfan Cerrig, is the perfect place Middleton estate for William Paxton, who for a picnic by the river. Unusually, the village dedicated it to Lord Nelson. Constructed so takes its name from an inn that once stood that it could be seen from the main house, it
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affords panoramic views from the tower over based on food that is as organic and local as possible. the estate and the Tywi valley. The Parish Church of St David dates mainly from the DRYSLWYN 13th century, though the base of the tower 8½ miles E of Carmarthe on the B4300 may be earlier. In the porch can be see the A Dryslwyn Castle Caercastell Cross, which dates from the 10th or 11th century. By the side of the River Tywist and the stark To the south of Llanarthne, and set in the remains of Dryslwyn Castle, built on a 18th century parkland of the former regency terraced hill by one of Lord Rhys’ descendants estate of Middleton Hall (which no longer in the mid-13th century. An ideal location for exists), is the National Botanic Garden of a stronghold, the castle throughout its life Wales - a Millennium project that covers an suffered several savage attacks that amazing 568 acres on the edge of the contributed to its present ruined condition. beautiful Towy Valley. Dedicated to LLANGATHEN conservation, horticulture, science and 11 miles E of Carmarthen off the A40 education, this national botanic garden, the first to be constructed in Britain for over 200 A Parish Church of St Cathen years, is centred around a great glasshouse E Aberglasney Gardens that is the largest single span house of its The village is home to Aberglasney Gardens, kind in the world. In 2009, it featured as a one of the oldest and most interesting gardens giant Biosphere in an episode of BBC-TV’s in the country. The first recorded description Doctor Who. Among the many delights to be of Aberglasney House and Gardens was made found within this old parkland are one of by the bard Lewis Glyn Cothi in 1477 when he Europe’s longest herbaceous borders, the wrote of “a white painted court, built of recently restored Double Walled Garden, a dressed stone, surrounded by nine gardens of Japanese garden, lakeside walks and the orchards, vineyards and large oak trees”. At a Physicians of Myddfai, an exhibition that pays tribute to the legendary Welsh healers of the Middle Ages. Tribute is also paid to the Welsh botanist Alfred Russel Wallace, whose theories of natural selection paralleled those of Charles Darwin. However, this is also very much a garden of the future. In the Energy Zone there is a biomass furnace using salvaged or coppiced wood for heating the site, and also the Living Machine sewage treatment system. The Seasons Restaurant located in Aberglasney Gardens, Llangathen the Stable Block, offers a menu
A historic building B museum and heritage C historic site D scenic attraction E flora and fauna F stories and anecdotes G famous people H art and craft I entertainment and sport J walks

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

ACORN HEDGE COTTAGE Llwyn Y Fesen, Maesquarre Road, Betws, Ammanford SA18 2PE Tel: 01269 597248 e-mail: dave.smith897@talktalk.net
David Smith opened Acorn Hedge Cottage in 2008, a beautiful stone fronted cottage found in a rural location just a mile from the main town of Ammanford. The cottage has all modern conveniences including central heating but has been sympathetically decorated to give a cosy cottage feel, with original oak beams and farmhouse furniture. The garden is picture perfect, when in summer months its herbaceous borders bloom with the delights of nature. A small patio complete with table and chairs means that guests can enjoy al fresco dining or breakfast in the morning sunshine, admiring the gorgeous view from the cottage. It’s popular with walkers, golfers, cyclists and families who can enjoy the range of local attractions which include large expanses of beaches, historical castles, parks and gardens. It can sleep up to four people, but also has a travel cot for children. There is one large double bedroom with a fully tiled en suite power shower room and one living/dining room area complete with a large leather double sofa bed for convenience. A separate kitchen opens its beautiful French doors into the pretty garden, filling the room with natural light. David and June provide their guests with everything they need to make a home from home with board games, books, DVDs and all household appliances to hand.

later date, at the beginning of the 17th century, the estate was sold to the Bishop of St David’s, and it was Bishop Anthony Rudd who improved both the house and gardens in a manner befitting a bishop’s palace. At the heart of the nine acres is a unique and fully restored Elizabethan/Jacobean cloister garden and a parapet walk, the only surviving example in the UK. Also remarkable is the Yew Tunnel, planted more than 300 years ago. The tunnel is created by training the 5 yew trees over the path and getting them to root on the other side. Also on site are a shop and a licensed restaurant. The Parish Church of St Cathen is medieval, worth visiting to see the tomb of Bishop Anthony Rudd, who became Bishop of St David’s in 1594 and died in 1615. His wife erected a splendid monument to him, which is known as the ‘bedstead tomb’ as it

show the bishop recumbent within a fourposter bed. It is in the south aisle, and was erected in 1616.

GOLDEN GROVE 11 miles E of Carmarthen off the B4300
D Gelli Aur Country Park

To the east of the village lies Gelli Aur Country Park (Gelli Aur means ‘golden grove’) on part of the estate of the ancestral home of the Vaughan family. Containing remnants of a 17th-century deer park (where a small number of deer still roam), the landscaped parkland was laid out in the 18th century. The park includes a Victorian arboretum planted by Lord Cawdor in the 1860s. Other attractions include nature trails, an adventure playground and a cafeteria. The original mansion, now part of an agricultural college, was the work of the architect Joseph Wyatville.

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LLANSTEFFAN 7 miles SW of Carmarthen on the B4312

his life living at what is now named The Dylan Thomas Boathouse set in a cliff overlooking the Taf estuary. Discovering this A Llansteffan Castle C St Anthony’s Well small out-of-the-way place in the 1940s, A Parish Church of St Ystyffan Thomas famously “got off the bus and This village, near the mouth of the River Tywi, forgot to get on again”. Approached by a is dominated by the ruins of Llansteffan narrow lane, the boathouse is a remarkably Castle on a headland above the estuary. The evocative place, partly because of the many successor to an earlier defensive earthwork, items associated with the poet, partly because the castle dates from the 12th century, and the of the serene views of the estuary and its main remaining feature is the impressive “heron-priested shore”. In the family living gateway dating from 1280. To the southwest room, a vintage wireless is tuned to the poet of the castle lies St Anthony’s Well, the himself reading his own work. As well as the waters of, which were thought to have fascinating memorabilia on display here, there medicinal properties. The Parish Church of is also an interpretation centre, bookshop and St Ystyffan dates from the 13th century and tea room. It was while he was living at later. In 1170 the church was given to the Laugharne that Thomas wrote some of his Knights Hospitaller by the local lord of the best works, including Under Milk Wood, a day manor, Geoffrey de Marmoin. in the life of his imaginary village of Llareggub (read the name backwards to find Llansteffan, along with Ferryside, its neighbour across the river mouth, is a paradise why it has this odd name). Thomas, notoriously prone to self-destructive drinking for walkers as well as sailors, and the sprees, died in The White Horse Bar in New waymarked walks around the estuary take in some truly breathtaking coastal scenery. A ten- York while on a lecture tour in 1953, at only 39 years of age. He was buried at minute walk from Llansteffan leads to Scott’s Laugharne’s parish church of St Martin Bay, a beautiful secluded beach. The where there is a replica of the plaque to his promontory of Wharley Point, in particular, memory, which can be seen in POETS’ affords stunning views across the Taf and Corner, Westminster Abbey. Tywi estuaries to Carmarthen Bay. Laugharne is also home to one of the LAUGHARNE country’s most handsome castles, a “castle 9 miles SW of Carmarthen on the A4066 brown as owls” according to Dylan Thomas. A Laugharne Castle Laugharne Castle (CADW) was built in stone around the 13th century and much of A The Dylan Thomas Boathouse that fortification still remains. But it is the A Parish Church of St Martin transformation undertaken by Sir John Perrot Over the past few years, this pretty rural town in the 16th century that make this a of Georgian houses on the estuary of the particularly special site. Granted Laugharne River Taf has become a shrine to the memory by Queen Elizabeth I, Perrot, an illegitimate of its most famous resident, Dylan Thomas. son of Henry VIII, turned the castle into a The poet, together with his wife Caitlin and comfortable mansion. In 1591 Perrot was their three children spent the last four years of found guilty of high treason and confined to
A historic building B museum and heritage C historic site D scenic attraction E flora and fauna F stories and anecdotes G famous people H art and craft I entertainment and sport J walks

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

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the Tower of London where he died the following year. As soon as word of his death reached Laugharne, looters stripped the castle of much of its contents. Half a century later, during the Civil War, the fabric of the castle suffered severe damage, leaving the romantic ruins seen today. However romantic the castle ruins may be, this is not all Laugharne Castle has Laugharne Castle to offer, as the Victorian garden has been splendidly restored. Both the land speed records. In 1924, Sir Malcolm castle ruins and the superb surroundings broke the World Motor Flying Kilometre have provided inspiration for artists over the Record here by averaging 146 miles per hour. centuries and, in particular, they are the He later raised that to 174mph, and went on subject of a dramatic watercolour by JMW to achieve speeds in excess of 300mph on Turner. the salt flats at Bonneville, Utah. In 1927, Writers too have found inspiration here. while attempting to beat Sir Malcolm’s Dylan Thomas wrote in a gazebo in the record, Welshman JG Parry Thomas was grounds, and Richard Hughes, author of A decapitated in an accident on the beach, and High Wind in Jamaica, stayed at the adjoining, his car, Babs, lay buried in the sand before rather dilapidated, Castle House from 1934 being unearthed in 1969 and restored by to 1942. Owen Wyn Owen, a lecturer from Bangor. Babs can now be seen in all its gleaming glory Located in King Street, Laugharne Pottery at the Museum of Speed, a dramatic has been producing fine designs in traditional modern building overlooking the beach, handcrafted stoneware since 1971. Also on which explores the history of this stretch of sale here are individually crafted crystal sand where so many records were broken. paperweights, which can be decorated with a However, not all the speed attempts involved design of your choice in 24ct gold. land vehicles. It was from these sands in 1933 PENDINE that the intrepid aviatrix Amy Johnson and 13½ miles SW of Carmarthen on the A4066 her husband Jim Mollinson set off in a de Havilland Dragon Rapide for a non-stop B Museum of Speed flight across the Atlantic. In 2004, all vehicles The vast, seven-mile-long expanse of sand, were banned from the beach because of which makes Pendine a popular place with possible bombs buried on it, as at one time it families was used in the 1920s by Sir was owned by the MOD. Malcolm Campbell and others for attempting
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The Parish Church of St Margaret, with its saddleback tower, has a cast iron gravestone in its churchyard. The building largely dates from the 14th century, though it was restored in Victorian times. No one knows, which St Margaret the church is dedicated to, so one of the windows features three of them - St Margaret of Antioch, St Margaret of Scotland and the shadowy local saint St Margaret Marloes. As the lord of the manor at the time of the dedication, Sir Guy de Bryan, claimed descent from St Margaret of Scotland, she is the likeliest candidate.

ST CLEARS 8½ miles SW of Carmarthen on the A40
A Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene H Glyn Coch Craft Centre

This small market town was the site of the defeat of Owain Glyndwr by Pembrokeshire’s

army in 1406. Later, in the 1840s, St Clears was involved in more trouble when it featured in the Rebecca Riots during, which the rioters destroyed toll gates. All that remains of St Clears Castle is its motte. It was founded in the 11th century, but we know little about its early history. The Glyn-Coch Craft Centre offers visitors some hundreds of locally hand-made crafts. There’s also a small working pottery, wild life to be seen on the Woodland Walk; farm animals and machinery, and displays of local and general interest. The large Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene had its origins in a Clunaic priory established here in the 12th century. It was a daughter house of St Martin des Champs in Paris, but supported only two or three monks at a time. As an ‘alien’ (i.e. foreign) priory, it was always viewed with

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

WEST WALES CRAFTS Coach House, Pentre Road, St Clears, Carmarthenshire SA33 4AA Tel: 01994 484436 / 07920224040 e-mail: mohair@fsmail.net website: www.mohairweaving.com
You will find a fabulous selection of the highest quality locally produced crafts at West Wales Crafts. Owner Jean AlexanderOwens is extremely proud of the craft centre, which opened at its new premise at the Coach House in August 2009. There is a fantastic range of jewellery, cards, soft furnishing and fashion accessories available to buy here. Customers take their time looking through the different styles of jewellery and with new and different stocks arriving weekly, craft-lovers return regularly to check out what is on offer. West Wales Crafts is the perfect place to shop if you are looking for an original gift for a friend or family member, or even a treat for yourself. Individual items that have been locally produced can be found displayed on the shelves. Landscape paintings and prints, wax and acrylic pictures and photographic pictures are all available. Cushions, lavender pillows, stained glass, turned wood, hand-carved Welsh Lovespoons and leather goods are also sold as well as chutney, jams and preserves.

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

THE PLASH INN Llanfallteg, Whitland, Carmarthenshire SA34 0UN Tel: 01437 563472 e-mail: plash@btconnect.com
Many people are attracted to The Plash Inn because there is no jukebox, TV or background music, so there is always an interesting conversation to be had. Dating back to the early 19th century in parts, this lively pub was once the railway inn between the now closed Cardigan and Whitland line. It is now run and owned by experienced licensees and caterers Christie and Steve Goymer who have put the child-friendly Plash back on the map over the past six years. In the winter a log fire creates a warm and homely atmosphere where customers relax well into the evening. Christie and Steve are extremely proud of the real ales they serve, and focus primarily on quality and preservation. There are always three real ales available, which includes a rotating guest ale. They firmly believe in quality over quantity and offer a small range of excellent products rather than a vast selection of items that lack in quality. Food is served from opening to closing time everyday and the excellent and renowned home-made Pizza’s are the Plash speciality now and are available to eat in or take away and can be enjoyed on their own or with some “proper” chips, fresh baked Garlic Bread or “made to order” Coleslaw. More traditional Bar Snacks such as Jacket Potatoes, Omelettes and Baguettes are also available during all opening hours. The inn’s dining area is very cosy and seats 12 people, though more relaxed dining can be enjoyed in the bar area. This charming village pub is a great stop off for walkers or those fancying a rural break away in the fully fitted self catering cottage also on hand here. The one bedroom holiday cottage has been recently refurbished and provides the ideal get-away. Ring for details. The Plash Inn can be found in the tiny village of Llanfallteg just east of the A478 or north of the A40. This olde worlde inn offers the very best in hospitality, real ale, food and accommodation and is popular with all those who come across it. A quiz night is held every fortnight on Tuesdays from 8pm. Ring or email brewerycottage@yahoo.co.uk for details.

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suspicion, especially when England was at war with France. So much so that it was finally dissolved in 1414.

chocolates of all shapes, sizes and flavours are made. The recipes are based on those in a Victorian cookbook put together by Alice Pemberton and found many years later by her WHITLAND grandson Alan Jones who, together with his 13 miles W of Carmarthen on the B4328 wife Elizabeth, founded the Chocolate Farm. A Whitland Abbey B Hywel Dda Centre As well as watching chocolate-making demonstrations and touring the factory to see This small market town and centre of the dairy industry is historically important as the just how the chocolate is produced, visitors can buy gifts and treats for family and friends meeting place of the assembly convened by Hywel Dda in the 10th century. Born towards (and selves) at the farm shop, which has the largest selection of chocolates in Wales. And, the end of the 9th century, Dda made a as this is rich dairy country, there are also pilgrimage to Rome in AD928 and, some 14 farmhouse cheeses and other dairy delights for years later, he was ruler of most of Wales. sale along with a wide range of hand-roasted Summoning representatives from each part coffee beans prepared daily. Don’t even try to of Wales to Whitland, Dda laid down a legal resist the homemade fudge! system that became known for its wisdom and justice, and which remained in force in CENARTH Wales up until the Act of Union with 16 miles NW of Carmarthen on the A484 England in 1536. This system and its A Cenarth Mill A Old Smithy instigator are remembered at the Prince of B National Coracle Centre Wales Design award-winning building, the Hywel Dda Centre. Here, too, is a memorial D Salmon Leap Waterfalls in the form of six gardens representing the This delightful conservation village is set six separate divisions of the law: Society and around the spectacular Salmon Leap Status; Crime and Tort; Women; Contract; Waterfalls on the River Teifi. In the the King; and Property. succession of low waterfalls cascading over Just north of the town stand the remains rock and boulders, salmon can be seen each of the once great Whitland Abbey, which year leaping their way upstream. Close to the was founded in 1140 by Bernard, the first falls is Cenarth Mill. Dating from the 17th Norman Bishop of St David’s. It moved to century, the watermill, which has two pairs of its present position in 1151 and at one time stones (one for barley, the other for oats) is was the premier Cistercian house in Wales. powered by the river close to the salmon leap.

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LLANBOIDY 12 miles NW of Carmarthen off the A40
H Pemberton’s Chocolate Farm

In old stone farm buildings to the north of the village is a chocoholic’s dream – the Pemberton’s Chocolate Farm where

Now restored and producing wholemeal flour, the mill complex also houses the National Coracle Centre, where visitors can see a unique collection of these ancient boats from around the world, including Tibet, India, Iraq, Vietnam and North America. Dating back to the Ice Age, these little round boats, once

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

CILFORD COTTAGE Cenarth, Newcastle Emlyn, SA38 9LD Tel: 01239 710232 e-mail: dilwyn_thomas@btconnect.com
A quiet comfortable house in a quiet rural location. An ideal venue for that special holiday in West Wales. With stunning views over the Cych valley and surrounding countryside, Cilford Cottage is a must for those in need of a relaxing getaway. The beaches and coves of North Pembrokeshire are all within easy driving distance and fishing and boat trips are available locally. The detached farmhouse boasts four comfortable sized rooms; three double and one twin sleeping a total of eight people. All linen and towels are included so guests need not worry about bringing their own. Downstairs a large porch leads into a kitchen/ dining room complete with all the much needed essentials including an oil Rayburn as well as a utility room with a washing machine, dryer, fridge, freezer and sink. There is a comfortable lounge with open fire, TV with Freeview, video and DVD making it an ideal place to unwind of an evening. During the warmer months, guests can take in the views and enjoy the garden and patio area complete with BBQ. There is off road parking for several cars and payments must be made via cheque.

THE BAY TREE Emlyn Square, Newcastle Emlyn, Camarthenshire SA38 9BQ Tel: 01239 711223 Fax: 01239 710170
The Bay Tree is owned by Helen Nolan who, after working in the shop for a number of years, took over the business in December 2010. Situated in the market town of Newcastle Emlyn, this attractive double fronted shop dates back 300 years and is bursting with character. The shop stocks high quality cookware and utensils, with brands including Stellar from Horwood, TG Woodware, Churchill China, Dexham and Colourworks from Kitchencraft. There is also a range of beautiful baskets and gifts alongside sugar craft and cake decorating supplies. The products are well laid out across two floors and there is a vast choice of inspired products for the kitchen and home, both decorative and practical. Owner Helen is very knowledgeable and her friendly and helpful manner means she will always go the extra mile to ensure customers receive an excellent service. If you can’t find what you’re looking for, she will endeavour to get it for you. Helen has breathed new life into the business by regularly holding workshops in cake decorating and sugarcraft in the classroom on the second floor. The workshops cater for all abilities and Helen is more than happy to pass on her extensive expertise.

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covered in skins, are still used for salmon fishing, and at the Centre visitors can see demonstrations of coracles at work. During the season coracle rides are also available. From the mill there’s a lovely riverside walk that takes in the 200-year-old bridge with its distinctive cylindrical holes. The Old Smithy Craft Shop and Heritage Centre can be found within an 18th-century blacksmith’s workshop that still has some of the old tools used by the blacksmith who last worked here in 1953.

NEWCASTLE EMLYN 18 miles NW of Carmarthen on the A484
A Newcastle Emlyn Castle D Old Cilgwyn Gardens

The first settlement here developed around a loop of the River Teifi. In 1240 this strategic spot was chosen as the site for Newcastle Emlyn Castle.

Like that of many other castles in Wales, Newcastle Emlyn’s turbulent history is in some ways confirmed by the present condition of this now ruined fortress, as it changed hands several times until it was destroyed during the Glyndwr rebellion in the early 1400s. Having fallen into disrepair, the castle was granted to Sir Rhys ap Thomas by Henry VII in the late 15th century, and became a country residence before being all but demolished during the Civil War for harbouring Royalist sympathisers. This bustling market town has the distinction of having had the first printing press in Wales, set up by Isaac Carter in 1718. His first publication was an anti-smoking ballad. On the B4571, a mile north of Newcastle Emlyn, lie Old Cilgwyn Gardens. This is a 14acre mixed garden set in 900 acres of parkland that includes a 53-acre Site of Special Scientific Interest. It contains the site of the last fatal duel

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

PANED UN 12 Sycamore Street, Newcastle Emlyn SA38 9AP Tel: 07837831107
Enjoy an unforgettable chocolate experience by visiting Paned Un in the heart of Newcastle Emlyn. Talented owner Dianne Jones has been creating chocolates for 10 years and she has previously worked as a chef in a bakery and in the cake decorating business. Dianne began making chocolates from her home to sell to local hotels. However, soon word spread about her amazing chocolates and she opened this shop from which to display and sell her fantastic range. Dianne specialises in making bespoke wedding and celebration cakes that can be colour coordinated and decorated to reflect the personal hobbies of the lucky recipient. She also creates beautiful cup cakes and wedding favours made from chocolate, marzipan or sugar almonds. Inside the shop you can give in to temptation and sample any of the delicious items on display. There is even a small area to sit and enjoy tea, coffee and cakes, making this a delightful place to enjoy a break from shopping or to relax after a bracing walk. Dianne’s creations are frequently displayed at food festivals around the UK and you cannot fail to be inspired by her infectious enthusiasm for chocolate and her passion to bring this wonderful business to Wales.

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

GWESTY’R EMLYN HOTEL Bridge Street, Newcastle Emlyn, Camarthenshire SA38 9DU Tel: 01239 710317 Fax: 01239 710792 e-mail: reception@gwestyremlynhotel.co.uk website: www.gwestyremlynhotel.co.uk
There has always been a warm welcome at the Gwesty’r Emlyn Hotel that’s offered centuries of service. With a new name following a complete luxurious but sensitive heritage refurbishment decorated in tranquil green, fawn and cream colours, Gwesty’r Emlyn Hotel on the high street, offers a top class, comfortable, quality service and stay. Complete refurbishment has transformed this 300 year old Coaching Inn giving you the best of both worlds with contemporary chic and traditional accents sitting side by side. In the heart of West Wales the enchanting and traditional market town of Newcastle Emlyn with beautiful countryside, picturesque beaches and historic sites just a short distance away makes Gwesty’r Emlyn Hotel the ideal place to visit or stay. The Old Coach House part of the hotel offers a fitness suite which includes a gym, spa pool and sauna. For casual dining in the light and comfortable conservatory freshly baked pizza, pasta and salads are served in Italo’s Pizzaria now open from Thursdays to Sundays –please check for opening times. In the main hotel there are two bars; one is cozy and casual with a large flat screen television and warming fire effect stove, perfect for those cold winter nights. The main bar is relaxed and inviting with elegant soft furnishings, and soothing background music, ideal while enjoying a glass of wine or one of our cocktails. Both bars are open Monday to Saturday from 11.00am until 11.00pm and Sunday 12.00 noon until 10.30pm.Teas, Coffees and non-alcoholic beverages are available throughout the day. Our beautifully decorated Bwyty’r Bont Restaurant has a tranquil and sophisticated ambience, with a modern yet comfortable theme. We serve a set lunchtime menu as well as the Bar menu snacks from Monday to Saturday from 12.00noon until 2.30pm offering a good range of seasonal and local dishes. The evening menu is available Monday to Saturday from 6.00pm until 9.00pm. Bookings are advisable to avoid disappointment. There is also a small terrace outside the restaurant where guests can sit and enjoy the morning sun reading the paper with a cappuccino. A delicious traditional Sunday lunch carvery is served in our newly refurbished function room known as Tw´ Nest. Our function facility can seat up to 170 people for a function or wedding. We also cater for conference and meetings of any size. The Hotel boasts 21 stylish guest bedrooms, including double executive rooms, family rooms and the Gwenllian suite also known as the bridal suite. There is also a disabled friendly room on the ground floor with a wet room en-suite. The rooms have been recently refurbished to an impeccably high standard creating a true sense of place. All our rooms are en-suite with all the luxury you would expect, including free Wi-Fi internet access, direct dial telephone, flat screen television, hair dryer and tea and coffee making facilities.

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

RAINBOW CRYSTALS Glyndwr House, Sycamore Street, Newcastle Emlyn SA38 9AJ Tel: 01239 711729 e-mail: emma.manwaring@orange.net website: www.rainbowcrystals2012.net
Rainbow Crystals is a truly unique and inspiring place to visit and is situated within the charming town of Newcastle Emlyn in the heart of Carmarthenshire. Since opening in 2007, what was originally intended as an interesting and remarkable gift shop has evolved into a small but fascinating museum of natural history. As well as being a wonderfully peaceful haven in which to browse and learn about the secrets and treasures of the earth, you will also find an amazing selection of gifts and souvenirs for purchase. There is a stunning selection of crystal, fossil and silver jewellery on sale alongside fine quality rare crystals and unusual fossils. Items on display are sourced from around the world and all stock is grade A or above. Inside there is a distinct calm and relaxing atmosphere which is heightened by the presence of a beautiful water feature at the back of the shop. Knowledgeable and fascinating owner Emma is a professionally qualified Landscape Architect and has designed a number of spiritual and meditation gardens. Emma is also an AmaDeus Shaman, offering powerful and energetic Shamanic healing and spiritual guidance. For a genuinely unique and illuminating experience, Rainbow Crystals is definitely not to be missed.

fought in Wales. It occurred in 1814 and the victim, Thomas Heslop, was shot in the back.

waters), seems particularly apt. The Romans were here and built a fort within whose ramparts a church was later built. The Parish Church of St Mary on the Hill still has some Roman tiles within its walls. Also of note are the barrel-vaulted chancel A Llandovery Castle and tie-beam roof. A Parish Church of St Mary on the Hill Llandovery Castle, the remains of which A Dolauhirion Bridge C Twm Sion Catl’s Cave overlook the cattle market (held every other B Llandovery Heritage Centre Tuesday), was the most easterly Norman castle F Physicians of Myddfai G Rhys Pritchard within Carmarthenshire, constructed in 1116 Visiting in the 19th century, the author George by Richard Fitzpons, only to be captured and Borrow called Landovery “the pleasantest little destroyed some 42 years later. Henry IV used town in which I have halted”. Still an attractive the castle as his base during his campaign against Owain Glyndwr. The king witnessed place, this busy market town is situated at the the hanging, drawing and quartering of confluence of the Rivers Bran, Gwennol and Llewelyn ap Gruffydd Fychan of Ceao who, in Tywi, so Llandovery’s Welsh name, 1401, was executed for refusing to betray Llanymddyfri (meaning the church amid the

Llandovery

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

BRAMBLES 38 High Street, Llandovery, Carmarthenshire SA20 0DD Tel: 01550 720534
There can be few more delightful places to browse and buy than Brambles, which stands on the High Street in Llandovery. Mary Dunkley, who previously ran an antiques business in Heathfield, Sussex, came here in 2006, since when she has been filling her shop with an amazing variety of antiques, collectables, curios, giftware and things that put the finishing touches to a home. Every inch of space is given over to a fascinating selection of items large and small: jewellery, selected pieces of furniture, china and glass, mugs and jugs, lamps, rugs, cushions, pillows, books on all kinds of eclectic subjects, dolls and dolls houses, baskets in all shapes and sizes……Mary is constantly on the lookout for interesting items, so every visit is certain to reveal new delights. Usual shop hours are 11 to 4 Monday to Saturday, but it’s best to phone before setting out on a visit.

CWMGWYN FARM Llangadog Road, Llandovery SA20 OEQ Tel: 01550 720410 e-mail: cwmgwyn@waitrose.com website: cwmgwyn-holidays.co.uk
Marian and Arwyn Lewis run a working livestock farm Cwmgwyn Farm, which has been operating since the 17th century. Since 1975 they have been running a homely farmhouse bed and breakfast alongside it. They offer three four star en suite guest bedrooms decorated in a traditional country style, but with all modern conveniences including TV, DVD player and tea and coffee facilities. Just like the rooms, the main farm house is full of character, with a beautiful inglenook feature fireplace and original oak beams and stonework walls. They also offer a five star self catering cottage, which comes equipped with the same gorgeous farm house feel as the rest of the guest house. It sleeps up to four people with one beautifully decorated double en suite bedroom, and one twin bedroom with its own private bathroom. The cottage also has a luxurious covered outdoor hot tub, overlooking the farm’s stunning grounds. The vast expanse of greenery is a wonder to behold, especially when sat with a cold glass of wine or beer within the warm bubbles of the hot tub. Each morning B&B guests can wake truly refreshed after getting some good old country air, starting their day with a handsome farmhouse breakfast served in the main house. Simply delicious, the breakfast is created using only fresh local produce where possible for that real country taste.

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Glyndwr. Llewellyn is commemorated by an imposing monument on the castle mound. After 1403, the castle was left to decay and only the tumbledown remains are visible today. The history of this town, which delighted many people before and since George Borrow, is told at the Llandovery Llandovery Castle Heritage Centre where the legends surrounding of the collection of verses The Welshman’s the hero Twm Sion Cati - the Welsh Robin Hood - and the local Physicians of Myddfai Candle, was vicar here from about 1602. In the following century the renowned Methodist poet are also explored. The legend concerning the physicians is that a lady appeared one day from and hymn writer William Williams (1717-1791) was born in Llandovery. Amongst his many a lake in the Black Mountain. A local farmer’s hymns, the best-known in English is Guide Me, son fell in love with her and she agreed to marry him on condition that he did not hit her O Thou Great Redeemer. three times without cause. Over the years he The attractive Dolauhirion Bridge spanning had given her three light taps for what he the River Tywi was built in 1173 by William thought was poor behaviour and sure enough Edwards. North of Llandovery, near Rhandirshe returned to the lake. But before mwyn, is all that remains of Twm Sion Cati’s disappearing she passed on her herbal healing Cave, the hideout of the 16th century Robin secrets to her three sons, who became the first Hood of Wales. A poet whose youthful of the famous Physicians of Myddfai, a line escapades earned him the title, Twn Sion later of healers who practised from the 12th to the curtailed his activities and settled down after 18th centuries. A recent venture among a marrying the heiress of Ystradffin and even group of farmers in Myddfai (a short drive became a magistrate. He died in 1620. south of Llandovery) was bringing together this age-old legend and the growing modern interest in the properties of herbs. In 2010 they launched a range of herbal remedies and CILYCWM other branded goods, which they hope will 3½ miles N of Llandovery off the A483 revive a place renowned across Europe in A Capel Bwlchyrhiw medieval times. A Parish Church of St Michael Llandovery boasts two famous sons. Rhys Pritchard, known as a preacher and the author The village’s Capel Bwlchyrhiw is said to

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

Around Llandovery

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

NEUADD FAWR ARMS Cilycwm, Llandovery SA20 OST Tel: 01550 721644 e-mail: neuaddfawr@gmail.com
Neuadd Fawr Arms is regarded by locals and tourists alike as a the embodiment of a traditional Welsh pub. Built at some point in the mid 17th century when it was originally named the Black Lion, the inn has undergone several upgrades to keep it functioning smoothly, but retains its original charm. Owners James and Julie have filled it with a variety of antiques and period furnishings which befit the quirky, olde worlde feel. The bar is made from old church pews which James and Julie crafted themselves, whilst the handsome stone floor is the original. James and Julie offer an extensive and diverse menu which draws on recipes from traditional to Welsh cuisine and modern influences. All dishes are prepared on the premises and include razor clams, suet pies, seasonal game dishes, steaks, patisseries and desserts. A carefully chosen wine list accompanies the menu, alongside a healthy range of real ales, lagers, spirits and soft drinks, which can be enjoyed in the inn’s large beer garden in the summer months, with views of the magnificent Towy Valley and Brecon Beacons beyond. And next door is Cilycwm’s 12th century parish church with possibly Wales’ oldest Yew tree, all of which featured in the popular TV series Pentalar. There are many scenic walks in the immediate area, Cwm Rhaider Forest and Mountain Biking Complex is close by and the breathtaking Lyn Brianne Reservoir is only a short drive away.

have been the first meeting place of Methodists in Wales. The Parish Church of St Michael dates from the early 14th century, and the nave has delightful wall paintings.

LLANGADOG 5 miles SW of Llandovery on the A4069
A Llangadog Castle C Carn Coch F Bethlehem

Bethlehem. Thousands of people from all over the world send cards to the Post Office here at Christmas time to be franked and sent on elsewhere, a practice that is known locally as ‘franking sense’.

TRAPP 12 miles SW of Llandovery off the A483
A Carreg Cennen Castle H Trapp Arts and Crafts Centre

This picturesque village set beneath the great bulk of Black Mountain in the Vale of Towy boasted a castle, Llangadog Castle, but all that remains today is a mound. The castle was destroyed by its owners in 1277 rather than let it fall into the hands of the English. A few miles to the southwest lies Carn Coch, the largest hill fort in Wales, whose earthworks and stone ramparts cover some 15 acres. Also southwest of the town is the village of

Situated on the top of a precipitous limestone crag on the Black Mountain, and with a vertical drop to the River Cennen below, Carreg Cennen Castle, to the east of Trapp, enjoys one of the most spectacular locations of any Welsh castle. The present castle dates from 1248, but some attribute a castle here to Urien, a knight of Arthur’s Round Table. It remained a Welsh stronghold for 30 years,

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falling to Edward I during his first invasion in 1277. During the Wars of the Roses it became a base for bandit Lancastrians. Taken on behalf of the Yorkists in 1462, the fortress was dismantled on the orders of Edward IV, leaving the romantic ruins seen today. A visit is well worth the effort to enjoy the impressive views and to appreciate what a daunting task attacking the castle must have been. There is only one way up – a steep, grassy hill protected by a complicated system of defences. One local legend tells of a narrow underground tunnel that leads from the castle to a wishing well where visitors used to throw corks into the water to make their dreams come true. The well’s waters were also thought to have special powers, particularly in curing eye and ear complaints. Trapp itself has a connection with water as the village is the source of Brecon Carreg mineral water.

In the converted barns of Llwyndewi Farm is Trapp Arts and Crafts Centre, which specialises in Welsh crafts. The shop stocks an interesting range of quality items including stained glass, love spoons, pottery and jewellery, and the art gallery on the first floor shows the work of local artists. Demonstrations and exhibitions run throughout the summer months, and the centre has a coffee shop.

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

LLANDEILO 11½ miles SW of Llandovery on the A483
A Tywi Bridge A Parish Church of St Teilo A Dinefwr Castle D Dinefwr Park A Newton House

The former ancient capital of West Wales, Llandeilo’s hilltop position shows off to best advantage this pretty little market town. In

THE WORKS ANTIQUE CENTRE Station Road, Llandeilo SA19 6NG Tel: 01558 823964 e-mail: workant@clara.co.uk website: www.works-antique.co.uk
If you find yourself in Llandeilo, then what better way to while away a few hours than by looking around The Works Antique Centre. Opened in 2001, this marvellous centre is occupied by sixty antique dealers presenting a wide and eclectic collection of distinctive furniture, china, kitchen ware, books, paintings, jewellery, vintage clothes and other collectable items. As well as offering a wide range of antiques for purchase, the centre also offers pine stripping, restoration and upholstery services. While you spend time meandering through the warren of antique stalls you would also be wise to take advantage of the wealth of knowledge contained under this one roof by talking to the dealers, who offer a quality service and sound advice. The Garden Centre at The Works is also well worth a look and features a variety of unusual plants for the home and garden. Llandeilo is conveniently situated close to the M4 and the A40 between the market towns of Carmarthen and Brecon. When you reach The Works Antique Centre you will find it is easy to access with plenty of parking available. The centre is open from Tuesday through to Saturday from 10am to 5.30pm and from 10am to 4.30pm on Sundays.

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

PINC 70 Rhosmaen Street, Llandeilo SA19 6EN Tel: 01558 824515 e-mail: pinc@btconnect.com
PINC occupies a beautiful listed building and specialises in selling flowers, organic produce, outdoor living accessories and a range of jewellery. This friendly family run business was opened in 2006 by local Welsh speaking brother and sister duo, Aled and Nia, who are always willing to go the extra mile and exceed your expectations with their fantastic creations and products. The attractive and exciting window displays give a preview of the shop’s inviting interior, which holds a beautiful selection of flowers for all occasions. The flowers can be specially arranged to meet customer’s requirements and there is also a special consultancy service for brides. The flowers and organic produce always reflect the current season and the owners are keen to encourage people to buy locally and support the community instead of shopping at the supermarket. The vegetables are locally sourced where possible and sold within the shop as well as in veg boxes delivered to customers on a daily basis. PINC also sells high quality and well made products in its outdoor living section, including well known brands Barbour and Le Chameau. Conveniently located just off the M4, PINC sits in the shadow of the Brecon Beacons with good access via Llandeilo Railway Station.

J H COOPER 4 Carmarthen Street, Llandeilo, Carmarthenshire SA19 6AE Tel: 01558 823463 e-mail: jhcooper@btconnect.com
For many years J H Cooper Family Butcher has been providing the local area with the very best beef, lamb, poultry and game. Owner Julian Cooper and his staff are proud of the traditional qualities they bring to their profession, combining the finest meat (most of it locally reared or sourced) with friendly service and excellent value for money at their long-established shop. As well as the cuts and joints and poultry the shop sells its own home-cured bacon, Barbary ducks, home-made faggots and game both furred and feathered. The shop, which is readily identified by its cheerful red canopy, is located in one of Llandeilo’s many little side streets in Smithfield House its name to one of the many varieties of sausages made on the premises: the Smithfield Sausage is made with pork, leek, ginger and rosemary. Spitroast chickens and delicatessen items including cooked and cured meats, cheeses (mostly Welsh) and olives make J H Cooper an ideal stop-off for self-catering holidaymakers to stock up. Shop hours are 8 to 5.30 Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, 8 to 1 Thursday and 8 to 4.30 Saturday.

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

EVE’S TOY SHOP 1a King Street, Llandeilo SA19 6AA Tel: 01558 824755
Situated in the picturesque and unspoilt town of Llandeilo is this delightfully traditional Eve’s Toy Shop. On sight of the fantastic and exciting window display, both children and adults will be curious to explore inside. The shop is owned by Jayne Campisi who is assisted by her 9 year old daughter Eve. Jayne is extremely knowledgeable and clearly very enthusiastic about this superb business in the heart of Wales. The shop sells unique and interesting traditional toys sourced from locations around the UK, Europe and America. There is a great emphasis on quality, design, play value, fun and safety. The fantastic collection of toys on display here come from Djeco, The Puppet Company, Wild Republic and other reputable toy brands and sit alongside a selection of Usborne Books and the ever popular Lego and Duplo. Jayne is French and she employs artists to design some beautiful French toys, including Le Toy Van Budkins. There is also a selection of excellent quality clothing, with a lot of European brands of clothing on offer which set the range apart from many other children’s clothing stores. There is also a collection of Welsh made Inch Blue shoes available for purchase.

recent years Llandeilo has been upwardly mobile with an influx of smart shops and galleries, along with delis, cafes, restaurants and a stylishly revamped former coaching inn. Pastel coloured Georgian houses line the main road, which curves elegantly up from the Tywi Bridge (its central span is said to be the longest in Wales). The road continues to the Victorian Parish Church of St Teilo. It is dedicated to the 6th century saint who gave the town its name and founded the monastery where the so-called Lichfield Gospels, the most perfect Welsh Christian manuscripts, were written. They are now in the library of Lichfield Cathedral. To the west of the town stands Dinefwr Castle (CADW), the ancient seat of the Princes of Deheubarth, one of the three ancient kingdoms of Wales. The fortress was built on the site of an Iron Age fort, and

legend has it that Merlin’s grave is in the area. Overlooking the River Tywi, the first stone castle here is believed to have been built by Rhys ap Gryffydd in the 12th century. Regarded as an important target, it was dismantled by Rhys Grug in 1220 to prevent Llywelyn from taking this strategic position. The castle ruins are surrounded by Dinefwr Park (NT). Extensive areas of the parkland were landscaped by ‘Capability’ Brown in 1775 and incorporated the medieval castle, house, gardens and ancient deer park into one breathtaking panorama. Footpaths through the parkland lead to the castle, bog wood and beech clumps and offer outstanding views of the Tywi valley. The site is one of international importance for wintering birds, including white-fronted geese, curlews and lapwings. There is a small herd of white cattle. Also within the park is Newton House,

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

THE TAPESTRY KIT COLLECTION Cathilas Farm, Abergorlech, Carmarthenshire, West Wales SA32 7TB Tel: 01588 685096 e-mail: tapestry@tapestry-kits.com website: www.tapestry-kits.com
Occupying a beautifully converted stone dairy set within 13 acres of land, The Tapestry Kit Collection is a unique and specialised business that is well worth a visit. Situated close to the picturesque market town of Llandeilo and surrounded by the stunning scenery of the Cothi Valley, this business hosts a great choice of high quality tapestry kits representing the very best of British tapestry designs. You will also find a selection of tapestry frames and all the accessories you need to partake in this absorbing and rewarding craft. Owners Karen and Richard are incredibly knowledgeable and inspirational people who are fascinating to talk to. Karen has a background in archaeology and she injects a great deal of historical inspiration into her own tapestry designs. Offering a broad spectrum of design styles to suit all tastes, well known brands are stocked here including Beth Russell, Jolly Red, Kirk & Hamilton, Glorafilia, Elizabeth Bradley, Primavera and their own brand Millennia Designs. They also specialise in traditional trammed tapestry canvases which are perfect for period furniture and interiors. All three major brands, Ivo, Beverley and Stitchery, are stocked in depth. A comprehensive making up service is available and you can even commission your own bespoke needlepoint design. Customers can also browse through an extensive range of stitched design samples to get an idea of what can be achieved. It’s not all about tapestry here though; Karen and Richard also farm rare breed Soay sheep and the meat is available to preorder. Their flock can be seen grazing on the surrounding land and lambing happens from mid April through to mid May. During this time visitors are welcome to indulge in a spot of lamb cuddling! Karen and Richard spent 4 years completing the amazing conversion of this historic building. They used beams made from trees grown in their own woodland which they felled and shaped themselves. Reclaimed and restored antique furniture and character features are plentiful inside including a delightful woodburning stove, oak floors, an old Abbey door, two 19th Century Indian windows with shutters and a stone cobbled patio area accessed by reclaimed stone steps. Outside the property there is an area laid to lawn surrounded by flower beds and ponds from which to enjoy spectacular views over the Cothi Valley. For your convenience there is disabled access, plenty of car parking and well-behaved dogs are welcome if kept on a lead. Opening days vary seasonally, please phone them or consult their website for details.

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

STANGWRACH COTTAGE & ASH TREE LODGE Stangwrach, Llanfyndd, Carmarthen SA32 7TG Tel: 01558 668287 e-mail: enquiries@holidaycottagewales.com website: www.holidaycottagewales.com
Stangwrach Cottage and Ash Tree Lodge are surrounded by stunning Carmarthenshire countryside and situated on the edge of the Brecon Beacons National Park. From this idyllic location you can enjoy the best of the coast and countryside. These immaculate self catering properties are set within beautifully landscaped gardens and can be booked separately or together for larger groups. Ash Tree Lodge has been awarded 5 stars from the Welsh Tourist Board and is spacious, with wooden flooring throughout and under floor heating. The accommodation is set on one level with wide doors offering good disabled access. There are four bedrooms and a playroom, which can also be used as a fifth bedroom. The Lodge also benefits from a covered patio area with garden furniture. The 4 star Stangwratch Cottage dates back to the 15th Century and enjoys panoramic views of the surrounding dramatic landscapes and breathtaking countryside. Traditional beams and character features combine seamlessly with modern comforts, including central heating throughout. The cottage has a double bedroom and a twin bedroom with a sofa bed to sleep two extra people if necessary.

originally built in 1660, provided with a new limestone façade in the 1860s, and restored by the National Trust in 2006. The ground floor and basement have been returned to the Edwardian era. Visitors are taken back to 1912 where they can see, touch and hear about life above and below stairs in the early years of the 20th century.

remains to have survived, is an immense tower still overshadowing the peaceful abbey lawns. The nearby 18th-century Parish Church of St Michael is something of an oddity: it was built with no aisle and its interior was entirely taken up with box pews.

CRUGYBAR 7 miles NW of Llandovery on the B4302
A Felin Newydd

TALLEY 8½ miles W of Llandovery on the B4302
A Talley Abbey A Parish Church of St Michael

This village, with its backdrop of rolling hills, takes its name from Tal-y-llychau, meaning head of the lakes. Between two lakes stands Talley Abbey, founded in the late 12th century by Rhys ap Gryffyd, and the only Welsh outpost of the austere Premonstratensian canons. Among the few

Just to the northeast of the village, and nestling in the beautiful foothills of the Cambrian Mountains, lies Felin Newydd, a 200-year-old working watermill believed to have been constructed on the site of a grist mill used by Roman soldiers working on the nearby gold mines. Restored in the 1980s, when fascinating graffiti on the mill walls linked the building with 19th-century Welsh

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

BRUNANT ARMS Church Street, Caio, Llanwrda SA19 8RD Tel: 01558 650483 e-mail: hywelslec@hotmail.com
The Brunant Arms is a delightful country pub situated within the village of Caio and conveniently located between the towns of Lampeter and Llandovery. This family run pub has a very friendly and traditional atmosphere which is enhanced by the open fire and high backed pews around the tables. Landlady Janet speaks both Welsh and English and there are many paintings of local scenes and black and white photographs of local characters decorating the walls. The delicious home cooked meals on the menu are freshly prepared and include options for vegetarians. The bar offers an excellent range of real ales and ciders alongside an impressive selection of fine wines. There is ample parking at the rear of the pub and an attractive beer garden. Guest accommodation comprises a twin room with en-suite facilities and a double room with its own bathroom across the landing. The Brunant Arms is full of historic charm and even has its own resident ghost! Whether the ghost is John Harris, one of the last wizards of Wales, whose final resting place was in the village of Caio, or one of the characters decorating the walls is something that you will have to find out for yourself.

Felin Newydd, Crugybar

byre has been converted into a cosy tearoom that also has an interesting selection of local crafts for sale.

PUMSAINT 8 miles NW of Llandovery on the A482
C Dolaucothi Goldmines

colonists of South America, the mill is now capable of grinding flour once more. The land around the mill is quiet, unspoiled and ideal for discovering all manner of wild plant and animal life. Lucky visitors have been known to see red kite circling overhead although there are also more friendly ducks and chickens to amuse young children. A renovated

Near this hamlet, whose names means five saints, are the Dolaucothi Goldmines (NT), which date back some 2000 years to a time when the open-cast gold workings were secured by the Roman army. Once a likely source of gold bullion for the Imperial mints of Lyons and Rome, the mines are still in a remarkable state of preservation despite being abandoned by the Romans in AD140. They were reopened between 1888 and the late 1930s. Visitors to this site in the beautiful Cothi Valley can join one-hour-long guided tours to see both the ancient and modern

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mine workings, including a number of the horizontal tunnels dug into the hillside for drainage and access. There is also the opportunity to try gold panning, to see an exhibition of vintage mining machinery and to tour the surrounding woodland on a waymarked trail. The site also has a shop selling Welsh Gold and a tearoom serving delicious home-cooked food.

Llanelli
A Parish Church of St Elli A Llanelly House E National Wetland Centre of Wales B Parc Howard Museum and Art Gallery D Millennium Coastal Park and Cycleway

Located on the Loughor estuary, Llanelli is perhaps best known as the home of the

Scarlets, one of the most famous rugby teams in Wales. The saucepan tipped rugby posts at Stradey Park and the Scarlets’ anthem, Sospan Fach (‘little saucepan’), are both reminders of Llanelli’s industrial heritage. In Stepney Street, the Stepney Wheel was made in the early 20th century; this was an inflated spare tyre on a spokeless rim, to be fixed over a punctured wheel. In India, the term Stepney Wheel is still sometimes applied to any spare tyre. Llanelli was named after the Celt, St Elli, to whom the Parish Church of St Elli is dedicated. It has two naves, one dating from Norman times and one built in the 15th century. The stained-glass windows commemorate the traditional industries of the town – iron making and mining. Housed in a former mansion set in a large civic park with grand sea views, Parc

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

LLWYN HALL HOTEL Hoel Hendre, Llwynhendy, Llanelli SA14 9LD Tel: 01554 777754 e-mail: info@llwynhall.co.uk website: www.llwynhall.co.uk
On the outskirts of Llanelli is the beautiful Llwyn Hall Hotel. It is an oasis of good taste and comfort, away from the daily hustle and bustle of the towns. This beautifully and appropriately furnished Victorian House reveals a delightful display of colours and fabrics, yet for all its elegance and rich furnishings, Llwyn Hall also manages to be extremely homely and informal. Owner Sharon Jones is a large part of that, her welcoming and charming personality embracing all her guests immediately. The hotel boasts five beautifully furnished en suite rooms and one twin room with a shared bathroom in the main house, and a further four en suite bedrooms at sister cottage Han Y Bont, just down the road. Free standing clawed bathtubs and four poster beds and just some of the features guests can enjoy in rooms here, whilst the bridal suite offers yet more. Weddings are often held at the Hall, Sharon putting everything into making sure your special day is truly unforgettable, with the beautiful Carmarthenshire coast as a backdrop in the beautiful grounds. Elegant dining is also offered for non-function and non-residents, with Llwyn’s restaurant opening from 12-2pm and 6-9pm daily. It serves a range of excellent quality food in a refined, yet relaxed setting, perfect for an intimate dinner, family celebration, anniversaries, birthdays or christenings. Please call for details.

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Howard Museum and Art Gallery has a collection of local paintings and 19th century Llanelli pottery as well as displays on the history of the town. However, Llanelli is not all industry and rugby as the town is home to one of the country’s newest attractions, the Millennium Coastal Park and Cycleway. Providing all manner of leisure activities and peaceful wildlife havens, the park incorporates wetlands, gardens, woodlands, a golf course and both sailing and watersports. Llanelly House, built in 1714, opposite the church, is a good example of an early 18th-century house. A finalist in BBC-TV’s Restoration series in 2003, the house has been purchased by the local council, which is currently restoring the property. Work is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2011 when it will re-open as a Heritage Centre. To the east of Llanelli lies the National Wetland Centre of Wales, which is one of the eight centres established by the Trust founded by Sir Peter Scott at Slimbridge in 1946. Also a haven for wild plant and animal life throughout the year, the centre’s 200-acre saltmarsh is home to flocks of curlew, lapwing and redshank, which visitors can observe from secluded hides. The Discovery Centre has hands-on activities to help visitors learn about conservation.

War II a Royal Ordnance Factory produced munitions for the Allied Forces here. At the factory’s peak, in 1942, it covered some 500 acres and employed 3000 people. It ceased production in 1965 and since then the land has been landscaped to produce Pembrey Country Park, which offers visitors an unusual mix of pine forests, sand dunes and beaches as well as a dry ski slope, a toboggan run, a miniature railway and an adventure playground. Pembrey Pines Trail is a four-mile walk through dunes and woodland, with splendid views. There’s also a visitor centre. To the east lies Pembrey Saltmarsh, a local nature reserve and a Site of Special Scientific Interest. The park also includes Cefn Sidan, a blue flag beach that is one of Europe’s best and safest, and from, which there are glorious views over the Gower coastline.

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

KIDWELLY 7½ miles NW of Llanelli on the B4308
A Parish Church of St Mary A Kidwelly Castle B Kidwelly Industrial Museum F Gwenllian

This historic town, whose charter was granted by Henry I in the 12th century, boasts a fine 4th-century bridge over the

Around Llanelli
PEMBREY 5 miles W of Llanelli on the A484
D Pembrey Country Park D Cefn Sidan

This village lies on the flat lands, which border Carmarthen Bay to the east of Llanelli. During World

Pembrey Country Park

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River Gwendreath and the Parish Church of St Mary, originally built as the church of a Benedictine priory in 1320. However, the most interesting and impressive building is undoubtedly the remarkably well-preserved Norman Kidwelly Castle (CADW), which stands on a steep bluff overlooking the river. The castle spans four centuries, but most of what remains today is attributed to Roger, Bishop of Salisbury, who founded the priory and died in 1139. He endeavoured to build a home from home from Sherborne Abbey in Dorset. One of Wales’ best kept secrets, Kidwelly Castle gives a fascinating insight into the evolution of a medieval castle into a domestic dwelling of more settled times. For hundreds of years, the ghost of Gwenllian, daughter of the King of Gwynedd and the wife of the Prince of South Wales, was said to haunt the countryside around the castle. During an attack in 1136, which Gwenllian led, she was decapitated and legend has it that her headless ghost was unable to find rest until a man searched the battlefield and returned her skull to her. Princess Gwenllian was certainly a warrior, and she was perhaps also a writer. Some have attributed parts of The Mabinogion to her, and if the attribution is correct, she would be Britain’s earliest known woman writer. On the outskirts of the town, marked by its 164ft redbrick chimney, lies the Kidwelly Industrial Museum - housed in an original tin-plate works dating from 1737. At one time, the area around Kidwelly produced half the world’s tinplate. Inside the museum, visitors have a unique opportunity to see how the plate was made, as well as learning something of the county’s industrial past. The museum contains Britain’s sole surviving pack mill.

GORSLAS 9 miles N of Llanelli on the A476
F Mynydd Mawr D Llyn Llech Owain Country Park

Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

Legend tell us that on Mynydd Mawr, a mountain to the north of the village, there was a well that was long ago given to the shepherds by the fairies to water their flocks. The only condition of the gift was that the shepherds had to replace the well slab after they used it. This the shepherds did, and everything remained peaceful. Some time later, King Arthur had sent his knights out to seek the Holy Grail, and one of them, Sir Owen (Sir Gwain in the Arthurian legends) met and slew a pagan knight who lived near Gorslas. Weary and parched, he rested by the well, and both he and his horse drank from it. But so tired was he that he forgot to replace the slab over the well before falling asleep, and when he wakened he found that the water had created a great lake at the foot of the mountain. Not only that, shepherds were running towards him, angry that he had robbed them of good farmland. He had to think of something to tell them, so he calmly explained that he had created a great lake at the foot of the mountain, so that they need not longer climb it to get good, fresh water. Placated, the shepherds left him in peace. The lake of water that was left is known today as Llyn Llech Owain - the Lake of Owain’s Stone Slab. Today, Llyn Llech Owain Country Park includes the lake, as well as the peat bog, which surrounds it, an area of largely coniferous woodland and dry heath. The lake and peat bog, designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest, are home to a variety of rare plants such as bogbean, round leafed sundew and royal fern. The park’s visitor centre has an exhibition that describes both the history and the natural history of the park.

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

IMAGE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS
Some images in this publicationhave been supplied by http://www.geograph.org.uk and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA.

COPYRIGHT HOLDERS ARE AS FOLLOWS:
Merlin’s Hill, Carmarthen © Nigel Davies pg 5 pg 9 pg 12 Llandovery Castle, Llandoverty Felin Newydd, Crugybar © Nick Earl pg 21 pg 28

Aberglasney Gardens, Llangathen © Rose and Trev Clough Laugharne Castle, Laugharne © Gareth James

© John Atherton

Pembrey Country Park, Pembry

© Humphrey Bolton pg 30

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

TOWNS, VILLAGES AND PLACES OF INTEREST

A
Abergwili 8
Carmarthenshire County Museum 8 Merlin’s Hill Centre 8

K
Kidwelly 30
Gwenllian 31 Kidwelly Castle 31 Kidwelly Industrial Museum 31 Parish Church of St Mary 31

B
Bronwydd Arms 8
Gwili Steam Railway 8

L
Laugharne 11
Laugharne Castle 11 The Dylan Thomas Boathouse 11

C
Carmarthen 4
Carmarthen Castle 4 Carmarthen Heritage Centre 5 Guildhall 5 Merlin’s Hill 4 Oriel Myrddin 5 Parish Church of St Peter 5 Picton Monument 7 Trinity College 5

Llanarthne 8
Caercastell Cross 9 National Botanic Garden of Wales 9 Parish Church of St David 9 Paxton’s Tower 8

Llanboidy 15
Pemberton’s Chocolate Farm 15

Llandeilo 23
Dinefwr Castle 25 Dinefwr Park 25 Newton House 25 Parish Church of St Teilo 25 Tywi Bridge 25

Cenarth 15
Cenarth Mill 15 National Coracle Centre 15 Old Smithy Craft Shop and Heritage Centre 17 Salmon Leap Waterfalls 15

Cilycwm 21
Capel Bwlchyrhiw 21 Parish Church of St Michael 22

Llandovery 19
Dolauhirion Bridge 21 Llandovery Castle 19 Llandovery Heritage Centre 21 Parish Church of St Mary on the Hill 19 Physicians of Myddfai 21 Rhys Pritchard 21 Twm Sion Cati’s Cave 21

Crugybar 27
Felin Newydd 27

D
Drefach Felindre 7
National Wool Museum 7 Woollen Mill Trail 7

Llanelli 29
Llanelly House 30 Millennium Coastal Park and Cycleway 30 National Wetland Centre of Wales 30 Parc Howard Museum and Art Gallery 29 Parish Church of St Elli 29

Dryslwyn 9
Dryslwyn Castle 9

G
Golden Grove 10
Gelli Aur Country Park 10

Llangadog 22
Bethlehem 22 Carn Coch 22 Llangadog Castle 22

Gorslas 31
Llyn Llech Owain Country Park 31 Mynydd Mawr 31

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Guide to Rural Wales CARMARTHENSHIRE

TOWNS, VILLAGES AND PLACES OF INTEREST
Llangathen 9
Aberglasney Gardens 9 Parish Church of St Cathen 10

Pumsaint 28
Dolaucothi Goldmines 28

Llansteffan 11
Llansteffan Castle 11 Parish Church of St Ystyffan 11 St Anthony’s Well 11

S
St Clears 13
Glyn-Coch Craft Centre 13 Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene 13

N
Newcastle Emlyn 17
Newcastle Emlyn Castle 17 Old Cilgwyn Gardens 17

T
Talley 27
Parish Church of St Michael 27 Talley Abbey 27

P
Pembrey 30
Cefn Sidan 30 Pembrey Country Park 30

Trapp 22
Carreg Cennen Castle 22 Trapp Arts and Crafts Centre 23

W
Whitland 15
Hywel Dda Centre 15 Whitland Abbey 15

Pendine 12
Museum of Speed 12 Parish Church of St Margaret 13

Pontarsais 8
Gwili Pottery 8

A historic building B museum and heritage C historic site D scenic attraction E flora and fauna F stories and anecdotes G famous people H art and craft I entertainment and sport J walks

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