Teacher’s Manual

Includes Blackline Masters for Test Practice

B

Published by Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, of McGraw-Hill Education, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., Two Penn Plaza, New York, New York 10121. Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. The contents, or parts thereof, may be reproduced in print form for non-profit educational use with Treasures, provided such reproductions bear copyright notice, but may not be reproduced in any form for any other purpose without the prior written consent of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., including, but not limited to, network storage or transmission, or broadcast for distance learning. Printed in the United States of America 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 HES 13 12 11 10 09

Contents
Pacing Suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v How to Use Time For Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi ISSUE 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Retell Photographs and Captions Context Clues Pond Life Model the Skills Earth Helpers Apply the Skills Leave it to Beavers Diagrams ISSUE 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Main Idea and Details Maps Context Clues Getting over the Hump Model the Skills Not a Drop to Drink Apply the Skills Bubbles Poetry ISSUE 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Compare and Contrast Diagrams Context Clues A Ladybug’s Life Model the Skills Giving Time for the Common Good Apply the Skills The Caterpillar Poetry ISSUE 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Author’s Purpose Photographs and Captions Context Clues The Forest Roof Model the Skills Rain Forests: From Soup to Nuts Apply the Skills Life in the Rain Forest Diagrams ISSUE 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Main Idea and Details Diagrams Context Clues Digging for Bones Model the Skills Animals on the Move Apply the Skills Loose and Limber Poetry ISSUE 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Main Idea and Details Lists Context Clues Sharing with Others Model the Skills Thanks, Mom and Dad Apply the Skills Hamster Hide-and-Seek Poetry ISSUE 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Author’s Purpose Charts Context Clues Eat Well, Feel Well Model the Skills Orange You Glad? Apply the Skills Climb the Pyramid Diagrams

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ISSUE 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Main Idea and Details Maps Context Clues Wow! Wind Works! Model the Skills Blow, Wind, Blow! Apply the Skills Cloud Parade Poetry ISSUE 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Main Idea and Details Charts Context Clues Sunny Side Up Model the Skills Where Does the Water Go? Apply the Skills Sunflakes Poetry ISSUE 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Main Idea and Details Signs and Symbols Context Clues Whoo’s a Wonderful Bird? Model the Skills Food for Whoo? Apply the Skills Growing and Changing Charts ISSUE 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Author’s Purpose Charts Context Clues Prize Pets Model the Skills All for America! Apply the Skills Lady Liberty Diagrams

ISSUE 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 Retell Photographs and Captions Context Clues Money Goes Around Model the Skills How Money Is Made Apply the Skills U.S. Coins Charts ISSUE 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121 Compare and Contrast Diagrams Context Clues Things Change Model the Skills What a Trip! Apply the Skills The Space Shuttle Diagrams ISSUE 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131 Compare and Contrast Signs and Symbols Context Clues Wild About Museums Model the Skills A Basket Maker Apply the Skills Sarah Enters a Painting Poetry ISSUE 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141 Main Idea and Details Photographs and Captions Context Clues Get Ready, Get Set, Go! Model the Skills Play Ball! Apply the Skills From the autograph album Poetry Short-Answer Reading Rubric . . . . . . . . . . . . . .T1 Answer Key. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .T2

iv

Time For Kids

Pacing Suggestions
THREE-MONTH PACING SUGGESTION You might wish to use the Time for Kids, Student Edition as test preparation starting in the second half of the year. At this pace, each issue corresponds to one week of instruction in the Teacher’s Edition. Time for Kids, Student Edition Issue Issue 1 Issue 2 Issue 3 Issue 4 Issue 5 Issue 6 Issue 7 Issue 8 Issue 9 Issue 10 Issue 11 Issue 12 Issue 13 Issue 14 Issue 15 USING TIME FOR KIDS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR Each issue contains 2 articles and a poem or text feature. You might wish to use the Time for Kids, Student Edition throughout the year by assigning one article a week. The poem or text feature can be read with the second article. Related Teacher’s Edition Lesson Unit 4 Week 1 Unit 4 Week 2 Unit 4 Week 3 Unit 4 Week 4 Unit 4 Week 5 Unit 5 Week 1 Unit 5 Week 2 Unit 5 Week 3 Unit 5 Week 4 Unit 5 Week 5 Unit 6 Week 1 Unit 6 Week 2 Unit 6 Week 3 Unit 6 Week 4 Unit 6 Week 5

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How to Use Time for Kids
TIME FOR KIDS, STUDENT EDITION Each issue in Time for Kids, Student Edition includes two articles and a text feature, such as a chart or a diagram, or a poem. Each issue relates to Social Studies or Science skills. TRANSPARENCIES A transparency is provided for the first article in each issue. Use the transparency to model how to answer test questions. Questions are provided in Blackline Masters found in the Time for Kids Teacher’s Manual. TEACHER’S MANUAL The Teacher’s Manual contains lessons for each issue of Time for Kids. Article 1: Model the Skills Use the transparency and Blackline Master to model how to answer comprehension, vocabulary, and text feature questions. Read the questions and answers aloud to children. Article 2: Apply the Skills The Blackline Master for the second article offers children the opportunity to answer questions based on the same skills and strategies modeled with the first article. Read the questions and answers aloud to children. Text Feature or Poetry: Apply the Skills A third Blackline Master is provided for children to review previously taught skills and strategies. Read the questions and answers aloud to children.

vi

Time For Kids

COMPREHENSION AND VOCABULARY FOCUS As noted earlier, each issue of Time for Kids relates to Social Studies or Science skills. However, the items in the tests that accompany each issue focus on Reading and Language Arts skills and strategies for comprehension, vocabulary, and text features. SHORT-ANSWER PREPARATION The first two tests for each issue of Time for Kids provide opportunities for children to practice responding to shortanswer items. These items will help children to begin building the skills and confidence they will need when they are faced with short-answer items in a testing situation. LEVELS OF THINKING Test questions can be broken down into four developmentally sequenced categories, based on the different levels of thinking required to answer them.

• A question may have an answer that is stated in the selection.
At the most basic level, children can find or locate the answer in the selection. Words from the question and words that answer it are often “right there” in the same sentence. At the next level, the answers are stated in the text but cannot be found in a single sentence. Children must “think and search,” or combine different parts of the selection, to find the answer.

• A question may have an answer that is not stated in the
selection. For an “author and me” question at the third level of thinking, children must find clues and text evidence in the selection and connect them to find the inferred or implied answer to the question. A question that addresses the fourth level of thinking requires children to analyze the selection and make judgments based on text evidence to determine the author’s style or purpose for writing.

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TFK Pages 6–7

Retell
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 5 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs and captions. Tell children, We will learn how to retell the information from a text in order. Display Transparency pp. 6–7 of the article “Pond Life” and distribute Blackline Master 1. Ask children to turn to page 6 of Time for Kids. Ask children to look at the title and photographs before they read the article. Have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 When does a swan swim?
A B C

In the morning In the afternoon At night
From Blackline Master 1

Materials
Transparency pp. 6–7 Blackline Masters 1, 2, 3

Think Aloud This question asks when a swan swims. I can locate the answer in the selection. First I find the part of the article that tells about swans. Then I look for words that tell about times of day. I see a sentence that says: In the afternoon, a swan swims. This is the stated answer. Elicit the correct answer (B) from children. Explain that this choice, In the afternoon, is correct because the article says that a swan swims in the afternoon. Work through the rest of the answers and show that they are not correct. For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish to have children work together or independently to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 1.

Teacher’s Manual

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TFK Pages 6–7

Photographs and Captions
3 What animal stays up at night?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Raccoon Swan Heron

Explain to children that texts often are accompanied by photographs that can help them understand information from a reading. Sometimes there will be text that explains what is happening in the photograph. This kind of text is called a caption. Invite children to look at the photographs and describe what they see. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud This article has photographs of different animals. I should look for a picture of a raccoon, a swan, and a heron and make sure to read the information that goes with the photos. Then I can combine these details to figure out the stated answer. Have children look at the photographs and colored captions on pages 6 and 7. Point to the correct photograph and caption on the transparency and read the caption aloud with the class. Explain that the caption gives information about the animal. Then have children select the correct answer choice (A).

From Blackline Master 1

Context Clues
4 On page 7, the article says that a heron can trap a bug. What does trap mean?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Drink Run Catch

Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every single word in a text that they read. Explain that the context, or the other words and sentences in the paragraph, can help them figure out what unfamiliar words mean. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud The answer to this question is not stated in the article. To answer it, I will have to find clues in the article and connect them. I can start by finding the sentence that has the word trap in it. I will see if any words or sentences near it in the paragraph or anything in the picture can help me figure out what trap means. Invite children to explain what the text and the picture tell about how and why herons trap bugs. Go through each choice and have the class decide which answer makes the most sense in the context of the article (C).

From Blackline Master 1

2

Time For Kids • Issue 1

TFK Pages 6–7

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 Tell, in order, when you can find different animals at the pond. Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 1

Think Aloud The question asks me to tell when different animals are at the pond. I need to find details from the article that support the idea that different animals are at the pond at different times. I can combine these details to write the answer. Help children put their fingers on details from the article to answer the question, and have a volunteer underline these details on the transparency. Have children look for clues about time of day, such as morning and afternoon. Remind children that the answer should be based only on information from the article, not on something that they read or saw somewhere else. Tell children that they should answer in their own words and that they should not copy sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to form complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: Dragonflies are at the pond in the morning. Swans are there in the afternoon. Raccoons are there at night. See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T2 for answers to Blackline Master 1.

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Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Pond Life.” 1 When does a swan swim?
A B C

In the morning In the afternoon At night

2 In the morning, a dragonfly looks for —
A B C

plants lily pads bugs to eat

3 What animal stays up at night?
A B C

Raccoon Swan Heron
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 1

4

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Pond Life

Student Name

4 On page 7, the article says that a heron can trap a bug. What does trap mean?
A B C

Drink Run Catch

5 Tell, in order, when you can find different animals at the pond. Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 1

Grade 1 Pond Life

Time For Kids

5

TFK Pages 8–9

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on retelling, context clues, and using photographs and captions. Introduce “Earth Helpers” by having children open to page 8 of Time for Kids. Point out that the important ideas of an article can often be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the photographs, captions, and headings and then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to share their ideas and explain how they came to those conclusions. Record their ideas on the board. Tell children to keep these ideas in mind as they read to see if their ideas are correct. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 2 on pages 7-8 of the Teacher’s Manual. Tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at pictures, headings, and the title to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “Earth Helpers” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on the article. If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again. 4. Plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support from the article in your answer. 5. Make sure to write complete sentences. Have children complete Blackline Master 2. Answers can be found on pages T2–T3 of the Teacher’s Manual.

6

Time For Kids • Issue 1

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Earth Helpers.” 1 Look at the chart about “Earth Helpers.”
First Kids in green schools have lunch. Next Glass and plastic bottles are recycled. Last

Which idea belongs in the bottom box?
A B C

Bottles are made into kites. Bottles are thrown away in the trash. Bottles are made into new products.

2 Before the children go to the park, they —
A B
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

save money to help the school make kites from old plastic bags learn about animals in class

C

Blackline Master 2

Grade 1 Earth Helpers

Time For Kids

7

Student Name

3 Brett uses a plastic bag to make a —
A B C

kite bottle plant

4 The article says, “During class, they find ways to reuse things.” What does the word reuse mean?
A B C

Talk about Use again Throw away

5 What do children in a green school do to help Earth? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 2

8

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Earth Helpers

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 10

Diagrams
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children that they will practice what they learned about diagrams. Remind children that a diagram is a picture with labels. Labels give information about what is being shown in the picture. Have children open to “Leave It to Beavers” on page 10 of Time for Kids. Read the title “Leave It to Beavers” with children and ask them to look at the article. Then ask them to share their ideas on what the article is about. Write their ideas on the board. Invite children to look at the diagram of the dam. Ask children to think about how beavers build a dam. Ask what materials the beavers might use and how the beavers get the materials. Have children follow along with the text as you read it aloud. Ask them to identify any words they do not know. After you have finished reading, explain any unfamiliar words. Have children look at the diagram and discuss what the beavers do in each labeled part of the diagram. Explain that the den is a part of the lodge. Read aloud the question and answer choices. Tell children to look back at the diagram to find details and facts. Then they can combine this text evidence to determine the stated answer to the question. Think Aloud I need to remember that there is only one correct answer to the question. I should look for details and facts in the diagram that I can combine to come up with the correct answer. Remind children that they should look for the label on the diagram that says entrance to figure out where the entrance is. Tell them to read each answer choice carefully. After children have identified the correct answer (A), go back to the diagram. Ask a volunteer to show how the arrow from the label entrance is pointing below, or under, the water. Have children complete Blackline Master 3 on page 10 of the Teacher’s Manual. Answers can be found on page T3.

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Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Leave It to Beavers,” 1 Where is the entrance to the lodge?
A B C

Under the water Above the dam In the den

2 Where does a beaver find food?
A B C

In the den At the dam In the pond

3 The article says, “Soon, the dam blocks the river and makes a pond.” What does the word blocks mean?
A B C

Opens Holds back
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Fills up

Blackline Master 3

10

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Leave It to Beavers

TFK Pages 12–13

Main Idea and Details
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 11 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs and captions. Tell children, We will use these articles to learn how to identify the main idea and important details in a text. Display Transparency pp. 12–13 of the article “Getting over the Hump” and distribute Blackline Master 4. Ask children to turn to page 12 of Time for Kids. Ask children to look at the title and photographs before they read the article. Have them read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 What is this article mostly about?
A B C

What camels in Africa look like How children in Garissa get books Why young children like to read
From Blackline Master 4

Materials
Transparency pp. 12–13 Blackline Masters 4, 5, 6

Think Aloud This question asks what the article is mostly about. That means I need to figure out the main idea of the article. I have to look at the whole article to see what each section is about. The headings and pictures can help me, too. Then I can connect the details to come up with the answer. Go through all of the answer choices with children and have them identify the correct answer (B). Have children explain how they got the answer. Invite a volunteer to underline on the transparency the details he or she used to determine the answer. For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish to have children work together or independently to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 4.

Teacher’s Manual

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TFK Pages 12–13

Maps
3 Look at the map on page 13. What is the name of the capital of Kenya?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Nairobi Somalia Ethiopia

Explain that texts often are accompanied by maps that can help them understand information from a reading. Maps are drawings that show the locations of countries, cities, and other places. Invite children to look at the map on page 13. On the transparency, show the outline of the country of Kenya. Point to the labels that name the nearby countries of Ethiopia and Somalia. Then point out the map key and discuss the symbols used to show a city and the capital. Read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud The article talks about the village of Garissa, but it does not mention any other cities or towns in Kenya. I need to look at the map and the map key to find the name of the capital of Kenya. Then I can combine these details to find the answer. Have children look at the map and find the three names listed in the answer choices: Nairobi, Somalia, and Ethiopia. Point to the map key and remind children that a solid black dot stands for a city, and a star inside a circle stands for a capital city. Then have the children select the correct answer choice (A).

From Blackline Master 4

Context Clues
4 “Garissa is a remote, or faraway, village in the desert in Kenya.” Which word in the sentence helps you understand what remote means?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every word in a text that they read. Explain that sometimes the other words and sentences in the paragraph can help them figure out the meaning of an unfamiliar word. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I see the word remote in the sentence. I can look at the other words in the sentence for clues about what remote means. Then I can connect these clues to figure out the meaning of the word. Point to the first sentence in the article and read it aloud. Point to the difficult word remote. This word describes the village of Garissa. Ask children to find an easier word that also describes Garissa (faraway). Then ask children to select the best answer (A).

faraway village desert

From Blackline Master 4

12

Time For Kids • Issue 2

TFK Pages 12–13

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 How do children who live near Garissa get books to read? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 4

Think Aloud This question asks about how the children in Garissa get books to read. I need to look back at the text and the photos to find details that tell how books get to Garissa. Then I can combine these details to write the answer. Work with children to find details from the article to answer this question. Have a volunteer underline these details on the transparency. Remind children that the answer should be based on information from the text. Tell children that they should answer in their own words, and not copy sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to use complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: The children who live near Garissa do not have books to read. People from other countries give books to a special library for these children. Camels carry the books to towns near Garissa so children can read the books. See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T4 for answers to Blackline Master 4.

Teacher’s Manual

13

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Getting over the Hump.” 1 What is this article mostly about?
A B C

What camels in Africa look like How children in Garissa get books Why young children like to read

2 Books get to Garissa by —
A B C

horse car camel

3 Look at the map on page 13. What is the name of the capital of Kenya?
A B C

Nairobi Somalia
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Ethiopia

Blackline Master 4

14

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Getting over the Hump

Student Name

4 “Garissa is a remote, or faraway, village in the desert in Kenya.” Which word in the sentence helps you understand what remote means?
A B C

faraway village desert

5 How do children who live near Garissa get books to read? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 4

Grade 1 Getting over the Hump

Time For Kids

15

TFK Pages 14–15

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on main ideas and details, context clues, and reading maps. Introduce “Not a Drop to Drink” by having children turn to page 14 in Time for Kids. Point out that important ideas of an article often are found in the headings and photographs. Have children look at the photographs, map, and headings, and then ask, What do you think the article is mainly about? Encourage children to share what they think is the main idea of the article. Have them point to the text and text features to show how they came up with their answers. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 5 on pages 17–18 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at pictures, headings, and the title to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “Not a Drop to Drink” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on information in the article, not something that you read or saw somewhere else. If you are not sure about the details, go back and look at that part again. 4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you use details from the article to support your answer. 5. Be sure to write complete sentences in your answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 5. Answers can be found on pages T4–T5 of the Teacher’s Manual.

16

Time For Kids • Issue 2

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Not a Drop to Drink.” 1 Look at the web about the “Water Wise” part of the article.
Kids help out on World Water Day. Teach others to take short showers

Make posters

Which idea belongs on the blank line?
A B C

Give people water to drink Grow plants at home and school Teach others to water plants at night

2 World Water Day makes us think about —
A B C
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

the importance of water using umbrellas in the rain how much water on Earth is salty

Blackline Master 5

Grade 1 Not a Drop to Drink

Time For Kids

17

Student Name

3 Look at the map on page 14. What ocean is between North America and Europe?
A B C

Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean Indian Ocean

4 The article says, “So world leaders chose a day to teach about it.” What does the word chose mean?
A B C

Gave Told Picked

5 Why should people save water? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 5

18

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Not a Drop to Drink

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 16

Poetry
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children that they will read a poem and answer questions about it. Explain to children that a poem usually is written in lines and stanzas instead of paragraphs. Many poems have words that rhyme. Rhyming words usually come at the ends of lines. Sometimes poems repeat a word or line several times to help express an important idea. Have children open to “Bubbles,” on page 16 of Time for Kids. Read the title “Bubbles” with children and ask them to share their ideas on what the poem will be about. Write their ideas on the board. Have children follow along with the poem as you read it aloud. Then have children identify the images of bubbles in the poem. Ask if they can they “see” these word pictures in their minds. Explain any images they do not understand. (For example, explain that spittlebugs are bugs that suck sap out of plants and then fill the sap with bubbles. Ask if any children have seen plants covered with frothy, or bubbly, sap.) Distribute Blackline Master 6 on page 20 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices. Tell children to look at the poem to find the answer. Think Aloud This question asks about words that rhyme. I know that rhyming words are words that end with the same sound. I can say the words to myself and connect the sounds to find the ones that rhyme. After children have identified the correct answer (C), read all of the answer choices aloud so they can hear which pairs of words rhyme and which do not. Have children complete Blackline Master 6. Answers can be found on page T5 of the Teacher’s Manual.

1 Which words from the first stanza rhyme?
A B C

tank, lake bubbles, batter lake, cake
From Blackline Master 6

Teacher’s Manual

19

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Bubbles.” 1 Which words from the first stanza rhyme?
A B C

tank, lake bubbles, batter lake, cake

2 Which line from the poem has the same rhythm as “Bubbles in the ocean”?
A B C

“Bubbles in the lake” “Bubbles in the garden” “Bubbles from my bubble wand”

3 In which line does the poet repeat the same beginning sound in two or more words?
A B C

“Bubbles in the batter” “Flowing with the tide” “Where a spittlebug can hide”
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 6

20

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Bubbles

TFK Pages 18–19

Compare and Contrast
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 17 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs and captions. Tell children, We will use these articles to learn how to compare and contrast things that are alike and different in a text. Explain that when you compare two things, you tell how they are alike. Some clue words that tell that things are alike are both, and, also, like, and too. When you contrast two things, you tell how they are different. Some clue words that tell that things are different are yet, but, most, and than. Display Transparency pp. 18–19 of the article “A Ladybug’s Life” and distribute Blackline Master 7. Ask children to turn to page 18 of Time for Kids and look at the title and photographs before they read the article. Have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 How is the larva different from a grown ladybug?
A B C

Materials
Transparency pp. 18–19 Blackline Masters 7, 8, 9

It is bigger. It is smaller. It is faster.
From Blackline Master 7

Think Aloud This question asks how a larva is different from a grown ladybug. I can locate the answer in the selection. First I find the part of the article that tells about the larva stage. Then I look for details telling how the larva is different. After children have had a chance to review the article, point out the correct answer (B). Invite a volunteer to underline the detail sentences on the transparency that give the answer (Out comes a little bug, or larva. It is much smaller than a grown ladybug.) For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish to have children work together or independently to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 7.

Teacher’s Manual

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TFK Pages 18–19

Diagrams
3 Look at the diagram on page 19. What is on the ladybug’s head?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Leg Wing Antenna

Explain to the children that a diagram can help a reader visualize information explained in the text. Diagrams usually have labels that identify each part and captions that give information. Explain that diagrams provide information that may not appear in the text. Then read question 3 and the answer choices aloud. Think Aloud This question asks what the diagram shows. I will need to look at the picture and read the labels. Then I will combine the information I found in the diagram and see which answer choice is best. Point to the diagram of the ladybug on Transparency pp. 18–19 and then point to two of the labels and read them aloud. Have children look at the diagram of the ladybug on page 19 and decide which answer choice is correct (C).

From Blackline Master 7

Context Clues
4 On page 18, the article says, “A ladybug grows in three stages.” What does stages mean in this sentence?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every single word they read. Explain that the pictures and other words and phrases in the text provide context clues that can help them determine the meaning of an unfamiliar word. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I see the word stages in the article. I cannot figure out the meaning of stages from this sentence alone. When I look at the article, I see the word stage in the four numbered headings about the parts of a ladybug’s life. I need to connect this information to figure out what stages means. After children have had time to review the article, have them decide which answer choice is correct (C).

Shells Places Steps

From Blackline Master 7

22

Time For Kids • Issue 3

TFK Pages 18–19

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 How are ladybugs different from other bugs? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 7

Think Aloud I need to find details in the article about ladybugs and other bugs. Then I can combine the details to find out how they how they are different. I remember that the last part of the article, “Science Scoop,” talked about ladybugs and other bugs. I need to go back to that section and reread it. Work with children to find the paragraph under “Science Scoop” that discusses the differences between ladybugs and other bugs. Have a volunteer point to this paragraph on the transparency. Tell children that they should write the answer in their own words and not copy the sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to form complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: The wings are different on ladybugs than on other bugs. Ladybugs have two outer wings and thin wings underneath them. See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T6 for answers to Blackline Master 7.

Teacher’s Manual

23

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “A Ladybug’s Life.” 1 How is the larva different from a grown ladybug?
A B C

It is bigger. It is smaller. It is faster.

2 Ladybugs and other bugs all have —
A B C

six legs four legs three legs

3 Look at the diagram on page 19. What is on the ladybug’s head?
A B C

Leg Wing
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Antenna

Blackline Master 7

24

Time For Kids

Grade 1 A Ladybug’s Life

Student Name

4 On page 18, the article says, “A ladybug grows in three stages.” What does stages mean in this sentence?
A B C

Shells Places Steps

5 How are ladybugs different from other bugs? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 7

Grade 1 A Ladybug’s Life

Time For Kids

25

TFK Pages 20–21

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on comparing and contrasting, reading diagrams with labels, and context clues. Introduce “Giving Time for the Common Good” by having children open to page 20 in Time for Kids. Point out to children that important ideas of an article can be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the photographs, headings, and diagram, and then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to share what they think will be compared and contrasted in the article. Have them point to the text and text features in the article to show how they came up with their answers. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 8 on pages 27–28 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at the title, photographs, and captions to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “Giving Time for the Common Good” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on the article, diagram, and labels. If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again. 4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support from the article in your answer. 5. Be sure to write complete sentences in your answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 8. Answers can be found on pages T6–T7 of the Teacher’s Manual.

26

Time For Kids • Issue 3

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Giving Time for the Common Good.” 1 Look at the diagram below.
Big Bend Rangers Big Bend Volunteers Work for free

Help people

Which idea goes on the blank line?
A B C

Get paid Fix trails Win awards

2 What is one way all park rangers are alike?
A B
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

They all work at Big Bend. They all join Take Pride in America. They all help people stay safe.

C

Blackline Master 8

Grade 1 Giving Time for the Common Good

Time For Kids

27

Student Name

3 What animal is shown on the patch on page 20?
A B C

Sequoia Bison Bull

4 What does the word uniforms mean?
A B C

Special clothes for workers Prizes for volunteers Rules for people in the park

5 In what ways are all volunteers alike? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 8

28

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Giving Time for the Common Good

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 22

Poetry
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children that they will read a poem and answer some questions about it. Remind children that many poems rhyme. Explain that poems often describe people, places, or things in unusual or playful ways. Have children open to “The Caterpillar” on page 22 of Time for Kids and follow along with the poem as you read it aloud. Ask children to identify any words they do not know. After you have finished reading, explain any unfamiliar words. Point out the word play with the words cat and caterpillar in the first line of the poem. Distribute Blackline Master 9 on page 30 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the question and answer choices. Tell children to look at the poem to find details and ideas to determine the stated answer. Think Aloud To answer this question, I first need to look at the poem and find the lines that tell about the caterpillar’s eyes. Then I will connect the information to figure out how the speaker feels. After children have identified the correct answer (A), go back to the poem and have a volunteer read aloud the words or phrases that led to the correct answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 9. Answers can be found on page T7 of the Teacher’s Manual.

1 The speaker in the poem thinks the caterpillar’s eyes are —
A B C

ugly big fat
From Blackline Master 9

Teacher’s Manual

29

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “The Caterpillar.” 1 The speaker in the poem thinks the caterpillar’s eyes are —
A B C

ugly big fat

2 Which word from the poem rhymes with eyes?
A B C

Beady Prize Fat

3 How is a caterpillar different from a cat?
A B C

A caterpillar is very small. A caterpillar has a big brain. A caterpillar knows how to eat.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 9

30

Time For Kids

Grade 1 The Caterpillar

TFK Pages 24–25

Author’s Purpose
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 23 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs and captions. Tell children, We will use these articles to learn how to identify the author’s purpose in a text. Display Transparency pp. 24–25 of the article “Eat Well, Feel Well” and distribute Blackline Master 10. Have children turn to page 24 of Time for Kids. Ask children to look at the title and photographs before they read the article and to predict what they think the article is about. Then have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 The author wrote this article to —
A B C

tell a story about a boy teach readers about healthy foods show readers how to cook
From Blackline Master 10

Materials
Transparency pp. 24–25 Blackline Masters 10, 11, 12

Think Aloud This question asks why the author wrote this article. I know the answer will not be stated in the text. I will have to analyze the writing to understand the author’s purpose. I will look at the pictures and headings for clues, too. I need to think about what the article is about and how the author presents the information. Is the author trying to tell an entertaining story, explain something, or show how to do something? Explain that several answers might mention ideas from the text but that only one answer identifies the author’s purpose for writing the article. Allow children to select an answer choice. Have them explain how they reached the correct answer (B). For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish to have children work together or independently to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 10.

Teacher’s Manual

31

TFK Pages 24–25

Charts
3 Look at the chart on page 25. In which food group does corn belong?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Explain to children that some texts are accompanied by charts that give additional information about the text. Charts can help to organize the information in the article. Invite children to look at the chart on page 25. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud This chart adds more information than the text gives about different kinds of food. I will read the headings and the information that goes along with the chart to find details about food groups and corn. Then I will combine these details to figure out the correct answer to the question. Have children look at the chart. Read the title and headings of the chart with children. Point out that the different foods are classified, or grouped, by type: fruit, vegetables, meat, and dairy. Give children a moment to choose an answer and then ask them to show how they reached the correct answer (C).

Fruit Meat Vegetables

From Blackline Master 10

Context Clues
4 On page 24, the article says, “Oats, wheat, and bran give you energy.” What is the meaning of energy?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every word in a text that they read. Explain that context clues, or other words and phrases in the same sentence or the same paragraph, can help them figure out the meaning of an unfamiliar word. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud This question asks what energy means. I will go back to the text to see where the word energy is used and look for clues in the sentences near it. Then I can connect the clues to determine the answer. Have children read through the answer choices on their own and choose the best answer (A). Ask children to share the answer with the class. Have volunteers underline on the transparency the clues they connected to figure out the answer.

Power Shape Hair

From Blackline Master 10

32

Time For Kids • Issue 4

TFK Pages 24–25

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 Why does the author include the photograph of the boy? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 10

Think Aloud This question asks about why the author included the photograph of the boy in the article. The answer is not stated in the text. I will have to analyze the article to figure out the author’s purpose. I need to ask myself why the photograph is important to the article. Work with children to describe the boy in the photograph and what he is doing (using his body to play a sport, looking happy and healthy). Ask them to think about the different ways the photo might support the author’s purpose (adds a graphic element that catches the reader’s attention). Remind children that they should answer in their own words, and not copy the sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to form complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: The author wants readers to get healthy by eating good foods and staying in shape. The boy looks healthy and happy. Kids will see the picture and want to be like the boy. See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T8 for answers to Blackline Master 10.

Teacher’s Manual

33

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Eat Well, Feel Well.” 1 The author wrote this article to —
A B C

tell a story about a boy teach readers about healthy foods show readers how to cook

2 The author put in facts about each food group to —
A B C

show that too much food is bad for you tell where to buy these foods show that we should eat different kinds of foods

3 Look at the chart on page 25. In which food group does corn belong?
A B C

Fruit Meat
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Vegetables

Blackline Master 10

34

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Eat Well, Feel Well

Student Name

4 On page 24, the article says, “Oats, wheat, and bran give you energy.” What does energy mean?
A B C

Power Shape Hair

5 Why does the author include the photograph of the boy? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 10

Grade 1 Eat Well, Feel Well

Time For Kids

35

TFK Pages 26–27

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on author’s purpose, charts, and context clues. Introduce “Orange You Glad?” by having children turn to page 26 in Time for Kids. Point out that important ideas of an article can often be found in the headings and photographs. Have children look at the photographs, chart, and headings, and then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to share their ideas and explain how they came to those conclusions. Record their ideas on the board. Tell children to keep these ideas in mind as they read to see if their ideas are correct. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 11 on pages 37-38 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at photographs, headings, and the title to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “Orange You Glad?” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Remember that some questions have answers that are stated in the text. For other questions, you will have to figure out an answer that is not stated in the text. 4. Make sure your answers are based on information in the article, photographs, and chart. If you are not sure about the details, go back and look at that part again. 5. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully. Be sure to write complete sentences. Have children complete Blackline Master 11. Answers can be found on pages T8–T9 of the Teacher’s Manual.

36

Time For Kids • Issue 4

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Orange You Glad?” 1 Look at the chart about “Orange You Glad?”
Clue A sweet potato is orange, right? Not always! Some are dark red. Clue Have you ever seen a purple carrot?

Author’s Purpose

Which idea belongs in the Author’s Purpose box?
A B C

To tell jokes about vegetables To get people to eat sweet potatoes To describe vegetable colors

2 Look at the chart on page 27. The author put the chart in the article to —
A
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

show the colors vegetables can be tell what foods farmers like to eat teach how to cook vegetables

B C

Blackline Master 11

Grade 1 Orange You Glad?

Time For Kids

37

Student Name

3 Which vegetable on the chart is only yellow or purple?
A B C

Carrot Bean Potato

4 The article says, “They are a healthy snack.” What does healthy mean?
A B C

Bad for you Easy to find Good for you

5 How does the author make readers want to eat colorful foods? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 11

38

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Orange You Glad?

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 28

Diagrams
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children that they will practice what they learned about diagrams. Remind children that a diagram gives information in visual form. The information is often grouped in categories. Have students open to “Climb the Pyramid” on page 28 of Time for Kids. Read the heading for each category aloud with them and have them follow along by pointing to the words as you read. Guide children to see that each group is represented by a color. Point out the word grains on the diagram in the orange box. Then point out the orange bar in the pyramid. Have children identify the color of each food group in the diagram. Distribute Blackline Master 12 on page 40 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read question 1 aloud. Think Aloud I need to figure out the food group that I should eat from the most. I will have to combine information from different parts of the diagram to figure out the answer. Explain that the width of each colored bar in the pyramid represents how much of that food group a person should eat. Explain to children that they should not use the size of the category headings to judge the importance of the food groups. Ask children to find each answer choice on the pyramid. Then have them tell you which bar is the widest (Grains). Explain that this means the greatest amount of what we eat should be from the grains group (B). Have children complete Blackline Master 12. Answers can be found on page T9 of the Teacher’s Manual.

1 Look at the pyramid. From which food group should you eat the most?
A B C

Meat and beans Grains Oils
From Blackline Master 12

Teacher’s Manual

39

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Climb the Pyramid.” 1 Look at the pyramid. From which food group should you eat the most?
A B C

Meat and beans Grains Oils

2 From which food group should you eat the least?
A B C

Vegetables Fruits Oils

3 The red bar shows —
A B C

meat and beans fruits
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

vegetables

Blackline Master 12

40

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Climb the Pyramid

TFK Pages 30–31

Main Idea and Details
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 29 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs. Tell children, We will use these articles to learn how to identify the main idea and important details in a text. Display Transparency pp. 30–31 of the article “Sharing with Others” and distribute Blackline Master 13. Ask children to turn to page 30 of Time for Kids. Ask children to look at the title, headings, and photographs before they read the article. Ask children to describe what they see. Have them predict what they think the article will be about. Write their predictions on the board. Then have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 What is this article mainly about?
A B C

There are many ways we can help others. Soldiers need to call home sometimes. We should read to young kids.
From Blackline Master 13

Materials
Transparency pp. 30–31 Blackline Masters 13, 14, 15

Think Aloud This question asks about the main idea of the article. I will need to find details from different parts of the article and connect them to find the answer. Even though each answer choice may tell something from the article, I know that only one of them will state the main idea. Remind children that the main idea covers all of the important details in an article, not just some of them. Remind them that they can use the photographs, the headings, and the information in each paragraph to answer this question. Have children select an answer choice and then volunteer to explain how they got the correct answer (A). Point out that the other answer choices are details that support the main idea. For further practice with the comprehension skill you may wish to have children work together or independently to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 13.

Teacher’s Manual

41

TFK Pages 30–31

Lists
3 Look at the list on page 31. The money from UNICEF goes to pay for —
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

toys for children food and medicine books for young girls

Explain to children that some articles include lists that can help them understand the text and give them more information about a topic. A list is a series of items that may be presented in a numbered format. Invite children to look at the list on the transparency. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud This question asks me to use the list to find specific information about UNICEF. I need to find facts about UNICEF and then combine them to find the correct answer. Read the entries on the list aloud with children. Point out that this list gives additional information about certain organizations that help other people. Give children time to choose an answer and then ask them to explain how they reached the correct answer (B). Invite volunteers to underline the information on the transparency that helped them reach the answer.

From Blackline Master 13

Context Clues
4 On page 31, the article says, “Tyler collects money and toys.” What does collects mean?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every word in a text that they read. Explain that in many articles the context, or other words and sentences in the paragraph, can help them determine the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I need to find the answer choice that best matches the meaning of the word collect. I can look back in the text to see where the sentence is used. Then I can connect information from nearby sentences to figure out the answer. Have children carefully read through the answer choices and choose the one they think is correct (A). Then ask children to share their answers with the class. On the transparency, have a volunteer underline any information that helped in determining the answer.

Brings together Throws away Lets go

From Blackline Master 13

42

Time For Kids • Issue 5

TFK Pages 30–31

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 Tell how the children in the article help other people. Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 13

Think Aloud I know from the article that there are many ways kids help other people. This information is not presented in a single sentence. I need to find specific examples of how children help others. I will look in different parts of the article and use the headings and pictures, too. Then I will combine the information when I write my answer. Elicit examples of different ways in which children help others. Then help children combine these details in their responses. Remind children that the answer they write should be based only on information from the article, not on something that they read or saw somewhere else. Tell children that they should answer in their own words and not copy sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to form complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: Children collect food for people in need. They also collect toys and money so all kids will get holiday gifts. Some children give their time by reading to younger kids. See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T10 for answers to Blackline Master 13.

Teacher’s Manual

43

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Sharing with Others.” 1 What is this article mainly about?
A B C

There are many ways we can help others. Soldiers need to call home sometimes. We should read to young kids.

2 Pat gathers food for —
A B C

soldiers far away people in need holiday gifts

3 Look at the list on page 31. The money from UNICEF goes to pay for —
A B C

toys for children food and medicine
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

books for young girls

Blackline Master 13

44

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Sharing with Others

Student Name

4 On page 31, the article says, “Tyler collects money and toys.” What does collects mean?
A B C

Brings together Throws away Lets go

5 Tell how the children in the article help other people. Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 13

Grade 1 Sharing with Others

Time For Kids

45

TFK Pages 32–33

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on main ideas and details, context clues, and reading a list. Introduce “Thanks, Mom and Dad” by having children turn to page 32 in Time for Kids. Point out that the important ideas of an article can often be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the title, photographs, and headings, and then ask, What do you think this article is about? As children share their answers, ask how they used details from specific text features to come up with their ideas. Record their ideas on the board. Tell children to keep these ideas in mind as they read to see if they are correct. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then read the article with children or have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 14 on pages 47–48 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at photographs, headings, and the title to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “Thanks, Mom and Dad” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Remember that some questions have answers that are stated in the text. For other questions, you will have to figure out the answer that is not stated in the text. 4. Make sure your answers are based on information in the article, photographs, and list. If you are not sure about the details, go back and look at that part again. 5. For the short-answer question, plan your answer before you write. Be sure to write complete sentences. Have children complete Blackline Master 14. Answers can be found on pages T10–T11 of the Teacher’s Manual.

46

Time For Kids • Issue 5

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Thanks, Mom and Dad.” 1 Look at the following diagram of information.
Detail An otter mother feeds its pup a crab. Detail This crocodile mother carries its baby. Detail When Mom is out hunting, the lion protects the cubs.

Main Idea

Which idea belongs in the Main Idea box?
A B C

Father animals protect their young. Baby animals cannot find their own meals. Mom and dad animals help their babies in many ways.

2 A goose father keeps keep its baby safe by —
A B
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

making lots of noise bringing it to the water flapping its wings

C

Blackline Master 14 Grade 1 Thanks, Mom and Dad

Time For Kids

47

Student Name

3 Look at the list on page 33. What is the name for a baby elephant?
A B C

Kid Calf Cub

4 What does the word warns mean?
A B C

Helps Sees Tells

5 Why do animal babies need help? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 14

48

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Thanks, Mom and Dad

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 34

Poetry
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children they will read a poem and answer questions about it. Point out some of the differences between poetry and prose. Poems may not have complete sentences. They are arranged into lines and stanzas instead of paragraphs. Some poems rhyme, but some do not. Sometimes poems repeat a word or line several times to help express an important idea. Have children open to “Hamster Hide-and-Seek” on page 34 of Time for Kids. Read the title with children and ask them to share their ideas on what the poem is about. Write their ideas on the board. Ask how many children have seen a hamster in real life. Ask what hamsters look like and how they act. Then have children follow along with the poem as you read it aloud. Discuss the different images in the poem and what they might mean. Ask children to identify any words they do not know and explain any unfamiliar words or confusing images. Distribute Blackline Master 15 on page 50 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud question 1 and the answer choices. Tell children to look back at the poem to find the answer. Think Aloud I know that words that rhyme sound alike because they end in the same sound. So, I can connect the sounds of the words in the answer choices and the sound of the word flows to figure out the correct answer. Have a volunteer read each answer choice. Then ask children to identify the correct answer (A). Have children complete Blackline Master 15 on page 50 of the Teacher’s Manual. Answers can be found on page T11.

1 Which word from the poem rhymes with flows?
A B C

Nose Fur Softly
From Blackline Master 15

Teacher’s Manual

49

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Hamster Hide-and-Seek.” 1 Which word from the poem rhymes with flows?
A B C

Nose Fur Softly

2 Which two words in the last stanza rhyme?
A B C

Ripple, fur Inside, roads Leave, sleeve

3 What makes “Hamster Hide-and-Seek” a poem?
A B C

It tells about an animal. It has a rhythmic pattern. It uses describing words.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 15

50

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Hamster Hide-and-Seek

TFK Pages 36–37

Author’s Purpose
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 35 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs and captions. Tell children, We will use these articles to identify the author’s purpose for writing an article. Display Transparency pp. 36–37 of the article “The Forest Roof” and distribute Blackline Master 16. Ask children to turn to page 36 of Time for Kids. Ask children to look at the title and photos before they read the article. Have children read the article carefully and identify any words that they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 Why did the author write “The Forest Roof”?
A B C

To tell readers a story about a sloth baby and its mother To convince readers to visit a rain forest To tell about the plants and animals in a rain forest
From Blackline Master 16

Materials
Transparency pp. 36–37 Blackline Masters 16, 17, 18

Think Aloud This question asks about why the author wrote the article. To understand why the author wrote this article, I need to analyze the text and the photographs. Is the author trying to convince me to do something, give me information, or entertain me with a story? Explain to the children that while all of the answer choices may mention facts and ideas related to the text, only one of them correctly states the author’s purpose. Allow children to select an answer choice. Have them explain how they reached the correct answer (C). Then invite volunteers to explain why answers A and B are not correct. For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish to have children work together or independently to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 16.

Teacher’s Manual

51

TFK Pages 36–37

Photographs and Captions
3 Look at the photograph of the frogs on page 36. The frogs send out a warning with their —
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

spikes blue color white spots

Remind children that texts are often accompanied by photographs that can help them understand information in the text. Sometimes there will be text nearby that explains what is happening in the photograph. This kind of text is called a caption. Invite children to look at the photographs and describe what they see. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud At the top of page 36, there is a photograph of some frogs. Next to the photograph is a caption with information about the frogs. I need to combine the information in the text with the information in the photograph to answer the question. Point to the photograph of the frogs on Transparency pp. 36–37 and ask what children notice about the frogs. Ask children what the text says about frogs. Then give them time to reread the item and select an answer. Ask them to explain how they reached the correct answer (B). Discuss the fact that frogs do not have spikes or white spots, but do have blue skin to warn other animals about their poison.

From Blackline Master 16

Context Clues
4 On page 36, the article says, “Its spikes scare off its enemies.” The word enemies means things that —
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Remind children that they may not know the meaning of every word in a text that they read. Explain that in many articles the context, or nearby words and sentences, can help them figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I cannot put my finger on the answer to this question in a single sentence in the article, so I will have to find and connect clues about the word. The sentence that contains the word enemies is in the caption that goes with the photograph of the bug on page 36. I will see if anything in the text or photograph helps me to figure out the meaning of enemies. Invite children to explain what the bug is trying to do. Tell them to ask themselves what a bug would want to scare off. Go through the answer choices with them and have the class decide which answer (A) makes the most sense in context.

want to hurt bugs bugs like to eat help sick people

From Blackline Master 16

52

Time For Kids • Issue 6

TFK Pages 36–37

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 Why did the author include the photograph on page 37? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 16

Think Aloud To understand why the author included this photograph, I have to analyze why the author wrote the article and then see how the photograph fits this purpose. The photograph shows people standing on a bridge high in the rain forest and looking down. Have children reread the text that goes with the photograph and think about how the photograph helps readers understand that text. Remind children that their answer should be based only on information from the article and the photograph. Tell children that they should answer in their own words, and not copy sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to form complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: The text is about people exploring the rain forest. It says that they can walk on bridges high over the ground. The photograph shows people on one of these bridges. It helps readers understand what the bridges look like. See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T12 for answers to Blackline Master 16.

Teacher’s Manual

53

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “The Forest Roof.” 1 Why did the author write “The Forest Roof”?
A B C

To tell readers a story about a sloth baby and its mother To convince readers to visit a rain forest To tell about the plants and animals in a rain forest

2 The author wrote the last sentence of the article to show that the rain forest is —
A B C

beautiful scary important

3 Look at the photograph of the frogs on page 36. The frogs send out a warning with their —
B C

blue color white spots

Blackline Master 16

54

Time For Kids

Grade 1 The Forest Roof

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

A

spikes

Student Name

4 On page 36, the article says, “Its spikes scare off its enemies.” The word enemies means things that —
A B C

want to hurt bugs bugs like to eat help sick people

5 Why did the author include the photograph on page 37? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 16

Grade 1 The Forest Roof

Time For Kids

55

TFK Pages 38–39

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on author’s purpose, context clues, and using photographs and captions. Introduce “Rain Forests: From Soup to Nuts” by having children turn to page 38 in Time for Kids. Point out that important ideas of an article often can be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the photographs, captions, and headings, and then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to share their ideas and explain how they came to those conclusions. Record their ideas on the board. Tell children to keep these ideas in mind as they read to see if their ideas are correct. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then read the article aloud or have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 17 on pages 57-58 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at the title, photographs, and captions to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “Rain Forests: From Soup to Nuts” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Remember that some questions have answers that are stated in the text. For other questions, you will have to figure out the answer that is not stated in the text. 4. Make sure your answers are based on information in the article and the photographs. If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again. 5. For the short-answer question, plan your answer before you write. Be sure to write complete sentences. Have children complete Blackline Master 17. Answers can be found on pages T12–T13 of the Teacher’s Manual.

56

Time For Kids • Issue 6

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Rain Forests: From Soup to Nuts.” 1 Look at the chart about the article.
Clue People need to help protect the rain forests. Clue You can join a rain forest rescue program.

Author’s Purpose

Which idea belongs in the Author’s Purpose box?
A B C

To tell a story about life in a rain forest To convince people to save the rain forests To tell about animals that live in rain forests

2 The author tells readers to celebrate Arbor Day so they will —
A
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

plant more trees use more trees for lumber cut trees down for farming

B C

Blackline Master 17

Grade 1 Rain Forests: From Soup to Nuts

Time For Kids

57

Student Name

3 The plants shown on page 38 are important because they —
A B C

can cure illnesses are used to make paint are bright red

4 What does the word oxygen mean?
A B C

A healthy food A kind of medicine A gas we breathe

5 How does the author show readers that rain forests help us in many ways? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 17

58

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Rain Forests: From Soup to Nuts

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 40

Diagrams
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children that they will practice what they learned about diagrams. Remind children that a diagram can help readers see, or visualize, information. Explain that diagrams often have labels with arrows pointing to specific parts of the picture. They can also have text that gives information about the diagram as a whole. Have children open to “Life in the Rain Forest” on page 40 of Time for Kids. Ask children to share their ideas about what information the diagram provides. Read the title and the introductory text of the diagram with children. Point out to children that the white dividing lines in the diagram mark off sections, or layers, of the rain forest. Guide children to understand that the boxed text, or label, in each section of the diagram is giving information about what lives in that particular layer. Discuss with children the meaning of the words emergent, canopy, understory, and floor as they relate to the diagram. Ask children to point to the canopy layer of the rain forest. Have them use the label and picture to tell you two animals that live in that layer. Distribute Blackline Master 18 on page 60 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices. Tell children to look back at the different parts of the diagram to find the correct answer. Think Aloud I need to remember that there is only one correct answer to the question. The question is asking which layer of the rain forest is home to large animals. The diagram shows four layers. I need to combine information from the labels and pictures describing each layer to find the answer. Remind children to look for specific information in the pictures and labels in the diagram to answer the question. Remind them to use only the information from the diagram, even if they think they know the answer from texts they have seen or read elsewhere. After children have identified the correct answer (C), go back to the diagram and point to the drawing of the leopard and the label for the “Forest Floor.” Have children complete Blackline Master 18 on page 60 of the Teacher’s Manual. Answers can be found on page T13.
Teacher’s Manual

1 Look at the diagram. In which layer of the rain forest do large animals live?
A B C

The understory The canopy The forest floor
From Blackline Master 18

59

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Life in the Rain Forest.” 1 Look at the diagram. In which layer of the rain forest do large animals live?
A B C

The understory The canopy The forest floor

2 The rain forest trees are tallest in the —
A B C

canopy emergent layer understory

3 Birds live in every layer of the rain forest except the —
A B C

forest floor understory
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

emergent layer

Blackline Master 18

60

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Life in the Rain Forest

TFK Pages 42–43

Main Idea and Details
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 41 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs and captions. Tell children, We will use these articles to learn how to identify the main idea and important details in reading selections. Display Transparency pp. 42–43 of the article “Digging for Bones” and distribute Blackline Master 19. Ask children to turn to page 42 of Time for Kids. Have children look at the title and photographs before they read the article. Have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 Which little tools did the scientists use to clean rock?
A B C

Trowels Brushes Saws
From Blackline Master 19

Materials
Transparency pp. 42–43 Blackline Masters 19, 20, 21

Think Aloud This question asks which little tools the scientists on the dig used to clean rock. I need to look at the article to find where it talks about tools. Then I can look for details about little tools and cleaning rock. I will combine these facts and details to figure out the answer. Tell children that they do not need to read the whole text again. They can look back at the article headings to help them find the answer. Have children review the two paragraphs about tools on page 43. Then ask a volunteer to identify the correct answer (B). For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish to have children work together or independently to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 19.

Teacher’s Manual

61

TFK Pages 42–43

Diagrams
3 Look at the diagram on page 42. What can you do with a trowel?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Dig in dirt Cut a rock Clean a fossil

Remind children that diagrams can help them visualize information given in a text. Diagrams can be made up of a picture with labels that identify its different parts. Tell children they can use the diagram on page 42 to help them visualize, or see, how scientists work on a dig and what tools they use. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud The text tells me that scientists found a new dinosaur, and it tells how they dug it out. However, the text doesn’t say what a trowel looks like or how it is used. I can use the diagram to find this information. I can combine the information and facts on the diagram to figure out the correct answer. Point to the diagram on Transparency pp. 42–43. Have children read the word trowel in the label and then follow the arrow to the picture of the trowel. Ask children how the scientist is using the trowel. Then have children read item 3 again and determine which answer is correct (A).

From Blackline Master 19

Context Clues
4 On page 43, the word skeleton means —
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

once looked like a block of rock an animal’s bones

Remind children that they may not know the meaning of every word in a text they read. Remind them that they can use clues in the text around the word, as well as any text features or graphics, to help them figure out the meaning of the word. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I see the word skeleton in the last paragraph on the page, above a picture of bones in the shape of a dinosaur. I also see the word in a label at the top of the page. I will have to find context clues in the text and connect them with the label and the pictures to find the correct meaning of skeleton. Have children reread the paragraph that contains the word skeleton. Then have them look at the pictures on the page. Ask children to decide which of the answer choices most closely fits the meaning (C).

From Blackline Master 19

62

Time For Kids • Issue 7

TFK Pages 42–43

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 What did scientists learn about the dinosaur? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 19

Think Aloud This question asks what the scientists learned about the dinosaur. First, I need to find the part of the article that tells what the scientists learned about the dinosaur bones they found. Then I will combine the facts and details about what the scientists learned to write my answer. Have children reread the text and determine which parts tell about the dinosaur itself rather than the process of finding it. Remind children that their answer should be based on information from the article, not on something that they read or saw somewhere else. Tell children that they should answer in their own words and not copy the sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to use complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: This was a new type of dinosaur that no one knew about before. It had arms like wings. It had a long nose like a beak. See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T14 for answers to Blackline Master 19.

Teacher’s Manual

63

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Digging for Bones.” 1 Which little tools did the scientists use to clean rock?
A B C

Trowels Brushes Saws

2 What is the main idea of the article?
A B C

The dig took place in South America. A new kind of dinosaur was found. The scientists used many tools.

3 Look at the diagram on page 42. What can you do with a trowel?
A B C

Dig in dirt Cut a rock
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Clean a fossil

Blackline Master 19

64

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Digging for Bones

Student Name

4 On page 43, the word skeleton means —
A B C

once looked like a block of rock an animal’s bones

5 What did scientists learn about the dinosaur? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 19

Grade 1 Digging for Bones

Time For Kids

65

TFK Pages 44–45

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on main idea and details, diagrams, and context clues. Introduce “Animals on the Move” by having children turn to page 44 in Time for Kids. Point out that the important ideas of an article can often be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the photographs, diagram, and headings, and then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to share what they think the article is about. Have them point to the text and text features in the article to show how they came up with their answers. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 20 on pages 67–68 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at the title, photographs, and diagram to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “Animals on the Move” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on the text, photographs, and diagram. If you are not sure about the details, go back and check that part again. 4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support from the article in your answer. 5. Be sure to write complete sentences in your answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 20. Answers can be found on pages T14–T15 of the Teacher’s Manual.

66

Time For Kids • Issue 7

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Animals on the Move.” 1 What is the main idea of this article?
A B C

People have strong legs for running. Animals live on land and in water. Animals move in many different ways.

2 The bottom of a snail’s body is like a —
A B C

tail foot wing

3 Look at the diagram on page 45. A dolphin’s flipper is on its —
A B
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

side back tail

C

Blackline Master 20

Grade 1 Animals on the Move

Time For Kids

67

Student Name

4 The first paragraph on page 45 says, “It flaps its wings to rise and soar.” Which word from the paragraph helps the reader understand the meaning of soar?
A B C

Flies Tail Helps

5 How do different animals move? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 20

68

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Animals on the Move

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 46

Poetry
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children that they will practice what they have learned about poems. Remind children that poems do not follow the same rules as prose. Sometimes they have complete sentences, but these sentences are often split into short lines. Some poems rhyme, but some do not. Poems often use sound effects like alliteration to appeal to the reader’s senses and feelings. Sometimes poems repeat a word or line several times to help express an important idea. Have children open to “Loose and Limber” on page 46 of Time for Kids. Ask children to read the title and share their ideas about what the poem might be about. Write their ideas on the board. Then read the poem aloud with children. Discuss any unfamiliar words or images with the children. Distribute Blackline Master 21 from page 70 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices. Tell children to look back at the poem to find the correct answer. Think Aloud I know that alliteration means that the same beginning sound is repeated in two or more words. To answer this question, I will reread the first, second, and last lines of the poem. I will connect the sounds of the words to find the line that uses words with the same beginning sound. Have children answer the question. After children have identified the correct answer (A), ask a volunteer to say aloud the words that begin with the same sound. Have children complete Blackline Master 21. Answers can be found on page T15 of the Teacher’s Manual. 1 Which line in the poem uses alliteration?
A B C

First line Second line Last line
From Blackline Master 21

Teacher’s Manual

69

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Loose and Limber.” 1 Which line in the poem uses alliteration?
A B C

First line Second line Last line

2 Which word from the poem rhymes with bows?
A B C

Shows Knots Bones

3 Beanbag Jim is like a living rubber band because he —
A B C

holds things together helps everyone stretches easily
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 21

70

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Loose and Limber

TFK Pages 48–49

Main Idea and Details
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 47 of Time for Kids. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs and captions. Tell children, We will use these articles to identify the main idea and important details in a text. Display Transparency pp. 48–49 of the article “Wow! Wind Works!” and distribute Blackline Master 22. Ask children to turn to page 48 of Time for Kids. Remind children to look at the title and photographs before reading. Have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 What is this article mainly about?
A B C

Trees, ice, and rocks The power of wind A very big pinwheel
From Blackline Master 22

Materials
Transparency pp. 48–49 Blackline Masters 22, 23, 24

Think Aloud This question asks about the main idea of this article. I need to look back at the article and see what each section is about. I will think about the title and section headings, too. Then I will connect the details to figure out the main idea of the article. Tell children that they do not have to read the whole text again. They should look back at the title and the beginning of the article to see what the article is mostly about. Then they should look through the article to find sentences that give important details. After children have had time to review the article, ask a volunteer for the correct answer (B). Invite volunteers to underline the sentences they used to determine the answer. (Wind has lots of power. Wind can help balloons move up. Wind can change the shape of trees.) For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish to have children work together or independently to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 22.

Teacher’s Manual

71

TFK Pages 48–49

Maps
3 Look at the map on page 49. The red and orange parts show where many —
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Remind children that maps are drawings that show where places, such as countries and states, are located. Point out that the labels on a map and the text next to a map can give more information about the map. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud I see the orange and red parts of the map, but I do not know why these parts are colored orange and red. By combining the information on the map with the text next to the map, I should be able to figure out the answer. Point to the orange and red sections of the map of the United States on Transparency pp. 48–49. Tell children it is important to pay careful attention to graphic features such as maps because they will help them better understand the articles. After children have had time to review the map and the accompanying text, ask a volunteer for the answer to the question (C). Then have a volunteer underline the sentence in the text that led to this answer.

trees grow balloons soar tornadoes start

From Blackline Master 22

Context Clues
4 On page 48, the article says, “Wind can spin pinwheels.” The word spin means —
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

stop turn break

Remind children that they may not know the meaning of every word in a text they read. Explain that the context, or other words and sentences in the article, can often help them figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I see the word spin in the article, but the article does not tell me what it means. To figure out its meaning, I will have to connect clues in the surrounding sentences and photographs. Then I can use the clues to connect the word spin to its meaning. Ask children to look back at the article and find where the word spin appears. On the transparency, point out the photograph of the children holding pinwheels. Discuss with children what a pinwheel does when the wind blows. Ask children which of the answer choices means almost the same thing as spin (B).

From Blackline Master 22

72

Time For Kids • Issue 8

TFK Pages 48–49

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 What are some things that wind can do? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 22

Think Aloud I know from the article that wind is powerful and can do a lot of things. To find information about what the wind can do, I need to reread the different parts of the article. Then I can combine the details to write my answer. Work with children to find details from the article to answer the question, and have a volunteer underline these details on the transparency. Tell the children that they should answer in their own words and not copy the sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to use complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: Wind can make balloons fly. It can change the shape of trees and rocks. It can be used to make electricity. See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T16 for answers to Blackline Master 22.

Teacher’s Manual

73

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Wow! Wind Works!” 1 What is this article mainly about?
A B C

Trees, ice, and rocks The power of wind A very big pinwheel

2 Wind machines use wind to make —
A B C

electricity ice balloons

3 Look at the map on page 49. The red and orange parts show where many —
A B C

trees grow balloons soar
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

tornadoes start

Blackline Master 22

74

Time For Kids • Issue 8

Grade 1 Wow! Wind Works!

Student Name

4 On page 48, the article says, “Wind can spin pinwheels.” The word spin means —
A B C

stop turn break

5 What are some things that wind can do? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 22

Grade 1 Wow! Wind Works!

Time For Kids

75

TFK Pages 50–51

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on main idea and details, maps, and context clues. Introduce “Blow, Wind, Blow!” by having children turn to page 50 in Time for Kids. Point out that the important ideas of an article can often be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the title, photographs, and headings, and then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to share what they think is the main idea of the article. Then have them point to the text and text features to show how they came up with their answers. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 23 on pages 77–78 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at the title, photographs, and captions to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “Blow, Wind, Blow!” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on the article, pictures, and map. If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again. 4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer before you write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support from the article in your answer. 5. Be sure to write complete sentences in your answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 23. Answers can be found on pages T16–T17 of the Teacher’s Manual.

76

Time For Kids • Issue 8

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Blow, Wind, Blow!” 1 Look at the chart about “Blow, Wind, Blow!”
The wind can blow very fast on Mount Washington. Chicago is called the Windy City. Strong winds blow over Antarctica.

Which main idea belongs in the empty box?
A B C

Some places are very windy. You should visit a windy city. People can measure windy weather.

2 The wind can blow more than 200 miles per hour in —
A B C
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Chicago Antarctica Kansas

Blackline Master 23

Grade 1 Blow, Wind, Blow!

Time For Kids

77

Student Name

3 Look at the map on page 51. Which place is labeled on the map?
A B C

Mount Washington, New Hampshire Lake Michigan Antarctica

4 The article says, “The wind blows very fast on this peak.” What does the word peak mean?
A B C

Tall building Continent Mountain top

5 What are two windy cities in the United States? Which city is windier? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 23

78

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Blow, Wind, Blow!

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 52

Poetry
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children they will read a poem and answer questions about it. Point out some of the differences between poetry and prose. For example, poems may not have complete sentences. They are arranged into lines and stanzas instead of paragraphs. Some poems rhyme, but some do not. Sometimes poems repeat a word or line several times to help express an important idea. Have children open to “Cloud Parade” on page 52 of Time for Kids. Read the title with children and ask them to share their ideas on what the poem is about. Write their ideas on the board. Then read the poem aloud with children. Help them understand any unfamiliar words. Then discuss the different images in the poem and what they might mean. Distribute Blackline Master 24 from page 80 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices. Tell children to look back at the poem to find the correct answer. Think Aloud To answer this question, I should look carefully at “Cloud Parade” and read it quietly to myself. Then I can connect details about how it looks and sounds to help decide what makes it a poem. Guide children to look back at the poem to find the information they need. Ask them to share how they arrived at the correct answer (C). Have children complete Blackline Master 24. Answers can be found on page T17 of the Teacher’s Manual.

1 What makes “Cloud Parade” a poem?
A B C

It tells about clouds It uses numbers. Its lines have rhythm.
From Blackline Master 24

Teacher’s Manual

79

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Cloud Parade.” 1 What makes “Cloud Parade” a poem?
A B C

It tells about clouds It uses numbers. Its lines have rhythm.

2 Which words from the poem rhyme?
A B C

scoot, see by, sky four, furry

3 The speaker in the poem thinks the first cloud in the parade looks like —
A B C

a furry cat an ice-cream cone
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

a purple plum

Blackline Master 24

80

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Cloud Parade

TFK Pages 54–55

Main Idea and Details
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 53 of Time for Kids. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs. Tell children, We will use these articles to identify the main idea and important details in a text. Display Transparency pp. 54–55 of the article “Sunny Side Up” and distribute Blackline Master 25. Ask children to turn to page 54 of Time for Kids. Ask them to look at the title, photographs, and chart before reading. Then have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 What is this article mainly about?
A B C

Animals in the ocean How to cool off Learning how to swim
From Blackline Master 25

Materials
Transparency pp. 54–55 Blackline Masters 25, 26, 27

Think Aloud This question asks what the article is mainly about. To answer this question, I need to look at the article and find information. I need to think about the details in the whole article and then connect the details to determine what the whole article is about. Tell children that they do not have to read the entire text again. They should look back at the title and the beginning of the article to see what the article is mostly about. Then they should look through the article to find sentences that give important details. After children have had time to review the article, ask a volunteer for the correct answer (A). Invite volunteers to underline the sentences they used to determine the answer. (They share the water with many living things. Some animals drift. Some animals swim to the top to breathe.) For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish to have children work together or independently to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 25.

Teacher’s Manual

81

TFK Pages 54–55

Charts
3 Look at the chart on page 55. Which animal is biggest?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Whale shark Man-of-war jellyfish Blue whale

Remind children that charts show information in a visual way. Information on a chart shows things that can be measured, such as size, weight and length. Labels on the left-hand side and across the bottom explain what is being compared in the chart. Tell children that text features such as charts help them to understand the text more fully. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud This question asks me to use the chart to figure out which animal is biggest. I can look at the bars on the chart to see which is the biggest. Then I can combine information from the left side of the chart and the bottom of the chart to find the correct answer. Point to the chart on Transparency pp. 54–55 and read the explanatory text under the title. Then read the labels along the left side and the bottom of the chart. Point to each animal and ask children how long it is. Then ask them to tell you which answer is correct (B).

From Blackline Master 25

Context Clues
4 On page 54, the word crawls means —
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

creeps hides keeps

Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every word they read in a text. Explain that sometimes the author uses another similar word to describe the same person, thing, or action. If you know one of the words, it can be a context clue to help you figure out the meaning of the unfamiliar word. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud This question asks about the meaning of the word crawls. I see the word in the section about crabs. The author doesn’t tell me which word means the same as crawls. I have to connect clues in the text to figure out what it means. Elicit from children that the word crawls describes the way a crab moves under rocks to hide. Have them look at the paragraph to find another word that describes a crab moving in a similar way. Then have children reread the question and pick the correct answer (A).

From Blackline Master 25

82

Time For Kids • Issue 9

TFK Pages 54–55

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 How do some ocean animals protect themselves? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 25

Think Aloud I know that the article talks about many animals in the ocean and what they do. To answer this question, I need to find information in different parts of the article about how ocean animals protect themselves and combine them to write my answer. Work with children to find details from “Sunny Side Up” to answer the question, and have a volunteer underline these details on the transparency. Tell children that they should answer in their own words and not copy the sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to use complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: Crabs hide under rocks, and they have hard shells. Jellyfish can sting. Fish swim down deep during the day so they cannot be seen. See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T18 for answers to Blackline Master 25.

Teacher’s Manual

83

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Sunny Side Up.” 1 What is this article mainly about?
A B C

Animals in the ocean How to cool off Learning how to swim

2 Whales swim to the top of the ocean to —
A B C

get sun see people breathe air

3 Look at the chart on page 55. Which animal is biggest?
A B C

Whale shark Man-of-war jellyfish Blue whale
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 25

84

Time For Kids • Issue 9

Grade 1 Sunny Side Up

Student Name

4 On page 54, the word crawls means —
A B C

creeps hides keeps

5 How do some ocean animals protect themselves? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 25

Grade 1 Sunny Side Up

Time For Kids

85

TFK Pages 56–57

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on main idea and details, reading charts, and context clues. Introduce “Where Does the Water Go?” by having children open to page 56 in Time for Kids. Point out to children that the important ideas of an article can often be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the title, photographs, and captions, and then ask, What do you think the article is about? Ask children to share their ideas about the main idea of the article. Have them point to the text and text features in the article to show how they came up with their answers. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 26 on pages 87–88 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at the photographs and title to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “Where Does the Water Go?” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on the article, photographs, and chart. If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again. 4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support from the article in your answer. 5. Be sure to write complete sentences. Have children complete Blackline Master 26. Answers can be found on pages T18–T19 of the Teacher’s Manual.

86

Time For Kids • Issue 9

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Where Does the Water Go?” 1 Look at the chart below.
Wet footprints go away in the sun. Puddles go away in the sun. A wet swimsuit dries in the sun.

Which main idea belongs in the empty box?
A B C

The sun’s heat changes water to a gas. Rain makes puddles on the sidewalk. Look at what happens to water in two jars.

2 The “Rain, Rain, Go Away” part of the article is mainly about how —
A B
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

someone left wet footprints most people do not like rainy days puddles dry up after the rain

C

Blackline Master 26

Grade 1 Where Does the Water Go?

Time For Kids

87

Student Name

3 Look at the chart on page 57. On Tuesday, how much water is left in the jar without a lid?
A B C

0 cm 8 cm 10 cm

4 Which words on page 56 help you know what vapor means?
A B C

“The sun’s heat” “puddle water” “to a gas”

5 How do wet things get dry? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 26

88

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Where Does the Water Go?

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 58

Poetry
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children that they will practice what they have learned about poems. Remind children that poems are arranged into lines. Poems often rhyme and use vivid words to appeal to the reader’s senses and feelings. Sometimes poems repeat a word or line several times to help express an important idea. Poems often appeal to a reader’s imagination rather than telling a story or giving information. Have children open to “Sunflakes” on page 58 of Time for Kids. Read the title with children and ask them to share their ideas on what the poem is about. Write their ideas on the board. Then read the poem aloud with children and discuss the different images in the poem and what they might mean. Read the poem aloud with children. Help them understand any unfamiliar words. Then discuss the images in the poem. Distribute Blackline Master 27 on page 90 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices. Tell children to look back at the poem to find the correct answer. Think Aloud This question asks which two words from the poem rhyme. I know that rhyming words end with the same sound. I can say the words to myself and connect the sounds to pick the ones that rhyme. Point out to children that rhyming words are not always spelled the same way, even though they end with the same sound. After children have identified the correct answer (B), ask a volunteer to read aloud the words so that everyone in the class can hear the rhyming sounds. Have children complete Blackline Master 27. Answers can be found on page T19 of the Teacher’s Manual. 1 Which two words in the poem rhyme?
A B C

yellow, bright sunmobile, feel sundrifts, sunbanks
From Blackline Master 27

Teacher’s Manual

89

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Sunflakes.” 1 Which two words in the poem rhyme?
A B C

yellow, bright sunmobile, feel sundrifts, sunbanks

2 Which word in the poem rhymes with sky?
A B C

sunlight fight July

3 “Sunflakes” is a poem because it —
A B C

uses rhyme has a title is about the sun
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 27

90

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Sunflakes

TFK Pages 60–61

Main Idea and Details
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 59 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs. Then tell children, We will use these articles to identify the main idea and important details in a text. Display Transparency pp. 60–61 of the article “Whoo’s a Wonderful Bird?” and distribute Blackline Master 28. Ask children to open to page 60 of Time for Kids. Have children look at the title, photographs, and sign before they read the article. Then have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 What is this article mainly about?
A B C

Owls see well at night. Owls have very long wings. Owls are fascinating birds.
From Blackline Master 28

Materials
Transparency pp. 60–61 Blackline Masters 28, 29, 30

Think Aloud This question asks what the article is mainly about. To find the answer to this question, I need to look at details and information from the whole article. Then I can connect the details to determine the main idea. After children have had time to review the article, ask a volunteer for the correct answer (C). Invite volunteers to point out where they found the answer. For further practice with the comprehension skill, have children work independently or together to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 28.

Teacher’s Manual

91

TFK Pages 60–61

Signs and Symbols
3 Look at the sign on page 61. If you go down the trail, you will most likely see —
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

the moon some mice many birds

Explain to children that signs give information by using words, pictures, or both. Signs can be different colors and different shapes. Ask children about any signs they are familiar with. Discuss the fact that many signs contain symbols, or pictures that stand for something. When a magazine article includes a sign or symbol, it often includes text that explains its meaning and purpose. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud The item asks what I would see if I went down the trail. The sign gives me an idea of the correct answer, but to be sure, I need to combine the information in the sign with the information in the text next to it. Point to the sign on Transparency pp. 60–61. Read the words at the top of the sign and call attention to the picture of the flying bird. Then read the explanatory text next to the sign. Finally, have children look at the question again and tell you which answer is correct (C).

From Blackline Master 28

Context Clues
4 In the first paragraph on page 61, which word helps you figure out the meaning of fluffy?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Explain to children that sometimes an author uses two similar words to describe the same person, thing, or action. If you know one of the words, it can help you figure out the meaning of the other word. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I see the word fluffy in the section about how owls fly. I see all three answer choices in that section, too. I need to pick the answer choice that helps me figure out what fluffy means. Remind children to reread the relevant paragraph and look carefully at each answer choice. Then ask them which answer choice is correct (B). Have a volunteer explain how he or she arrived at the answer.

Space Soft Hunt

From Blackline Master 28

92

Time For Kids • Issue 10

TFK Pages 60–61

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 How are owls’ bodies made to survive in the night? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 28

Think Aloud I know that the first paragraph of this article says that owls’ bodies are made to survive in the night. I need to find details and evidence from the article and then combine them to write the answer. Work with children to find details from the article to answer the question, and have volunteers underline these details on the transparency. Tell the children that they should answer in their own words. Write a short answer together. Remind children to use complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: Owls can hear and see very well at night. This helps them hunt for food. They can also fly very quietly. See page T1 in the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T20 for answers to Blackline Master 28.

Teacher’s Manual

93

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Whoo’s a Wonderful Bird?” 1 What is this article mainly about?
A B C

Owls see well at night. Owls have very long wings. Owls are fascinating birds.

2 What do owls do during the day?
A B C

Sleep Hunt Play

3 Look at the sign on page 61. If you go down the trail, you will most likely see —
A B C

the moon some mice
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

many birds

Blackline Master 28

94

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Whoo’s a Wonderful Bird?

Student Name

4 In the first paragraph on page 61, which word helps you figure out the meaning of fluffy?
A B C

Space Soft Hunt

5 How are owls’ bodies made to survive in the night? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 28

Grade 1 Whoo’s a Wonderful Bird?

Time For Kids

95

TFK Pages 62–63

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on main idea and details, signs and symbols, and context clues. Introduce “Food for Whoo?” by having children open to page 62 in Time for Kids. Point out to children that important ideas of an article can often can be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the title, photographs, and captions. Then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to share what they think is the main idea of this article. Have them point to the text and text features in the article to show how they came up with their answers. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 29 on pages 97–98 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at the photographs and title to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “Food for Whoo?” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on the article, photographs, and text feature about symbols. If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again. 4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support from the article in your answer. 5. Be sure to write complete sentences in your answers. Have children complete Blackline Master 29. Answers can be found on pages T20–T21 of the Teacher’s Manual.

96

Time For Kids • Issue 10

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Food for Whoo?” 1 Look at the chart below.
Plants make food from the sun.

Owls eat insects.

Grasshoppers eat plants.

Which main idea belongs on the blank line?
A B C

All living things need food. Most owls hunt at night. Owls also eat mice.

2 All energy first comes from —
A B C

plants the sun water

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

3 Look at the picture of an owl on page 63. The owl stands for —
A B C

courage wisdom energy

Blackline Master 29

Grade 1 Food for Whoo?

Time For Kids

97

Student Name

4 On page 62, which words from the article help the reader understand the meaning of burrowing?
A B C

“eats insects mostly” “hunts in the day” “lives in a hole”

5 How do living things get energy? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 29

98

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Food for Whoo?

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 64

Charts
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children that they will practice reading a chart and answering questions about it. Review with children that a chart presents information organized by categories. Charts have columns that are read up and down and and rows that are read across. Have children open to “Growing and Changing” on page 64 of Time for Kids. Ask children to share their ideas about the chart’s purpose. Write their ideas on the board. Point out the heading “Life Stage” at the top of the first column and read the stages of an owl’s life listed down the column. Then explain that the chart can also be read across. Read the heading of the second column. Ask them to find the nestling stage in the first column. Have them move their finger along the “nestling” row to find the description of what happens at this stage. Distribute Blackline Master 30 from page 100 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices. Think Aloud I see the word nestling in the first column, but I do not see the description of a nestling in that column. To answer the question, I will need to combine information in the first column with information in the second column. After children have had time to look at the chart, ask a volunteer for the correct answer (C). Then, if any children had trouble finding the answer, show them how to find the label and photograph of the nestling stage in column one and then run their finger along the row to find the description of this stage in column two. Have children complete Blackline Master 30 on page 100 of the Teacher’s Manual. Answers can be found on page T21. 1 What is a nestling?
A B C

An owl that is fully grown An owl still inside the egg An owl that is young and helpless
From Blackline Master 30

Teacher’s Manual

99

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Growing and Changing.” 1 What is a nestling?
A B C

An owl that is fully grown An owl still inside the egg An owl that is young and helpless

2 What stage comes just before the adult stage?
A B C

Egg Fledgling Nestling

3 When an owl becomes an adult, it —
A B C

stops growing learns to fly breaks out of an egg
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 30

100

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Growing and Changing

TFK Pages 66–67

Author’s Purpose
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 65 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs. Tell children, We will use these articles to identify the author’s purpose in a text. Display Transparency pp. 66–67 of the article “Prize Pets” and distribute Blackline Master 31. Ask children to turn to page 66 of Time for Kids. Ask children to look at the title, photographs, and chart before they read the article. Then have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 The author wrote “Prize Pets” to —
A B C

make readers want to buy dogs give information about dog shows tell a funny story about a special dog
From Blackline Master 31

Materials
Transparency pp. 66–67 Blackline Masters 31, 32, 33

Think Aloud This question asks why the author wrote the article. To figure out the author’s purpose, I will have to analyze the text and the text features. I need to think about the article as a whole and what the article is trying to do. I can ask myself if the author is trying to convince or persuade me of something, to entertain me, to give me information about a topic, or to teach me how to do something. Tell children that they do not need to read the whole text again but that they can look back at the headings and photographs to remind themselves what each part is about. After children have had time to review the article, point out the correct answer (B). Invite a volunteer to explain how he or she got the answer. For further practice with the comprehension skill, you may wish to have children work together or independently to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 31.

Teacher’s Manual

101

TFK Pages 66–67

Charts
3 Look at the chart on page 67. Which president had a flying squirrel as a pet?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Review with children that a chart presents information in a visual way. The information is usually organized in columns and rows. Charts can be read across the rows or down the columns. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud The article tells about dogs but not about other animals. I can look at the chart to find information about a different kind of pet. I will have to look at the different columns and combine the details to find the answer. Point to the chart on Transparency pp. 66–67, and then read the informational text at the top of the chart. Guide children to understand that the chart is made up of two columns. Read the column titles aloud. Then read the first row across with children. Tell children that using text features such as charts will help them better understand a text. Have children look at the chart on page 67 and determine which answer choice is correct (A).

Theodore Roosevelt George Washington Herbert Hoover

From Blackline Master 31

Context Clues
4 In the last paragraph on page 66, the word coat means —
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

jacket fur breed

Remind children that they may not know the meaning of every word in a text that they read. Explain that often the context, or nearby words and sentences, can help them figure out the meaning of an unfamiliar word. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I see the word coat in the article, but I do not know what the author means by coat in this sentence. To answer the question, I will have to find clues in the rest of the paragraph and connect them to determine the meaning of the word. Ask children which of the answer choices most closely fits the meaning of coat as it is used in the article (B). Then have children explain what clues in the text led them to pick this answer.

From Blackline Master 31

102

Time For Kids • Issue 11

TFK Pages 66–67

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 Why did the author call the article “Prize Pets”? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 31

Think Aloud I know from reading the article that the author wrote about dogs that compete in dog shows. I need to analyze the title and the article as a whole to understand why the author chose this title. Work with children to find details from the article to answer the question, and have a volunteer underline these details on the transparency. Tell children that they should answer in their own words. Write a short answer together. Remind children to use complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: The article is about pet dogs that compete in shows. If a dog wins, it gets a prize. That is why the author chose the title “Prize Pets.” See page T1 of the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T22 for answers to Blackline Master 31.

Teacher’s Manual

103

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Prize Pets.” 1 The author wrote “Prize Pets” to —
A B C

make readers want to buy dogs give information about dog shows tell a funny story about a special dog

2 The author most likely says that only the best dogs can compete at the Westminster Kennel Club to show that —
A B C

all the dogs will get prizes any dog can be in the show it is hard to get a dog into the show

3 Look at the chart on page 67. Which president had a flying squirrel as a pet?
A B C

Theodore Roosevelt George Washington Herbert Hoover
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 31

104

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Prize Pets

Student Name

4 In the last paragraph on page 66, the word coat means —
A B C

jacket fur breed

5 Why did the author call the article “Prize Pets”? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 31

Grade 1 Prize Pets

Time For Kids

105

TFK Pages 68–69

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on author’s purpose, reading a chart, and context clues. Introduce “All for America!” by having children open to page 68 in Time for Kids. Point out to children that the important ideas of an article can often be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the photographs, captions, and headings, and then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to share what they think might be the author’s purpose for writing this article. Then have them point to the text and text features in the article to show how they analyzed the author’s writing to come up with their answers. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 32 on pages 107–108 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at the pictures, captions, and title to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “All for America!” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on the article, pictures, and chart. If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again. 4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support from the article in your answer. 5. Be sure to write complete sentences in your answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 32. Answers can be found on pages T22–T23 of the Teacher’s Manual.

106

Time For Kids • Issue 11

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “All for America!” 1 Look at the chart below.
The bald eagle is a symbol of America. The Liberty Bell is a symbol of America.

Author’s Purpose

Which idea belongs in the Author’s Purpose box?
A B C

Tell a funny story about eagles Make readers want to visit Philadelphia Give information about symbols of America

2 The author includes two pictures on page 69 to —
A B
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

tell why Betsy Ross made the flag show what our flag looks like describe where you can see the flag

C

Blackline Master 32

Grade 1 All for America!

Time For Kids

107

Student Name

3 Look at the chart on page 69. The Great Seal is on the —
A B C

one-dollar bill Liberty Bell American flag

4 In this article, the word symbol means —
A B C

a bird that flies fast a person who makes flags a thing that stands for something

5 Why did the author choose the name, “All for America!” for this article? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 32

108

Time For Kids

Grade 1 All for America!

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 70

Diagrams
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children that they will practice what they learned about diagrams. Review with children that a diagram is a picture or drawing of something. On the diagram are labels that name the parts of what is being pictured. Diagrams also can include text that provides extra information. Have children open to “Lady Liberty” on page 70 of Time for Kids. Ask children to share their ideas about the purpose of the diagram. Write their ideas on the board. Read the informational text with children. Then read the labels and point to the parts of the statue they are naming. Distribute Blackline Master 33 on page 110 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices. Tell children to look back at the diagram to find the answer. Think Aloud This question asks about another name for Lady Liberty. I need to combine information in the picture, the labels, and the text. I do not see the answer in the labels, and I cannot answer it based on just the picture, so I will look at the information in the text of the diagram. After children have identified the correct answer (A), ask a volunteer to read aloud the sentence that gives the answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 33. Answers can be found on page T23 of the Teacher’s Manual. 1 Lady Liberty is also called the —
A B C

Statue of Liberty Freedom Symbol Tall Lady
From Blackline Master 33

Teacher’s Manual

109

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Lady Liberty.” 1 Lady Liberty is also called the —
A B C

Statue of Liberty Freedom Symbol Tall Lady

2 What is Lady Liberty holding in her hand up high?
A B C

A crown A book A torch

3 Lady Liberty is standing on a —
A B C

crown pedestal harbor
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 33

110

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Lady Liberty

TFK Pages 72–73

Retell
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 71 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs. Tell children, We will use these articles to retell the events in a text in order. Display Transparency pp. 72–73 of the article “Money Goes Around” and distribute Blackline Master 34. Ask children to open to page 72 of Time for Kids. Have children look at the title, photographs, and captions before they read the article. Remind children of words used to show the order of events, such as first, then, and now. Then have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Underline these words on the transparency and review them with the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 What happens after you put money in the bank?
A B C

The money goes to hungry people. You earn money at a yard sale. The bank adds interest.
From Blackline Master 34

Materials
Transparency pp. 72–73 Blackline Masters 34, 35, 36

Think Aloud This question asks what happens after you put money in the bank. I need to find the part of the article that tells about putting money in the bank and what happens next. Then I can combine this information to figure out the answer. Explain to children that to retell events in the correct order, they usually will need to combine details from different sentences. After children have had time to review the article, point out the correct answer (C). Invite volunteers to explain how they got the answer. (First you save money. You put it in the bank. The money earns interest. That is money that the bank adds in.) For further practice with the comprehension skill, have children work independently or together to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 34.

Teacher’s Manual

111

TFK Pages 72–73

Photographs and Captions
3 Look at the photograph and caption on page 72. What is the girl doing in the store?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Review with children that photographs often have captions that explain what is happening in the pictures. Explain that photographs and captions may provide information that is not found in the text of the article. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud This question asks what the girl is doing in the store. To answer the question, I need to combine the information in the photograph with the information in the caption. Have a volunteer point to the photograph of the girl at the store on Transparency pp. 72–73. Read the caption aloud with children. Then have children determine which answer is correct (A).

Buying food Saving her money Giving money away

From Blackline Master 34

Context Clues
4 Which word from the article means the same as earn in the first paragraph?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Spend Make Give

Remind children that they may not know the meaning of every word in an article that they read. Explain that often the context, or nearby words and sentences, can help them figure out the meaning of an unknown word. Sometimes the author uses an easy word that means the same as an unfamiliar word. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I see the words earn, spend, make, and give in the article, but the author does not tell me which two words have almost the same meaning. To answer the question, I will have to connect clues in the text. Give children a moment to look over the article. Then ask children which of the answer choices most closely fits the meaning of earn. (B). Ask a volunteer to explain what clues led to this answer. (The final paragraph tells how you can “earn money” or “make more money.”)

From Blackline Master 34

112

Time For Kids • Issue 12

TFK Pages 72–73

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 What are some ways that kids can earn money? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 34

Think Aloud On the first page of the article, the author tells about ways that kids can use their money, but I need to find the part of the article that tells how they can earn money. Then I can combine the details to write the answer. Work with children to find details from the article to answer the question, and have volunteers underline these details on the transparency. Tell the children that they should answer in their own words and not copy the sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to use complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: Kids can sell goods, like old toys, to earn money. They can also sell services, like walking a dog. See page T1 in the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T24 for answers to Blackline Master 34.

Teacher’s Manual

113

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Money Goes Around.” 1 What happens after you put money in the bank?
A B C

The money goes to hungry people. You earn money at a yard sale. The bank adds interest.

2 If you want to buy things, first you have to —
A B C

do some tasks give money away save money

3 Look at the photograph and caption on page 72. What is the girl doing in the store?
A B C

Buying food Saving her money
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Giving money away

Blackline Master 34

114

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Money Goes Around

Student Name

4 Which word from the article means the same as earn in the first paragraph?
A B C

Spend Make Give

5 What are some ways that kids can earn money? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 34

Grade 1 Money Goes Around

Time For Kids

115

TFK Pages 74–75

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on retelling events in order, using photos and captions, and context clues. Introduce “How Money Is Made” by having children open to page 74 in Time for Kids. Point out to children that important ideas of an article can often be found in the title and photos. Have children look at the photos, captions, and headings. Then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to think about how making new money might involve steps taken in a certain order. Have them point to the text and text features in the article to show how they used different parts of the text to come up with their answer. Remind children to use context clues to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Have them read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 35 on pages 117–118 of the Teacher’s Manual. Tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at the pictures, captions, and title to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “How Money Is Made” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on the article, photographs, and captions. If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again. 4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support from the article in your answer. 5. Be sure to write complete sentences in your answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 35. Answers can be found on pages T24–T25 of the Teacher’s Manual.

116

Time For Kids • Issue 12

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “How Money Is Made.” 1 Look at the following diagram about “How Money Is Made.”
First Metal strips go through a machine. Next

Last A machine stamps pictures on the metal.

What idea belongs in the middle box?
A B C

The U.S. Mint makes every coin. The machine cuts out disks. U.S. bills are made of cloth.

2 What happens just after metal disks are cut out?
A B
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Metal strips go through a machine. The disks are metal coins. Pictures are stamped on the metal.

C

Blackline Master 35

Grade 1 How Money Is Made

Time For Kids

117

Student Name

3 Look at the picture of a quarter on page 75. What is shown on the quarter?
A B C

A star A flag A tree

4 In the first paragraph on page 75, the word tearing means —
A B C

crying making ripping

5 Tell, in order, the steps for making metal coins. Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 35

118

Time For Kids

Grade 1 How Money Is Made

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 76

Charts
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children that they will practice what they learned about reading charts. Review with children that a chart presents information organized by categories. Charts have columns and rows that can be read across or up and down. Have children open to “U.S. Coins” on page 76 of Time for Kids. Ask children to share their ideas about the chart’s purpose. Write their ideas on the board. Point out the heading “Coin” at the top of the first column and read the kinds of coins listed below. Read through each of the two remaining columns. Then explain that the chart also can be read horizontally. Ask them to find the dime on the chart. Have them move their finger across the “dime” row to find the picture on the front of the dime and the picture on the back. Distribute Blackline Master 36 on page 120 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices. Tell children to look at the chart to find the answer. Think Aloud To answer this question, I will need to find the dollar in the “Coin” column. Then I will have to look at the “dollar” row and combine the details to find the answer. After children have had time to look at the chart, ask a volunteer for the correct answer (A). Then, if any children had trouble finding the answer, show them how to link information in the correct row (“Dollar”) and the correct column (“Picture on Back”). Have children complete Blackline Master 36 on page 120 of the Teacher’s Manual. Answers can be found on page T25. 1 What is on the back of a dollar coin?
A B C

The Statue of Liberty George Washington A map of Texas
From Blackline Master 36

Teacher’s Manual

119

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “U.S. Coins.” 1 What is on the back of a dollar coin?
A B C

The Statue of Liberty George Washington A map of Texas

2 Who is pictured on the front of a nickel?
A B C

Franklin D. Roosevelt Abraham Lincoln Thomas Jefferson

3 The Lincoln Memorial is shown on the back of the —
A B C

dime cent quarter
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 36

120

Time For Kids

Grade 1 U.S. Coins

TFK Pages 78–79

Compare and Contrast
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 77 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs. Tell children, We will use these articles to identify how to compare and contrast information in a text. Display Transparency pp. 78–79 of the article “Things Change” and distribute Blackline Master 37. Ask children to open to page 78 of Time for Kids. Have children look at the title, photographs, and headings before they read the article. Then have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Remind children to look for words that signal differences, such as then and now, and words that signal similarities, such as alike and the same. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 How were clothes long ago different from clothes today?
A B C

They were warmer. They cost more money. They were made by hand.
From Blackline Master 37

Materials
Transparency pp. 78–79 Blackline Masters 37, 38, 39

Think Aloud This question asks how clothes were different long ago. To answer this question, I need to find out what clothes were like long ago and what clothes are like today. Then I can combine these details to figure out the difference between the two. Remind children that when they compare things, they tell how they are alike. When they contrast things, they tell how the things are different. After children have had time to review the article, ask a volunteer to give the correct answer (C). Invite volunteers to explain how they got the answer. (Long ago, families made their own clothes. They sewed their clothes by hand. Now, most clothes are made in big factories.) For further practice with the comprehension skill, have children work independently or together to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 37.

Teachers Manual

121

TFK Pages 78–79

Diagrams
3 Look at the diagram on page 79. Which of these is in both pictures?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Review with children that diagrams can provide additional information that may not appear in the text. Diagrams usually have labels that identify different parts. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud This question asks me to name something that is in both pictures. I need to look carefully at the pictures to find which item appears in both. Then I can combine what I see in the pictures with the answer choices to choose the right answer. Have a children look carefully at both pictures. Then have children determine which answer is correct (B).

Computer Desk Whiteboard

From Blackline Master 37

Context Clues
MODEL THE SKILL

4 On page 78, what does the word factories mean?
A

Places where things are made Things that cost money People who buy things

Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every word in a text that they read. Remind them to use context clues, such as surrounding words and sentences, to help determine the meaning of unfamiliar words. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I see the word factories in the article, but I do not know what it means. I will have to find clues in the text and connect them to the meaning of the word. I will also look at the photograph next to the section that tells about factories. Give children a moment to look over the paragraph about factories. Then ask children which of the answer choices most closely fits the meaning of the word (A). Ask a volunteer to explain what clues led to this answer. (Now, most clothes are made in big factories.)

B C

From Blackline Master 37

122

Time For Kids • Issue 13

TFK Pages 78–79

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 How is the way families get their clothes today different from the way they got their clothes long ago? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 37

Think Aloud The first paragraph under the part of the article called “Making Clothes” tells how families got their clothes long ago. The second paragraph contrasts this with how families get clothes today. I can combine details from both paragraphs to write the answer to this question. Work with children to find several details from the article to answer the question, and have volunteers underline these details on the transparency. Write a short answer together. Remind children to use complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: Long ago, families sewed their own clothes by hand. Today, clothes are made by machines in factories. Families buy these clothes in stores. See page T1 in the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T26 for answers to Blackline Master 37.

Teachers Manual

123

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Things Change.” 1 How were clothes long ago different from clothes today?
A B C

They were warmer. They cost more money. They were made by hand.

2 What was different in classrooms of long ago?
A B C

Teachers sat down at a desk. Students worked in a big circle. All of the girls wore dresses.

3 Look at the diagram on page 79. Which of these is in both pictures?
A B C

Computer Desk
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Whiteboard

Blackline Master 37

124

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Things Change

Student Name

4 On page 78, what does the word factories mean?
A B C

Places where things are made Things that cost money People who buy things

5 How is the way families get their clothes today different from the way they got their clothes long ago? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 37

Grade 1 Things Change

Time For Kids

125

TFK Pages 80–81

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on comparing and contrasting, reading a diagram, and context clues. Introduce “What a Trip!” by having children open to page 80 in Time for Kids. Point out to children that important ideas of an article often can be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the title, photographs, and diagram, and then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to share what they think will be compared and contrasted in this article. Have them point to the text and text features in the article to show how they came up with their answers. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 38 on pages 127–128 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at the photographs and title to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “What a Trip!” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on the article, photographs, and diagram. If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again. 4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support from the article in your answer. 5. Be sure to write complete sentences in your answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 38. Answers can be found on pages T26–T27 of the Teacher’s Manual.

126

Time For Kids • Issue 13

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “What a Trip!” 1 How is the pilot different from the other astronauts on the space shuttle?
A B C

The pilot is in charge of the space shuttle. The pilot works on science projects. The pilot flies the space shuttle.

2 Joe Tanner is like the other astronauts because he —
A B C

had a job to do on the space station lived outside the space station stayed on Earth to do his job

3 Look at the diagram on page 81. It shows the space shuttle going to —
A B
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

the moon the space station Earth

C

Blackline Master 38 Grade 1 What A Trip!

Time For Kids

127

Student Name

4 Which words from the article help you understand what college means on page 80?
A B C

“a school after high school” “how machines work” “work on science projects”

5 What are some things that all astronauts do? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 38

128

Time For Kids

Grade 1 What A Trip!

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 82

Diagrams
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children that they will practice what they learned about reading diagrams. Review with children that a diagram is made up of a picture and labels that identify the parts of the picture. Often, introductory text or a caption gives information about the whole diagram. Have children open to “The Space Shuttle” on page 82 of Time for Kids. Ask children to share their ideas about the diagram’s purpose. Write their ideas on the board. Point out the title “The Space Shuttle” and read the information above the diagram. Explain that by looking at the labels on the diagram, children can get more information about the parts of the space shuttle. Distribute Blackline Master 39 on page 130 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices. Think Aloud This question asks about the tank of the space shuttle. The paragraph at the top of the page tells me that the diagram shows the three main parts of a space shuttle. The tank must be one of those parts. I will look at the labels on the diagram to see what the tank holds and combine the details in the diagram to figure out the correct answer. After children have identified the correct answer (C), ask a volunteer to explain how he or she arrived at the answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 39. Answers can be found on page T27 of the Teacher’s Manual. 1 On the space shuttle, the tank holds the —
A B C

ground crew fuel
From Blackline Master 39

Teacher’s Manual

129

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “The Space Shuttle.” 1 On the space shuttle, the tank holds the —
A B C

ground crew fuel

2 What lifts the shuttle off the ground?
A B C

Rocket boosters Fuel tank Orbiter

3 Which part carries the crew?
A B C

Orbiter Tank Rocket boosters
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 39

130

Time For Kids

Grade 1 The Space Shuttle

TFK Pages 84–85

Compare and Contrast
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 83 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs. Tell children, We will use these articles to identify how to compare and contrast information in a text. Remind children that when they compare things, they tell how they are alike. When they contrast things, they tell how the things are different. Display Transparency pp. 84–85 of the article “Wild About Museums” and distribute Blackline Master 40. Ask children to open to page 84 of Time for Kids. Have children look at the title, photographs, and captions before they read the article. Then have children read the article carefully and identify any words they do not know. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 How are the two museums described in this article alike?
A B C

You can see dinosaur bones. You can see the sea. You can learn new things.
From Blackline Master 40

Materials
Transparency pp. 84–85 Blackline Masters 40, 41, 42

Think Aloud I know that the museums described in this article are different in some ways. To answer this question, I need to find a way that they are alike. I can look for details about museums in the article and then combine the details to find the answer. After children have had time to review the article, point out the correct answer (C). Invite volunteers to explain how they arrived at the answer. (Do you like to learn new things? Then a museum is a place for you.) For further practice with the comprehension skill, have children work independently or together to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 40.

Teacher’s Manual

131

TFK Pages 84–85

Signs and Symbols
3 Look at the signs on page 85. What rule can you learn from reading these signs?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Review with children that signs give information by using words, pictures, or both. Remind children that when an article includes a sign or symbol, it often includes text that explains the meaning and purpose. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud This question asks what rule you can learn from the signs in the picture. To answer this question, I need to look at the picture and read the words on the sign. Then I can combine the words with the picture on the sign to figure out the answer. Have children look carefully at the photograph and the text. Then have children determine which answer is correct (A).

No pets allowed Do not eat here Wear a bike helmet

From Blackline Master 40

Context Clues
4 On page 85, the word hatched means —
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

seen born caught

Tell children that they may not know the meaning of every word in a text that they read. Remind them to use the context, or other words and sentences in the article, to help determine the meaning of unfamiliar words. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I see the word hatched in the second paragraph, but the article does not tell me what hatched means. I can look at other words in the sentence and in the rest of the paragraph to see if I can find are any clues to help me understand the meaning of the word. Then I can connect the clues to find the right answer. Give children a moment to look over the paragraph about sea turtles. Then ask them which of the answer choices most closely fits the meaning (B). Ask a volunteer to explain what clues led to this answer. (The paragraph is about baby sea turtles. After they are hatched, the tiny turtles run to the sea.)

From Blackline Master 40

132

Time For Kids • Issue 14

TFK Pages 84–85

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 How is the Padre Island National Seashore a different kind of museum? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 40

Think Aloud This article first tells about the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Then it says that Padre Island National Seashore is a different kind of museum. I need to think about ways in which the two museums are different. Then I need to combine details from the article to write the answer. Work with children to find several details from the article to answer the question, and have volunteers underline these details on the transparency. Tell children that they should answer in their own words, and not copy sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to use complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: Most museums are indoors. Padre Island National Seashore is an outdoor museum and park. You can see birds and animals there. You can also see the sea. See page T1 in the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T28 for answers to Blackline Master 40.

Teacher’s Manual

133

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Wild About Museums.” 1 How are the two museums described in this article alike?
A B C

You can see dinosaur bones. You can see the sea. You can learn new things.

2 At the Houston Museum of Natural Science, you can see —
A B C

birds at the seashore many sand dunes a special place for butterflies

3 Look at the signs on page 85. What rule can you learn from reading these signs?
A B C

No pets allowed Do not eat here
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Wear a bike helmet

Blackline Master 40

134

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Wild About Museums

Student Name

4 On page 85, the word hatched means —
A B C

seen born caught

5 How is the Padre Island National Seashore a different kind of museum? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 40

Grade 1 Wild About Museums

Time For Kids

135

TFK Pages 86–87

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on comparing and contrasting, signs and symbols, and context clues. Introduce “A Basket Maker” by having children open to page 86 in Time for Kids. Point out to children that important ideas of an article can often be found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the title and photographs, and then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to share what they think will be compared and contrasted in this article. Have them point to the text and text features in the article to show how they came up with their answers. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 41 on pages 137–138 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at the photographs and title to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “A Basket Maker” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on the article, photographs, and signs. If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again. 4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support from the article in your answer. 5. Be sure to write complete sentences and keep your writing inside the lines. Have children complete Blackline Master 41. Answers can be found on pages T28–T29 of the Teacher’s Manual.

136

Time For Kids • Issue 14

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “A Basket Maker.” 1 Look at the diagram below.
Baskets in the Past Made to sell or trade Baskets Today Made by machines

Which information belongs on the blank line?
A B C

Teri Rofkar Made by hand Pots used for this

2 How is spruce wood different from other kinds of wood?
A B C

It is beautiful. It bends easily. It has no roots.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 41

Grade 1 A Basket Maker

Time For Kids

137

Student Name

3 In the sign for a deer on page 87, the hands are held —
A B C

out to the side around each eye beside the head

4 On page 86, the word weavers means —
A B C

people who make baskets things used for cooking people who teach lessons

5 How were baskets of long ago different from baskets of today? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 41

138

Time For Kids

Grade 1 A Basket Maker

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 88

Poetry
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children they will read a poem and answer questions about it. Remind children that poems may not have complete sentences. They are arranged into lines and stanzas instead of paragraphs. Many poems rhyme, but some do not. Poems often use vivid words to appeal to the reader’s senses and feelings. Sometimes poems repeat a word or line several times to help express an important idea. Have children open to “Sarah Enters a Painting” on page 88 of Time for Kids. Read the title with children and ask them to share their ideas of what the poem is about. Write their ideas on the board. Then read the poem aloud with children, and make sure they understand the basic concept: a girl is looking at a painting and wondering what it would be like to get inside the painting. Discuss the images in the poem and what they might mean. Distribute Blackline Master 42 on page 140 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices. Tell children to look at the poem to find the answer. Think Aloud The question asks how the reader can tell that “Sarah Enters a Painting” is a poem. All of the answer choices are features of poetry, but only one is a feature of this poem. I need to look at “Sarah Enters a Painting” carefully and connect what I find to figure out the best answer. After children have identified the correct answer (C), ask a volunteer to explain how to find the answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 42. Answers can be found on page T29 of the Teacher’s Manual. 1 You can tell that “Sarah Enters a Painting” is a poem because —
A

every line has words with the “p” sound its lines have a regular rhythm it is written in lines instead of paragraphs
From Blackline Master 42

B C

Teacher’s Manual

139

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Sarah Enters a Painting.” 1 You can tell that “Sarah Enters a Painting” is a poem because —
A B C

every line has words with the “p” sound its lines have a regular rhythm it is written in lines instead of paragraphs

2 Which two words from the poem rhyme?
A B C

stair, there toy, train rush, hurry

3 Which two words from the poem have the same beginning sound?
A B C

chairs, climb If, I’d what, way
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 42

140

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Sarah Enters a Painting

TFK Pages 90–91

Main Idea and Details
MODEL THE SKILL

Have children open to page 89 of Time for Kids, Student Edition. Look at the cover and read the article titles aloud with the class. Have children preview the photographs. Tell children, We will use these articles to identify the main idea and details of a reading selection. Display Transparency pp. 90–91 of the article “Get Ready, Get Set, Go!” and distribute Blackline Master 43. Ask children to open to page 90 of Time for Kids. Have children look at the title, photographs, and captions before they read the article. Then guide them to notice that each paragraph describes a different sporting event. Point out that words showing lengths of time are in bold type. Underline any unknown words on the transparency and explain them to the class. Then read the following question and answer choices aloud: 1 This article is mostly about —
A B C

a short race called a sprint how long some sports take to play where some games are played
From Blackline Master 43

Materials
Transparency pp. 90–91 Blackline Masters 43, 44, 45

Think Aloud This question asks what the article is mostly about. I cannot find the answer in a single sentence. To answer this question, I must connect clues and evidence from different parts of the article. After children have had time to review the article, point out the correct answer (B). Invite a volunteer to explain how to figure out the answer. For further practice with the comprehension skill, have children work independently or together to answer question 2 on Blackline Master 43.

Teacher’s Manual

141

TFK Pages 90–91

Photographs and Captions
3 Look at the picture and caption at the bottom of page 91. What does a calendar show?
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

Review with children that photographs often are accompanied by captions that explain what is happening in the photographs. Explain that photographs and captions provide information that may not be found in the text. Then read question 3 aloud. Think Aloud This question asks about the picture of the calendar and the caption that goes with it. I need to read the question carefully and then look back at the picture and caption. Then I can combine the facts and information to get the answer. Have a volunteer point to the picture of the calendar on Transparency pp. 90–91. Read the caption aloud with the children. Then have children determine which answer is correct (B).

A big race Days and weeks Hours, minutes, and seconds

From Blackline Master 43

Context Clues
4 The article says, “The best players meet in the last match.” In this sentence, the word match means —
A B C

MODEL THE SKILL

game jump time

Remind children that they may not know the meaning of every word in a text that they read. Explain that often the context, or nearby words and sentences, can help them figure out the meaning of an unknown word. Sometimes a word has many different meanings. Context clues can be helpful for figuring out which meaning of a word best fits the text. Then read question 4 aloud. Think Aloud I cannot find the definition of match in the article. When I look back at the article, I see that the best tennis players play in many games before they meet in the last match. I can connect the context clues to figure out the meaning of the word. Ask children which answer choice best fits the way match is used in the sentence (A). Then have children explain how they determined the correct answer.

From Blackline Master 43

142

Time For Kids • Issue 15

TFK Pages 90–91

Short Answer
MODEL WRITING A SHORT ANSWER

Remind children that short-answer questions will ask them to write an answer in complete sentences on the lines provided. Read the following short-answer question aloud: 5 Why does a tennis tournament last longer than the Kentucky Derby? Support your answer with details from the article.

From Blackline Master 43

Think Aloud I know that the author tells how long it takes to play different sports. I need to find details about the Kentucky Derby and about a tennis tournament. I will combine the information about the two sports in my answer. Work with children to find details from the article to answer the question, and have volunteers underline these details on the transparency. Tell children that they should answer in their own words and not copy the sentences from the article. Write a short answer together. Remind children to use complete sentences in their answers. Possible response: In the Kentucky Derby, the horses run one mile. The race is over in just minutes. In a tennis tournament, the winner of each game plays again until the best players are in the last match. This can take weeks. See pages T1 in the Teacher’s Manual for a short-answer rubric. See page T30 for answers to Blackline Master 43.

Teacher’s Manual

143

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Get Ready, Get Set, Go!” 1 This article is mostly about —
A B C

a short race called a sprint how long some sports take to play where some games are played

2 Which of these lasts for days?
A B C

A golf tournament A horse race A soccer game

3 Look at the picture and caption at the bottom of page 91. What does a calendar show?
A B C

A big race Days and weeks
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Hours, minutes, and seconds

Blackline Master 43

144

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Get Ready, Get Set, Go!

Student Name

4 The article says, “The best players meet in the last match.” In this sentence, the word match means —
A B C

game jump time

5 Why does a tennis tournament last longer than the Kentucky Derby? Support your answer with details from the article.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Blackline Master 43

Grade 1 Get Ready, Get Set, Go!

Time For Kids

145

TFK Pages 92–93

Show What You Know
APPLY THE SKILLS

Remind children that some of the questions they will see on a test will focus on main ideas and details, photos and captions, and context clues. Introduce “Play Ball!” by having children open to page 92 in Time for Kids. Point out to children that important ideas of an article often are found in the title and photographs. Have children look at the photographs, captions, and headings, and then ask, What do you think the article is about? Encourage children to share what they think is the main idea of this article. Have them point to the text and text features in the article to show how they came up with their answers. Remind children to use context clues as they read to figure out the meanings of unfamiliar words. Then have children read the article independently. Distribute Blackline Master 44 on pages 147–148 of the Teacher’s Manual and tell children that they will take a practice test on the article they just read. Share these specific suggestions with children to help them answer test questions: 1. Before you read, look at the photographs, captions, and title to give you an idea of what the article is about. 2. Read “Play Ball!” and the questions on the worksheet very carefully. Make sure you understand what the questions are asking. 3. Make sure your answers are based on the article, photographs, and captions. If you are not sure about the details, go back and read that part again. 4. For the short-answer question, plan your answer carefully before you write. Make sure you answer every part of the question and use support from the article in your answer. 5. Be sure to use complete sentences in your answer. Have children complete Blackline Master 44. Answers can be found on pages T30–T31 of the Teacher’s Manual.

146

Time For Kids • Issue 15

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “Play Ball!” 1 Look at the diagram of information from the article.
Held in Williamsport, Pennsylvania Top teams play Kids make friends

Which of these belongs in the empty box?
A B C

Little League World Series Hawaiian athletes Softball around the world

2 A coach’s job is to —
A B C
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

throw the ball train the team catch the ball

Blackline Master 44

Grade 1 Play Ball!

Time For Kids

147

Student Name

3 Look at the photo and caption on page 92. What do players do before the game?
A B C

Swing the bat Stretch Chew gum

4 On page 93, the word admire means —
A B C

make fun of act just like look up to

5 What makes the Little League World Series fun? Support your answer with details from the article.

Blackline Master 44

148

Time For Kids

Grade 1 Play Ball!

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

TFK Page 94

Poetry
APPLY THE SKILLS

Tell children they will read a poem and answer questions about it. Remind children that poems do not follow the same rules as prose. For example, poems may not have complete sentences. They are arranged into lines and stanzas instead of paragraphs. Some poems rhyme, but some do not. Poems often use vivid words to appeal to the reader’s senses and feelings. Sometimes poems repeat a word or line several times to help express an important idea. Have children open to “From the autograph album” on page 94 of Time for Kids. Read the title with children and ask them to share their ideas of what the poem is about. Write their ideas on the board. If some children do not know what an autograph album is, explain that some famous people sign their names for fans. These are autographs. Collectors sometimes put these autographs into albums. Then read the poem aloud with children and discuss the different images in the poem and what they might mean. Make sure children understand the baseball terms in the poem. Distribute Blackline Master 45 on page 150 of the Teacher’s Manual. Read aloud the first question and the answer choices. Tell children to look at the poem to find the answer. Think Aloud This question asks about how the poet writes the first stanza. I will need to look at the first stanza carefully and connect what I find to the answer choices to figure out which answer is best. After children have had time to identify the correct answer (A), ask a volunteer to explain why this answer is correct and the other two answers are not. Have children complete Blackline Master 45. Answers can be found on page T31 of the Teacher’s Manual. 1 In the first stanza, the poet —
A B C

repeats the “s” sound rhymes the two lines uses lines of the same length
From Blackline Master 45

Teacher’s Manual

149

Student Name

DIRECTIONS Answer these questions about “From the autograph album.” 1 In the first stanza, the poet —
A B C

repeats the “s” sound rhymes the two lines uses lines of the same length

2 How can the reader tell that “From the autograph album” is a poem?
A B C

It is divided into short lines. It mixes easy and hard words. It tells about life and baseball.

3 Which words in the second stanza rhyme?
A B C

In, out Jim, star
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

drop, shortstop

Blackline Master 45

150

Time For Kids

Grade 1 From the autograph album

Short-Answer Reading Rubric
Use the rubric below to score the short-answer items in the tests.
Score Description
An exemplary response gives an interesting and detailed response strongly supported by text evidence. A sufficient response gives a clear and reasonable response supported by text evidence. A partially sufficient response gives a reasonable but vague response weakly connected to text evidence. An insufficient response does not respond to the question.

3 2 1 0

Evidence may be specific words from the story or a retelling.

Teacher’s Manual

T1

Answer Key
ISSUE 1, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
B C A C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Retell Retell Photographs and Captions Context Clues Retell

3-Point Answer: Dragonflies are at the pond in the morning. Swans are there in the afternoon. Raccoons are there at night. 2-Point Answer: Dragonflies are at the pond in the morning. Swans are there in the afternoon. 1-Point Answer: Raccoons are at the pond at night.

ISSUE 1, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C C A B See possible responses below

Content Focus
Retell Retell Photographs and Captions Context Clues Retell

3-Point Answer: Children reuse and recycle things. They learn about plants and animals. They use less power and light. 2-Point Answer: Children reuse and recycle things. They use less power. 1-Point Answer: Children reuse and recycle things.

T2

Time For Kids • Issue 1

ISSUE 1, Text Feature
Question
1 2 3

Answer
A C B

Content Focus
Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams

Teacher’s Manual

T3

ISSUE 2, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
B C A A See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Maps Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-Point Answer: The children who live near Garissa do not have books to read. People from other countries give books to a special library for these children. Camels carry the books to towns near Garissa so children can read the books. 2-Point Answer: People from other countries give books to a special library for the children of Garissa. Camels carry the books to Garissa so children can read them. 1-Point Answer: Camels carry the books to towns near Garissa.

ISSUE 2, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C A A C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Maps Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-Point Answer: People should save water because there is little fresh water on Earth. The number of people on Earth is getting bigger. More people need water to drink. They also need water to wash in and to grow food. 2-Point Answer: People should save water because there is little fresh water on Earth. People need water to drink. 1-Point Answer: People need water to drink.

T4

Time For Kids • Issue 2

ISSUE 2, Poetry
Question
1 2 3

Answer
C B A

Content Focus
Poetry Poetry Poetry

Teacher’s Manual

T5

ISSUE 3, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
B A C C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Compare and Contrast Compare and Contrast Diagrams Context Clues Compare and Contrast

3-Point Answer: The wings are different on ladybugs than on other bugs. Ladybugs have two outer wings and thin wings underneath them. 2-Point Answer: Ladybugs have four wings. 1-Point Answer: Ladybugs have different wings.

ISSUE 3, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
A C B A See possible responses below

Content Focus
Compare and Contrast Compare and Contrast Diagrams Context Clues Compare and Contrast

3-point answer: All volunteers are good citizens. They work for free. They deserve a big “thank you.” 2-point answer: All volunteers work for free. They deserve a big “thank you.” 1-point answer: Volunteers work for free.

T6

Time For Kids • Issue 3

ISSUE 3, Poetry
Question
1 2 3

Answer
A B A

Content Focus
Poetry Poetry Poetry

Teacher’s Manual

T7

ISSUE 4, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
B C C A See possible responses below

Content Focus
Author’s Purpose Author’s Purpose Charts Context Clues Author’s Purpose

3-point answer: The author wants readers to get healthy by eating good foods and staying in shape. The boy looks healthy and happy. Kids will see the picture and want to be like the boy. 2-point answer: The boy looks happy and healthy. Kids will see the picture and want to be like the boy. 1-point answer: The boy looks healthy and happy.

ISSUE 4, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C A B C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Author’s Purpose Author’s Purpose Charts Context Clues Author’s Purpose

3-point answer: The author tells how colorful vegetables are good for you. A purple carrot has extra vitamins. An orange cauliflower has extra vitamin A. 2-point answer: The author tells how colorful vegetables are good for you. A purple carrot has extra vitamins. 1-point answer: The author tells how colorful vegetables are good for you.

T8

Time For Kids • Issue 4

ISSUE 4, Text Feature
Question
1 2 3

Answer
B C B

Content Focus
Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams

Teacher’s Manual

T9

ISSUE 5, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
A B B A See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Lists Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: Children collect food for people in need. They also collect toys and money so all kids will get holiday gifts. Some children give their time by reading to younger kids. 2-point answer: Children collect food for people who need it. They also collect toys so all kids will get holiday gifts. 1-point answer: Children collect food for people who need it.

ISSUE 5, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C C B C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Lists Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: Baby animals need help getting food and staying safe. A baby otter cannot get its own meal. A baby crocodile needs its mom to take it to the water to be safe. 2-point answer: Baby animals need help getting food and staying safe. A baby otter cannot find its own meal. 1-point answer: Baby animals need help getting food.

T10

Time For Kids • Issue 5

ISSUE 5, Poetry
Question
1 2 3

Answer
A C B

Content Focus
Poetry Poetry Poetry

Teacher’s Manual

T11

ISSUE 6, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C C B A See possible responses below

Content Focus
Author’s Purpose Author’s Purpose Photographs and Captions Context Clues Author’s Purpose

3-point answer: The text is about people exploring the rain forest. It says that they can walk on bridges high over the ground. The photograph shows people on one of these bridges. The photograph helps readers understand what the bridges look like. 2-point answer: The text says people can walk on bridges in the rain forest. The photograph shows one of these bridges. 1-point answer: The photograph shows a bridge in the rain forest.

ISSUE 6, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
B A A C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Author’s Purpose Author’s Purpose Photographs and Captions Context Clues Author’s Purpose

3-point answer: Many foods and medicines come from rain forests. Fiber and oils from rain forests are used to make rugs and paint. Rain forests add a gas called oxygen to the air. People and animals breathe oxygen. 2-point answer: Many foods and medicines come from rain forests. Fiber and oils from rain forests are used to make rugs and paint. 1-point answer: Many foods and medicines come from rain forests.

T12

Time For Kids • Issue 6

ISSUE 6, Text Feature
Question
1 2 3

Answer
C B A

Content Focus
Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams

Teacher’s Manual

T13

ISSUE 7, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
B B A C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Diagrams Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: This was a new type of dinosaur that no one knew about before. It had arms like wings. It had a long nose like a beak. 2-point answer: It had arms like wings. It had a long nose like a beak. 1-point answer: It had arms like wings.

ISSUE 7, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C B A A See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Diagrams Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: A snail crawls on the bottom of its body. A frog uses its legs to jump. A dog uses its legs to run. An eagle flaps its wings to fly. A dolphin uses its tail to swim. 2-point answer: A frog uses its legs to jump. A dog uses its legs to run. A bird flaps its wings to fly. 1-point answer: A frog uses its legs to jump. A dog uses its legs to run.

T14

Time For Kids • Issue 7

ISSUE 7, Poetry
Question
1 2 3

Answer
A A C

Content Focus
Poetry Poetry Poetry

Teacher’s Manual

T15

ISSUE 8, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
B A C B See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Maps Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: Wind can make balloons fly. It can change the shape of trees and rocks. It can be used to make electricity. 2-point answer: Wind can make balloons fly. It can change the shape of trees and rocks. 1-point answer: Wind can make balloons fly.

ISSUE 8, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
A B A C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Maps Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: Chicago and Dodge City are two windy cities in the United States. Dodge City is windier. It is the windiest city in the United States. 2-point answer: Chicago and Dodge City are two windy cities. Dodge City is windier. 1-point answer: Chicago and Dodge City are two windy cities.

T16

Time For Kids • Issue 8

ISSUE 8, Poetry
Question
1 2 3

Answer
C B B

Content Focus
Poetry Poetry Poetry

Teacher’s Manual

T17

ISSUE 9, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
A C B A See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Charts Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: Crabs hide under rocks, and they have hard shells. Jellyfish can sting. Fish swim down deep during the day so they cannot be seen. 2-point answer: Crabs hide under rocks, and they have hard shells. Fish swim down deep so they cannot be seen. 1-point answer: Crabs hide under rocks, and they have hard shells.

ISSUE 9, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
A C B C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Charts Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: Wet things get dry from the sun’s heat. The sun’s heat turns the water into a gas. The gas goes into the air. 2-point answer: Wet things get dry from the sun’s heat. The water turns into a gas. 1-point answer: The water goes into the air.

T18

Time For Kids • Issue 9

ISSUE 9, Poetry
Question
1 2 3

Answer
B C A

Content Focus
Poetry Poetry Poetry

Teacher’s Manual

T19

ISSUE 10, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C A C B See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Signs and Symbols Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: Owls can hear and see very well at night. This helps them hunt for food. They also can fly very quietly. 2-point answer: Owls can hear and see well at night. They can fly quietly. 1-point answer: Owls can see at night.

ISSUE 10, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
A B B C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Signs and Symbols Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: Living things get energy from food. Plants make food from sunlight. Plants are food for grasshoppers. Insects are food for owls. 2-point answer: Living things get energy from food. Plants make food from sunlight. 1-point answer: Living things get energy from food.

T20

Time For Kids • Issue 10

ISSUE 10, Text Feature
Question
1 2 3

Answer
C B A

Content Focus
Charts Charts Charts

Teacher’s Manual

T21

ISSUE 11, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
B C A B See possible responses below

Content Focus
Author’s Purpose Author’s Purpose Charts Context Clues Author’s Purpose

3-point answer: The article is about pet dogs that compete in shows. If a dog wins, it gets a prize. That is why the author chose the title “Prize Pets.” 2-point answer: The article is about pet dogs that compete in shows. If a dog wins, it gets a prize. 1-point answer: The article tells about dogs that win pet shows.

ISSUE 11, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C B A C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Author’s Purpose Author’s Purpose Charts Context Clues Author’s Purpose

3-point answer: The article tells about different symbols of America. It tells about the eagle, the Liberty Bell, and the flag. All of these symbols are about America. 2-point answer: The author wrote about different symbols. All of these symbols are about America. 1-point answer: The article is about America.

T22

Time For Kids • Issue 11

ISSUE 11, Text Feature
Question
1 2 3

Answer
A C B

Content Focus
Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams

Teacher’s Manual

T23

ISSUE 12, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C C A B See possible responses below

Content Focus
Retell Retell Photographs and Captions Context Clues Retell

3-point answer: Kids can sell goods, like old toys, to earn money. They can also sell services, like walking a dog. 2-point answer: Kids can sell goods, like old toys. They can also sell services. 1-point answer: Kids can sell goods.

ISSUE 12, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
B C A C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Retell Retell Photographs and Captions Context Clues Retell

3-point answer: First, metal strips go through a machine. Then disks are cut out of the metal. Last, pictures are stamped on the disks. 2-point answer: First, metal strips go through a machine. Then disks are cut out of the metal. 1-point answer: A machine cuts disks out of metal strips.

T24

Time For Kids • Issue 12

ISSUE 12, Text Feature
Question
1 2 3

Answer
A C B

Content Focus
Charts Charts Charts

Teacher’s Manual

T25

ISSUE 13, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C C B A See possible responses below

Content Focus
Compare and Contrast Compare and Contrast Diagrams Context Clues Compare and Contrast

3-point answer: Long ago, families sewed their own clothes by hand. Today, clothes are made by machines in factories. Families buy these clothes in stores. 2-point answer: Long ago, families sewed their own clothes by hand. Today, families buy their clothes in stores. 1-point answer: Families used to make their own clothes.

ISSUE 13, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C A B A See possible responses below

Content Focus
Compare and Contrast Compare and Contrast Diagrams Context Clues Compare and Contrast

3-point answer: All astronauts study science and math. They get good grades and go to college. All astronauts go into space. They all have jobs in space. 2-point answer: All astronauts study science and math. All astronauts have jobs in space. 1-point answer: All astronauts have jobs in space.

T26

Time For Kids • Issue 13

ISSUE 13, Text Feature
Question
1 2 3

Answer
C A A

Content Focus
Diagrams Diagrams Diagrams

Teacher’s Manual

T27

ISSUE 14, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
C C A B See possible responses below

Content Focus
Compare and Contrast Compare and Contrast Signs and Symbols Context Clues Compare and Contrast

3-point answer: Most museums are indoors. Padre Island National Seashore is an outdoor museum and park. You can see birds and animals there. You can also see the sea. 2-point answer: Most museums are indoors. Padre Island National Seashore is an outdoor museum and park. 1-point answer: Padre Island National Seashore is outdoors.

ISSUE 14, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
B B C A See possible responses below

Content Focus
Compare and Contrast Compare and Contrast Signs and Symbols Context Clues Compare and Contrast

3-point answer: Long ago, all baskets were made by hand. They were used for drinking and for cooking. Today, some baskets are made by machines. Machines make baskets fast. 2-point answer: Long ago, baskets were made by hand. Today they are made by machines. 1-point answer: Long ago, baskets were made by hand.

T28

Time For Kids • Issue 14

ISSUE 14, Poetry
Question
1 2 3

Answer
C A C

Content Focus
Poetry Poetry Poetry

Teacher’s Manual

T29

ISSUE 15, Article 1
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
B A B A See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Photographs and Captions Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: In the Kentucky Derby, the horses run one mile. The race is over in just minutes. In a tennis tournament, there are many games. The winner of each game plays again until there are just two players left. This can take weeks. 2-point answer: In the Kentucky Derby, the horses run one mile. The race is over in just minutes. A tennis tournament can take weeks. 1-point answer: There are many games in a tennis tournament.

ISSUE 15, Article 2
Question
1 2 3 4 5

Answer
A B B C See possible responses below

Content Focus
Main Idea and Details Main Idea and Details Photographs and Captions Context Clues Main Idea and Details

3-point answer: Kids get to play baseball against top teams. They make friends. They meet kids on other teams. 2-point answer: Kids play baseball. They also make friends. 1-point answer: Kids play baseball.

T30

Time For Kids • Issue 15

ISSUE 15, Poetry
Question
1 2 3

Answer
A A C

Content Focus
Poetry Poetry Poetry

Teacher’s Manual

T31

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