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BLAC K K FARMERS &URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE Growing Wealth, Health and Justice in our Communities

BLACKK

FARMERS

&URBAN

GARDENERS

CONFERENCE

Growing Wealth, Health and Justice in our Communities November 19 - 21, 2010

Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

ABOUT US

The 2010 Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners Conference is presented by Black Urban Growers (BUGS), an alliance of predominately Black urban farmers and gardeners, food activists and allies united in rebuilding our community wealth and health by reconnecting to the land and our traditional roles as agriculturalists and environmental stewards.

In November of 2009, this alliance began organizing and hosting a series of community events with the purpose of starting a conversation around food:Where does it come from? Who is providing it? Why don’t we see more black farmers at the farmers markets? What is the relationship between our individual health and the health of our communities, and why does it matter?

Beginning with a fundraiser event in February of 2010, followed by a Community Forum in April, we’ve been inviting more and more people from our communities to engage in the conversation and together connect the dots between the health of our farmers and our collective health as a community.At the Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners Conference happening November 19-21, 2010, we will engage in a national and international dialogue and action planning to build a national network that includes producers, consumers, and everyone in between in creating sustainable solutions.

Based in the New York City Metropolitan area, our founding members include representatives from the following grassroots groups, non-profit organizations as well as individuals from our communities:

Grassroots Groups

• Brooklyn Rescue Mission – Brooklyn, NY

• Community Vision Council – Brooklyn, NY

• Garden of Happiness – Bronx, NY

• La Familia Verde – Bronx, NY

• La Finca Del Sur – Bronx, NY

• Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, New York Chapter

• Taqwa Community Farm – Bronx, NY

Non-Profits Organizations

• Citizens Committee for New York City – Manhattan, NY

• GreenThumb – Manhattan, NY

• Heritage Radio – Online Radio Network

• Isles, Inc. – Trenton, NJ

• Just Food – Manhattan, NY

• NYFood Museum – Manhattan, NY

• Weeksville Heritage Center – Brooklyn, NY

• WEACT – Manhattan, NY

• WhyHunger – Manhattan, NY

Volunteer Planning Committee

• Aki Hirata-Baker

• Asantewaa Harris

• Bilen Berhanu

• Erica Lonesome

• James Subudhi

• Jennifer Steverson

• Karen Washington

• Adjoa Linda Fletcher

• Lorrie Clevenger

• Meredith Taylor

• Onika Abraham

• Regina Ginyard

• Sharon Wong

• Yemi Amu

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

OUR SPONSORS

CULTIVATOR

AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE OUR SPONSORS CULTIVATOR Jesse Smith Noyes Foundation GERMINATORS

Jesse Smith Noyes Foundation

GERMINATORS

Lawson'Valen+ne'Founda+on''

''

Lawson'Valen+ne'Founda+on'' '' POLLINATORS GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation

POLLINATORS

'' POLLINATORS GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation SEED STARTER
'' POLLINATORS GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation SEED STARTER
'' POLLINATORS GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation SEED STARTER
'' POLLINATORS GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation SEED STARTER
'' POLLINATORS GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation SEED STARTER
'' POLLINATORS GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation SEED STARTER

GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation

POLLINATORS GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation SEED STARTER Anderson's)1949)-brooklyn-)Inc.
POLLINATORS GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation SEED STARTER Anderson's)1949)-brooklyn-)Inc.
POLLINATORS GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation SEED STARTER Anderson's)1949)-brooklyn-)Inc.
POLLINATORS GreenThumb, Department of Parks and Recreation SEED STARTER Anderson's)1949)-brooklyn-)Inc.

SEED STARTER

Anderson's)1949)-brooklyn-)Inc.

NYC)Community)Gardens)Coali>on

Brooklyn)College)

TeIeh)Tawiah

Grandaisy)Bakery

Tom)Cat)Bakery

The)Hor>culture)Society)of)New)York

Young)GiJed

Murray’s)Cheese

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

THANK YOU

A special thank you to our local farmers who donated fresh produce and added-value products for our participants to enjoy:

• Alan Troncillito, Troncillito Farms

• Cheryl Rogowski, W. Rogowski Farm

Stanley Osczepinski, S&SO Produce

Ron Binaghi Jr., Stokes Farm Inc

Dan Madura JR, Madura Farms

Alice Messerich, Knoll Krest Farm

Howard Stark, Eckerton Hill Farm

Franca Tantillo, Berried Treasures

Pete Osofsky, Ronnybrook Farm

Just One, Red Jacket

Ken Migliorelli, Migliorelli Farm

Bronx Wholesale Market

We would also like to extend our thanks to the following supporters for helping make this conference possible:

• Adopt-A-Farmbox

• Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr. Brooklyn College Coffee Collective

• Brooklyn College Staff:

Calvin Abraham Mitzu Adams Ryan Buck

• DJ Qing Lewy

• Kwik Printing Company

• Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer

• Youth Ministry for Peace and Justice

Last, but not least, thank you to our tireless volunteers:

• April Murray

• Ashley Pedraza

• Beatrice Beckford

• Carly Hutchinson

• Damian Graham

• Dashana Robinson

• Frances Fabian

• Ida Cohen

• Katia Reyes

• Lauren Royes-Baccus

• Maria Marasign

Brian Santigo

Erika Morales

Iesha Wadala

Karl Ingram

• Nando Rodriguez

• Norda Nienstag

• Phillip Shipman

• Raven Sapp

• Ruby Doswell

• Selina Achou

• Simon Herbin

• Stephney Rogers

Suzanne Babb

Rabel Polanco

Shevon Gant

• Vance Cherbin

• Wendy Wilkins

Talia Bravo

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

SCHEDULE:

Saturday, November 20

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

9:00 AM - 9:20 AM

9:20 AM - 10:00 AM

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

10:45 AM - 12:00 PM

Registration & Light Breakfast

Black Farmers & Urban Gardeners Welcome

• Karen Washington, La Familia Verde

Opening Keynote

• Will Allen, CEO and Founder, Growing Power, Inc.

2010 Black Farmers & Urban Gardeners

George Washington Carver Awards Ceremony

Presenters:

Jennifer Stevenson,Weeksville Heritage Center Asantewaa Gail Harris, Community Vision Council

Breakout Sessions #1

The Next Generation: Youth Creating Food Change

• Anim Steel, Director of National Programs,The Food Project; Co- Founder Real Food Challenge, Brooklyn, NY

• Myles Postell-Reynolds, Field Organizer, Real Food Challenge,Alum of The Food Project’s Summer Program, Springfield, MA

• Cameal Tapper, High School Intern, East New York Farms, Brooklyn, NY

• Rahkiah Clark, High School Intern, East New York Farms, Brooklyn, NY

Reclaiming & Reframing Black Farmers’ History in the U.S.

Gail Myers, Cultural Anthropologist and founder, Farms to Grow, Oakland, CA

Jennifer Steverson, Public Programs Curator, Weeksville Heritage Center, Brooklyn, NY

Undoing Racism in the Food System:

Lessons from the Detroit Struggle

Lila Cabbil, D-Town Farm Detroit Black Community Food Security Network, Detroit, MI

6th Floor:

Gold Room

6th Floor:

Gold Room

6th Floor:

Gold Room

6th Floor:

Gold Room

2nd Floor:

Glennwood

4th Floor:

African Art

Gallery

4th Floor:

Alumni

Lounge

Kids “Hands On” Cooking Demonstration from Farm to Table

• Rosalind Francis, Harlem Seeds, New York, NY

• Michele Hatchette, Harlem Seeds, New York, NY

4th Floor:

Maroney-

Leddy

Using Herbs as Companion Plants in Your Organic Garden

Solita Stephens, Olympus Garden Club, Union, NJ

5th Floor:

International

Scaling Up! Creating 100,000 New Farmers: Local and National Resources for Rural and Urban Farmers

Michelle Hughs, Director, GrowNYC: New Farmer Development Program, New York, NY

Professor Neil D. Hamilton, Dwight D. Opperman Chair of Law and Director of the Agricultural Law Center at Drake University Law School, Des Moines, IA

5th Floor:

Occidental

continued on next page

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

SCHEDULE:

Saturday, November 20 (continued)

10:45 AM - 12:00 PM

Breakout Sessions #1 (continued)

The People’s Struggle for Food Sovereignty:

From Local to Global, Another Food System is Possible!

Juana Mercedes, General Coordinator, National Confederation of Women of the Countryside (CONAMUCA) and International Human Rights Commission Member, La Via Campesina, Dominican Republic

Sara Medina, Urban Agriculture Specialist, Foundation for Training and Innovation to Support the Agrarian Revolution (Fundación CIARA), Caracas,Venezuela

Ben Burkett, President, National Family Farm Coalition and Member, La Via Campesina North America

Detroit Black Community Food Security Network

Malik Yakini, Founder and Chairman, Detroit Black Community Food Security Network, Detroit, MI

Monica White,Assistant Professor of Sociology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

Black Family Land Trust

• Ebonie Alexander, Executive Director, Black Family Land Trust, Durham, NC

Urban Farming as a Framework for Holistic Community Development

Michael S. Easterling, Convener, Community Developer and Food Producer, Cleveland, OH

Increasing Access to Affordable Foods in Communities of Color

• Tanikka Cunningham, Executive Director, Healthy Solutions, Washington, DC

12:00 PM - 1:15 PM

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Lunch: Food Fair Marketplace

Anderson’s 1949-Brooklyn – Mexican Cuisine

• Live Sip – Vegetarian Cuisine "

• Mirage – Nigerian Cuisine

Pigford, USDA, and the 2012 Farm Bill Panel:

A Community Forum and Action Planning Session

Gary Grant, President, Black Farmers & Agriculturists Association, Tillery, NC

Spencer D. Wood, PhD; Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

Dr. Ridgely Abdul Mu'min, Minister of Agriculture and Farm Manager, Muhammad Farms, Albany, GA

Barry Crumbley (Moderator), Intact Community Development Corporation; Mount Vernon, NY

5th Floor:

State Room

6th Floor:

Gold Room

6th Floor:

Maroon Room

Penthouse

(Left)

Penthouse

(Right)

2nd Floor:

Amersfort &

Bedford

6th Floor:

Gold Room

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2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

SCHEDULE:

Saturday, November 20 (continued)

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM

Breakout Sessions #2

A

Conversation and Strategy Session around the

2nd Floor:

Industrialization of Black Food Culture

Glennwood

Malcolm X Grassroots Movement

From Field to Policy:

4th Floor:

Leveraging Grassroots Power for the 2012 Food and Farm Bill

African Art

Savi Horne,The Land Loss Prevention Project, Durham, NC

Gallery

Tracy Lloyd McCurty, Rural Coalition/Coalición Rural,Washington DC

Kathy Ozer, National Family Farm Coalition,Washington DC

Designing Linkages Between Upstate Farmers and

4th Floor:

Downstate Food Desert Communities

Alumni Lounge

Dennis Derryck, President/Founder Corbin Hill Road Farm, Schoharie County, NY

Feed Denver

4th Floor:

Paula Thompson, Urban Farmer, 42nd & Steele St. Parking Lot Farm, Denver, CO

Maroney-Leddy

Trineka Freeman, Urban Farmer, 42nd & Steele St. Parking Lot Farm, Denver, CO

A Project Overview - Northeast Alliance in Support of

5th Floor:

African American Farmers (NEASAAF)

International

Lisa Jackson, Former Secretary/Treasurer of the Northeast Alliance of African American Farmers (NEASAAF), LilClif Productions

Segun Shabaka, PhD, Former Co-Chairman of the Northeast Alliance of African American Farmers (NEASAAF),The International African Arts Festival (I.A.A.F),The National Association of Kawaida Organizations (N.A.K.O.),The African Poetry Theatre (A.P.T.), Brooklyn, NY

By Any Greens Necessary:

5th Floor:

Food as a Tool of Colonization and Joining the Resistance

Occidental

Jade Walker, Co-founder and Co-director, Mill Creek Farm

Christopher Bolden-Newsome, Food Justice Consultant, Philadelphia, PA

Creating Wealth and Improving the Lives of Black Farmers

5th Floor:

and the Rural Community through Cooperatives

State Room

Ralph Paige, Executive Director, Federation of Southern Cooperatives / Land Assistance Fund, East Point, GA

Training the Next Generation of Urban Farmers

6th Floor:

Patrick Crouch, Program Manager, Capuchin Soup Kitchen's Earthworks Urban Farm, Detroit, MI

Maroon Room

Marilyn Nefer Ra Barber, Coordinator, Earthworks Agricultural Training (EAT) Program, Earthworks, Detroit, MI

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2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

SCHEDULE:

Saturday, November 20 (continued)

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM

4:45 PM - 5:30 PM

Breakout Sessions #2 (continued)

A Place for Us: Black Farmers in the Organic Movement

Leah Penniman, Soul Fire Farm,Albany, NY

Composting in the City:

Why Composting is Important in Urban Settings

Andrew Hoyles, Master Composter, Brooklyn, NY

Young, Black and Gifted:

Creating Niche Food Communities

Nicole Taylor, Hot Grease on Heritage Radio Network Host and Food Justice Activist, Brooklyn, NY

Closing Keynote

Ralph Paige, Executive Director, Federation of Southern Cooperatives

6th Floor:

Gold Room

Penthouse

(left)

Penthouse

(right)

6th Floor:

Gold Room

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Keynote Speaker - Will Allen Founder and CEO, Growing Power, Inc.

Will Allen, son of a sharecropper, former professional basketball player, ex-corporate sales leader and now farmer, has become recognized as among the preeminent thinkers of our time on agriculture and food policy.The founder and CEO of Growing Power Inc., a farm and community food center in Milwaukee,Wisconsin,Will is widely considered the leading authority in the expanding field of urban agriculture.

At Growing Power and in community food projects across the nation and around the world,Will promotes the belief that all people, regardless of their economic circumstances, should have access to fresh, safe, affordable and nutritious foods at all times. Using methods he has developed over a lifetime,Will trains community members to become community farmers, assuring them a secure source of good food without regard to political or economic forces.

of good food without regard to political or economic forces. In 2008, Will was named a

In 2008, Will was named a John D. and Katherine T. McArthur Foundation Fellow and was awarded a prestigious foundation “genius grant” for his work – only the second farmer ever to be so honored. He is also a member of the Clinton Global Initiative, and in February 2010, he was invited to the White House to join First Lady Michelle Obama in launching “Let’s Move!” her signature leadership program to reverse the epidemic of childhood obesity in America. In May 2010,Time magazine named Will to the Time 100 World’s Most Influential People.

Will to the Time 100 World’s Most Influential People. Keynote Speaker - Ralph Paige Executive Director,

Keynote Speaker - Ralph Paige Executive Director, Federation of Southern Cooperatives

Ralph Paige has dedicated his life’s work to proving that cooperatives can be used to enhance incomes and improve quality of life for Black family farmers and rural low-income families. Never deterred by scarcity of resources or organized resistance, he has been a tireless advocate, fundraiser and teacher.

Under his leadership, the Federation has been the primary organization representing Black farmers and fighting the precipitous decline in a lifestyle and culture of land ownership and independence. Among the Federation’s accomplishments under his leadership: over 200 units of low-income housing developed; 18 community credit unions formed; 75 cooperatives started; and creation of the Federation’s Rural Training and Research Center in Epes,Alabama.

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

2010 George Washington Carver Award Recipients

The Black Urban Growers (BUGS), the coalition of individuals and organizations behind the Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners Conference, is proud to present the first annual George Washington Carver Award to three outstanding organizations. The award is given in recognition of extraordinary efforts to forge food, farming and policy solutions for the Black Community. We would like to offer our gratitude to the people who have shaped these esteemed organizations and contributed to the growing movement to promote health, wealth and justice in our communities.

Afrikan Zion Organic Roots Farm

Ras Oba Jacobs, a native of St.Vincent and the Grenadines, first arrived in Vermont, he picked apples.Then he and his wife, Dafina, founded the Afrikan Zion Organic Roots Farm in West Wardsboro,Vermont. By the mid-1980s, they were bringing produce to New York City, first to Brooklyn, then to Harlem and the Bronx. In partnership with the Hattie Carthan Community Garden Farmer's Market, the Jacobs recently launched the Bed/Stuy CSA in Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.

launched the Bed/Stuy CSA in Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. Oba and Dafina Jacobs and Family The Jacobs

Oba and Dafina Jacobs and Family

The Jacobs sell a full range of vegetables grown naturally without additives or pesticides from June through November. Afrikan Zion Organic Roots Farm has been recognized for its leadership in linking organic growing to urban neighborhoods. For more than three decades, the Jacobs have been learning, growing, building and sharing. Afrikan Zion Organic Roots Farm continues to bring their very best in a steadfast commitment to the organic food revolution.

in a steadfast commitment to the organic food revolution. An East New York Farms! Youth Intern

An East New York Farms! Youth Intern

East New York Farms

East New York Farms has worked with youth, gardeners, farmers and entrepreneurs to build a more just and sustainable community since 1998. East New York is a diverse and economically disadvantaged community in the eastern part of Brooklyn. Decades of urban decline and neglect left the community with numerous vacant lots, few businesses and services, and a reputation for violent crime and poverty.

Through a coalition of local and city-wide organizations and residents,The East New York Farms! Project came together as a way to use and further develop one resource that the neighborhood had in abundance–more than 65 community gardens. Working with youth interns and adult gardeners to increase organic food production in community gardens, the organization was able to start a small farmers market that has grown over the years into a thriving destination including dozens of gardeners and local entrepreneurs of many backgrounds, as well as upstate farmers, bringing fresh affordable food to over 17,000 customers each year.

People’s Grocery

food to over 17,000 customers each year. People’s Grocery Young People’s Grocery urban gardeners People's

Young People’s Grocery urban gardeners

People's Grocery’s mission is to build a local food system that improves the health and economy of West Oakland, CA. Founded in 2002, the organization now operates a network of urban gardens, a suburban

farm, a CSA and a wholesale organic buying club.

of community educators who offer cooking and nutrition demonstrations at local hospitals, schools, public events, and other community-based gatherings.

It has trained an army

People's Grocery has attracted local and national attention in their effort to transform the inner city food environment and address health

problems in West Oakland. The organization continues to engage the conversation around wellness, socio-economic status and social determinants of health through a food lens, and ensure that diet and nutrition play a large part in the revitalization of communities.

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

Farmer to Farmer Track:

CONFERENCE WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS Farmer to Farmer Track: Photo Credit: Joshua east side Creating Wealth and Improving

Photo Credit: Joshua east side

Creating Wealth and Improving the Lives of Black Farmers and the Rural Community through Cooperatives

Time: 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Location: 5th Floor, State Room Presenter: Ralph Paige, Executive Director, Federation of Southern Cooperatives / Land Assistance Fund

A conversation with Ralph Paige on building cooperatives to enhance incomes and improve quality of life for Black family farmers and rural low-income families; food deserts; childhood obesity; the Farm Bill and mobilizing for policy change; working in collaboration to effect change.

Scaling Up! Creating 100,000 New Farmers:

Local and National Resources for Rural and Urban Farmers

Time: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM Location: 5th Floor, Occidental Room Presenters:

Michelle Hughs, Director, GrowNYC: New Farmer Development Program, New York, NY

Professor Neil D. Hamilton, Dwight D. Opperman Chair of Law and Director of the Agricultural Law Center at Drake University Law School, Des Moines, IA

This workshop will examine various USDA and local programs to support new and beginning farmers and expand markets for locally grown food, and discuss how these efforts can help urban farmers scale up their operations. Speakers will discuss the recent proposal by Secretary of Agriculture Vilsack to add 100,000 new farms and discuss how a new farmer title in the 2012 farm bill can support this effort.The work of GrowNYC's New Farmer Development Project will be reviewed to highlight resources and support services available for all farmers on the local level. Strategies for expanding the role of urban agriculture within the work of USDA and local governments will also be addressed.

Understanding Land Trust As Land Protection and Wealth Retention Strategy

Time: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM Location: 6th Floor, Maroon Room Presenter: Ebonie Alexander, Executive Director, Black Family Land Trust, Durham, NC

The mission of the Black Family Land Trust is to provide educational, technical and financial services to ensure, protect, and preserve African American land ownership.

Black land loss has reached the crisis stage.While African- Americans amassed 15 million acres of land in the South between 1865 and 1919, by 1999 African-Americans owned a total of 7.7 million acres and only 2.5 million of those acres were farmland. In 1920, Black farmers numbered 925,708 (when 1 of 4 owned their own land) and controlled approximately 14 percent of the nation's farmland.Today, Black farmers have declined in number to approximately 18,000 and they control less than 1 percent of the nation's farmland.

In this workshop learn how to protect family land through utilizing land trust and or conservation tools. Participants will receive an overview of the various trust, conservation and community economic development tools available to protect land by putting it back into production.

Using Herbs as Companion Plants in Your Organic Garden

Time: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM Location: 5th Floor, International Room Presenters:

Solita Stephens, Olympus Garden Club, Union, NJ

Participants will learn about herbs that can be used to reduce the use of harmful pesticides on/in the farm/garden. We will review plants and group will get to share any knowledge they have about the plants. I will share my personal experiences using these plants and some of their value-added uses in markets as teas, or potpourris in a highly interactive format.

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

Farmer to Farmer Track: (continued)

Training the Next Generation of Urban Farmers

Time: 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Location: 6th Floor, Maroon Room Presenters:

Patrick Crouch, Program Manager, Capuchin Soup Kitchen's Earthworks Urban Farm, Detroit, MI

Marilyn Nefer Ra Barber, Coordinator of Earthworks Agricultural Training (EAT) Program, Earthworks Farm, Detroit, MI

Urban farming is all the rage these days, but how do you hire from the community that urban farms are in when most of the community have not been exposed to current organic and sustainable farming methods? The answer is simple! You train them, and grow more farmers.

Earthworks Agricultural Training is a program which seeks to teach residents of the near east side of Detroit about organic farming and urban food systems-so they may acquire jobs in the quickly developing ban agriculture field as well as start and incubate their own projects. In this workshop you will learn about the teaching methods applied, the success and failures we have experienced, and what are some of the keys for success of developing your own project. Earthworks Urban Farm has been cultivating the land and community for over 15 years.

Designing Linkages between Upstate Farmers and Downstate Food Desert Communities

Time: 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Location: 4th Floor,Alumni Lounge Presenter: Dennis Derryck, President/Founder Corbin Hill Road Farm, Schoharie County (NY)

In creating a Farm Share Program, the Corbin Hill Rd Farm (CHRF) began as a farm with a long –term goal of creating a Farm Share membership of some 4-5,000 members over 10 years who would eventually own shares on the farm. Working at a scale that makes a difference requires reexamining the role of being a farmer, the importance of collaboration and defining the nature of strategic partnerships are requirements needed to serve food deserts.The rapid transformation of CHRF to being a produce distributor with a social mission owning a farm has major implications as to costs and in attracting social investors.This experience and the learning that has occurred in the first year of CHRF’s operation where it surpassed its initial goal of 175 members by more than 60 percent will be shared and discussed with conference participants.

initial goal of 175 members by more than 60 percent will be shared and discussed with

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

Food Policy and Action Planning Track:

Panel: How USDA and Other US Government Policies Effect both Farming & Urban Gardening

Time: 1:30 PM – 3:00 PM Location: 6 th Floor, Gold Room Presenters:

Gary Grant, Black Farmers & Agriculturists Association President,Tillery, NC

Spencer D. Wood, PhD; Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

Dr. Ridgely Abdul Mu'min, Muhammad Farms, Minister of Agriculture and Farm Manager,Albany, GA

Barry Crumbley (Moderator), Intact Community Development Corporation; Mount Vernon, NY

This panel of experts will discuss:

Identifying underlying laws and food policy legislation in the USA

How U.S. government and corporations work together to control food production

How to acquire land by establishing financial support systems and landowner alliances

Explaining the truth about the concept of heir’s property

Showing a perspective between gardening and farming

Undoing Racism in the Food System: Lessons from the Detroit Struggle

Time: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM Location: 4 th Floor,Alumni Lounge Presenters: Lila Cabbil, D-Town Farm Detroit Black Community Food Security Network, Detroit, MI

In this workshop we will begin by laying the foundation and developing an understanding of the scope of the problem in identifying structural/institutionalized racism in the food system as a root cause for economic and health disparities. We will outline critical content areas for strategic analysis and action planning then review resources for continued learning, planning and taking action. Workshop will include:

Description of Detroit work in progress

Interactive exercises to increase awareness of unconscious participation in racism

Group dialogue to provide opportunity to express perspectives from individual localities

Action Planning Guide

From Field to Policy: Leveraging Grassroots Power for the 2012 Food and Farm Bill

Time: 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Location: 4th Floor, African Art Gallery Presenters:

Savi Horne,The Land Loss Prevention Project, Durham, NC

Tracy Lloyd McCurty, Rural Coalition/Coalición Rural, Washington DC

Kathy Ozer, National Family Farm Coalition, Washington DC

The U.S. will begin renegotiation of U.S. Farm Policy before 2012; consequently, a grassroots alliance will need to begin laying the framework for a farm policy agenda that reflects the values of community food sovereignty, respect for Mother Earth, and a renewed commitment to keep farmers of African descent as well as other historically underserved farming communities on the land. In 2008, the Farm and Food Policy Diversity Initiative, a grassroots coalition working in solidarity for more diversity and access to USDA programs, was successful in opening doors to farmers, ranchers and farm workers long excluded from federal agriculture programs and services.The Diversity Initiative’s legislative victories included more than $1.5 billion designated for socially disadvantaged farmers and more than thirty provisions to ensure the equitable participation of socially disadvantaged and limited resource farmers in federal agriculture programs.

Key organizations with long experience in this debate will lead a discussion about developing grassroots focused strategies for the coming debate on farm and food policy, and to develop a concrete agenda to influence this policy to advance rather than hinder food sovereignty and economic solidarity at the national, regional and global level.This will be an interactive workshop and will invigorate thoughtful dialogue through group participation and smaller focus groups.The first half of the workshop will focus on the changes achieved through the concerted action of diverse organizations and on the additional changes needed to assure food sovereignty for all communities in the U.S.The second half of the workshop will focus on the structural issues of U.S. Farm Policy and the implications for food sovereignty at the domestic and global scale, as well as concrete recommendations on process, substance and strategies for the upcoming US Farm and Food Policy Debate.

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

Food Policy and Action Planning Track: (continued)

A Project Overview - Northeast Alliance in Support of African American Farmers (NEASAAF)

Time: 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Location: 5th Floor, International Room Presenters:

Lisa Jackson, Former Secretary/Treasurer, NEASAAF, LilClif Productions

Segun Shabaka, PhD, Former Co-Chairman, NEASAAF, The International African Arts Festival,The National Association of Kawaida Organizations,The African Poetry Theatre, Brooklyn, NY

In 1997, Community Organizer Segun Shabaka,The House of the Lord Church Pastor, Brooklyn - Rev Herbert Daughtry, and Event/Marketing Consultant - Lisa Jackson formed the not for profit organization, Northeast Alliance in Support of African American Farmers (NEASAAF) in efforts to:

Lend support to southeastern African American Farmers, via the Federation of Southern Cooperatives Land Assistance Fund, a 501(c) 3 organization serving the rural south since 1967.

Strengthen connections between farmers and northeastern African Americans by enlightening northerners of the farmer’s plight & the importance of eating healthier produce.

Provide northerners with healthy freshly grown produce by the farmers.

This presentation will be an overview of the project, which can be used as a model to build upon by organizations with similar initiatives. Presenters will share info from the Federation of Southern Cooperatives Land Assistance Fund, including a brief explanation and status of the Pigford Lawsuit; how attendees can support the Federation and keep updated on their status and initiatives.

The People’s Struggle for Food Sovereignty: From Local to Global, Another Food System is Possible!

Time: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM Location: 5th Floor, State Room Presenters:

Juana Mercedes, General Coordinator of the National Confederation of Women of the Countryside (CONAMUCA) and member of the International Human Rights Commission of La Via Campesina, Dominican Republic

Sara Medina, Urban Agriculture Specialist, Foundation for Training and Innovation to Support the Agrarian Revolution (Fundación CIARA), Caracas,Venezuela

Ben Burkett, President, National Family Farm Coalition and member of La Via Campesina North America

Across the globe, a vibrant movement of farmers, food workers, fisher-folk, indigenous peoples, and others is calling for food sovereignty, the right of people to control their food and agriculture systems. As we challenge the underlying injustices of our current food system, we too are part of this movement.

This workshop will explore food sovereignty from the local to the global levels, with a special emphasis on the critical roles of people of African ancestry, particularly women, in this movement. Speakers will include powerful women leaders from the Dominican Republic,Venezuela, and the United States.

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

Building Self-Reliant Communities Track:

Detroit Black Community Food Security Network

Time: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM Location: 6th Floor, Gold Room Presenters:

Malik Yakini, Founder and Chairman, Detroit Black Community Food Security Network, Detroit, MI

Monica White,Assistant Professor of Sociology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

The Detroit Black Community Food Security Network (DBCFSN) is a coalition of organizations and individuals working together to build food security in Detroit’s Black community by: 1) influencing public policy; 2) promoting urban agriculture; 3) encouraging co-operative buying; 4) promoting healthy eating habits; 5) facilitating mutual support and collective action among members; and 6) encouraging young people to pursue careers in agriculture, aquaculture, animal husbandry, bee-keeping and other food related fields.

Feed Denver

Time: 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Location: 4 th Floor, Maroney-Leddy Room Presenters: Paula Thompson and Trineka Freeman, Urban Farmers, 42nd & Steele St. Parking Lot Farm, Denver, CO

Feed Denver is a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating working urban farms to create food, jobs, and business.This past summer we created a farm out of a Parking Lot in one of our more challenged communities. The neighborhood of Swansea is cut in half by a highway and dwarfed by truck stops, industrial factories, and junk yards but now has its own operating farm… in answer to Joni Mitchell’s iconic song, Big Yellow Taxi, we took that parking lot back and made it paradise!

Our Parking Lot Farm and Urban Agriculture Project is in a federally recognized “enterprise zone”, the Globeville/ Swansea/Elyria neighborhoods, which are home to over 10,000 residents.According to the Piton Foundation over 80% of the individuals in these communities are low income and 27% live in poverty, making accessing fresh foods and employment opportunities a great challenge. These diverse neighborhoods include strong ethnic cultures representing predominantly African-American, Latino, and Asian communities.

Young, Black and Gifted:

Creating Niche Food Communities

Time: 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Location: Penthouse (Right) Presenter: Nicole Taylor, Host of Hot Grease on Heritage Radio Network and Food Justice Activist, Brooklyn, NY

Whether you are a farmer interested in social media, a gardener with a food product idea or local eater interested in self-reliance, this workshop will give you the examples and inspiration to sustain niche food communities. In this presentation, participants will learn the fundamentals elements for successful community building through food. Case studies include Roberta's Pizza,The Greenhorns,African Hebrew Israelites, Muhammad Farms, and Eat Slow Jams. There will be an open discussion on resources needed for stronger black food organizations.

Increasing Access to Affordable Foods in Communities of Color

Time: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM Location: Penthouse (Right) Presenter: Tanikka Cunningham, Executive Director, Healthy Solutions,Washington DC

Lack of Food Access is not just a hot topic now, but it is a very real situation for African Americans. Most of our communities fall into “food deserts” and we suffer some of the highest negative health outcomes because it. We can help change our health, our food, and better our youth by creating community food systems that allow us to feed ourselves. This workshop will allow you to see some of the simple things that anyone can do to make food access a reality for our communities. This workshop will answer questions about what food systems are and what they can do to impact our communities.

Healthy Solutions’ vision is to create equitable

communities by creating community based food systems allowing all community members:

1. access to healthy affordable foods,

2. quality jobs through agriculture, and

3. education and training.

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

Building Self-Reliant Communities Track: (continued)

Urban Farming as a Framework for Holistic Community Development

Time: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM Location: Penthouse (Left) Presenter: Michael S. Easterling, Convener, Community Developer and Food Producer, Cleveland, OH

This presentation offers a vision of how neighborhood- based food production can work as the foundation of a holistic social and economic development strategy.The regenerative economics model was synthesized from the experience and best practices of educators, growers and policymakers and is based on the belief that a thriving local food economy is the most fundamental basis for building the local economy.

Seed to Table Track:

Participants will be provided with a framework that can be used to:

Refine program strategies and assess opportunities for partnership,

Apply models cooperative finance to create lower cost, high impact learning, and

Engage school systems through project-based learning in the community

Participants will also be provided with an overview of an enterprise development strategy that prepares youth for opportunities:

Horticulture / Aquaculture / Permaculture

Construction & Design

Compost/ Waste Utilization

Logistics / Distribution

Program Documentation

By Any Greens Necessary: Food as a Tool of Colonization and Joining the Resistance

Time: 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Location: 5 th Floor, Occidental Room Presenters:

Jade Walker,The Mill Creek Farm, Co-founder, Co- director of The Mill Creek Farm

Christopher Bolden-Newsome, Food Justice Consultant, Philadelphia, PA

The workshop will be hosted in popular education style and participants will engage through a series of discussions (large and small group), historical games, and listening.

There is a serious isolation and lack of cohesion in the food justice movement. We will use conference space to gather together and challenge ourselves to rewrite the narrative to not be about our individual work but to focus on the collective good of a transformed society. A goal of this workshop is to stimulate the creation of a food justice praxis. We want participants to leave with the ability to recognize the interconnectedness of oppressions and learn new ways to challenge the (way) systems of oppression (act within ourselves) within our work.Through this workshop we will expose that as long as the imposition of colonization has occurred, there have been movements to resist it.

We will begin the workshop by honoring our ancestors, move to a history of the food politics game in order that participants in this conversation leave with the ability to see our work in a historical context as a vehicle for social change.Then through an interactive timeline we will investigate the historical role of food in colonization.To help us locate ourselves and our justice work in the stream of food centered revolutions throughout human history. In closing we reflect, through meditation and story, on our own ancestral paths to the US and the personal and collective work it will take to get us to liberation.

A Place for Us:

Black Farmers in the Organic Movement

Time: 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Location: 6th Floor, Gold Room Presenters: Leah Penniman, Soul Fire Farm,Albany, NY

Participants will have the opportunity to share experiences and wisdom gleaned from interfacing with the organic movement. Additionally, I will provide information about the requirements of organic farmers and strategies to make organic farming possible without access to huge amounts of capital. I particularly have experience with organic vegetables, small fruits, and poultry as well as teen farming programs. I have been a part time grower for 15 years.

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

Seed to Table Track: (continued)

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS Seed to Table Track: (continued) Capuchin Soup Kitchen's Earthworks Urban Farm, Detroit,

Capuchin Soup Kitchen's Earthworks Urban Farm, Detroit, MI

The Next Generation: Youth Creating Food Change

Time: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM Location: 2nd Floor, Glennwood Presenters:

Anim Steel, Director of National Programs,The Food Project; Co-Founder Real Food Challenge, Brooklyn, NY

Myles Postell-Reynolds, Field Organizer with the Real Food Challenge Real Food,Alum of The Food Project’s Summer Program, Springfield, MA

Youth Team from East New York Farms!

Young people (in their teens, twenties, and thirties) are a rising voice in the movement.Whether we’re growing food in our communities our advocating in our schools, we

believe real food is our right and our responsibility. In this interactive workshop, you will hear about three models of youth engaged in the food movement:

East New York Farms!, a program that is greening one Brooklyn neighborhood with gardens and a thriving farmer’s market;

Real Food Challenge, which mobilizes college students to create new markets for family farmers; and

Live Real, a new project uniting youth nationwide to reform federal food policy.

After these short presentations, participants will have a chance to discuss how they might want to shape the movement, individually and collectively.

We intend to come out of the workshop with new ideas and ways to be involved.

Reclaiming and Reframing the History of Black Farmers in the U.S.

Time: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM Location: 4th Floor,African Art Gallery Presenters:

Gail Myers, Cultural Anthropologist and founder of Farms to Grow, Oakland, CA

Jennifer Steverson, Public Programs Curator Weeksville Heritage Center, Brooklyn, NY

Very little research has been conducted on the topic of blacks in United States agriculture, nor has the important contributions of blacks in agriculture been properly noted.

This paper discusses the agricultural contributions of black farmers in early American history and the ability of black farmers to transform land into meaningful resources, during and after the enslavement years. For example, the author cites the rice economy in South Carolina as evidence of African based landscape architectural design knowledge of the Senegambians.The paper discusses the plantation survival adaptations, Colono-Ware pottery, and the ethnobotanical/ecological knowledge of the first Africans in the Americas.

A Conversation and Strategy Session around the Industrialization of Black Food Culture

Time: 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Location: 2nd Floor, Glennwood Room Presenters: Malcolm X Grassroots Movement

Join us for pre screening of Byron Hurt’s forthcoming film “Soul Food Junkies”, followed by a conversation about the industrialization of Black food culture, from slavery to today. Let’s Build, and discuss ways we can collectively address the oppression of our communities through food/ our food system.

"We declare our right on this earth

to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society, on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring into existence by any means necessary."

to be a human being,

Malcolm X

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

Seed to Table Track: (continued)

Kids “Hands On” Cooking Demonstration from Farm to Table

Time: 10:45 AM – 12:00 PM Location: 4th Floor, Maroney-Leddy Room Presenters:

Rosalind Francis, Harlem Seeds, New York, NY

Michele Hatchette, Harlem Seeds, New York, NY

At Harlem Seeds, we understand the importance and urgency to connect children’s relationship to food with the growing process and agricultural practices. Participants will also learn:

How to prepare tasty and delicious farm fresh food

The differences between farm fresh foods and processed foods

The positive benefits of consuming healthy food

Participants will be divided into teams; four members per team.A maximum total of 20 participants will be allowed to participate in the hands-on cooking demonstrations.The purpose of the workshop is to introduce an alternative way of preparing food for maximum nutritional benefits.

Simply put, Harlem Seeds; cultivating the seeds of tomorrow one child at a time. Participants will be able to make smarter, more informed choices about what food they put inside their bodies.They will be empowered with knowing where the food comes from and how to best prepare it for maximum nutrition.They too can continue the legacy in growing food for their communities.

Composting in the City - Why Composting is Important in Urban Settings Time: 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM Location: Penthouse (Left) Presenter: Andrew Hoyles, Compost Instructor, NYC Compost Project in Manhattan, New York, NY

A basic primer on why composting is a critical part of urban gardening and a look at some of the tools that help you to get started.Topics discussed will be why composting matters, different composting options, what should or shouldn't be composted, and applications.

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

Garden Tours – Sunday, November 21

Come experience why they call New York City the mecca of urban agriculture on one of three garden tours this Sunday. Our gardens and farms are among the city’s most extraordinary and best-kept secrets. Tourists will discover an enormous variety of trees, vegetables, herbs and flowers as well as ponds, gazebos, rain-water harvesting systems, and more. The gardens are host to people of all ages and to a wide range of programs, from canning to composting, rain water harvesting to CSAs, homework tutoring to environmental studies workshops.

On the tours you will have a chance to see and hear how community residents took back their neighborhoods and now are growing food, providing education and in some cases have become healing and cultural centers. In Harlem come meet and greet urban farmers whose history stems from the migration of the rural South to the urban North, bringing with them the seeds of our past. In Brooklyn, learn about the borough’s oldest African American settlement Weeksville and the spiritual rituals passed down from our ancestors at Hattie Carthan community Garden. In the Bronx, discover our ancestral roots from Southern, Caribbean and a blend of Afro-Latino cultures, as you visit farms, a community garden and a rooftop youth garden. The only drawback is that you have to choose just one tour!

Tours are scheduled for Sunday morning, November 21. Transportation on the Bronx and Brooklyn tours is via vans; the

Harlem tour is a walking tour.

Please dress accordingly. Tours cost $25 and are on a first come first serve basis.

CHECK AT THE REGISTRATION DESK TO SEE IF SPACE IS STILL AVAILABLE.

Brooklyn Itinerary

Tour Guide: Jennifer Stevenson, 347-678-1258 Start Time: 11 AM Start Location: Weeksville Heritage Center, 1698 Bergen Street, between Rochester and Buffalo Avenues. A, C trains to Utica Avenue: Walk four blocks south on Utica. Turn left on Bergen St. 3, 4 trains to Utica Avenue: Walk eight blocks north on Utica. Turn right on Bergen St.

• 11:00 AM 11:45 AM:

• 12:00 PM 12:45 PM: East New York Farms! (613 New Lots Ave.), Host: David Vigil

• 1:00 PM 1:45 PM:

Weeksville Heritage Center, Host: Jennifer Stevenson

Brooklyn Rescue Mission/Bed-Stuy Farm (255 Bainbridge St.), Hosts: Rev. Robert & Rev. DeVanie Jackson

Hattie Carthan Community Garden (Lafayette & Marcy Ave), Host:Yonnette Fleming

End

• 2:00 PM to 2:45 PM:

3:00 PM:

(Lafayette & Marcy Ave), Host:Yonnette Fleming End • 2:00 PM to 2:45 PM: • 3:00 PM:

!

East New York Farms!

Page 19

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

Garden Tours – Sunday, November 21 (continued)

Bronx Itinerary

Tour Guide: Karen Washington, 917.861.2783 Start Time: 10 AM (Buses leave at 10:15 AM) Start Location: La Finca Del Sur, 138th Street and Grand Concourse. 4, 5 trains stop at garden.

• 10:30 AM 11:00 AM: Taqwa Farms! (164th & Ogden Ave), Hosts: Abu Talib & Bobby Watson

• 11:15 AM – 12:00 PM: Tremont Community Garden (178th and LaFontaine Ave), Hosts:

Elizabeth Butler & James Alexander

• 12:15 PM – 1:00 PM: Youth Ministries for Peace and Justice (174th and Strafford Ave), Hosts: Julien Terrell & Youth Organizers

• 1:15 PM – 2:00 PM: La Finca Del Sur (138th and Grand Concourse), Hosts: Nancy and Demetrio Suran

• 2:00 PM: end

Concourse), Hosts: Nancy and Demetrio Suran • 2:00 PM: end Gardener Abu Talib at Taqwa Community

Gardener Abu Talib at Taqwa Community Farm. Photo Credit: Ira Block

Manhattan Itinerary

Tour Guide: Haja Worley Start Time: 10 AM Start Location: Joseph Daniel Wilson Garden, 219 West 122nd Street between 7th and 8th Avenues. Take A, C, or D train to 125th and St. Nicholas or 2,3 trains to 125th and Malcolm X Blvd/Lenox Avenue.

10:00 AM 11:00 AM: Joseph Daniel Wilson Garden, (219 West 122nd Street), Hosts: Haja and Cindy Worley

• 11:15 AM 12:00 PM: Hattie McCracken/Truce Garden (St. Nicholas Ave., 118th & 119th Streets) Host: Steve Kidd

• 12:15 PM 1:00 PM: Clayton Williams Garden (126th and 8th Ave.), Host: Loretta Welcome

• 1:15 PM 2:00 PM: William B. Washington Garden (126th @ St Nicholas). Host: Gwendolyn Kingsberry

• 2:00 PM end

Washington Garden (126th @ St Nicholas). Host: Gwendolyn Kingsberry • 2:00 PM end Clayton Williams Garden

Clayton Williams Garden

2010 BLACK FARMERS AND URBAN GARDENERS CONFERENCE

TAKE ACTION!

Thank you for attending the first annual Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners Conference!

We hope that this conference has helped you strengthen networks with other growers and activists and inspired new ideas to address the food-related issues that contribute to inequities in health, wealth and justice in black communities. Our work together should not end with this weekend’s events. Help further our collective efforts by staying connected:

Search for “Black Farmer and Urban Gardener Conference” on Facebook and join the conversation.Help further our collective efforts by staying connected: Follow us on Facebook. Visit our website re

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Go to www.blackfarmersconf.org for information about our speakers, partners and upcoming events.

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Help us make the 2011 conference more inspiring and productive than this inaugural event. Fill out the feedback survey in your registration packet, share your thoughts, and get involved with planning next year’s events.to join our online community and stay up-to-date. Get ready for the 2011 Black Farmers and

Get ready for the 2011 Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners Conference!