You are on page 1of 25

AIR CONDITIONING TERM PROJECT

PARADISE MOTEL
BY AC UNLIMITED

Prepared for
Dr. Gary Rankin

AC UNLIMITED
FAISAL SIDDIQUI 101 963 673
BASEL TAWIL 101 865 922
DAMIEN LEWIS 101 984 799
AC Unlimited 

2891 University Ave West 

Windsor, ON 

N84 2G3 

University of Windsor 

401 Sunset Avenue 

Windsor, ON 

N9B 3P4 

Dear Dr. Rankin 

Re: Construction of motel on lot 22 

AC unlimited has taken the liberty to review several designs in regards to the proposal to build a motel 
on your land. We have analyzed several different building materials in different seasons to see which 
material will provide the best insulation during winter and summer at a low cost.   We also analyzed the 
materials to be used for the inner and outer walls and have decided that the most cost effective and 
durable option is timber‐clad.   

To see the results of the heating and cooling loads of timber‐clad and brick block wall, please see 
attached report. 

Thank you 

Damien Lewis 

Director, AC Unlimited 

 
One of the central and more important engineering industries that emerged in the past 50 years is the 
Heating  Ventilating  and  Air  Conditioning  industry,  also  known  as  HVAC.  The  industry  started  as  small 
individual  companies  trying  to  provide  a  better  comfort  level  for  individuals  living  in  a  certain  space. 
With time, the ideas became more innovative, the simple task became more advanced and complex and 
the small companies emerged together to provide an industry of air conditioning. As the industry grew 
larger,  heating  and  ventilating  became  as  important  as  air  condition  and  therefore  they  were  all 
included as one field of knowledge. 

Along with global warming, the earth’s atmosphere has been changing dramatically and therefore the 
HVAC  industry  has  been  very  vital  for  building  design  along  with  architecture.  In  recent  years,  all 
buildings  are  obliged  to  have  an  air  conditioning  report  that  comes  along  with  the  proposal  of  a  well 
engineered building.  This report is a proposal of an air‐conditioning design of a two story motel that will 
be  built  in  Oklahoma  City,  Oklahoma  State.  With  the  known  information  such  as  latitude  and  specific 
factors that can be used for the American Society of Heating , Refrigerating and Air conditioning Society 
(ASHRAE) clear sky model, and with the help of standards calculated and approved by the ASHRAE, the 
report will include an analysis of both the heating load and the cooling load of this motel. The analysis 
will  help  comprehend  the  optimal  solution  for  the  energy  supplied  to  every  room  to  provide  the  best 
comfort level for residents of the motel. The suggested name for the motel is Paradise Motel. 

The Required data for cooling/heating load calculations are: 

A. BUILDING LOCATION AND ORIENTATION (ARCHITECTURAL  
PLANS) 
B. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION (ARCHITECTURAL PLANS) 
C. OUTDOOR DESIGN CONDITIONS 
D. INDOOR DESIGN CONDITIONS 
E. OCCUPANCY SCHEDULE 
F. LIGHTING  
G. EQUIPMENT SCHEDULES 
H. INFICTRATION / VENTILATION 
 

Calculating Heating and Cooling loads is one of the hardest duties in heating and ventilating, and this is 
because  there  is  no  exact  answer  to  a  heating  load  or  a  cooling  load  in  a  specific  room  in  an  exact 
location at a specific time. Therefore an engineer would resort to the best approximation available and 
the  closest  answer  possible.  Over  the  years  many  models  have  been  made  to  approximate  the  load 
capacity that needs to be delivered. Some of these models are: 

1) cooling  load  factor:  This  method  depends  on  a  factors  that  are  tabulated  through  previous 
approximations. 

2) Cooling  load  temperature  difference:  This  method  mainly  depends    on  the  conductance  and 
surface area of the material  

3) Heat Balance Method: This method requires an extensive amount of iteration in calculation and 
therefore a computer is used to simulate these calculations given the appropriate inputs. 
 

The approach used in this proposal is HB, because this method is the latest method recommended by 
the ASHRAE. Although other methods were not invalidated, but they were discontinued because of the 
more accurate models proved to be better in calculations. The program used is HVAC load explorer load 
explorer  as  it  is  the  most convenient  and  most  accessible  program  available.  Figure  1  (a)(b)  illustrates 
the  layout  of  the  motel  in  the  first  and  the  second  floor.  The  motel  is  divided  into  24  bedrooms  in 
addition to the reception room, spa room, the two kitchens and dining room, the laundry room and the 
clerk’s  bedroom.  Also  each  bedroom  has  its  own  bathroom  that  has  been  included  in  the  calculation. 
There  are  6  zones  for  this  motel.  First  floor  has  three  zones  which  contain  room  1‐6,  room  7‐12,  and 
reminders of first floor respectively. Second floor has three zones which contain room 13‐18, room 19‐
24, and reminders of second floor respectively. 

 Some Assumptions: 

1) The rooms are closed and there is no heat exchange between the rooms 

2) All Doors are 7' high 

3) All Windows are 4' high 

4) All Walls are 8' high   

5) Electricity costs $0.08/kWh = $0.0000234457/BTU 
 

Figure 1(a): 1st Floor Plan Schematics (Also see the file “1st Floor Layout.pdf” file) 
 

1 (b):  2nd Floor Plan Schematics (Also see the file “2nd Floor Layout.pdf” file) 
 

The  proposal  is  going  to  hold    an  analysis  on  different  heat  and  cooling  loads  with  the  presence  of 
insulation.  Two  different  approaches  for  insulation  have  been  used  in  two  separate  cases  to  compare 
and  contrast  the  effects  of  insulation  material  and  layout  onto  the  cooling  and  heating  loads  of  the 
motel.  And  hence,  calculating  what  is  the  best  path  to  use  to  optimize  the  combination  of  Energy 
conservation, architectural structure completeness, low initial cost and thermal comfort maintenance.  

The 2 insulation schemes are having the outer wall as: 

1) Lightweight  timber clad 

2) Brick Block work cavity with insulation 

Figure 2 Shows an example of a lightweight timber clad house in the building process. In the picture, it is 
seen that the timber clad is suitable for summer more than in the winter, because the space is relatively 
thin.  However,  there  are  many  benefits  for  using  timber  clad.  Modern  timber  is  very  good  for  sound 
insulation. Newer buildings with timber readily comply with sound insulation standards through using a 
layered  structure  of  different  materials.  Also,  with  good  design  and  correct  detailing,  structural  wood 
needs  no  chemical  treatment  to  achieve  a  long  life.  Wood  is  resistant  to  heat,  frost,  corrosion  and 
pollution;  the  only  factor  that  needs  to  be  controlled  is  moisture.  Another  major  advantage  of  timber 
clad  is  its  light  weight.  This  feature  makes  handling  and  transport  simple.  Used  in  combination  with 
insulation  materials,  it  keeps  brick  walls  frost  free,  reduces  heating  costs  and  provides  a  more 
comfortable interior. 
Newer technologies in building are turning into wooden materials for windows for the most demanding 
thermal specifications. It has low maintenance intervals and a long service plan as well As well as being 
aesthetic to the eye. Finally, timber clad has major advantages over other materials when being used for 
renovation purposes.  

 
Figure 2: House made of lightweight timer clad. 

On the other hand, Traditional brick (Figure 3)and block  houses  remain  the  most  popular  form  of  self 


building  with  around  70%  of  self  builders  choosing  this  traditional  build  method.  Heated  discussions 
over the speed of brick and block construction will be around for years to come ‐ it is often argued that 
the speed of construction is close between traditional methods and timber frames      

   
Figure 3: Typical Brick wall                     Figure 4: Animation of Brick wall with insulation 

The solid mass of a brick and block self build allows the absorption of heat, which is radiated into the 
house.  This  creates  a  more  stable  temperature  meaningless  heat  will  be  required  at  night.  Tests  have 
shown brick and block built houses to maintain a temperature between 5°C ‐ 8°C higher than lightweight 
structures. Further to the thermal performance regulation changes, sound insulation specifications have 
been increased. It is widely accepted that mass stops noise in the simplest terms. Brick and block is also 
more flexible ‐ if a measurement is slightly out or the floor is not perfectly true the timber frame has to 
go back to the manufacturer to be adjusted. An extra line of bricks in a traditional build can easily be 
added and the problem is solved. 

Also, innovation in brick and block building is moving forward ‐ thin joint mortar allows the depth of the 
mortar  to  be  reduced  from  l0mm  to  just  2mm  increases  the  speed  of  construction.  Thin‐joint  system 
improves thermal insulation and air tightness of construction and increases ease of installation . 

With  the  addition  of  insulation  to  the  brick  wall  the  thermal  resistance  would  decrease  dramatically. 
And hence, heat loss will be minimal which is generally advantageous for cost. Figure 4 shows an outer 
wall  with  insulation  used  for  thermal  resistance.  The  type  of  insulation  used  in  this  proposal  is  cavity 
insulation.  

By installing cavity wall insulation into a brick veneer wall, up to 85% of heat transfer through the walls 
can  be  prevented.  Similarly,  in  a  double  brick  wall  (often  called  cavity  brick),  this  figure  is  up  to  63%, 
making houses home warmer in winter and cooler in summer. It will also make the inside of the walls 
warmer in Winter, virtually eliminating any condensation and mould problems. Cavity wall insulation is 
also an acoustic insulator, protecting your home from unwanted exterior noise and reducing the impact 
of noise from within your home on the neighbours. This is most significant for windowless walls. 

Table 1 shows the R value of different walls with and without insulation, an increase in R value will show 
higher insulation and lower heat loss 

Table 1 : Different R values 

House Type  No Insulation  After Insulation 


Double Brick:  R0.5  R1.5 
Brick Veneer  R0.4  R3.4 
Weatherboard  R0.5  R2.5 
 

Many assumptions had to be made in order to approximate the heating and cooling loads  

the assumptions about the building  and its components are: 
Building City: Oklahoma City 
Building State: Oklahoma 
Latitude: 35.0 
 
People: 
Peak number of people: 2 
Sensible Heat fraction: 0.55 
Latent Heat fraction: 0.45 
Activity: 450  Btu/hr 
Radiant fraction: 0.7 
Convective fraction: 0.3 
 
Light: 
The lights used in the motel are 44W and 13W bulbs 
Peak Lighting gain: 0.68 W/ft^2 
SW radiant fraction: 0.1 
LW radiant fraction: 0.6 
Convective fraction: 0.3 
Fraction of heat returned: 0 
 
Other equipment: 
3 Computer + Monitor: 330W 
Laser Printer: 133W 
Fax: 15W 
Microwave Oven: 586 W 
Range & Oven: 1553 W 
3 Washers: 475 W 
2 Dryers: 1172 W 
2 Water Heaters: 586 W 
Refrigerator: 88 W 
2 Dishwashers: 317 W 
 
Infiltration Load: 
Occupancy based: 3.5 L/s = 7.4 cfm 
Rate of air change is per person. 
 
BUILDING SUMMER CONDITIONS 
Dry Bulb Temperature: 96.1 F 
Daily Range: 19.4 F 
Wet Bulb Temperature: 75.0 F 
Clearness: 1.0000 
Ground Reflectivity: 0.2 
Atm. Pressure: 14.4 PSI 
Wind Direction: 10.0 degrees clockwise from North 
Wind Speed: 11.0 mph 
 
 
 
BUILDING WINTER CONDITIONS 
Dry Bulb Temperature: 17.1 F 
Daily Range: 0.0 
Wet Bulb Temperature: 17.1 F 
Clearness: 0.0000 
Ground Reflectivity: 0.2 
Atm. Pressure: 14.4 PSI 
Wind Direction: 10.0 degrees clockwise from North 
Wind Speed: 10.1 mph 

These assumptions have been made based on statistical data that were acquired in the previous years 
with  a  certain  percentage  of  uncertainty.  All  of  these  data  are  tabulated  in  one  of  the  ASHRAE 
handbooks and can be obtained from there. 

The external and internal walls suggested to be used in the building of Paradise Motel are listed below: 

1) For External Walls for brick blockwork cavity The properties are: 
 
Tilt: 90.0 Facing Direction: 0 
SW Absorbtivity in: 0.9  
SW Absorbtivity Out: 0.9 
LW Emissivity In: 0.9  
LW Emissivity Out: 0.9 
Area: 192.0 ft^2                       
Wall U‐Factor: 0.062 Btu/[Hr.ft^2.F] 
Wall Layer Details 
1 Layer Name: Facing Brick 3" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 6.0 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 3.0 in Density: 100.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.500 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
2 Layer Name: Air Gap 2" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 2.0 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 2.0 in Density: 0.1 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 1.000 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
3 Layer Name: Insulation 3" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.3 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 3.0 in Density: 5.7 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 9.997 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
4 Layer Name: Concrete Block 6" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 1.4 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 6.0 in Density: 59.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 4.166 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
5 Layer Name: Plaster 0.55" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 1.4 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.5 in Density: 59.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.382 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 

2)   For External Walls for lightweight timberclad. The properties are: 
 
 
Tilt: 90.0  
Facing Direction: 0 
SW Absorbtivity in: 0.9  
SW Absorbtivity Out: 0.9 
LW Emissivity In: 0.9  
LW Emissivity Out: 0.9 
Area: 192.0 ft^2 
Wall U‐Factor:0.045 Btu/[Hr.ft^2.F]  
 
Wall Layer Details 
1 Layer Name: Cedar Wood Planks 0.59" 
Sp Heat: 0.4 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.7 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.6 in Density: 25.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.819 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
2 Layer Name: Air Gap 0.79" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.8 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.8 in Density: 0.1 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.997 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
3 Layer Name: Ply Wood 0.35" 
Sp Heat: 0.3 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.8 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.3 in Density: 34.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.417 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
4 Layer Name: Insulation 6" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.3 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 6.0 in Density: 2.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 19.995 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
5 Layer Name: Vapor Barrier 0.04" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 2.4 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.0 in Density: 116.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.017 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
6 Layer Name: Plaster Board And Skim 0.5" 
Sp Heat: 0.1 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 3.0 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.5 in Density: 50.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.167 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
 

3) For Internal walls the properties are: 

Tilt: 90.0  
Facing Direction: 180 
SW Absorbtivity in: 0.9  
SW Absorbtivity Out: 0.9 
LW Emissivity In: 0.9  
LW Emissivity Out: 0.9 
Area: 192.0 ft^2 
Wall U‐Factor:0.045 Btu/[Hr.ft^2.F] 

Wall Layer Details 
1 Layer Name: Cedar Wood Planks 0.59" 
Sp Heat: 0.4 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.7 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.6 in Density: 25.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.819 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
2 Layer Name: Air Gap 0.79" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.8 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.8 in Density: 0.1 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.997 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
3 Layer Name: Ply Wood 0.35" 
Sp Heat: 0.3 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.8 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.3 in Density: 34.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.417 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
4 Layer Name: Insulation 6" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.3 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 6.0 in Density: 2.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 19.995 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
5 Layer Name: Vapor Barrier 0.04" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 2.4 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.0 in Density: 116.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.017 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
6 Layer Name: Plaster Board And Skim 0.5" 
Sp Heat: 0.1 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 3.0 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.5 in Density: 50.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.167 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 

4) For ceilings (Floor 1)the properties are: 

Tilt: 0.0                          
Facing Direction: 0                                       SW 
Absorbtivity in: 0.9                             SW 
Absorbtivity Out: 0.9                     LW 
Emissivity In: 0.9                         
LW Emissivity Out: 0.9                      Area: 
288.0 ft^2                        Wall U‐
Factor:0.045 Btu/[Hr.ft^2.F] 

 
 
Wall Layer Details 
1 Layer Name: Membrane 0.4" 
Sp Heat: 0.4 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 2.3 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.4 in Density: 70.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.175 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
2 Layer Name: Insulation 6" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.3 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 6.0 in Density: 2.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 19.995 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
3 Layer Name: Steel Pan 0.08" 
Sp Heat: 0.1 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 312.0 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.1 in Density: 480.8 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.000 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
4 Layer Name: Ceiling Air Space 39" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 39.0 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 39.0 in Density: 0.1 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 1.000 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
5 Layer Name: Ceiling Tile 0.4" 
Sp Heat: 0.1 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.5 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.4 in Density: 23.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.833 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 

5) For Roof (FLOOR 2) the properties are: 

Tilt: 0.0  
Facing Direction: 0 
SW Absorbtivity in: 0.9  
SW Absorbtivity Out: 0.9 
LW Emissivity In: 0.9  
LW Emissivity Out: 0.9 
Area: 288.0 ft^2 
Wall U‐Factor:0.136 Btu/[Hr.ft^2.F]  
 
Wall Layer Details 
1 Layer Name: Stone Chippings 0.5" 
Sp Heat: 0.4 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 10.0 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.5 in Density: 55.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.050 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
2 Layer Name: Felt 3/8" 
Sp Heat: 0.4 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 1.2 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.4 in Density: 70.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.310 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
3 Layer Name: Insulation1 2" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.3 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 2.0 in Density: 2.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 6.665 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
4 Layer Name: Cast Concrete 4" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 12.0 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 4.0 in Density: 143.9 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.333 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 

5)For Floors the properties are: 

Tilt: 180.0  
Facing Direction: 0 
SW Absorbtivity in: 0.9 
SW Absorbtivity Out: 0.9 
LW Emissivity In: 0.9  
LW Emissivity Out: 0.9 
Area: 288.0 ft^2 
Wall U‐Factor:0.353 Btu/[Hr.ft^2.F]  
 
Floor Layer Details 
1 Layer Name: Ceiling Tile 0.4" 
Sp Heat: 0.1 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 0.5 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.4 in Density: 23.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.833 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
2 Layer Name: Ceiling Air Space 39" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 39.0 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 39.0 in Density: 0.1 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 1.000 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
3 Layer Name: Cast Concrete 8" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 12.0 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 8.0 in Density: 143.9 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.666 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
4 Layer Name: Screed 2.75" 
Sp Heat: 0.2 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 9.7 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 2.7 in Density: 120.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.283 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 
5 Layer Name: Vinyl Tiles 0.2" 
Sp Heat: 0.3 Btu/[lb.F] Conductivity: 4.2 Btu.in/[hr.ft^2.F] 
Thickness: 0.2 in Density: 50.0 (lb/ft^3) 
R‐Value: 0.048 [Hr.ft^2.F]/Btu 

After inputting the assumptions made above into HVAC Load Explorer, a simulation took place and the 
results given were as follows: 

 
Summer: 
Table 2: Summer Cooling Load & Cost for First Floor (Brick Block Work Cavity with Insulation) 

Room   Time of peak  Total load (sensible &  corresponding air  Annual Cost 


load   latent)  Btu/hr  flow rate   ($) 
1  19 4226.4 3.5  868.04
2  18 4062.9 3.4  834.46
3  18 4062.9 3.4  834.46
4  18 4062.9 3.4  834.46
5  18 4062.9 3.4  834.46
6  18 4062.8 3.4  834.44
7  18 3675.3 3.4  754.85
8  18 3833.1 3.4  787.26
9  18 3833.1 3.4  787.26
10  18 3833.1 3.4  787.26
11  18 3833.1 3.4  787.26
12  18 3833.1 3.4  787.26
passage and office   15 23050 0  4734.11
bathroom  15 1113 0  228.59
staff kitchen   15 1657 0  340.32
kitchen and dining room  15 15477.7 3.5  3178.88
Total Cost           18213.33
 

Table 3: Summer Cooling Load & Cost for Second Floor (Brick Block Work Cavity with Insulation) 

Room   Time of peak  Total load (sensible &  corresponding air  Annual Cost 


load   latent)  Btu/hr  flow rate   ($) 
13  19 5675.7 3.5  1165.70
14  19 5515.6 3.5  1132.82
15  19 5515.7 3.5  1132.84
16  19 21793.3 0  4476.00
17  19 5515.7 3.5  1132.84
18  19 5515.7 3.5  1132.84
19  19 5156.4 3.4  1059.04
20  18 5308.6 3.4  1090.30
21  18 5308.6 3.4  1090.30
22  18 5308.6 3.4  1090.30
23  18 4903.6 3.4  1007.12
24  18 4903.6 3.4  1007.12
passage  16 18372.3 0  3773.38
laundry  17 26919.9 0 omit
spa   17 47008.9 0 omit
kitchen  9 20699.9 3.6  4251.43
manager's room  18 4027.6 3.5  827.21
Total Cost           25369.24
Table 4: Summer Cooling Load & Cost for First Floor (Lightweight Timber Clad) 

Room   Time of peak  Total load (sensible &  corresponding air  Annual Cost 


load   latent)  Btu/hr  flow rate   ($) 
1  18 4553.3 3.4  935.18
2  19 4199.2 3.5  862.45
3  19 4199.2 3.5  862.45
4  19 4199.2 3.5  862.45
5  19 4199.2 3.5  862.45
6  19 4199.2 3.5  862.45
7  18 3836.9 3.4  788.04
8  18 3836.9 3.4  788.04
9  18 3836.9 3.4  788.04
10  18 3836.9 3.4  788.04
11  18 3836.9 3.4  788.04
12  18 3836.9 3.4  788.04
passage and office   15 23420.2 506.3  4810.14
bathroom  14 1227.3 40.5  252.07
staff kitchen   14 1818.8 0  373.55
kitchen and dining room  15 15844.4 3.5  3254.19
Total Cost           18665.61
 

Table 5: Summer Cooling Load & Cost for Second Floor (Lightweight Timber Clad) 

Room   Time of peak  Total load (sensible &  corresponding air  Annual Cost 


load   latent) Btu/hr  flow rate   ($) 
13  19 5930.1 3.5  1217.95
14  19 5647.6 3.5  1159.93
15  19 5647.6 3.5  1159.93
16  15 22116.5 0  4542.38
17  19 5647.6 3.5  1159.93
18  19 5647.6 3.5  1159.93
19  18 5318.9 3.4  1092.42
20  18 5318.9 3.4  1092.42
21  18 5318.9 3.4  1092.42
22  18 5318.9 3.4  1092.42
23  18 5318.9 3.4  1092.42
24  18 5318.9 3.4  1092.42
passage  16 18523.3 0  3804.39
laundry  17 26977.5 0 omit
spa   17 47122.2 0 omit
kitchen  9 20860.2 3.6  4284.36
manager's room  18 4090.5 3.5  840.12
Total Cost           25883.42
 
Winter: 
Table 6: Winter Heating Load & Cost for First Floor (Brick Block Work Cavity with Insulation) 

Room   Time of peak  Total load (sensible &  corresponding air  Annual Cost 


load   latent)  Btu/hr  flow rate   ($) 
1  12 1645.9 0  338.04
2  12 1116.7 0  229.35
3  12 1116.7 0  229.35
4  12 1116.7 0  229.35
5  12 1116.7 0  229.35
6  12 1116.7 0  229.35
7  12 1645.4 0  337.94
8  12 1509.1 0  309.95
9  12 1509.1 0  309.95
10  12 1509.1 0  309.95
11  12 1509.1 0  309.95
12  12 1509.1 0  309.95
passage and office   7 5016.3 0  1030.27
bathroom  7 508.6 0  104.46
staff kitchen   7 225.5 0  46.31
kitchen and dining room  6 2005.8 0  411.96
Total Cost           4965.47
 

Table 7: Winter Heating Load & Cost for Second Floor (Brick Block Work Cavity with Insulation) 

Room   Time of peak  Total load (sensible &  corresponding air  Annual Cost 


load   latent) Btu/hr  flow rate   ($) 
13  12 1883.3 0  386.80
14  12 1344.6 0  276.16
15  12 1344.6 0  276.16
16  12 8644.4 0  1775.42
17  12 1344.6 0  276.16
18  12 1344.6 0  276.16
19  12 1883 0  386.74
20  12 1742.6 0  357.90
21  12 1742.6 0  357.90
22  12 1742.6 0  357.90
23  12 1742.6 0  357.90
24  12 1742.6 0  357.90
passage  7 4048.2 831.44
laundry  7 ‐23154.8 348.6  Omit
spa   7 ‐39182.8 581.3  Omit
kitchen  6 ‐680.9 4.4  Omit
manager's room  12 1181.9 0  242.74
Total Cost           6517.29
Table 8: Winter Heating Load & Cost for First Floor (Lightweight Timber Clad) 

Room   Time of peak  Total load (sensible &  corresponding air  Annual Cost 


load   latent)  Btu/hr  flow rate   ($) 
1  12 1449.6 0  297.72
2  12 1056.1 0  216.91
3  12 1056.1 0  216.91
4  12 1056.1 0  216.91
5  12 1056.1 0  216.91
6  12 1056.1 0  216.91
7  12 1449.1 0  297.62
8  12 1449.1 0  297.62
9  12 1449.1 0  297.62
10  12 1449.1 0  297.62
11  12 1449.1 0  297.62
12  12 1449.1 0  297.62
passage and office   7 4884.1 0  1003.12
bathroom  7 451 0  92.63
staff kitchen   7 133.1 0  27.34
kitchen and dining room  6 1918.6 0  394.05
Total           4685.12
 

Table 9: Winter Heating Load & Cost for Second Floor (Lightweight Timber Clad) 

Room   Time of peak  Total load (sensible &  corresponding air  Annual Cost 


load   latent) Btu/hr  flow rate   ($) 
13  12 1681.2 0  345.29
14  12 1282.2 0  263.34
15  12 1282.2 0  263.34
16  12 8599.7 0  1766.24
17  12 1282.2 0  263.34
18  12 1282.2 0  263.34
19  12 1680.8 0  345.21
20  12 1680.8 0  345.21
21  12 1680.8 0  345.21
22  12 1680.8 0  345.21
23  12 1680.8 0  345.21
24  12 1680.8 0  345.21
passage  7 3948.5 0  810.96
laundry  24 ‐23152 348.6  0.00
spa   7 ‐39401.5 582  0.00
kitchen  6 ‐738.1 5.3  0.00
manager's room  12 1026.2 0  210.77
Total Cost           6257.89
 

After the analysis of table 2 to table 5,  it was found  that the summer cooling  load and cooling cost is 


lower when the construction material for the outer wall is Brick Blockwork Cavity with insulation rather 
than Lightweight Timber clad walls.  

However  when  the  table  6  to  table  9  was  analyzed,  it  was  found  that  the  winter  heating  load  and 
heating cost is higher when the construction material for the outer wall is Brick Blockwork Cavity with 
insulation rather than Lightweight Timber clad walls. 

Most of the peak load was found to occur at around 18:00 or 19:00 hours. 

When analyzed the winter heating load from table 6 to table 9 was analyzed it was found that  some of 
the heat loads are negative. This was the case for some rooms such as the kitchen, spa room, laundry 
etc.  This  was  due  to  these  rooms  produce  more  heat  than  they  lose  due  to  equipment  gains  and 
therefore does not need heating by HVAC equipments. 

The comparison of the results are tabulated in Tables 10 ‐14 

Table 10: Summer Energy Cost for First Floor (Comparison) 

Outer  Wall:  Brick  Block  Work  Cavity  with  Outer Wall: Lightweight Timber Clad 


Insulation   
Room   Annual Cost ($)  Room   Annual Cost ($) 

1  297.72 1 935.18
2  216.91 2 862.45
3  216.91 3 862.45
4  216.91 4 862.45
5  216.91 5 862.45
6  216.91 6 862.45
7  297.62 7 788.04
8  297.62 8 788.04
9  297.62 9 788.04
10  297.62 10 788.04
11  297.62 11 788.04
12  297.62 12 788.04
passage and office   1003.12 passage and office  4810.14
bathroom  92.63 bathroom 252.07
staff kitchen   27.34 staff kitchen  373.55
kitchen and dining room  394.05 kitchen and dining room 3254.19
Total Cost  4685.12 Total Cost 18665.61
 

Table 11: Summer Energy Cost for Second Floor (Comparison) 

Outer  Wall:  Brick  Block  Work  Cavity  with  Outer Wall: Lightweight Timber Clad 


Insulation   
Room   Annual Cost ($)  Room   Annual Cost ($) 
13  345.29 13 1217.95
14  263.34 14 1159.93
15  263.34 15 1159.93
16  1766.24 16 4542.38
17  263.34 17 1159.93
18  263.34 18 1159.93
19  345.21 19 1092.42
20  345.21 20 1092.42
21  345.21 21 1092.42
22  345.21 22 1092.42
23  345.21 23 1092.42
24  345.21 24 1092.42
passage  810.96 passage 3804.39
laundry  omit  laundry omit 
spa   omit  spa  omit 
kitchen  omit  kitchen omit 
manager's room  210.77 manager's room 840.12
Total Cost  6257.89 Total Cost 21599.07
 

Table 12: Winter Energy Cost for First Floor (Comparison) 

Outer  Wall:  Brick  Block  Work  Cavity  with  Outer Wall: Lightweight Timber Clad 


Insulation   
Room   Annual Cost ($)  Room   Annual Cost ($) 

1  338.04 1 297.72
2  229.35 2 216.91
3  229.35 3 216.91
4  229.35 4 216.91
5  229.35 5 216.91
6  229.35 6 216.91
7  337.94 7 297.62
8  309.95 8 297.62
9  309.95 9 297.62
10  309.95 10 297.62
11  309.95 11 297.62
12  309.95 12 297.62
passage and office   1030.27 passage and office  1003.12
bathroom  104.46 bathroom 92.63
staff kitchen   46.31 staff kitchen  27.34
kitchen and dining room  411.96 kitchen and dining room 394.05
Total Cost  4965.47 Total Cost 4685.12
 

Table 13: Winter Energy Cost for Second Floor (Comparison) 

Outer  Wall:  Brick  Block  Work  Cavity  with  Outer Wall: Lightweight Timber Clad 


Insulation   
Room   Annual Cost ($)  Room   Annual Cost ($) 

13  386.80 13 345.29


14  276.16 14 263.34
15  276.16 15 263.34
16  1775.42 16 1766.24
17  276.16 17 263.34
18  276.16 18 263.34
19  386.74 19 345.21
20  357.90 20 345.21
21  357.90 21 345.21
22  357.90 22 345.21
23  357.90 23 345.21
24  357.90 24 345.21
passage  831.44 passage 810.96
laundry  0.00 laundry 0.00
spa   0.00 spa  0.00
kitchen  0.00 kitchen 0.00
manager's room  242.74 manager's room 210.77
Total Cost  6517.29 Total Cost 6257.89
 

Table 14: Winter, Summer, and Combined Energy Cost for Lightweight Timber Clad vs. Brick Block Work 
with Insulation (Comparison) 

Loads and Periods in Consideration  Cost ($) 

Summer Assuming Peak Load all the time (Brick Block)  43582.57402
Winter Assuming Peak Load all the time (Brick Block)  11482.76513

Summer + Winter Assuming Peak Load all the time (Brick Block)  55065.33915

     

Yearly savings of Brick Block Outer wall over Timberclad Outer Wall  426.7062698

As was mentioned earlier it was found that from analysis of table 2‐10 and from the comparison of table 
10‐13  that  the  advantage  gained  due  to  summer  cooling  cost  saving  by  using  Brick  Block  Work  Cavity 
with  Insulation  over  that  of  Lightweight  Timber  Clad  walls  for  outer  walls  during  summer  cooling,  is 
cancelled by the disadvantage due to winter heating cost increase by using Brick Block Work Cavity with 
Insulation over that of Lightweight Timber Clad walls for outer walls during winter heating. 

The reason for this observation can be explained by the relative U factor and the thermal mass of these 
two construction materials. The Block Work Cavity with Insulation has a U factor of 0.062 Btu/[Hr.ft^2.F] 
compared to the 0.045 Btu/[Hr.ft^2.F] of Lightweight Timber Clad walls. The U lower U factor is better 
due to it means higher resistance to heat transfer. 

Also the thermal mass of the Block Work Cavity with Insulation construction has a greater thermal mass 
due  to  concrete  and  air  gap  compared  to  the  Lightweight  Timber  Clad  construction.  The  lightweight 
Timber Clad has good insulation even though its lightweight due to wood is a good insulator of heat.  

Therefore it was found that for the year round energy cost neither wall would provide a clear advantage 
over  the  other.  However  there  is  an  advantage  in  using  the  Lightweight  Timber  Clad  wall  for 
construction due to the relatively cheap material. 

As  a  result  the  use  of  Lightweight  Timber  Clad  wall  for  both  inside  and  outer  wall  construction  was 
decided upon. 

In  connection  with  results  shown  It  is  seen  that  the  U  factor  of  a  material  is  essential.  The  U‐factor 
measures how well a product prevents heat from escaping. The rate of heat loss is indicated in terms of 
the U‐factor of a window assembly. U‐factor ratings generally fall between 0.20 and 1.20. The U‐factor is 
included  in  the  energy  performance  rating  (label)  offered  by  the  National  Fenestration  Rating  Council 
(NFRC).In addition, U factor does not take into account solar radiation or any other type of radiation. It 
only takes into account the conduction heat transfer. 

To Simplify the analysis, each floor is divided into three zones. Each zone consists of different rooms that 
add up to the same cooling and heating load. Tables 14 shows the different heating and cooling loads in 
Btu/hr and using the conversion factor. The amount of Tons required to heat a room 

Table 15: TimberClad and Brick Block Work Peak Loads in Summer 
Brick Block 
    Work     Timberclad    
    Peak Load  Peak Load  Peak Load  Peak Load 
Zone  Rooms   (BTU/hr)   (TONS)   (BTU/hr)   (TONS) 

1  1,2,3,4,5,6  24540.8  2.045066667  25549.3  2.129108333 


2  7,8,9,10,11,12  22840.8  1.9034  23021.4  1.91845 
3  Passage, Office  41297.7  3.441475  42310.7  3.525891667 
   Bathroom             
   Kitchen             
   Dining Room             
4  13,14,15,16,17,18  49531.7  4.127641667  50637  4.21975 
5  19,20,21,22,23,24  30889.4  2.574116667  31913  2.65945 
6  Passage, laundry  43099.8  3.59165  43474  3.622833333 
   Spa , kitchen             
   manager's room             
 

Table 16: TimberClad and Brick Block Work Peak Loads in Winter 

Brick Block   
    Work     Timberclad    

    Peak Load  Peak Load  Peak Load  Peak Load 


Zone  Rooms   (BTU/hr)   (TONS)   (BTU/hr)   (TONS) 

1  1,2,3,4,5,6  7229.4  0.60245  6730.1  0.56084167 


2  7,8,9,10,11,12  9190.9  0.765908333 8694.6  0.72455 
3  Passage, Office  7756.2  0.64635  7386.8  0.61556667 
   Bathroom             
   Kitchen             
   Dining Room             
4  13,14,15,16,17,18  15906.1  1.325508333 15409.7  1.28414167 
5  19,20,21,22,23,24  10596  0.883  10084.8  0.8404 
6  Passage, laundry  5790.8  0.482566667 4974.7  0.41455833 
   Spa , kitchen             
   manager's room             
 

From  The  previous  tables,  a  good  conclusion  would  be  that  Timber  clad  should  be  used  in  the  winter 
because in winter it has a lower peak load. On the other hand, the peak load in the summer is better for 
brick  block  work.  Since  there  cannot  be  a  change  between  the  two  seasons,  there  needs  to  be  a 
compromise between the two insulation schemes. Timber Clad was used as the best insulation scheme 
after testing the criterion of percentage error.  
Since there is three zones in each floor, an air conditioning unit will be installed in every zone. This gives 
a total of six Air conditioning units will be installed.  

Table 17 : AC UNITS USED 

Cooling  AC UNIT 
Required  Capacity 
Zone  (TONS)  (Ton)  AIR CONDITIONING SPECIFICATION 
Goodman GSC130301B 13 SEER R‐22 Central Air Conditioning Condenser  
1  2.129108333  2.5  Price: $815.00  
Goodman GSC130241C 13 SEER R‐22 Central Air Conditioning Condenser  
2  1.91845  2  Price: $785.00  
Goodman GSC130421A 13 SEER R‐22 Central Air Conditioning Condenser  
3  3.525891667  3.5  Price: $993.00  
Goodman GSC130601B 13 SEER R‐22 Central Air Conditioning Condenser  
4  4.21975  5  Price: $1,259.00  
Goodman GSC130361A 13 SEER R‐22 Central Air Conditioning Condenser  
5  2.65945  3  Price: $891.00  
Goodman GSC130481A 13 SEER R‐22 Central Air Conditioning Condenser  
6  3.622833333  4  Price: $891.00  
 

The air conditioning units used are Goodman GSC series. 

As for the winter heating procedure, there will be a heat pump installed in every floor, which means that 
all three zones in a floor will be sharing the same eat pump.  

Table 18 : Heat pump Used UNITS USED 

Heating  HP unit 
Required  Capacity 
Floor  Tons  (Ton)  Heat Pump Specification 
Goodman GSH130241A 13 SEER R‐22 HEAT PUMP  
1  1.90095833  2  Price: $1,005.00  
Goodman GSH130361A 13 SEER R‐22 HEAT PUMP 
2  2.5391  3  Price: $1,197.00  
 

The Heat Pumps used are also Goodman but have different series that the GSC. The heat pump series 
are GSH. 

 
Conclusion  

Our  aim  of  this  project  was  to  construct  motel  which  was  HVAC  efficient,  and  also  to  reduce  the 
construction cost. 

For our project we analysed two type of wall material, brick block wall and timber‐clad. We found that 
timber‐clad to be preferable over brick block because of its low construction cost and relatively similar 
HVAC running cost as brick block. Therefore we choose to make the outer and inner walls of timber‐clad. 

The heating load for timber‐clad in winter for zones 1,2,3,4,5,6 to be 6730.1, 8694.6, 7386.8, 15409.7, 
10084.0, 4974.7 Btu/hr respectively. 

The  cooling  load  for  timber‐clad  in  summer  for  zones  1,2,3,4,5,6  to  be  25549.3,  23021.4,  42310.7, 
50637, 31913, 43474 Btu/hr respectively. 

The annual energy cost (winter and summer combined) using the outer wall as brick block was found to 
be  $55,065.34  which  gives  a  saving  of  $426.71  over  using  timber  clad  as  the  outer  wall.  This  is  not  a 
great saving compared to the initial construction cost of brick block over timber‐clad, therefore making 
timber‐clad walls as our preferable construction material. 

The heating load for timber‐clad in winter for zones 1,2,3,4,5,6 to be 0.56, 0.72, 0.62, 1.28, 0.84, 0.41 
TONS respectively. 

The cooling load for timber‐clad in summer for zones 1,2,3,4,5,6 to be 2.13, 1.92, 3.5, 4.22, 2.66, 3.62 
TONS respectively. 

Based on the cooling and heating loads we choose one AC unit for each zone and one heat pump unit 
for each floor (zone 1‐3 and zone 4‐6). The capacity of the AC we choose for zone 1,2,3,4,5,6 to be 2.5, 2, 
3.5, 5, 3, 4 TONS respectively. The capacity of the heat pump for the first floor and the second floor was 
2 and 3 TONS respectively.