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Six Steps to a Polio-Free World
An Insider’s Look at a Massive Polio Immunization Campaign

A Message from the U.S. Fund Board Chair and President
Dear Friend of UNICEF, You have helped UNICEF to respond to emergencies both hidden and highly publicized and to protect young lives from threats old and new. When crises erupted in Libya, Côte d’Ivoire, Japan, and elsewhere, you were there for children in harm’s way. And your ongoing support is critical as UNICEF works to reach more of the world’s most disadvantaged boys and girls, in some of the most remote places. Making sure that we serve these children — that we serve all children — is crucial to our goal of reaching the day when zero young lives are lost to preventable causes. The fight against polio is a potent example. Since 1988, UNICEF and its partners have been able to cut the number of polio cases worldwide by 99 percent. Now, there is a final push to rid the world of this scourge forever. It is imperative that we succeed — because as long as one child remains unprotected, polio will persist. Carrying out a mass immunization campaign is a staggering and painstaking operation (see feature on page 11). The monumental global effort to end this horrid disease requires an enormous, ironclad commitment from the UNICEF family and its supporters, and from many key partners (see sidebar on page 14). This type of commitment fuels all of UNICEF’s work, from Haiti to Bangladesh, from Afghanistan to Nigeria. The unrelenting drive to save young lives — and the refusal to be daunted, no matter what challenges we face — is what galvanizes UNICEF and U.S. Fund staff as well as our supporters. This shared sense of mission was palpable at the U.S. Fund for UNICEF’s Annual Meeting in April. It was gratifying to be among hundreds of valued donors, partners, volunteers, and friends — all gathered in one room to celebrate lives saved and vowing to save even more. The meeting also marked a momentous occasion: the signing of a memorandum of understanding between UNICEF, the U.S. Fund, and Kiwanis International that affirms all three parties’ partnership in the Eliminate Project. This historic initiative will raise $110 million to eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus from the face of the Earth and to protect babies and mothers all over the world from this dreaded disease. Thank you for your continued generosity and loyalty, and thank you for helping us do whatever it takes to save a child.

Anthony Pantaleoni Board Chair

Caryl M. Stern President and CEO

P.S. To support UNICEF immunization programs, please visit unicefusa.org/donate/immunization.

U.S. Fund for UNICEF

In This Issue
9 Donor Activities at Home and Abroad

2–4 UNICEF in the Field 10 Field Visit 15 Partner Profiles Why I Give: Richard Levy 11–14 Feature: Six Steps to a Polio-Free World — An Insider’s Look at a Massive 5–8 Inside the U.S. Fund Polio Immunization Campaign 16 Inside the U.S. Fund Continued

U.S. Fund for UNICEF Board of Directors
Honorary Co-Chairs George H.W. Bush Jimmy Carter William J. Clinton Chair Emeritus Hugh Downs Chair Anthony Pantaleoni Vice Chair Peter Lamm President Caryl M. Stern Secretary Gary M. Cohen Treasurer Edward G. Lloyd Honorary Directors Susan V. Berresford James H. Carey Marvin J. Girouard Anthony Lake John C. Whitehead Honorary Members Joy Greenhouse Helen G. Jacobson Susan C. McKeever Lester Wunderman Directors Andrew D. Beer Daniel J. Brutto Nelson Chai Gary M. Cohen Mary Callahan Erdoes Pamela Fiori Dolores Rice Gahan, D.O. Bruce Scott Gordon Vincent John Hemmer Peter Lamm Téa Leoni Bob Manoukian Anthony Pantaleoni Amy L. Robbins Henry S. Schleiff Kathi P. Seifert Caryl M. Stern Jim Walton Sherrie Rollins Westin

Produced by the Department of Editorial and Creative Services
Executive Editor Mia Drake Brandt Managing Editor Adam Fifield Art Director Rachael Bruno Assistant Managing Editor Jen Banbury Contributing Editor Eileen Coppola Designer Melissa Axelrod Copyright © 2011 U.S. Fund for UNICEF . All rights reserved.

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Emergencies Update
LIBYA
Hostilities in Libya have created an extremely precarious situation for countless children and families. As of this writing, 822,000 people have fled the country since the crisis began. UNICEF has delivered humanitarian assistance for stranded populations on the Egyptian and Tunisian borders and within Libya itself. At the Salloum crossing on the Libya-Egypt border, UNICEF has provided water, sanitation equipment, and child protection services. At the Shousha transit camp near the Libya-Tunisia border, UNICEF has worked with partners to set up child-friendly spaces, and has deployed psychologists to assist families. Access inside Libya is severely limited, and UNICEF is working to increase its capabilities and presence in the country. UNICEF and its NGO partners have been delivering emergency health kits to serve 60,000 people in Benghazi. UNICEF emergency supplies for between 15,000 and 25,000 people reached the port of Misrata in late April. The items included first aid kits, water purification tablets, and hygiene kits and were distributed to those most in need. This followed an earlier delivery of supplies from a humanitarian cargo ship that docked in Misrata on April 7.

jAPAn
Days after Japan was devastated by both the most powerful earthquake in its history and a terrifying tsunami, the U. S. Fund for UNICEF started to raise funds to assist children in a country that has, since 1950, been a steadfast and generous donor to UNICEF. The contributions of U.S. Fund supporters have helped UNICEF provide aid for children who have lost parents, homes, neighborhoods, and friends. Among other things, UNICEF has supplied early childhood development kits, advocated for the protection of orphans, and helped establish child-friendly spaces in hard-hit areas. More than 60 UNICEF Mini-Libraries carrying books donated by the public have been established. Several Japanese UNICEF experts deployed elsewhere returned home to work with the Japan Committee for UNICEF (JCU) in assessing the needs of children and families. The JCU has been directing the distribution of supplies.
To donate to UNICEF emergency relief by region, please visit unicefusa.org/ donate/emergencies.

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Côte d’Ivoire — Fleeing Violence, Finding School
Twelve-year-old Pamela and fifteenyear-old Arouna felt lucky. As lucky as they could, given that they had to flee their village when it became a violent battleground following November’s disputed presidential election in Côte d’Ivoire. They felt lucky because, despite all they had been through, UNICEF and its partners made sure they had a chance to go to school. The children were part of a group of nearly 2,000 people who escaped to the safe, peaceful town of Tiébissou, located in the middle of a forest. All told, around 1 million people — the majority of them children and women — fled violence in Côte d’Ivoire, seeking refuge in secure areas of the country or asylum in Ghana, Guinea, and Liberia. Even under highly dangerous circumstances, UNICEF provided children and families with water, nutritional supplements, medicines, health care, hygiene kits, schooling, and much more. The wide-ranging violence disrupted education for an estimated 800,000 children across Côte d’Ivoire. With help from UNICEF, Pamela, Arouna, and other children were able to enroll in Tiébissou’s primary schools. To help them restart their studies, UNICEF gave each child a school bag containing notebooks, pens, pencils, an eraser, and a pencil sharpener. UNICEF also provided teachers with a variety of educational supplies, as well as recreation kits so students could play games and sports during breaks. Although Pamela couldn’t go to school for three weeks while on the move, she worked hard to catch up with her classmates. “My teacher and my new friends, Mariam and Sarah, are very supportive,” she says. “Even though I miss my old school, I feel safe here. There are no military troops.” With violence subsiding in Côte d’Ivoire, hundreds of thousands of children are now making their way back to their homes, and UNICEF is working to make sure all of them have the chance to return to school. Arouna hopes to be a professional competitive cyclist some day. Pamela recently decided she wants to work for UNICEF. “I like to be helpful to other people,” she says.

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A Sanctuary for Victims of Sexual Violence
Under a blue sky in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), the air filled with the sound of women laughing and singing. These women didn’t always have reason to laugh; most of them are victims of rape — a horrifyingly common weapon of war in the DRC. But on this day, the women were celebrating. Thanks to their own hard work, and with support from UNICEF and playwright Eve Ensler’s organization V-Day, they were opening City of Joy — a sanctuary for survivors of sexual violence in the DRC. City of Joy’s airy, colorful buildings will be home to 90 women at a time, in six-month stints. The women, aged fourteen to thirty-five, will receive psychotherapy as well as skills and literacy training. Most importantly, survivors will find support and self-empowerment as they attempt to reclaim their bodies and lives. In 2010, UNICEF helped 16,874 survivors of sexual violence in the DRC — including 8,704 children — through a host of health, education, and psychosocial services. Now City of Joy will provide roundthe-clock care and sanctuary for those who need it most. The women who thrive in this sanctuary will leave as leaders in the battle against gender-based violence in the DRC, determined to change the status of Congolese women and eventually, the country as a whole.
To contribute to UNICEF programs in the DRC, please visit unicefusa.org/donate/drc.

Adolescents Are Children Too
Being a teenager isn’t easy. But in the world’s most impoverished communities, adolescence is often a particularly harsh and dangerous time. Around the globe, there are 1.2 billion adolescents between the ages of ten and nineteen. Nearly nine out of ten live in the developing world. The unique needs of these children don’t get as much attention as those of younger kids, according to UNICEF’s annual flagship report The State of the World’s Children, released in February. While not as susceptible to disease and malnutrition as younger children, adolescents may in some ways be even more vulnerable — especially when it comes to violence and exploitation. All over the globe, adolescent boys and girls are forced to work, forced to fight in wars, and subjected to sexual abuse and other abhorrent forms of cruelty. In Brazil alone, 81,000 teenagers, ranging from fifteen to nineteen, were murdered between 1998 and 2008. Adolescent girls are particularly at risk throughout the world, enduring early and forced marriage. UNICEF works to protect adolescents from violence, conflict, and the threat of HIV/AIDS; teach them important life skills; provide health care; and promote adolescent participation in youth forums and community service initiatives. From Egypt to India, Honduras to Nigeria, adolescents can wield a powerful collective voice and — if given enough support and resources — can help break cycles of poverty and inequality and build a better future for all.
To learn more, adolescents. please visit unicefusa.org/

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K.I.N.D.: Kids in Need of Desks
Imagine all the schools in the world that are little more than rudimentary shelters. Most have dirt or cement floors, no chairs, no desks — just a teacher and crowds of children sitting on the ground, desperate to learn. Last summer, on a visit to Malawi, MSNBC’s Lawrence O’Donnell witnessed firsthand the enormous need for school desks. up He teamed UNICEF with on a cement floor. You will be uncomfortable in ten minutes or less. Then you will be in pain — your back, your hips. Now stay there for seven hours. Now try doing that five days a week. Oh, and don’t forget to read and write while you’re sitting on the

and, before he left the country, he had helped to furnish a classroom. Upon his

It’s amazing what a difference something as simple as a desk can make.

floor. And while you’re at it, try to learn something, anything, a language maybe, something that requires real concentration.” Already, more than 13,000 desks with builtin benches have been manufactured and are being delivered to distributed, each of which will allow two or more children to sit comfortably and better focus on their studies. By raising children up, two at a time onto a desk bench, UNICEF and Lawrence O’Donnell — who spoke at the U.S. Fund’s Annual Meeting in April — are doing their part to give children a head start.
To learn how you can donate a desk for a child in Malawi, please visit unicefusa.org/kind.

return to the U.S., he helped to launch K.I.N.D.: Kids in Need of Desks in partnership with the U.S. Fund for UNICEF. It’s amazing what a difference something as simple as a desk can make. But, as Lawrence O’Donnell put it, “Try sitting

schools, thanks to generous donors to the K.I.N.D. Fund. In addition to providing desks, K.I.N.D. is creating much-needed employment in Malawi by working with local manufacturers to make the desks. Eventually, at least 46,000 desks will be

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Students Brainstorm to Help UNICEF Solve Problems in the Field
In a classroom at New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program, students sit in clusters, brainstorming. They are trying to come up with simple technological solutions to some of the most basic problems faced by UNICEF staff in the field. Like how to reconnect and delegate staff when a disaster cuts off normal communications. Or how to precisely track each supply sent in response to a major disaster. These students are members of the “Design for UNICEF” course — a groundbreaking collaboration between academia and UNICEF staff to generate new, outside-the-box ideas that will help UNICEF work as effectively as possible. The course — which will be offered for the fourth year in a row this fall — is the brainchild of UNICEF’s Christopher Fabian and Erica Kochi and NYU Professor and new media expert Clay Shirky. Fabian and Kochi spearhead UNICEF’s Tech4Dev Unit, which seeks to maximize use of current technology in the agency’s field operations. In part because of the Tech4Dev unit, UNICEF was recently named a leading innovative international development organization by Devex, a global information hub for international development professionals and aid workers. At the U.S. Fund’s Annual Meeting in April, attendees had the opportunity to take part in an emergency simulation developed by the U.S. Fund in partnership with the Tech4Dev team and the Design for UNICEF class. By experiencing what it means to make life-and-death decisions during an emergency, U.S. Fund supporters got an invaluable, visceral sense of the biggest challenges UNICEF faces when disaster strikes and every minute is crucial to children’s survival and safety.

U.S. Fund for UnICEF’s 2011 Annual Meeting
UNICEF’s Representative in haiti, Françoise Gruloos-Ackermans, speaks at the U.s. Fund for UNICEF Annual Meeting on April 29 in New York, after receiving the Audrey hepburn humanitarian Award. Ms. Gruloos-Ackermans accepted the award, named for UNICEF’s legendary Goodwill Ambassador, on behalf of all the UNICEF staff members who quickly and fearlessly responded to the earthquake that struck haiti on January 12, 2010.
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Olivia Harrison Visits UNICEF Projects in Bangladesh
Olivia Harrison, founder of the George Harrison Fund for UNICEF and wife of the late musician George Harrison, visited Bangladesh in February with a delegation that included U.S. Fund for UNICEF President and CEO Caryl M. Stern and Jonathan Clyde of Apple Corps. George Harrison began his relationship with UNICEF through the groundbreaking “Concert for Bangladesh” in 1971. Olivia Harrison has wholeheartedly embraced the legacy of her late husband’s humanitarian contributions to the country, and she is dedicated to helping foster a new Bangladesh where every child counts. The trip was an opportunity for Ms. Harrison and the U.S. Fund group to see some of the programs that have been brought to life thanks to the George Harrison Fund for UNICEF. At a UNICEF-supported center for at-risk youth in Mirpur, close to 50 children between the ages of five and fifteen gather every day. Almost 30 of them live in the center, where they receive food, education, health services, and life-skills training. In fact, before coming to the center every one of them had been struggling to survive alone on the street, without families or any kind of support. On the day Ms. Harrison and the UNICEF team visited the center, the children performed a play about child labor, a critical issue in Bangladesh. They showed that they have learned a lot since they began going to the facility. When the delegation asked about child rights, they all piped up: “We have a right to shelter, food, education, health, and play!” “These children are living a harsh reality,” said Ms. Harrison (pictured below left). “But what is amazing to me is that all of them know their rights.” That same day, the UNICEF group visited an open-air school and met children who are living in makeshift shelters on a river embankment. These children spend their days performing jobs such as picking rags, collecting firewood, or taking care of siblings at home when their parents go to work. As a result, they’re unable to attend traditional school. But with the support of UNICEF, an “openair school” is providing them with basic education and helping to prepare them for future enrollment in government primary schools. The delegation was also able to observe the critical work of several other initiatives supported by the George Harrison Fund for UNICEF that are addressing the educational needs of Bangladesh’s most vulnerable children. In partnership with the Government of Bangladesh and various NGOs, UNICEF is helping the country’s poorest children learn the life skills they need to survive and have a better future.
To support the George Harrison Fund for UNICEF , please visit unicefusa.org/donate/georgeharrison.

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Sports Partnerships: a Big Win for the World’s Children
What bands the Los Angeles Dodgers and the New York Mets together? What unites the Chicago Bulls and the Boston Celtics? What makes hundreds of competing athletes all part of the same team? Simple: the fight to save children’s lives. Members of the sports community are a major source of ing support work. for They UNICEF’s lifesavare we grateful for the generosity, dedication, and involvement within the sports community — but what’s equally important to UNICEF is that these athletes serve as role models for America’s children on behalf of the world’s children.” Sports partners have been especially generous following emergencies. After the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Major League Baseball (MLB) and the Major League Baseball Players Association jointly contributed $500,000 Players, teams, and sports organizations have supported many other UNICEF initiatives as well. In March, NBA Star Dwight “Superman” Howard of the Orlando Magic joined the UNICEF Tap Project campaign to highlight the importance of clean water. Los Angeles Laker and UNICEF Spain Ambassador Pau Gasol has visited UNICEF programs in South Africa, Angola, and Ethiopia and has vigorously promoted child survival and emergency relief efforts. The New Jersey Devils hosted “UNICEF Night” in October of 2009 to raise funds and awareness for Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF (TOT) and to help victims of natural disasters in Asia-Pacific. MLB, the NBA, and MLS have also supported TOT. Sports partners generate funds that help UNICEF carry out its vital work, and they also set an admirable example of service and compassion for fans of all ages.
To learn more about sports partnerships, please visit unicefusa.org/partners/sports. (INsIdE thE U.s. FUNd continued on page 16)

have donated their time and resources, harnessing their unparalleled visibility to raise awareness about child survival issues and inspire their fans to action. The U.S. Fund for UNICEF Sports Partnerships de-

All of our sports partners are a part of a global movement to save children’s lives.

toward UNICEF relief efforts. In addition, the entire MLB family of 30 Clubs, the MLB Network, and MLB.com encouraged

partment works with athletes, teams, and leagues to advocate for children in need, and to mobilize resources to support UNICEF’s efforts. “All of our sports partners are a part of a global movement to save children’s lives,” says U.S. Fund for UNICEF President and CEO Caryl M. Stern. “Not only

fans to support the effort. The NBA’s Golden State Warriors held a silent auction and hosted U.S. Fund volunteers for in-arena collections, raising a total of $18,000 to help victims in Japan. In response to last year’s earthquake in Haiti, the National Basketball Association (NBA) and the NBA Players Association contributed $1 million for UNICEF’s aid efforts, and 20 NBA teams and many individual players made donations. In addition, MLB donated $1 million to support UNICEF’s critical work in Haiti, and 11 MLB clubs collected and made contributions. Major League Soccer (MLS), the National Hockey League, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and the United States Tennis Association also responded generously to help Haiti’s people.

The NBA’s Samuel Dalembert (pictured at left) with Caryl M. Stern.

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UNICEF’s Next Generation member Lauren Bush in Guatemala visiting UNICEF nutrition programs that her company, FEED Projects, LLC, helps support through the purchase of the FEED Guatemala bags.

NBA star and UNICEF Spain Ambassador Pau Gasol (c.) at a Los Angeles event with (l.-r.) Ladd Richland, Susan Holliday, Rick Levy, Tim Bruinsma, Thomas Zuber, Jamie Meyer, Caryl M. Stern, Joyce Rey, Anne Kelly, Marisa Zanuck, Carol Levy, and Gary Yale.

Ambassador Meron Reuben, Permanent Representative of Israel to the United Nations; Ron Guttmann, Board member of the Israeli Fund for UNICEF; and Caryl M. Stern display their T-shirts at a Purim reception held by the Israeli Fund for UNICEF .

Jennifer Lopez and Gucci Creative Director Frida Giannini at the inaugural Women of Compassion Luncheon in Los Angeles. Ms. Giannini was honored, along with UNICEF’s Malawi Representative, Carrie Auer.

Aoife Burke, niece of Midwest Regional Board member Brendan Burke, at Central Christian School in Belize City during a family field visit.

New England Regional Board member David Dodson, shown with women and their children during a field visit to Togo.

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Togo
In January, U.S. Fund for UNICEF supporters and staff traveled to Togo for a parent-child field visit. Jim and Jill Cochran and their children Lizzie, Johnny, and Jimmy were among those on the trip. JIM: For nearly two decades, Togo was cut off from development assistance because of its political turmoil and human rights violations. Now, the country is finally starting to recover. JILL: But Togo needs a tremendous amount of help. We visited a school where there wasn’t a UNICEF program yet, and it was essentially made of sticks, with a thatched roof. There were six or seven kids crammed onto each bench, sharing a little writing tablet. Because of the lack of trained teachers, one volunteer was teaching students ranging from young children to teenagers, regardless of their level. The children were so eager — all they wanted was to learn. JIM: In Togo, school is a great privilege. I was in the Peace Corps there in the 1980s, and taught English and art. There were no books, no pencils or paper, and some of the students had to walk three or more miles to get to school. It’s hard to see bright, energetic kids struggling because there are no resources. I decided that, when I could, I would support programs to help them. But I was saddened to see on our recent trip that young children in Togo need more help than ever. JILL: We were there to visit a range of UNICEF programs. We saw schools, protection programs, water and sanitation projects, and much more — all programs designed to help children and communities. In the village of Wekele, we met community health workers who were teaching parents about malnutrition, and evaluating children using simple but effective medical aids. The health workers discovered that one child was acutely malnourished, and they started giving supplemental food immediately. JIM: I’m convinced that if UNICEF were not in that village and didn’t have that program in place, that baby would have died. Early interventions are crucial — whether in nutrition or education. That’s why UNICEF’s new preschool program in Togo makes so much sense — for girls in particular. When I was there 30 years ago, a class of 50 students might have just five girls. Often, girls are kept home to help their mothers. But if we can get girls starting school very young, those girls are more likely to be able to stay and graduate and have better opportunities and the chance for a more prosperous life. JILL: Of course, they all have dreams just like American kids do. Children we spoke with wanted to be teachers, nurses, doctors. One girl wanted to be president. JIM: UNICEF does such a good job of identifying what a country’s needs are and drilling all the way down to the village level to implement programs and confirm that they’re being carried out properly. We have absolute confidence that whether we donate $100 or $100,000, that money is going to be managed well and will have an impact on people at the village level. The revitalization of Togo’s educational system is probably the most important step toward improving the prospects of future generations there. That is why we decided to pledge our support and enlist others to join us. Investing in Togo is a great way to help these bright, ambitious kids get the opportunities they deserve.
To contribute to UNICEF’s preschool program in Togo, please contact Karen Turney at KTurney@unicefusa.org or by calling 713-963-9390, ext. 24.

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Six Steps to a Polio-Free World
An Insider’s Look at a Massive Polio Immunization Campaign
By Jen Banbury

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n India, a boy struggles to cross a busy street. He uses a handmade crutch to hobble forward, dragging a twisted, useless leg behind him. This is a picture of polio. For most of the 20th century, the word polio spread terror throughout the U.S., where epidemics killed thousands and left tens of thousands permanently paralyzed. But an effective vaccine and mass immunization wiped out the disease in developed countries. And since the start of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (see page 14) in 1988, the number of polio cases worldwide has decreased by over 99 percent. Still, this highly infectious disease — for which there is

no cure — remains endemic in India, Nigeria, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, and continues to re-emerge in outbreaks in other developing countries. Poliovirus has also re-established itself (by jumping borders) in four previously polio-free countries. UNICEF and its partners — including Rotary International, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation — are working to permanently end polio. This is no simple feat — it requires enormous immunization campaigns that target tens of millions of children at a time.

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1. Planning a Campaign
Though many children in the developing world receive the polio vaccine as part of their regular health care, immunization campaigns target all children under five in a given country to ensure that none fall through the cracks. UnICEF typically assists governments and partners in overall planning and implementation of campaigns. But huge quantities of the oral polio vaccine (OPV) cannot be made overnight. UnICEF begins discussions with WHOaccredited manufacturers up to two years before a campaign — working out quantities, prices, and timelines. Complicating matters, there are four types of OPV, targeting different strains or combinations of strains, so UnICEF must make sure the right vaccine is available. All the planning must have flexibility built in for emergencies. In response to an unexpected polio outbreak in the Republic of Congo in 2010, UnICEF was able to supply the country with the correct OPV within just ten days.

4. Getting the Word Out
“You need to set up a system so that people know about the campaign,” says UnICEF’s Chief of Immunization jos Vandelaer. “You need to explain to people:⎯Why do they need a campaign, although their children already got a dose? What are the dates? Is there a danger in being immunized? All these things need to be wrapped into the communications strategy of the country’s campaign, and that takes preparation and time to roll out.” In addition, explains Vandelaer, different strategies work in different countries. For some, mass media campaigns using TV, radio, or even text messages are effective. But during UnICEF’s recent campaign in Afghanistan, local religious leaders and female volunteers going door-to-door made the biggest difference. In some countries where old rumors that vaccines lead to sterility or other disabilities still occasionally surface, it’s important that communications include assurances that the vaccine is both safe and essential. UnICEF communications officers work closely with governments and health officials to craft the best messaging for their country’s campaign.

5. The Volunteers

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To give a child polio vaccine, a volunteer tips two drops of the vaccine from a vial into the child’s mouth. It may not taste great, but it’s much simpler than having to get (or give) a shot. Polio volunteers receive training, but they don’t need to be health workers as do those helping with, say, measles immunization campaigns. Depending on the country, one polio drive can have thousands of volunteers.

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UnICEF and its partners train organizers; organizers train volunteers. On the day (or days) of the campaign, everything is planned down to the last detail. Every volunteer or team knows exactly where they need to go. They know how many children will be in the village or neighborhood they’re traveling to. If they’re taking public transportation, they know when the bus leaves, and they have been given correct bus fare. With so many volunteers fanning out, it’s essential to keep track of which children have already received their OPV dose that day, so all children have one finger marked with a pen as soon as they swallow their drops.

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2. Getting the Vaccine There
UnICEF contracts its own freight-forwarding company to deliver vaccines. When a manufacturer confirms that an order of, say, 60 million doses of OPV is ready for nigeria, the freight-forwarding company will find out the weight and volume of the shipment and start looking for space on aircrafts for shipping. Sixty million doses — in standard 20-dose vials — take up about five 40-foot long shipping containers. The least expensive transport is on commercial airlines. But the vaccine is kept cool using dry ice — a “dangerous good” in commercial aviation because it emits carbon dioxide, displacing oxygen — and most airlines can only transport a limited amount. That means that, for large campaign orders, UnICEF often has to arrange charter flights. UnICEF does a lot of pre-planning and paperwork to ensure that when the OPV lands, it clears customs as quickly as possible. Still, if the vaccine arrives on a weekend or holiday, UnICEF may need to coordinate with the government to make sure customs staff are on hand to expedite the process.

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6. Reaching Every Child
There are always unexpected hurdles. When UnICEF’s jos Vandelaer worked on a country’s campaign a decade ago, rebelcontrolled villages were virtually inaccessible and wary of anything done in cooperation with the government. The solution? Work with non-rebel neighbors to convey the importance of the vaccines and ferry OPV for the rebels’ children. Soon after, that country was declared polio-free. Though governments play an essential role, it’s the parents, communities, volunteers, religious leaders, village elders, teachers, and health workers who are the real drivers in campaigns. They are the reason around 55 million children were immunized in nigeria last fall, 10 million this year in Afghanistan, and 8 million in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in March. Immunization drives generate tremendous community spirit — a nationwide feeling that the entire country is working as one to keep its children safe and sound. With the dedication of all these people — and with help from UnICEF and its partners — a polio-free world might be just around the corner.

3. Keeping It Cool
While the vaccine is being transported, it’s usually kept at –20 degrees Celsius (–4 degrees Fahrenheit), frozen for stability. Upon arrival in country, the vaccine is checked to ensure that the cold chain hasn’t failed. After the OPV is distributed to regional health centers throughout the country, it’s moved to more conventional refrigeration and the temperature rises to 2–8 degrees Celsius (35–40 Fahrenheit) so that it remains chilled, but becomes liquid for administration to children. When the immunization drive begins, volunteers will transport the vaccine in portable cold-box carriers. Some will travel by car or bus, others might be on foot, in a boat, riding a bicycle or motorcycle, or leading a cold-box laden donkey along a mountain track to a village. Even with all the care taken to maintain the temperature, something can go wrong. So every single vial has a “vaccine vial monitor” (VVM) — a square strip that changes color if the vaccine has experienced extreme temperatures in transit. Each vaccinator is trained to check the VVM before giving the vaccine and will discard vials that have been compromised.

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In India, “Change Agents” Fight Polio
In India, immunization campaigns are powered by “change agents” like Munni Begum, who works in the “mohallas,” or slums, of Moradabad. Moradabad’s immunization rate is less than 15 percent — one of the lowest in the country. Munni is part of a team of five female community health volunteers who are trying to increase it. The program is part of an initiative supported by UNICEF with funds from the IKEA Foundation. Munni’s team identifies families with babies who need to be immunized and talks with parents to dispel vaccination myths and help them understand the benefits. They are benefits Munni understands very clearly herself. Some 30 years ago, her own infant son Zulfikar became seriously ill. “He was three months old and he had a sudden, very high fever,” she says. “I cleaned him with cold water, but I realized that his legs could not stand. They were very soft.” As she recalls the moment, her eyes well with tears. “I took him to the doctor and the doctor said, ‘He has polio.’” Munni’s husband, who earned only a few rupees a day pulling a rickshaw, saved what he could for Zulfikar’s treatment, often sacrificing money the family would have used to buy food. But despite medication, therapy, and an operation, nothing could help the baby. “I didn’t know immunization could save my child,” Munni says sadly. Today, Zulfikar is married. His wife Ayesha Parveen, who herself contracted polio as a child, is now six months pregnant. Munni makes sure Ayesha receives her folic acid supplements and prenatal care. And there is no doubt in her mind that her grandson or granddaughter will be immunized against polio.

Partners in Polio Eradication
The Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) is a global program partnership led by national governments and spearheaded by UNICEF, the World Health Organization (WHO), Rotary International, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Together, these partners devise and implement global strategies to achieve a polio-free world. The polio eradication coalition also includes governments of countries affected by polio, private foundations including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the UN Foundation, development banks, donor governments, inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations, and corporate partners. Volunteers in developing countries also play a key role; 20 million have participated in mass immunization campaigns. In addition, UNICEF receives funds from generous partners who want to join the fight to end polio. Recently, the U.S. Fund for UNICEF gratefully received a $4 million grant from Google Inc. to address the critical fundraising gap of $14 million in UNICEF’s Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV) pipeline for outbreak response. Bob Manoukian, a dedicated U.S. Fund National Board Member, was inspired by Google’s grant and has sponsored his own generous donation of $1 million.

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Why I Give: Richard Levy

I wanted them to know that we have the ability to help save not just one life, but many lives — and that this… is really an incredible gift.
As a young child attending Hebrew school, I learned about Tzedakah — an obligation to be charitable to others in need. We would bring coins to class each week to aid those less fortunate. And I remember being taught how even the smallest donations could add up and make a big difference. This idea has stayed with me throughout my life. When I became a father, I wanted to pass down these values to my own children and to have them understand the importance of giving back. I was already supporting several non-profits and charities, but I decided to get involved with a mission that my children could easily relate to on a very basic level. I wanted them to think about other kids who grow up with so much less than they have, children who are at risk of not growing up at all. And most importantly, I wanted them to know that we have the ability to help save not just one life, but many lives — and that this ability to give is not just a moral obligation but really is an incredible gift. There should be no argument or controversy or politics about helping vulnerable children in developing countries survive. They are innocents who suffer from circumstances not of their own making. It is the responsibility of all adults to protect and care for them, particularly those with the means to do so. This is why I became interested in UNICEF. The core mission is so basic: saving and improving children’s lives. As I learned more about how UNICEF operates, the influence it has all over the world, and just how important it is to the wellbeing of millions of children and families, I became convinced that UNICEF was the right organization for my family and me to support. UNICEF is so effective because it uses its expertise with governments and NGOs in a way that is synergistic and not competitive. The value added by these types of relationships is far greater than one-plus-one, which is why I believe UNICEF is deserving of people’s respect, dollars, and personal commitment. I saw UNICEF in action during a field visit to Mozambique last year. One of UNICEF’s partners was a local NGO that cared for children orphaned by HIV/AIDS. Without this program, these kids would have nothing and nowhere to go. UNICEF provided guidance and know-how to help the NGO protect these children and improve their lives. UNICEF also helped the Government of Mozambique significantly expand its birth-registration process. Without birth registration, children have no national or political identity and can’t access school, health care, and government programs. UNICEF’s efforts to get more children registered will have a far-reaching impact on many lives for generations to come. I am grateful for the opportunity to support such programs — and I’m grateful that my family and I have been able to be part of UNICEF’s mission.

Every Child No. 2, 2011

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The UNICEF Tap Project: Giving Water, Saving Lives
The UNICEF Tap Project made a big splash during World Water Week (March 20 – March 26), generating critical funds and awareness to help UNICEF combat the world water crisis. Restaurants, volunteers, corporations, celebrities, communities, and government partners participated in this dynamic national campaign, now in its fifth year. Restaurants across the United States encouraged patrons to donate $1 or more for the tap water they usually enjoy for free, and volunteers supported their efforts with fundraising events and activities. Brand new this year was “Celebrity Tap.” UNICEF Ambassador Selena Gomez, Adrian Grenier, NBA-superstar Dwight Howard, Rihanna, Taylor Swift, and Robin Williams donated bottles of tap water from their homes for a celebrity Tap pack sweepstakes to spotlight the life-and-death importance of this vital resource. Almost 900 million people around the world still do not have clean drinking water, and waterborne illnesses remain the second leading cause of preventable childhood deaths. Generous corporate, promotional, and media partners also played an important role this year. Giorgio Armani Fragrances returned as the campaign’s National Sponsor through its Acqua for Life campaign. From March 1 to March 31, the company donated $1 to support the UNICEF Tap Project for each Acqua di Giò and Acqua di Gioia fragrance sold in the U.S. and for each “like” on the Acqua for Life tab of the Acqua di Giò Facebook page. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., ZAGAT.com, OpenTable.com, SeamlessWeb.com, and Yelp.com also provided indispensable support. Once again, founding campaign Agency Partner Droga5 and Promotional Supporter MediaVest created a high-profile, probono national ad campaign.
To learn more, please visit uniceftapproject.org.

American Airlines Thanks a Million +
Have you ever traveled internationally with American Airlines and been encouraged by flight attendants to donate your unused U.S. or foreign currencies, or made contributions in Admirals Clubs and Flagship Lounges? Then you’ve seen UNICEF’s Change for Good program on American Airlines at work. And in 2010, American Airlines employee volunteers — known as “Champions for Children”— together with generous customers, raised a record $1.6 million to support UNICEF programs that provide children around the world with health care, clean water,
UNICEF Malawi UNICEF Malawi UNICEF/NYHQ2010-0125/Roger LeMoyne UNICEF/NYHQ2010-0148/Shehzad Noorani U.S. Fund for UNICEF/David Hietholdt UNICEF/NYHQ2006-0992/Shehzad Noorani UNICEF/2011/B. A. Sujan Dambreville UNICEF/NYHQ2006-0963/Shehzad Noorani U.S. Fund for UNICEF The NBA/Getty Images Left to right: Mia Baxter, Lee Salem, PhotoBureau, Inc., AB Images, Brendan Burke, Brendan Burke, Kristen Mangelinkx UNICEF/NYHQ2004-1417/Giacomo Pirozzi UNICEF/NYHQ2004-0832/Thierry Delvigne-Jean U.S. Fund for UNICEF/Karen Turney

nutrition, education, emergency relief, and more. American Airlines and the U.S. Fund are thrilled by the program’s success and grateful to all those who volunteered and donated to make its 16th year such a success — perhaps you were one of those generous people. Thank you!
P11: P12: UNICEF/NYHQ2010-2766/Olivier Asselin UNICEF/NYHQ2011-0193/Asad Zaidi UNICEF/LAOA2005-5270/ UNICEF/LaoPDR00368/Jim Holmes P13: UNICEF/INDA2010-00513/Gurinder Osan UNICEF/NYHQ2009-2609/Riccardo Gangale UNICEF/NYHQ2010-0417/Kate Holt P14: UNICEF/INDA2011-00108/Graham Crouch UNICEF/NYHQ2010-2789/Olivier Asselin P15: Courtesy of Joe Trofino UNICEF/NYHQ2007-2274/Roger LeMoyne UNICEF/NYHQ2007-2299/Roger LeMoyne P16: U.S. Fund for UNICEF IBC: UNICEF/NYHQ2010-0750/Roger LeMoyne Courtesy of Harriet Natsuyama Envelope: UNICEF/NYHQ2006-2866/Julie Pudlowski

Photo Credits
Cover: UNICEF/NYHQ2006-0403/Giacomo Pirozzi P1: UNICEF/NYHQ2009-1234/Giacomo Pirozzi UNICEF/NYHQ2011-0364/Marta Ramoneda UNICEF Malawi UNICEF/NYHQ2009-1929/Giacomo Pirozzi P2: UNICEF/NYHQ2011-0412/Marta Ramoneda UNICEF/NYHQ2011-0493/Adam Dean UNICEF/NYHQ2011-0430/Adam Dean P3: UNICEF/C.Ivoire/2011/Langue UNICEF/NYHQ2011-0166/Olivier Asselin UNICEF/NYHQ2011-0533/Olivier Asselin P4: UNICEF-DRC UNICEF/NYHQ2011-0585/Olivier Asselin P5: UNICEF Malawi P6:

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The U.S. Fund for UNICEF

dannyKayesociety

“When I was a senior in high school, I got a scholarship to go to the university and study science. I was from an immigrant family with little money, and it really changed my life. because of that education, I was able to have fairly well-paying jobs and to accumulate a bit of savings. Now I want to support UNICEF’s mission to give children, especially girls, the same chance to thrive.

I’m leaving money to UNICEF through my trust because I want to return the gift I was given to the whole world.”
Harriet Natsuyama Danny Kaye Society Member

Recognizing Those Who Have Invested in the Future of the World’s Children
to learn more about how you can create a legacy of life for future generations of children, please contact Karen Metzger toll-free at (866) 486-4233, or visit our website: unicefusa.org/giftplanning.

No child should die of a preventable cause. Every day 22,000 do. We believe that number should be zero.

Believe in zero.

The U.S. Fund for UNICEF has earned 6 consecutive 4-star ratings from Charity Navigator. Only 3% of charities evaluated by this trusted organization have received its highest ranking for at least 6 straight years. We meet all 20 of the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance Standards for Charity Accountability.

U.S. Fund for UNICEF 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038 1.800.FOR.KIDS unicefusa.org © 2011 U.S. Fund for UNICEF. All rights reserved.

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