URBAN DESIGN PORTFOLIO SETH GEISER

LIVING STREETS: JOINT DEGREE PROJECT
SEATTLE DPD
PROJECT SUMMARY From a lengthy research process, I prepared a primer detailing the history and form of woonerf, home zone, and shared space design. Recognizing the concurrent problems of underutilized street space and a lack of usable public space in Seattle’s urban neighborhoods, the document shows how streetscape design, which gives all users equal priority, can increase the livability of the space for residents. On policy, I included recommendations which detail the regulatory and fiscal changes needed to designate and implement living street design. On design, I compiled a set of recommendations which would promote context-sensitive, usable, livable street design. To visually convey the document’s recommendations, I developed a conceptual street plan for 8th Ave N in the South Lake Union neighborhood, a prime candidate for living street redevelopment.

Bollards act as permeable barrier

Sheltered resting spot

Urban canopy promotes pedestrian scale

Community garden space

Hard surface play space

Swales buffer ped-only space and provide stormwater function

Integrated parking bays

Narrow, non-linear travel lanes

MLK JR WAY LANE RECONFIGURATION
SEATTLE DPD
As part of a framework plan for the update of the Mt. Baker neighborhood, we looked at reconfiguring streets under complete street principles to promote TOD development around the new light-rail station. Following a series of charrette sketchings, I prepared three street sections that explored different options for bicycle infrastructure on Martin Luther King Jr Way.

PROJECT SUMMARY

family-friendly urban neighborhoods !nitiative

Center City Housing: Multiple-Bedroom Units

Employees Who Live in Center City with Children

340 (22%) 290 (11%)

140 (12%)
30 (2%)

1150 (17%)
80 (5%)

100 (12%)

285 (4%)

560 (21%)

115 (6%)

410 (15%) 440 (20%) 470 (21%) 19% 480 (25%)
1890 (8%) 85 (6%) 115 (7%) 75 (6%)

50 (2%)

420 (18%) Center City Total: 32,000 housing units 40 (3%)

200 (12%)
Center City Total: 25,000 workers

135 (10%) 130 (11%)

30 (5%)

2 or more bedroom units Other housing unit sizes
410 (15%)

80 (8%)
1890 (8%)

Have children under 18 No children under 18 Number of workers with children Percentage of total workers

115 (25%)

Number of 2 or more bedroom units Percentage of total units

Source: 2000 Census

Source: 2000 Census, Long Form

FFUN POLICY REPORT
SEATTLE DPD

As the culmination of 3 years of policy and demographic research, the Family-Friendly Urban Neighborhoods (FFUN) Report proposed a set of policy and design recommendations to promote livability for families in Seattle’s Center City neighborhoods. After mining Census and market data, our team (Gary Johnson, Bo Zhang) made the case that an unsustainable number of families with children were living where the greatest level of density was to occur. Then, through a process of site analysis and development potential, we identified areas where City resources could be leveraged with private investment to provide the sorts of daily needs and amenities that would attract and retain families. Through this project, I was able to combine my interests in the social impacts of urban design and planning with long-term policy and economic development. Being asked to collect and graphically display data was also a unique learning opportunity.

PROJECT SUMMARY

FOUR CAR PARK
RENEGADE PLANNERS COLLECTIVE
Over the course of six months, I directed an experiment with an underloved space in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Seatte, using low-cost and temporary interventions to add joy and activity. The project grew from a couple of pals gathering in its first iteration to over one hundred people enjoying a new space, meriting coverage in local publications. I am now exploring funding options to expand the project.

PROJECT SUMMARY

SLU URBAN DESIGN FRAMEWORK
SEATTLE DPD

During the Summer of 2009, I participated in a series of six charrettes convened to develop an urban design framework for future public and private development in the South Lake Union neighborhood of Seattle. Comprised of city staff, design professionals, and community members, teams worked to identify the preferred direction for zoning, building height and form, street design and function, and public space provision. Following the charrettes, I assisted in graphically synthesizing the results of the charrette teams.

PROJECT SUMMARY

CENTER CITY FRAMEWORK PLAN
SEATTLE DPD
As a synthesis of historic and ongoing city plans, the Center City Public Realm Guide identifies existing public realm assets and identifies gaps in the urban fabric. By looking at where the various public realm systems overlap and integrate, sites can be identified which maximize investment and a cohesive, legible framework can be developed. For the project, I was able to participate in sketch sessions to map out public realm features and system types. After rooting through plan archives and GIS databases, I developed system base maps for presentation.

PROJECT SUMMARY

Transit Priority Corridor Rapid Ride Bus Route Streetcar

Great Street Great Street Gap

Special Alley Alley - Clear Alley Alley

Potential Park Boulevard Designated Green Green Street Gap

WASH BA(SIN) CITY
AECOM URBAN SOS COMPETITION

As the urban design partner in a three-person interdepartmental team (Jordan Monez, Scott Claassen), I helped develop the Wash Ba(Sin) City project for submission to the 2009 AECOM Urban SOS Competition. To meet the competition goals, we proposed a series of design techniques and projects that would help shift the future development of Las Vegas from one of unfettered, unsustainable expansion to one of ecologically-mindful infill and reappropriation. The project fused urban form, social perception, and ecological function in a program that identified quick win interventions and long-term phasing strategies.

PROJECT SUMMARY

LITTLE SAIGON CENTER
UW + PYATOK ARCHITECTS STUDIO

Led by Pyatok Architects, this studio explored how to create new urban density while retaining the cultural influence and character of the Little Saigon neighborhood of Seattle. In the interdisciplinary studio, I had to approach urban design from an architectural perspective and grappled with how certain building uses and types shape the pedestrian realm. Covering a full city-block, my design proposes a transit-oriented, mixed-use development with particular focus on open space activation and housing type diversity.

PROJECT SUMMARY

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