Quis nos separabit a caritate Christi? An gladius?

Saint Paul Scholasticate Newsletter
No. 4 San Carlos 2007

HEIRS OF A GREAT TRADITION
by Giovanni Scalese, CRSP
Among the six Bishops ordained by Benedict XVI on last Michaelmas, the 29th of September 2007, there was also a Barnabite. It was the first episcopal ordination officiated by Pope Ratzinger since his election in 2005. Five of the new Bishops were Italian and one Polish; two entrusted with the responsibility of particular Churches, and the other four elected to titular sees, while remaining at the direct service of the Holy See; five came from the secular clergy and one was religious. The latter is the Most Rev. Sergio Pagano, CRSP, since 1997 Prefect of the Vatican Secret Archives and on 4 August 2007 appointed Titular Bishop of Celene. If I am not mistaken, he is the 60th Barnabite Bishop (not counting the seven Cardinals given in the past by the Order to the Church), out of whom three still living. It is a great honour for our Congregation. We know that the episcopate is not just an honour; it is, first and foremost, a sacrament instituted by Christ to guide his Church. We know
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Pope Benedict XVI lays his hands on Bishop Sergio Pagano, CRSP

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that, as a matter of principle, only those who have to really govern a Diocese should receive this Order; but it does not depend on us if across the centuries the Church started to provide even her officials with the fullness of priesthood. Since then episcopacy has become even an “honour,” a form of recognition for personal merits, a step of the ecclesiastical career. Maybe it will not be so right and theologically well-founded, but there is nothing to do: we have to adapt to reality. What matters is that this kind of reward should derive from real merits and not just from a bureaucratic mechanism or from an unfair favouritism or, even worse, from a climb to power or from corruption (unfortunately, these things may happen in the Church too). That, in this case, it is not an automatic promotion is proved by the fact that the office held— the management of the Pontifical Archives—is not traditionally connected with episcopacy. That it is indeed a sign of recognition for special personal merits can be witnessed by the writer of these lines, who knows well Bishop Pagano since the days of their common novitiate, and knows how serious a scholar he is (he is a “self-made man”: suffice it to say that he learned Latin on his own, and now he is a member of Latinitas Foundation!), and knows also that he is a really disinterested person and has never done anything to win the favour of his superiors: he is jealous of his freedom and does not mince his words. So this acknowledgement is a great privilege for him and, somehow, for the Order to which he belongs. In particular, I think that it is important for the Barnabites in the Philippines to know that one of their confreres has become a Bishop. Why? Because they live in a country where the Congregation has been present only for eighteen years (it was in 1989 that the Barnabites set foot in here for the first time); and they could be tempted to consider their religious family just as a new foundation, without identity and without history. It is true, we are few here; we cannot boast an illustrious past; we do not have yet impressive pastoral works to show off; but this is not a new Congregation, this is just a new branch of an old tree. We receive our lifeblood from its trunk, which thank God keeps being hale and hearty. And we can be proud of belonging to this family; better, we have

to deserve it. A French saying goes: “Noblesse oblige,” that is to say: nobility, more than a question of honour, is a responsibility. We belong to a religious Order, which, although small, in the course of time has made quite a name for itself: Popes and Bishops (starting from St. Charles Borromeo) on several occasions looked to the Barnabites for responsible positions, maybe because they esteemed them for their talent, preparation and seriousness. Unfortunately, during the past two centuries they came under suspicion of being unreliable, because of their liking for new philosophical and theological trends: first Rosminianism (see below) and then Modernism (just to mention a name: Padre Semeria). Censures and sentences (apparently, Pope Pius X wanted to suppress the Order) in the long run weakened the strength of the Barnabites, who, at a certain point, preferred to abandon their philosophical and theological studies in favour of a larger involvement in pastoral work: this has brought about a remarkable cultural impoverishment of the Congregation, but has also meant for it a considerable opening to new environments and activities. Now, maybe, something is changing; the attitude of the Church towards us seems to become more positive: people are probably realizing that the fidelity of the Barnabites to the Church has always been beyond question; if they took a liking for new ideas, it was just for the sake of the Church, because they saw that she needed a profound renewal, if she wanted to keep up with the times. The day would have come when the very summit of the Church would have realized the necessity for her to re-establish a dialogue with the world: and there was the Second Vatican Council. The Barnabites had already felt the same need a century in advance. Perhaps they made some mistakes; but no new attempt is ever devoid of dangers: I do not know if the Church herself did not run risks during and after the Council. It is just a toll you have to pay, if you want an authentic renewal. I would like Filipino Barnabites to feel the big responsibility they take on in signing themselves with those initials “CRSP”: they are heirs of a great tradition; they have to be worthy of it; they have to continue it and—why not?—enrich it with even more magnificent pages.

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DIACONAL ORDINATION
by Jonathan G. Ramoso, CRSP
On the afternoon of August 26, 2007 around  3:30,  two  of  our  fellow  confreres—Rev.  Ferdi‐ nand  M.  Dagcuta,  CRSP  from  Balingasag,  Misamis  Oriental  and  Rev.  Roan  Cipriano  M.  Aborque, CRSP from Carigara, Leyte—were or‐ dained  deacons  by  the  hands  of  the  Most  Rev.  Luis  Antonio  G.  Tagle,  D.D.  Bishop  of  Imus,  Cavite.  With  them,  Bro.  Arvin  M.  Dagalea,  CRSP from Zamboanga City received the minis‐ try  of  acolyte.  The  celebration  was  held  in  the  Sacred  Heart  Chapel  at  St.  Paul  Scholasticate,  Tagaytay  City.  It  was  concelebrated  by  the  Barnabite  priests  assigned  in  the  Philippines,  with  the  special  presence  of  Fr.  Francesco  Cic‐ cimarra,  CRSP  Assistant  General.  Among  the  concelebrants  was  even  Fr.  Manny  Regala,  old  friend of the deacons. The Barnabite Scholastics  served  the  mass  and  the  Barnabite  Collegians  from Marikina accompanied the rite with their  songs.  The  Bishop  was  assisted  by  deacon  Gianluca  Belotti,  PIME  a  classmate‐friend  of  the  ordinandi.  Bishop  Antonio  Tagle  in  his  in‐ spiring homily strongly reminded the two can‐ didates that diaconate is not a privilege, nor the  belonging  to  a  special  group  or  organization,  but  a  mission  to  other  people.  To  be  a  deacon 

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means  “service”  (diakonia),  a  service  rooted  in  faith  and  in  the  obedience  to  the  Father.  The  Bishop  further  added  that  the  deacons  should  be  a  living example  and  reminder in  the  midst  of  the  community:  even  their  mere  “shadows”  should  remind  the  community  of  the  value  of  service.  The Eucharistic celebration was followed by  a simple “salo‐salo”, a traditional Filipino recep‐ tion, as a way of thanking God for his blessings  and  a  way  also  of  thanking  all  who  supported  the newly ordained deacons in their long jour‐ ney  of  formation.  The  neighboring  religious  communities, families and especially poor peo‐ ple  and  children  took  part  in  the  reception.  Though the parents of Rev. Ferdinand and Rev.  Roan  did  not  attend  the  ordination,  the  pres‐ ence  of  other  relatives  and  friends  gladdened  the hearts and faces of the new deacons. From  Marikina  the  Angelics,  our  novices  and  semi‐ narians came along with the affiliates .  The celebration ended in the evening and the  people who attended left the place with a smile  on their faces. The newly ordained deacons took  the opportunity of thanking the Lord and those  who witnessed the event, which is both challeng‐ ing and a blessing for them. Congratulations, my  fellow confreres, and be always motivated in the  performance of your new ministry. 

DEDICATION AND CONVERSION
by Ferdinand S. Dagcuta, CRSP
People  nowadays  look  on  someone—mostly  on  actors,  singers  and  athletes—as  “idols”  to  imitate. They look on these people as models for  their lives; thus they act in accordance with their  behavior.  Whether  these  people  behave  in  a  dif‐ ferent way it doesn’t matter to them, for they are  convinced  that  this  is  the  kind  of  people  they  want to imitate in their lives. As a deacon, I too  have  someone  to  imitate,  and  His life  should  be  the  model  for  me  to  follow,  since  it  is  for  Him  that  I  have  received  the  gift  of  ministry.  Jesus  Christ is the model par excellence for all and for  me;  He  is  the  only  model  worthy  of  being  imi‐ tated,  since  His  life  represents  the  very  perfec‐ tion each of us is searching for.   It  is  almost  three  months  since  I  was  or‐ dained a deacon and within these past months I  encountered  a  lot  of  experiences  that  gave  me  lessons  to  learn  and  things  to  discover.  From  these  experiences  I  learned  that,  apart  from  Je‐ sus,  my  ministry  would  be  meaningless  and  without  foundation.  This  gives  me  the  idea  to  look on the life of Jesus as a guide in order for me  to live my life worthy of being called a true dea‐ con,  a  true  servant  of  God.  My  life  as  a  deacon  must  imitate  the  life  of  Christ;  to  serve  and  not  to be served is the principle that I need to follow  and  have  to  live  in  my  whole  life.  The  life  of  Christ is a life spent in service. The four gospels  show  the  untiring  service  that  Christ  did  in  fol‐ lowing the will of His Father. Thus to serve and  not to be served is the constant reminder that He  always gives as a challenge to those who want to  follow in His footsteps. As a deacon, this is also  a challenge that Christ wants me to face. To live  the life of Christ is the very reason of my calling.  The  call  to  serve  should  be  the  guide  to  which  I  have  to  respond  so  that  I  will  not  lose  my  way. 

The new acolyte: Arvin A. Dagalea

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This  is  the  only  way  wherein  I  can  walk  side  by  side with Christ and I am sure that I will not be  lost, for He is there to guide me.   Being a deacon is a gift from God, a gift that  is not for myself, but for the service of the gospel.  Thus  I  am  just  an  instrument  of  God  to  make  His message of love to all mankind known. I am  sent  to  tell  people  how  much  God  loves  them,  thus  bringing  hope  to  a  world  where  hopeless‐ ness  and  utter  meaninglessness  are  so  spread.  Hope is what I should bring and this is what peo‐ ple need to know and live in their lives. Yes, I am  called  to  do  this  service  and  it  is  here  that  the  challenge lays, a challenge that I have to face, for  it is here that the meaning of my calling can be  realized.  But what must I do in order to really live out  this  life?  Christ  himself  has  shown  me  the  way,  inviting me to look at his own life. There are two  qualities  that  I  need  in  order  to  follow  Christ:  dedication  and  conviction.  Everything  He  did  was done with self‐dedication, thus dedication is  needed very much when one serves. To serve God  requires  total  dedication  of  oneself;  I  must  give  everything  to  Him  and  that  includes  my  whole  life.  Self‐dedication  makes  me  focus  on  what  I  have to do in order for me to fulfill what God de‐ sires of me. Self‐dedication shows my unity with  God and adapts my actions to His will and not to  my own desires.  It gives me strength to continue  my service in the midst of struggles and difficul‐ ties. It is a way of showing an undivided heart in  responding to God’s calling.  Likewise,  inner  conviction  is  also  important  in  order  to  serve  God.  Inner  conviction  is  the  trust  that  the  one  who  called  me  to  serve  Him  will  never  leave  me  alone,  and  that  He  always  pours out His gifts in order for me to fulfill what  He wants me to do. Christ shows His conviction  as  He  follows  the  will  of  His  Father.  He  knows  that  what  He  does  is  the  right  thing  to  do,  and  thus  worthy  of  being  done.  I  too  as  a  deacon  should have this inner conviction, that in follow‐ ing  the  will  of  God  I  could  never  be  wrong,  for  God’s  will  always  leads  me  to  the  right  way. 

Trusting that God is the one who started what I  am called to do gives me courage to go on with‐ out doubting that what I am doing will reach its  fulfillment.  It  is  trusting  God  that  makes  all  things possible.  Indeed,  serving  God  is  a  great  challenge  but  this  challenge  is  nothing  compared  to  the grace  given  by  God  to  those  who  follow  in  His  foot‐ steps  and  respond  to  His  calling.  All  we  need  is  to serve, to dedicate our lives to this service and  to be convinced that God will always be there to  help and guide those who responded faithfully to  His calling. Thus, the two first letters of the word  “deacon”  mean  DEdication  of  one‐self  and  the  last three letters means CONviction that comes  from one’s inner‐self; this is to remind me that I  must  serve  always  with  DEdication  And  CON‐ viction  because  that  is  where  my  ministry  as  a  deacon will find its meaning and fulfillment. 

The new deacons: Ferdinand S. Dagcuta & Roan Cipriano J. Aborque

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The DIVINE WORD SEMINARY
The  last  two  issues  of  iPaul  featured,  first,  the  City  of  Tagaytay  and,  second,  the  Diocese  of  Imus.  This  time  our  newsletter  wishes  to  highlight  the  school  where  the  Barnabite  students  attend  their  classes,  the  Divine  Word  School  of  Theology,  part  of the Divine Word Seminary.  We do this through two interviews, the first with  the  Seminary’s  Vice­Rector,  Fr.  Antolin  Uy,  at  pre­ sent the acting Rector in the absence of Fr. Wilfredo  Saniel;  the  second  with  Fr.  Michael  Layugan,  Dean  of the Divine Word School of Theology. 

   

Interview with Fr. Antolin Uy, SVD 
by Roan Cipriano J. Aborque, CRSP 
  How did the Divine Word Seminary in Tagaytay  start?  Fr. Antolin: The Divine Word Seminary in Ta‐ gaytay started together with the Novitiate house in  1963. The following year, 1964, the School of The‐ ology was established within the Seminary. There  was  even  a  time  when  Philosophical  Studies  from  Christ  the  King  Seminary  in  Quezon  City  were  transferred  to  Tagaytay;  but  later  they  returned  permanently  to  Quezon  City.  The  Divine  Word  Seminary  was  at  the  beginning  intended  for  SVD  seminarians. Then a time came when the Seminary  invited  other  Religious  Institutes  to  perform  their  theological  studies  at  the  Divine  Word  School  of  Theology.  What is the main orientation of DWS?  Fr.  Antolin:  The  Seminary  was  called  Mission  Seminary,  or  better  “Divine  Word  Mission  Semi‐ nary.”    From  the  outset,  the  orientation  of  the  Di‐ vine  Word  Seminary  has  always  been  mission.  This  is  I  think  the  reason  why  even  the  Mission  Society of the Philippines (MSP) and the Pontifical  Institute  for  Foreign  Mission  (PIME)  established  their seminaries in Tagaytay. We also have a great  library. It contains books and references useful not  only  for  Biblical  Studies  but  above  all  for  Missi‐ ological Studies.  How  is  the  Divine  Word  Seminary  at  present,  and what are its prospects for the future?  Fr. Antolin: At present I would say that we are  blessed. SVD seminarians may have diminished in  numbers,  but  still  a  lot  of  seminarians—SVD  and  from other houses of formation—come to perform  their  studies  at  the  Divine  Word  School  of  Theol‐ ogy.  I  still  believe  that  the  Divine  Word  Seminary  and the School of Theology have always been and  will  always  be  a  Mission  Seminary  and  a  Mission  School.  How  come  some  of  the  SVD  seminarians  disap­ pear after some year of studies and non­Filipino stu­ dents attend DWST?  Fr. Antolin: The DWS has been integrated into  the Overseas Training Program (OTP) of the Soci‐ ety  of  the  Divine  Word  (SVD),  whereby  seminari‐ ans after the 2nd year of Theology are sent abroad  for a mission exposure. The exposure lasts for two  years.  Then  seminarians  are  given  two  options:  either  to  remain  in  foreign  missions  and  study  there  or  return  and  continue  their  studies  here.  This experience is also called “Regency Year.” It is  an integral formation. Seminarians are sent to for‐ eign missions not to test their vocation, but to ex‐ perience  missionary  work.  There  is  then  the  idea  of an exchange of students: SVD seminarians from  the  Philippines  are  invited  to  continue  their  stud‐ ies  in  foreign  countries  and  in  turn  foreign  semi‐ narians are invited to come and spend their theo‐ logical studies here in the Philippines.  At the end, the interviewer wished to know more  about  Fr.  Antolin,  but  he  humbly  declined.  And  so  the interview ended. 

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Interview with Fr. Michael Layugan, SVD
by Pat M. Golis, CRSP What are the requisites and qualifications to become a dean? Fr. Mike: Well, at least one must have a degree recognized by CHED. One must have a master’s degree, but much better if he has a PhD. Aside from that, he/she must be elected or voted by the professors of the DWST. They are the ones who elect the dean. On my part, I was elected by the faculty and, besides, I have my two degrees, the ecclesiastical (a licentiate in Church’s History) and the civil one (an MA in Theology). How many years is the term of office of a dean? Fr. Mike: Three years; and after that there will be the election for a new dean. What are your most blissful moments as a dean? Fr. Mike: When I was elected, I was a little bit scared, because it was the first time that I was an administrator and, besides, I had just come back from my studies in Rome. It was the first year that I was a member of the community as a priest. That is why, when I was elected, I actually asked the Provincial Superior a kind of reconsideration about the matter, that if possible somebody could take my place. But as a religious, I had to obey my superior, and so I told him that I would try. My blissful moments are: first, despite the small time given to me as a dean, I have been able to do many things. I have been able to contribute not just to the physical renovation of the school, but also to the improvement of the school as a whole. Secondly, a blissful moment is when I in-

teract with the students inside the classroom or sometimes when they come to my office and tell me their problems, and when I am able to solve them—that is for me a blissful moment. What about your frustrating experiences in school or in the seminary, Father? Fr. Mike: Well, my first year was rather difficult, because I was still adjusting; so, more or less, that was the most frustrating experience, because some professors left and then there was the death of the registrar, who was in charge of the office, plus the death of a very good professor—Fr. Ceresko. But that was not really so frustrating. I cannot think of a real frustrating experience, because there have always been difficulties from the beginning; so, more or less, rather than a frustrating experience, perhaps it could be considered a challenging one. Being an administrator for two years, have you experienced any problems with your staff or with the seminarians? Fr. Mike: Well, during these two years there were difficulties, like for instance the lack of office personnel, people who can really help in running the school. In fact, during my first year I had only one registrar, who was directly under me. Regarding the seminarians, so far, I didn’t encounter any serious problem with them, but the only difficulty would be their admission requirements, because it seems that they had problems in the past not yet resolved. So how did you settle and patch up those problems? Fr. Mike: Regarding the personnel, I requested the council if they could hire new personnel to work here; and then, as for the students who had problems with their requirements, what I did is to systematize the whole record department; so we have now an organized filing system. Moreover, an evaluation is done annually. Every student is given a chance to see me individually. So, with that, I talk to them and they disclose to me their difficulties and I also try to monitor not just their scholastic performance, but also some of the things that they need to fulfill in the school. What about your triumphant experience, Father? Fr. Mike: Whenever I get through a difficult situation and whenever I am able to help a seminarian in resolving his difficulties—that would be for me a triumphant experience as a dean.

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What was your most cherished moment here in the seminary? Fr. Mike: I have many cherished moments, just like when I am able to accomplish the things I had in my agenda. What I do every year is to set my agenda, that is the things I should accomplish, like the programs or the objectives for the whole year. I try to plan them out. After the year is over, I can see that part or most of the agenda is accomplished. That is for me my cherished experience; and of course another cherished experience is the interaction in the classroom. Besides the work, for me the most cherished moment is to be with the student. How would you assess your leadership, Father? Democratic, parliamentary, or lenient? Fr. Mike: I would say that, teaching in the school, one cannot just be lenient, when there are things, policies, guidelines to be implemented, specially regarding requirements; because this school is not only aiming for the students to fulfill their four-year ecclesiastical course, but we give more emphasis on the discipline and the formation of the students especially with regard to their studies. I don’t want then to call myself as a leader, but I rather feel a companion journeying with the students. I’m just here to facilitate their studies; but of course there are policies, rules and guidelines that have to be implemented. Can you please give me your five top performances that the whole community can be proud of? Fr. Mike: Uh… well… administratively, I have done many things. First, the systematization of

the records; second, the revision of the curricula and the different programs; third, the revised student handbook, which I have been able to accomplish; fourth, we have now a new clinic, classrooms, faculty rooms, dental clinic, classrooms are newly renovated and the development of the office; fifth, the sound system in each classroom. What is your philosophy of life, Father, that has brought you to the position you have now? Fr. Mike: My philosophy of life is to be always positive in all my undertakings, even if there are difficulties along the way; but I’m still hoping that something good may come out of them. As an outgoing dean, do you have any reminder to leave to us? Or any parting words you can share? Anyone to thank? Fr. Mike: Well, I would like to thank my confreres, who have been very supportive to me; the professors, who come to me when I need them; Bishop Tagle, who is very helpful; our Rector, who is ever supportive in all my programs; the different rectors, who regularly attend the meetings—I thank them for their recommendations, comments and suggestions. Most of all, I would like to thank the students for their cooperation, because I have not encountered any serious problem with them. They are very open to me and do not hesitate to come to my office if they have problems in their academics. Lastly, as an outgoing dean, I would say that the students have a great potential. This potential should be maximized to the fullest and we professors should bring out the best for their formation.

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The Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Infant Jesus

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IT IS CHRISTMAS
by Marlon B. Ramirez, CRSP After talking for an hour with Sr. Mercy Perlas, FMIJ (= Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Infant Jesus), whom I interviewed about their Congregation, I came to the decision to entitle this article It Is Christmas. There are two passages in the Gospel that could remind them of this. The first one is the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem (Lk 2:4-7), which we celebrate on December 25. Of course, when we move into a scientific investigation, that date could be questionable. But I don’t want to argue about it; what I want to emphasize is that Jesus was born on Christmas day. And the FMIJ too were born on Christmas day. The second gospel passage is when the disciples asked Jesus: “Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven?” He called a child over, and said, “Amen, I say to you, unless you turn and become like children, you will not enter the kingdom of heaven. Whoever humbles himself like this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. And whoever receives one child such as this in my name receives me” (Mt 18:1-5). Jesus teaches his disciples that to be great in heaven there is need of being humble. Humility is the qualification of the FMIJ in being disciples of Christ. The foundress of the FMIJ is Barbara Micarelli, also known with her religious name Sr. Mary Joseph of the Infant Jesus. She was the sixth of the seven children of Mr. and Mrs. Micarelli. She was born on December 3, 1845 in Sulmona, in the province of Aquila, Italy. At the age of 20 she got a serious illness, which brought her to the threshold of death. The physicians were unable to diagnose the nature of her illness, and declared they could do nothing. The doctors invited the family to accept the young lady’s death. Thus, Barbara’s parents, with deep sorrow and sadness, entrusted Barbara to St. Joseph, praying and begging him to wrench a miracle from the Lord. With great amazement, she woke up and asked food to eat. It was incredible that, through the miraculous intercession

The FMIJ Tagaytay Community with Card. Ricardo Vidal

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of St. Joseph, she had been healed. Indeed, she had been truly cured and given back to her loving family. That experience was a beginning of her craving to serve God in her whole life. She already was a Franciscan Tertiary, but after her miraculous healing she decided to dedicate herself to the Lord and to the poor. Along with her sister Carmela she left her home and went to live in a small apartment, where she started an apostolic activity in favor of the neighborhood. Soon Catherine Vicentini joined them, so that a kind of religious community was born. Subsequently they transferred to larger quarters and started accepting candidates. She received the religious habit from the hands of Fr. Bernardine of Portoguaro, Minister General of the Friars Minor, on December 25, 1879 in Rome. That date is usually considered as the birthday of the Congregation of the FMIJ. Mother Barbara devoted herself to the care of the poor, orphans, and the abandoned. Specifically, the charism of the Congregation—Serving Jesus in the neighbor and the neighbor in Jesus—found expression in apostolic activities such as: catechism, educational instruction to the children, home economic in-service training of the young girls who had come to live with the fraternity and home assistance to the sick, carrying out the commandment of charity in its two-fold dimension of love of God and love of neighbor, which is the whole essence of the Decalogue. On April 1909 the life of Mother Barbara ended with a meaningful death in the city of Assisi. After Mother Barbara’s death the new Congregation spread throughout the world. 1927 is the starting point of missionary activities with the preparation of personnel to send on mission. In fact, in 1928 the mission reached Peru, in 1929 Libya, in 1961 USA, in 1962 Bolivia, in 1964 Colombia and Argentina, in 1980 the Philippines, in 1992 Albania, in 1997 Paraguay and in 2000 Cameron. The presence of the FMIJ in the Philippines is a gift to the Filipino. Their communities are distributed in eight Dioceses, namely: Diocese of Cubao, 3 communities; Archdiocese of Lipa 2; Diocese of Gumaca 2; Diocese of Imus 2; Diocese of Parañaque 1; Diocese of San Carlos 1; Diocese of

Antipolo 1; Diocese of San Pablo 1. So, all in all, 13 independent communities all over the Philippines. In our country the FMIJ have at present 50 final professed sisters, 12 temporary, 2 novices, 3 postulants, and 4 aspirants. Their first missionaries in the Philippines were Sr. Chiara Flora Idili, Sr. Maria Cornelia (the mother superior), Sr. Pia Alessandra and Sr. Franca Lilia Nichetti. On January 20, 1980 they arrived at Sto. Tomas, Batangas through the invitation of Fr. Adolfo Faroni, SDB who introduced the Congregation to Archbishop Ricardo Vidal in Lipa. Their first assignment was the administration of St. Thomas Academy Diocesan School. If you want be part of their blessings, they have a retreat house—Bethlehem House of Prayer—located at 201 Maitim II East, Tagaytay City. This house offers a place of solitude that will restore the strength of those who are called to work in the vineyard of the Lord. Come and enjoy the beauty of silence at Bethlehem; you may go home with a renewed self. It is administered by Sr. Mercy Perlas, FMIJ with Sr. Albarosa Marfisi, FMIJ as local superior.

Mother Barbara Micarelli

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VENERABLE KARL h. SCHILLING
by Isfridus Syukur, CRSP
Venerable Schilling is one of the most meaningful figures in the history of the Clerics Regular of St. Paul. He was born in Oslo, capital of Norway, on June 9, 1835. He was a Protestant, who at a certain point decided to become a Catholic. He joined the Barnabites in Paris on July 2, 1868, and few weeks later he underwent his novitiate at Aubigny-sur-Nere, France. He was ordained a priest in Bourges on December 18, 1875. Reading through his biography in a booklet entitled “A Priest from Norway” written by Sigrid Undset, I come up to describe him with this word: HOBBS. Allow me then to explain each letter of the word. H stands for Holiness. Fr. Schilling was indeed a holy man. He was faithful to the ministry to which he was called: to preach the Gospel to all mankind. He followed what his Master taught him, “Be perfect as your heavenly Father is perfect.” For Fr. Schilling, if it were impossible to attain it, then Jesus would have not told his disciples this way. And God would never demand impossible things from his creatures. In other words, God says something, because He knows that man is able to do it with His grace. Thus Fr. Schilling kept and observed his Divine Master’s teaching faithfully in his daily life. He spent time in prayer and meditation, doing penance and self-mortifications for the salvation of souls. Not only that, he also showed charity to the people around him. He was very kind to his confreres in the community and to those poor and sick souls who sought for help. His intimate relationship with Jesus Christ allowed him to tell a woman whose only child and son had died, “Do not grieve, the child is not dead but is sleeping.” After he prayed with the mother of the child, he said to her, “Go home, your child is not dead.” Indeed, when the mother arrived home, she found her child sleeping and alive. People would come to him to listen to his encouraging words and everyone who experienced talking with him—Undset would say—could not remain indifferent but changed their lives. This is the reason why his confessional was never empty. People would flock to him not only for confessions but also to ask the holy man to pray over their illness, to ask for a piece of advice regarding their difficulties and problems in life. Fr. Schilling convinced everyone that they were loved by God. He himself experienced

God’s love within and he lived by the love of God alone. No doubt then people would call him “the holy man of Mouscron” (the Belgian town where he spent the last years of his life). Not only people outside acknowledged Fr. Schilling’s righteousness, but also his confreres and superiors in the community. When he was in the novitiate, his superior spoke of him, “Schilling is a very saintly novice and will certainly become a priest,” and “an Angel, a very angel.” O is Obedience. Fr. Schilling was very obedient to his superiors. His desire after the ordination to the priesthood was to go back to his own country and work with Fr. Stub, who had been his spiritual director in his journey to Catholicism. He would like to work with his own people in Norway to save their souls and to show to them, especially to his family, how joyful he was as a Catholic and even more as a priest. However, his desire remained just a desire. His

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superiors never sent him home to help Fr. Stub. On March 29, 1880, a law was issued by the French government which banished all religious Orders and Congregations from the country. He thought it was an opportunity for his superiors to send him home. However, it was another wrong prediction, for his superiors sent him to Monza, Italy where he was appointed as vice-master of the novices. Fr. Schilling, out of obedience to his superiors’ decision, went to Monza and carried out the assignment wholeheartedly. He never complained nor refused, for he knew it was God who spoke through his superiors. In fact his humble expression was, “God’s will be done.” This is the reason why his confreres would often speak of him, “Fr. Schilling is a very saintly priest. He never tires, he is modest and humble, his obedience is most edifying.” From Monza he was sent to Mouscron, Belgium in 1887. He ended his life there. He died on January 3, 1907. Till the end of his life he was never allowed to go back to his country. Nevertheless, Fr. Schilling remained enthusiastic in what he did in his assignment area. He loved and cared for the people and guided them in their spiritual journey. B stands for Brilliant. Fr. Schilling was also a brilliant man. Before he converted to Catholicism he was a great and known painter in Norway. In fact he was on the way to be known worldwide as an artist. He had painted a beautiful landscaping between 1862 and 1865. He owned a studio where he displayed all his masterpieces. One day he invited Fr. Tondini (a Barnabite) to the studio wishing to show him his yearly official art exhibition. However, he did not realize that the invitation would become his “turning point of life.” Instead of appreciating his art work, Fr. Tondini criticized him sharply saying, “This is not your vocation.” What a distressful day for Schilling! But like Mary, he kept it in his heart until later on he realized that Fr. Tondini was right. Schilling was not meant to paint the beauties of nature, but to paint the lifeless and weary souls so that they might become beautiful and worthy in God’s sight. B is for Boldness. His boldness was more on his determination to follow what the voice inside whispered to him. Fr. Tondini’s sharp criticism encouraged him to seek and to listen attentively to the voice within him. Indeed, God was calling the young Schilling to be his servant. God’s presence was manifested in the people around him. First of all, through his friend William Eitel who, instead of explaining to Schilling the Catholic faith, invited him to attend the Mass in the mornings so it could be easier for him to explain things. It was when William explained the

beauty of the sacrament of Reconciliation that Schilling more and more desired to become a Catholic. Other people who helped him were Sr. Emily and Fr. Paul Stub, who directed him in his spiritual journey towards faith. Moreover, Schilling himself was determined if not radical in his decision to become a Catholic, despite of seemingly lack of support from his family and friends. He knew what he was doing and was happy in everything he did. He was touched and called by God to be his instrument for the salvation of many souls. His boldness and radicalism to leave behind his job, family and country made him worthy and effective instrument of God. S stands for Simplicity. Despite of everything, Fr. Schilling remained humble and meek. He had nothing to boast for except the burning fire of God’s love within him. He never considered himself better or even holier than others. Instead, he showed kindness and humility to all he met and to those whom he mingled with. When he met another priest in the corridor or along the street, he would kneel down and ask for his blessing. He listened and conversed with the people he met along the road. He patiently guided and helped them in their difficulties and problems. He was totally available for everyone who sought for his help. He did everything in the name of Jesus Christ. As his confreres would say, “Fr. Schilling is a pattern in all that he does, in love of Our Lord, in childlike devotion to the Mother of God, in trust in saints, in tenderness for souls, both the living and the dead.” In other words, he offered all he did and said for the greater glory of God. Before he died he uttered these words, “My Jesus, make me love Thee more and more.” With those words he concluded the chapter of his life here on earth. Today, Fr. Schilling serves as an example and a model for all young Barnabites in their spiritual journey towards perfection. The Barnabites, seminarians and priests, are trying to develop this HOBBS of Fr. Schilling within themselves. He is a model priest, he shows us how we can attain a personal and deep relationship with Jesus Christ the High Priest. With this, we hope and pray that through the intercession of Venerable Schilling all the Barnabites throughout the world may remain faithful to their vocation and be worthy and accountable servants of God. And finally, may God in his mercy and goodness continue to grant us the grace so we can be steadfast in faith and be courageous in proclaiming His message of salvation to all mankind. The Barnabites continue to pray that someday, in God’s own time, Venerable Schilling will be canonized as a Saint.

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Augustin Šuvalov (1804-1859) & Caesar Tondini (1839-1907)

Barnabite Promoters of Christian unity
by Cirilo B. Coniendo, CRSP After the Second Vatican Council the Roman Catholic Church has focused her attention on ecumenism. Nowadays there arise several movements promoting the unity among different Christian denominations. The Barnabites also take part in this ecumenical effort especially with the activities and writings of Fr. Enrico Sironi. It was from him that I heard for the first time of Fr. Cesare Tondini and Fr. Augustin Šuvalov as the prime promoters of a movement in favor of the unity between the Roman Catholic and the Russian Orthodox Churches. We look back to September 8, 1855 when these two men—Cesare Tondini and Šuvalov—began their novitiate in Monza, Italy. During this year as novices, they offered prayers for the conversion of Russia to Catholicism and promised to continue offering prayers for Russia throughout their life. They had the same dedication to offer their lives for the conversion of Russia, but they had different life stories. Fr. Tondini was very young when he joined the Barnabites at 17 years of age, while Fr. Šuvalov was already 57 years old when he knocked at the door of the Congregation. This big difference in age did not hinder their agreement and their dedication for the conversion of Russia. Gregory (this was his given name) Šuvalov was a Russian Orthodox Count. After the death of his wife, on January 6, 1843 at the age of 55 he converted to Catholicism. His conversion was not a passing whim, but a very profound change in his life. After his conversion, he wrote a wonderful reflection: “Holy Church of Jesus Christ, temple of true God and arch of holiness… I am convinced

Fr. Šuvalov that only in your Church, O Lord, it is possible to achieve perfection. You alone are Holy… in you alone I can achieve sanctity.” Two years after professing his Catholic faith, Count Šuvalov made another difficult decision in his life: he entered religious life choosing the Barnabites as his new family. As a novice, he undertook to say a prayer every day for the conversion of Russia. On the day of his ordination this desire was present in his heart and upon elevating the chalice he offered a prayer of petition to the Lord: “My God, make me worthy to offer my life and my blood to Your blood for the glorification of the Blessed Virgin Mary in

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the conversion of Russia.” After his ordination Fr. Šuvalov lived only few years: he died in Paris in 1859. On his tomb was written an epitaph that reads: “Russia shall be converted to Catholicism”. This was the only desire of Fr. Šuvalov after his conversion, to witness the power of God and see his native land to come back to the Catholic Church. Cesare Tondini was a companion of Šuvalov as a novice in Monza. In a sense, he influenced the decision of Šuvalov to enter the Barnabite Order. Fr. Augustin testified: “In one of the holy masses, it so happened that I was seated beside a very young man, 17 years old, who was planning to enter the Congregation of the Barnabites. At that very instant, after receiving the Body of our Lord, this thought came into my mind: this only son left every thing, his family, his wealth and his future… instead I, at 57, have no courage to do so…” During their novitiate they became good friends so that Šuvalov could pass on his passion for the conversion of his country to his young companion. Subsequently, Fr. Tondini promised on the tomb of Fr. Šuvalov to continue his work. In order to accomplish his promise, he founded an

association or prayer, approved by Pope Pius IX in 1862. It was not the only achievement of Fr. Tondini: in Russia, in a convent with 200 nuns, he introduced a weekly mass with the litany in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary for the conversion of Russia and the unity of the Church. In order to intensify his work, Fr. Tondini formulated a program to follow for the promotion of Christian unity in Russia: besides praying, to eliminate any kind of obstacles by distinguishing well in the Church the divine element and the human one; to declare exactly some truths rejected by the Orthodox Church, and to use charity. He implemented this program especially through his frequent travels. He went to different countries in every part of Europe. Wherever he went, his desire remained the conversion of Russia.

daily recited by Frs. Šuvalov and Tondini O Mary, Immaculate Virgin, we Thy servants and children of the Holy Roman Catholic Church, full of confidence in Thy powerful patronage, humbly beseech Thee to implore of the Divine Spirit, in honour and glory of His eternal procession from the Father and the Son, the abundance of His gifts in favour of our astray brethren, the Greeks schismatic; that, illumined by His life-giving grace, they may return to the bosom of the Catholic Church, under the infallible guidance of her first Shepherd and Master, the Supreme Roman Pontiff; and so, sincerely reunited with us by the indissoluble bonds of the same faith and of the same charity, they may glorify along with us, by practising good works, the Most August Trinity, and honour at the same time Thee, O Virgin Mother of God, full of grace, now and for ever. Amen.

PRAYER TO MARY IMMACULATE

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ANTONIO ROSMINI BEATIFIED
by Giovanni Scalese, CRSP On November 18, 2007 the Venerable Servant of God Antonio Rosmini-Serbati will be beatified at Novara, Italy by Card. José Saraiva Martins, Prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, on behalf of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI. Why do we mention this event? How many holy men and women are being beatified or canonized these years? Rosmini is not a Barnabite; so, why on earth to emphasize his beatification? Simply because it is a historic event, not only for the Rosminians (the religious founded by the new Blessed), but for the whole Church and, in a special way, for the Barnabites, who were considered and really were “Rosminians,” and for this reason had to bear many a persecution. First of all, it can be useful to recall who Antonio Rosmini was. His figure might not be so familiar in the Philippines, where the religious families founded by him (the Institute of Charity and the Sisters of Providence) are not present. He was an Italian priest, born at Rovereto, Trent (a region at that time under Austrian rule) in 1797. He studied at the University of Padua, where he got a Doctorate in Theology and Canon Law. He was ordained a priest in 1821. In 1823 he went to Rome, where he was encouraged by Pope Pius VII to undertake the reform of philosophy. So he spent the following years in the study of this subject, especially focusing upon St. Thomas Aquinas. In 1828, while secluded on “Mount Calvary” near Domodossola, Piedmont, he laid the foundations for the Institute of Charity. That same year he went back to Rome, where the Popes—first Leo XII and then Pius VIII—knowing his talent, encouraged him to continue his philosophical studies. The latter told him: “God wills that you attend to write books: that’s your vocation! You handle very well logic; and the Church at present needs writers able of commanding respect. In order to influence people, no other means is left today but handling them by reason and through it lead them to religion. Depend upon it you can benefit your neighbour much more writing than performing any other work of the sacred ministry.” In 1830 he published his first great philosophical work—New Essay on the Origin of Ideas— wherein he presented a new “ideology” that, although well-founded in the great philosophers of the past, moved away from the traditional Aristotelian theory of knowledge: in order to know, the images coming from senses are not enough; there is need of a “light” innate in the human intellect— and for this reason somehow “divine”—the “idea of being” or “ideal being.” In 1832 he founded

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the Congregation of Sisters of Providence; while in 1838 the Institute of Charity was approved by Gregory XVI. In the following year, after the publication of Treatise of Moral Conscience, a controversy was aroused by the Jesuits. To stop the dispute, in 1843 the Pope imposed silence on both parties. In 1848 the Piedmontese Government sent Rosmini to Rome as plenipotentiary to Pius IX. The Pope welcomed him kindly and announced to him the cardinal’s scarlet; but, before the consistory, he was forced by the Roman revolution to flee to Gaeta, asking Rosmini to accompany him. In bad odour with the papal entourage and the Bourbon government, he left Gaeta for Stresa, Piedmont. In 1849 two little works of his— The Five Wounds of the Holy Church and The Civil Constitution according to Social Justice—were put on the Index. Because of the ever increasing charges, the Pope ordered a thorough examination of all Rosmini’s works. The decision was rendered in 1854: all the works were to be dismissed (“dimittantur”), because they did not contain anything worthy of censure. So Rosmini was able to die serenely on July 1, 1855 at Stresa. But attacks continued even after his death: in 1887 the Holy Office issued the decree Post Obitum, whereby forty Rosminian propositions, mostly taken from some posthumous works, were condemned inasmuch as they did not appear to be in harmony with Catholic truth. What have the Barnabites to do with Rosmini? There are various connections between them. First and foremost, Rosmini studying philosophy ran into some Barnabite authors, among whom the great philosopher Card. Hyacinthe-Sigismond Gerdil (1718-1802). Secondly, Rosmini had numerous personal contacts with the Barnabites: in 1826, during his first stay in Milan, he frequented the church of Sant’Alessandro and chose a Barnabite as confessor. In 1836 he was a guest of the Barnabites at Turin for two months. In 1848 he was lodged at Sant’Alessandro, Milan for three weeks. Even the correspondence between Rosmini and the Barnabites was frequent: we keep thirteen letters written to seven Barnabites.

Fr. A. M. Villoresi Several Barnabites can be considered “Rosminians,” as admirers of the Philosopher and supporters of his doctrines. The most important is Father Aloysius Maria Villoresi (1814-1883), who in 1841 was a guest of Rosmini at Rovereto for a month and then kept in touch with him by letter. He founded at Monza, Milan a seminary for poor young men, where he also taught philosophy according to the Rosminian system. For this he became the victim of several attacks to the extent of being forced to retire from teaching. Father Alexander Piantoni (1811-1892) also corresponded with Rosmini and met him in Milan, during one of his stays. He rushed to his bedside at Stresa at the end of June, 1855: on June 30 he asked him for a remembrance; and the dying Philosopher

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answered: “There is need of only one thing: may God be ever present to us.” Rosmini died on the following night; so we can consider those words as his precious legacy to the Barnabites. Father Michelangelo Manzi (1809-1898) also met Rosmini three times and considered himself a close friend of his. He taught at Lodi and Milan. In 1890 he was accused of maintaining “erroneous and scandalous propositions about the Rosminian doctrines condemned by the Holy See.” Father Caesar Tondini de’ Quarenghi (18391907) never met Rosmini: when this one died, he was just 16; but at that time he was a student at the Barnabite College in Milan, where Father Piantoni was Rector. He became one of the most convinced supporters of the Rosminian philosophy. He once wrote: “Rosmini’s philosophical writings are for the Church a treasure not inferior to the writings of St. Thomas.” Other Barnabites, though non-Rosminian, had to do with Rosmini. For instance, Father Charles Vercellone (1814-1869), a great biblical scholar, visited Rosmini at Stresa in 1851 and, as a consultor of the Congregation of the Index, had to examine a booklet published against him. When, in 1880, the encyclical Aeterni Patris, whereby Leo XIII promoted the restoration of Thomism in the ecclesiastical studies, was published, the Order immediately declared its public and full support; nonetheless, the Pope ordered the transfer of the philosophical scholasticate from Milan to Rome, where the Barnabite students would have attended classes of Thomistic philosophy (among the first students there was the future Father Giovanni Semeria). After the publication of the decree Post Obitum, the Barnabites were denounced as supporters of Rosminianism. For this, in 1889 the Holy See suspended the celebration of the General Chapter and appointed by authority the new superiors of the Order (the previous ones were considered too feeble). Moreover, some Barnabites under suspicion of being “Rosminians” were removed from their positions. How come this spontaneous reciprocal attraction between Rosmini and the Barnabites? Maybe because both of them had in view the same purpose: the restoration of philosophy. Rosmini had

received this mission from the Popes; thus he interpreted it: “If philosophy is to be restored to love and respect, I think it will be necessary, in part, to return to the teachings of the ancients, and in part to give those teachings the benefit of modern methods.” For their part, the Barnabites felt themselves heirs of Card. Gerdil, who had been a leading exponent of Christian philosophy in 18th century. As soon as they knew Rosmini, recognized in him the man chosen by Providence to renew philosophy and became his enthusiastic followers. For this choice they incurred, as we have seen, misunderstanding, suspicion and open attacks. This prolonged hostility, along with the subsequent sentences brought about by charges of Modernism, eventually forced the Barnabites to abandon their loved philosophical and theological studies. Now the Church has taken her first step: she has acknowledged Rosmini’s holiness. The Barnabites have always been convinced of that (witnesses on this subject are countless) and cannot but rejoice. But they hope that sooner or later the Church may acknowledge also his intellectual greatness. Even though the attitude toward Rosmini these past years has changed, certain mistrust persists (suffice it to read what John Paul II wrote in his encyclical Fides et Ratio). But the Barnabites fervently hope that the prophecy of their confrere Father Tondini may be soon fulfilled: “God himself will see to reveal what ends he pursued, by supplying in good time the Church with so wonderful a philosophical catholic encyclopaedia, such as Rosmini’s writings.”

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all about love!
by Thomas Federick S. Tabada, CRSP
“Love is the only virtue that counts. All other virtues do not count at all without love.” This statement is from the fourth sermon of St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria. The statement above connotes love as the law of God. Love is God’s law because it is His Being, His Essence, His Perfection, His Eternity and Infinity. Therefore all being participates in love for the reason that there can be nothing that does not come from God. To love that which no one else can participate in is to love what is separated from God, that is to love death. Pride and “self-love” (i.e. to seek only one’s own interests) are the love of death. It is because these turn away from God in whom is all Being. Thomas a Kempis rightly puts it: “For he who loves his own good or loves it more than anything else, is guilty of living this good unchastely, since he loves it for his own sake, and not for God.” This attitude is considerably an imperfect love. The imperfect love ends in something not for itself. It is restricted and bounded by fear and self-love; thus it is not free. As a consequence, it is short of charity. Charity, on the other hand, is perfectly free for it is not determined by anything outside of itself. It is not drawn by any necessary attraction towards the satisfaction of anything less than itself or conflicting with or of itself. Therefore, charity is love in itself. Love is an end in itself translated into charity whose subject is the well-being of the neighbor. It is clearly indicated in Jesus’ words: “Jesus said… You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the great and first commandment. And the second is like it, You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” It is only in charity then that love is spontaneous and free from determination or necessity. Hence the notion of charity correlates with liberty and freedom of man. Man is free in the sense that there is no one who determines his choices but himself. He is free to resist God and not to love Him; he is also free to love Him and his neighbor. Thomas Merton is right in saying that: “One man might (love) God because He is powerful and another might (love) Him because He is good to him and still another might (love) him because He is simply Good.” Merton explains: “The first is a slave, who is afraid for himself. The second is a hired hand, who seeks his won gain, third is a son, who honors his father. And so, the one who fears and the one who desires both seek their own good. Genuine love is only found in the son and this love is that which does not seek its own good.” Furthermore, St. Paul beautifully describes this genuine love: “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking. It is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil, but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. Love never fails” (1 Cor 13:4-8). Therefore the pure law of God is Love which does not seek its own usefulness but rather what is good for the many. Thus, St. Anthony is correct in saying that love is the highest virtue that supersedes all other virtues, for it is the law of God.

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by Jecker R. Luego, CRSP

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Teaching teaches the teacher
Teaching  is  a  challenging  yet  a  very  fulfilling  ca‐ reer.  Here  in  the  Philippines,  one  may  not  have  the  luxury  of  a  high  salary,  but  has  a  satisfaction  that  cannot  be  paid  by  any  amount.  Money  is  nothing,  once a teacher is wholeheartedly dedicated to teach‐ ing. Teaching students is itself a payment for such a  wonderful service to others. The learning of the stu‐ dents is the bonus that comes with it. Hence, teach‐ ing is compensation in itself.   Many  people  think  that  teaching  is  a  one‐sided  learning in favor of the students. A teacher is seen as  someone  who  delivers  knowledge  to  students  with‐ out benefiting anything. One would be just a delivery  person who hands to his customers, in this case the  students, the product (knowledge) with an assurance  that  an  equivalent  amount  of  payment  (salary)  will  be received. Meaning, there is no such personal rela‐ tionship but all material one. Some teachers of today  are  there  in  order  to  gain  money  and  to  be  able  to  live the tough financial life of the present times.  Yet still many teachers are willing to give their all  without counting the cost and the amount that they  are  going  to  receive.  What  matters  most  to  them  is  the  success  of  each  and  every  student  that  they  have.  They  are  ready  to  sacrifice  everything  for  the  sake  of  their  students/pupils.  One  example  of  such  teachers is a mathematics professor whom I person‐ ally  knew  in  the  university  where  I  taught  this  last  semester.  He  rejected  the  temptation  to  go  abroad  for the sake of teaching the local students. He shared  that he had already the chance to leave abroad with  a  promising  salary.  In  spite  of  the  high  salary,  he  opted to stay at home and teach here. Although his  wife has already gone ahead of him, he remained at  home  because  he  believes  that  teaching  is  a  very  much compensating job. The satisfaction that he gets  in  teaching  is  something  that  cannot  be  paid  by  money.  More so, teaching is something that one can also  learn from. It is not merely the students who do the  learning but the same teacher. Teachers themselves  get  the  benefit  of  learning.  As  teachers  teach  a  cer‐ tain  subject,  they  perfect  their  knowledge  on  such  subject.  In  terms  of  personal  relationship,  the  teacher learns to appreciate and understand others.  The  different  and  diverse  students  are  the  best  tool  in learning  human relationships better if a person is  only  wise  in  dealing  with  them.  One  can  learn  the  virtue of patience. With the obstinate and rowdy stu‐ dents, patience is the best tool that a teacher should  have and must learn. Many things can be learned in  teaching. But here I would like to mention just a few  that I really see as something important for me.  I  got  the  taste  of  what  is  it  to  teach  in  this  past  semester at the De La Salle University – Dasmariñas.  At first, I thought I could not finish the semester be‐ cause  I  went  through  a  shock  at  the  first  month  of  my job. I had five sections of first year students. They  were so hard to handle with since they were still ad‐ justing with the life in college. They were still in their  transition  period  from  their  high  school  mindset  to  that  of  college  students.  However,  what  I  noticed  was that as the days went on, I came to understand  more clearly  what I was teaching to them. I learned  new things and techniques which I had never learned  in  my  studies  of  mathematics.  Moreover,  teaching  first year students  tried  my patience. I almost failed  on this matter, but as the days passed, I came to un‐ derstand  them  and  learned  to  deal  with  them  with  compassion and sympathy. Despite of some negative  experience that I had in teaching them, I felt satisfied  within  me  for  once  in  their  lives  I  touched  their  hearts.  In  addition,  I  realized  that  no  matter  how  hard the life of a teacher might be, there is only one  important  thing  that  can  be  learned:  teaching  teaches the teacher.  Indeed,  teaching  is  challenging  but  the  fact  that it is fulfilling cannot be discarded. Sometimes  it breaks one down, but most of the time it gives a  person  joy.  It  may  be  difficult  to  teach,  but  the  difficulties  are  nothing  compared  to  the  satisfac‐ tion  a  teacher  may  have  in  teaching.  It  is  not  merely  teaching  students  but  also  oneself.  It  is  not  simply  a  learning  that  pertains  to  students,  but  also  to  teachers  themselves.  Teaching  is  a  teacher in its very nature. 

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Tahanang Mapag-aruga ni Padre Semeria

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changing of the guard
by Joseph M. Bernales, CRSP The “Tahanang Mapag-aruga ni Padre Semeria” was founded, on the initiative of Rev. Fr. Robert Kosek, CRSP, on February 18, 2005. He was assisted by Br. Arvin Dagalea, CRSP and other students of the St. Paul Scholasticate community. After having been scheduled to go to Italy, Br. Arvin with the approval of the Superior appointed new persons in charge for the foundation. Br. Thomas Tabada, CRSP was appointed as the principal of the kindergarten and Br. Joseph Bernales, CRSP, a newly professed student, was appointed as the one with overall responsibility for the Tahanan. Despite of being neophytes for this kind of work, they have made it to manage the Tahanan in the best of their ability. Before assuming their new responsibilities, they saw to it that all children were up-to-date with the rules and regulations of the Tahanan. To complete the team in the Tahanan, four more brothers were selected by the community to teach the kindergarten pupils. For Catechism, Br. Clyd Autentico, CRSP and Br. Jonathan Ramoso, CRSP; for Mathematics, Br. Rosauro Valmores, CRSP and Br. Jay Patulin, CRSP, both newly professed brothers. The major subject, that is Reading and Writing in English, is handled by Br. Joseph with the assistance of Br. Thomas. The Director of the Tahanan is our own Superior, Rev. Fr. John Scalese, CRSP. This year there are fifteen youngsters enrolled in the kindergarten program, eighteen scholars enrolled in the Elementary Level, eight High School students and six College students. All these scholars are supported by the Tahanan financially and materially. School supplies were distributed to them at the beginning of the school year. The start of the school year was marked by the blessing and distribution of the school supplies and the presentation of the new persons in charge of the Tahanan. The blessing and distribution was attended by Fr. John with the brothers of the St. Paul Scholasticate, and by the scholars with their parents. The Tahanan is concerned with the full human well being of every child/student. Therefore we have undergone different activities to enhance their spiritual, physical, affective and cognitive aspects. The kindergarten youngsters have undergone a medical, physical and dental check up (the rest of the scholars have their own physical examination in their respective schools). To enhance their spiritual life we encourage them to attend regularly Sunday Masses and Recollections scheduled in the calendar. A Mass card has to be signed by the priest. To ensure that the students/pupils are working well with their studies, we require a certain cut-off average grade for them to remain as bona fide members of the Tahanan Scholarship. In order to develop social capacities and to boost their morale we include in our program sports and academic competitions—these are inserted in the different activities scheduled in our school calendar. As compensation and a way of gratitude, parents and the scholars volunteered to clean the
Buwan ng Wikang Filipino: the children...

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Seminary garden every month. They also help in the kitchen when we need assistance during feasts, ordinations and professions. These parents and their children live a very simple life; so they find pleasant to weed and clean our surroundings. Sometimes they receive simple gifts from generous people through the Tahanan; this however is not the cause of their active participation. Their help is the fruit of their sense of community, as they mingle with other members of the Tahanan. Last June 12, 2007, the Philippines celebrated Independence Day. The Tahanan made a small celebration in order to instill a sense of sound nationalism in the mind of the youngsters. The National flag was carried over by the parents and we made a small parade along the street of Purok 163, San Jose, Tagaytay City. The children participated with enthusiasm and excitement. August was the Buwan ng Wikang Filipino (“Month of Filipino Language”); unfortunately, because of the different schedules and the weather, we were not able to hold our celebration on that month. We made it at the first of September. The celebration was participated by all scholars, their parents, and their siblings. The program was highlighted with different folk dances, folk songs, and declamation numbers. Indigenous games followed, and we culminated with a simple snack shared in a joyful and festive spirit. In the following months we still have many other celebrations to do such as: the English Month, Christmas Party, Foundation Day, and the Recognition Day. Our program in the Tahanan is extended to the parents; therefore we held a cooking activity last September 28, 2007 in order to teach mothers how to cook some delicacies from the different regions of the Philippines. Another activity is art making. We have started to fossilize leaves to be used for our Christmas Cards. Hopefully, these activities will enhance the children’s talents and capabilities. Seeing all the members of the Tahanan makes me realize how beautiful life is. These simple people who generously share their smiles to us make me think that truly in this life wealth is not

… and their mothers

the reason of happiness, because, despite of their poverty, they know how to be grateful and how to be happy. I see in them true faith in God. When they experience sadness and troubles, they manifest their faith by clinging unto God. Many of them shed their tears in front of me, but I can see in them, as tears flow from their eyes, a glittering hope inside their hearts. Serving this kind of people is truly a gift, for it is not only them who gain from the meager amount of help we extended to them, but above all we learn countless lessons in life from them. They are our brothers and sisters, not beneficiaries of Tahanan. Thanks be to God for this wonderful experience and His continuous blessing to make the Tahanan apostolate possible. We are also grateful to the people who in one way or another are continually supporting the Tahanan apostolate. To all of you we are so thankful and we pray that you may receive many blessings that you may also continue to support us. Let us make things happen, like the one we have in Tahanan. It will be possible if you will support us financially or in kind. To all those who want to share something with our poor brothers and sisters, we will be happy to accept your donations. Please address to the Superior of the Barnabite Community in Tagaytay, whatever transaction you want to make with regard to this matter. Thank you and God bless. Mabuhay!

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The Poets’ Corner

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show me the way
by Yohanes Besi Koten, CRSP

I am at a crossroads I don’t know where to go I don’t know what to do I don’t know how to walk I don’t know when to resume my journey I am at a crossroads I am standing there alone I am looking into space I am feeling so lost I am feeling so perplexed I am at a crossroads In the obscurity of a long night In the solitude of the sky In the broken voices of wild animals In the rhythm of the wind’s wave Is my life at a crossroads I went astray I lost my way I feel I’m loosing everything I am so distraught

I call you, Lord, come… In helping me with my distress In beaming at me in my darkness In walking with me in my loneliness In showing me the way I should walk I call you, Lord, come… In raising me from my falls In filling me with confidence In guarding me from the wrong track In keeping me alive I call you, Lord, come… In healing me of my wounds In supporting me in my uncertainties In knowing me as I am In binding me to yourself I am at a crossroads I lost my way I call you, Lord, come… In showing me the way In saving me from disarray

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Preparing for Solemn Profession
by Jose Nazareno S. Gabato, CRSP
It is part of the Scholasticate’s program to send seminarians to Italy after the second year of their theological studies to prepare them for their solemn profession. This year Arvin and I are going there to get ready for our final vows. The preparation will last around three months (from February to April). It will be an intensive course about the Barnabite spirituality, history and the five-century-old tradition of our Order. We are sent ahead of other scholastics coming from other countries (especially from Latin America and Africa), since we still have to study the Italian language, which will be the medium of instruction for the entire span of the preparation. I cannot deny that, whenever I think of my pre-solemn profession, I feel anxious. “Anxiety” is the appropriate word to express my present frame of mind. The Random House College Dictionary’s definition of “anxiety” perfectly captures the feelings that I am experiencing right now. First is the feeling of solicitous desire; eagerness. Second, the feeling of distressed and uneasiness caused by danger… Whenever I think of my pre-solemn profession I feel anxious! It is not because I am not ready for my solemn profession. No! I’m quite ready! I have a deep desire to profess not only for a year but for the rest of my life. I am excited about it. Besides, I have the eagerness to go and visit other places. It would be a new experience; perhaps a completely new world. I’m excited to experience new customs and cultures: it will probably broaden my horizons regarding how to deal with different people coming from different walks of life. BUT! But there is a big “BUT”! But there is another anguish that runs through my veins whenever I think of my pre-solemn profession. First, I have tried to deny this feeling over and over again. Sometimes I tried to hide it. Unfortunately, there is no way out. It came to the point that I could not run and there is no way to hide. I have to accept that I am afraid! It is the anguish that hunts me whenever I think of my pre-solemn profession. It has always been my nightmare. I am afraid! It will be the first time that I go abroad. I do not have any first-hand experience to live in a different country, where people speak a different language. It will be the first time that I live with people who have a different way of behaving. If I am ex-

cited to experience a new world, nevertheless I am afraid too. I don’t have any idea how to mingle with other people, who live in the “first world.” Besides, I have to get used not only to the customs and culture of Italians, but also to those of my confreres coming from other parts of the world: Brazilians, Chileans, Africans... I’m anguished how to deal with these people. Nonetheless, I know and ever trust that the almighty and loving God will never forsake us. I know that, in spite of our differences, we can still be united. Our differences complete the portrayal of God’s being. I’m very optimistic that it will be a lovely experience. An experience of different cultures merged into one. It will be a new learning not only about the spirituality, history and tradition of our Order, but also on how the spirit of the Congregation takes root in different cultures. Yes, we have different cultures and customs but we have the same spirit, the spirit of our founder St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria and of the one who inspired him, St. Paul.

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NEWS, EVENTS, AT IBA PA…
The 5th of July
“The saints have been traditionally honored in the Church and their authentic relics and images held in veneration. For the feasts of the saints proclaim the wonderful works of Christ in His servants, and display to the faithful fitting examples for their imitation” (SC 111). The Roman Catholic Church celebrates on the 5th of July the optional memorial of a saint who was a forerunner of the Catholic reformation in the first half of the 16th century. St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria was born at the end of 1502, during the rapid evolution of politicalmilitary situation in Cremona in Lombardy, Italy. He was not only a reformer, but also the founder of two religious families, namely the Clerics Regular of St. Paul (Barnabite Fathers), and the Angelic Sisters of St. Paul. For these two Congregations, of course, the 5th of July is not just a memorial, but a solemnity. This year’s July 5 marked the 468th death anniversary of St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria, a saint whose unfading voice of fervor still continues to touch and move the life of his sons and daughters, as well as the life of the faithful who are in quest of holiness. Throughout the globe, Zaccarian communities commemorated with great exultation the solemnity of their holy founder. Eucharistic celebrations and lively activities echoed as an honor and homage to a great and revered founder. The solemnity of the 468th death anniversary of St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria called to mind, once more, the life and the worth dying spirituality of our holy founder, who labored with zealous and reforming energy for the sanctification of souls and the renewal of Christian fervor. As a homage and tribute to the solemnity of our holy founder, the St. Paul Scholasticate community in Tagaytay City, joined with jubilation the entire Zaccarian family across the world through a Eucharistic celebration and a fraternal agape. Fr. Giovanni M. Scalese, CRSP the delegate superior of the Barnabite communities in the Philippines was the main celebrant of the mass. Priests from different religious communities stationed in Tagaytay City concelebrated. Among those who also took part in the solemnity mass were sisters and seminarians from different congregations and houses of formation, lay people and friends. During the mass, Fr. Scalese shared to the faithful the moral decadence at the beginning of 16th century, which aroused St. Anthony’s burning and unquenchable desire of curing the spiritual tepidity lurking within the Church’s ranks. Fr. Scalese also pointed-out in his homily the founder’s fervent desire of leading the sick souls back to the loving arms of the Father through seeking the pure honor of Christ, the pure service of neighbor, and pure self-contempt, which rejoices in being despised. The Eucharistic celebration in honor of our dear founder was indeed a homage to him and, most of all, it was a thanksgiving to God, who in His own way inflamed his heart (Rosauro A. Valmores, CRSP)

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T2, the winning team of the DWSTSA Days

DWSTSA Days
Last August 24-25, 2007 the student body of the Divine Word School of Theology held the sports league for all the students to flaunt their talents in different sports activities and to give a sort of lull after the tedious days of the Midterm exams. This sports activity was initiated by a parade around the campus with the glittering uniforms of each year level and with the loud cheer of each group just to show their readiness and excitement for that particular event. The parade was followed by the opening speech of our beloved dean of studies, Fr. Mike Layugan, SVD, the burning of torch and then the thundering cheering contest among the different groups. After the cheering contest, every group was very busy preparing for their respective games both indoor and outdoor. After the games, all were invited and gathered together for the lunch just to mark a sign of togetherness. On the second day of the event, all games were intended for the championship showdown in different games. The students were so occupied between the toughest battle of T1 and T2 in basketball and volleyball game. In fact, the supporters of every group were totally on the verge of quarreling because of the close fight in both games. You could hear the shouts, danc-

ing, heckling and the annoying sound of drums. Students in both teams overcrowded the court to support their team. Unluckily, the T2’s were ripped by the T1’s in both events. The exhilarating championship games were followed by the awarding ceremony and by a lunch for everybody, to signify the unity of all teams. The overall champion was T2, followed by T1 for the first runner-up, T3 for the second runner-up and, the last but not the least, our beloved T4 got the third runner-up. Lastly, the two days sports tournament was concluded by an inspiring speech of the president of the Divine Word School of Theology Student Association, Brother Dennis Nacorda, MSP. His speech dwelt on camaraderie, sportsmanship, togetherness and on the necessity of putting one’s own abilities and talents at the service of others (Jay L. Patulin, CRSP).

“Come and stay with us”
During the past months we were honored with the visits of two important confreres from Rome: Fr. Franco Ciccimarra, Assistant General, and Fr. Giuseppe Cagnetta, Treasurer General. Fr. Ciccimarra arrived on August 6, 2007 at Tagaytay. He stayed with us for a week. During his stay he visited also our school, the Divine Word Seminary, since he is also the Dean of the Theology Faculty of the Pontifical Urban University, to which the Divine Word School of Theology is affiliated. In the following days he went to Marikina, where he had the possibility to visit our Seminary and the Parish of St. Anthony Ma. Zaccaria at Silangan, San Mateo, Rizal. On August 21 he presided at Marikina a meeting with all the Fathers of the Delegation. On August 26 he came back to Tagaytay for the diaconal ordination of Roan and Ferdinand. On the following day he left for Rome.

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Fr. Ciccimarra during the 8/26 diaconal ordination

Fr. Cagnetta arrived at St. Paul Scholasticate on September 4, 2007. He stayed with us just few days. He also went to St. Anthony Ma. Zaccaria Seminary in Marikina for a meeting with the Superiors and Treasurers of the Delegation. He went back to Rome on September 10. Thank you Fathers for visiting us. We are so glad and happy for your visits. Moreover, you are not like visitors to whom it is usually said, “Thank you and come again!” You are like the two disciples who went with Jesus to Emmaus. Here, we welcome you and say, “Come and stay with us.” You are always welcome. May God bless you and your service (Yohanes Besi Koten, CRSP).

7 pm the recitation of the Rosary, followed by the celebration of the Mass and the procession with the statue of the Blessed Virgin. At about 6 pm a spontaneous procession of faithful coming from the barangay chapel of San Jose already arrived at the Scholasticate. When we started Rosary, the Sagrado Corazon chapel was not able to contain so many people, mostly poor and children (the favorites of the Lord!). Between the mysteries Marian songs, performed by the scholastics, were inserted. The Mass was presided by the Superior, Fr. Giovanni Scalese, and concelebrated by the other priests of the community, Fr. Cirilo Coniendo and Fr. Jecker Luego. At the end of the Mass, a procession auf flambeaux (= with torches) wound through the paths of our compound to bring back the statue of Our Lady of Fatima to her shrine, while singing In Fatima’s Cove (Fatima’s Ave Maria). The Marian celebration ended with the renewal of the act of consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Our chapel is no more sufficient for this kind of celebrations. Let us hope next year we will have a greater place to welcome the faithful. May the Blessed Virgin quicken the realization of the Philippine Santuario de Fatima. Meanwhile we continue reciting every Sunday afternoon the Rosary, for this intention and for all the intentions of our friends and benefactors.

Fatima celebrations
On October 13, 2007 the celebrations in honor of Our Lady of Fatima in the 90th anniversary of the apparitions ended. For six months, from May to October, every 13th of the month, we recited the Rosary with the faithful. There was always a good attendance. After the Rosary the apparition of that month was narrated. Surprising was the massive participation on Saturday, October 13. It had been scheduled at

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From other Communities
The new rector of St. Anthony Ma. Zaccaria Seminary in Marikina, Fr. Joselito Ortega, went to North America on June 13 this year to raise funds for the Seminary. He stayed in the different Barnabite communities, mostly in Lewiston, New York, and celebrated masses and preached in some US and Canadian parishes, in the context of the “Mission Cooperative Plan.” After a few months of staying there, he came back to the Philippines on August 15, 2007. Fr. Michael Sandalo, who was assigned in Tagaytay last year and spent this year’s first semester in Marikina as a disciplinarian of the seminarians, on October 2, 2007 left the Philippines to continue his studies in Rome for his licentiate in Moral Theology at the Angelicum University. After a long treatment for his wounded legs in New York, Fr. Michael Mancusi returned to the Philippines on September 22, 2007. With the beginning of the second semester he will be transferred to Tagaytay in order to teach Catechesis and Spirituality at the Divine Word School of Theology. Fr. Rudyson Nulo has been appointed Vocation Director of the Delegation. As such, he is in charge of the vocation campaign, which is usually held during the semestral break with the help of other priests and seminarians. They will go to different schools in their respective provinces to get some candidates willing to enter the seminary next school year. Fr. Richard Genetiano, Fr. Joselito Santos and Fr. Crisendo Dela Rosa are still assigned in St. Anthony Ma. Zaccaria Parish in Silangan, San Mateo, Rizal. Fr. Aldo Rizzi is still the novice master assisted by Fr. Jimmy Anastacio. Lastly Fr. Verano Ladra is still holding the task of treasurer in Marikina Seminary.

Saint Paul Scholasticate Newsletter
THE CLERICS REGULAR OF SAINT PAUL — BARNABITES —

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Saint Paul Scholasticate

Purok 163, San Jose Tagaytay City, Cavite, the Philippines Mailing Address: P. O. Box 32, 4120 Tagaytay City, Philippines Tel. & Fax: +63 46 413-2837 Email: stpaul@catholic.org Director: Fr. Giovanni Scalese, CRSP Editorial Staff: Fr. Cirilo B. Coniendo, Fr Jecker R. Luego, Rev. Ferdinand S. Dagcota, Rev. Roan Cipriano J. Aborque, Jose Nazareno S. Gabato, Marlon B. Ramirez, Yohanes Besi Koten, Clyd S. Autentico, Pat M. Golis, Jonathan G. Ramoso, Thomas Federick S. Tabada, Isfridus Syukur, Rosauro A. Valmores, Joseph M. Bernales, Jay L. Patulin Typeset in the Philippines by Saint Paul Scholasticate, November 2007

Quis nos separabit a caritate Christi? An gladius?