NY Times stories related to middle TN Franklin June 7, 1863

THE WAR IN TENNESSEE.; The Cavalry Fight Near Franklin Complete Defeat Of The Rebels.
NASHVILLE, Tenn., Friday, June 5. We have had a splendid cavalry fight near Franklin yesterday and to-day, resulting in whipping the enemy severely. We lost two Colonels, badly wounded. NASHVILLE, Saturday, June 6. The fight at Franklin, on the 4th inst., was between four brigades of rebels under FORREST, and our forces there, who held the rebels at bay until the removal of the Federal stores, when our reinforcements came up and drove the rebels beyond the town. On the morning of the 5th instant, the rebels were ascertained to have reentered the town. After severe fighting in the streets, Col. FAULKNER, of the Seventh Kentucky cavalry, again drove them some miles from the town, taking fifty prisoners. Col. FAULKNER was badly wounded, and arrived here last night. Col. WICKLIFFE COOPER, of the Fourth Kentucky cavalry, was injured by a horse falling on him. All is quiet at Franklin to-day.

June 7, 1863

THE WAR IN TENNESSEE.; The Strength Of Bragg's Army Successful Reconnoissance, &C. The Late Fight At Franklin.
CINCINNATI, Monday, June 8. Four rebel conscripts and one prisoner of the Fourteenth Kentucky cavalry, from Chattanooga, made their escape two weeks ago, and reached here. They had been sentenced to be shot. They say 10,000 men had been withdrawn from BRAGG to reinforce JOHNSTON, and that BRAGG has not now over 45,000 men. A detachment of the Forty-fifth Ohio regiment made a reconnoissance on Saturday and captured a rebel Captain and Lieutenant, three Sergeants and ten privates with their horses and equipments. The health of Gen. ROSECRANS' army is good. NASHVILLE, Tenn., Monday, June 8. Our forces pursued the retreating rebels to Spring Hill. It is rumored to-day that they have evacuated that place. Our loss in the engagement was about 50 killed, wounded and missing. The rebel loss was double that number. Partisan guerrillas burnt the bridge over the Little Harpeth River, at Brentwood; Sunday morning. Damage slight. Trains are running to-day. The river is falling. There is two feet of water on the shoals.

June 18, 1863

DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND.; Rebel Raid At Franklin--Rosecrans Awake And Ready--Fruits Of Vicksburgh Fallen --Andy Johnson's Return Home--Hospitals Of Nashville.
NASHVILLE, Friday, June 12, 1863. The quiet pervading military matters in this Department has been a little varied within a week past, by rebel cavalry attacks in the direction of Frankiln and Triune. The booming of canon, on Thursday last, continuing nearly all the afternoon, was distinctly heard here, indicating a brisk engagement. It awakened lively interest, but excited no alarm. The cavalry formed a part of FORREST's force, under command of STEARNS and ARMSTRONG. They seized Franklin and held it for a night, plundering stores and houses of whatever valuables they contained. Retiring the next day, they fell in with a cavalry force sent from Triune, consisting of the Fourth and

Sixth Kentucky, the Ninth Pennsylvania and Second Michigan, by whom they were effectually routed, losing fifty in killed and wounded. The Union loss was only four. Skirmishing has been going on in that direction since, a sharp, fight occurring yesterday near Triune, the particulars of which are not known here with sufficient distinctness to make the record reliable. These cavalry raids, it is thought, are designed to operate as a screen to BRAGG's movements in another direction. Gen. ROSECRANS, however, is too old a campaigner to be deceived by so shallow a device, if it be one. He is Watching his adversary with a vigilance that will not weary, and a sagacity not to be overreached. It surely cannot be long before the thunder of his guns shall again startle the ear of the nation, after the long repose that his splendid army has enjoyed. When the blow does fall, may it be overwhelming, utterly crushing the power of the rebel hordes who have so long defied and flouted the best of Governments. We expect from Gen. ROSECRANS, when his campaign is fairly opened, just such a result as this. But Vicksburgh must fall first. All eyes are turned now with feverish anxiety in that direction. Other interests yield now to this absorbing one. The armies in the field seem, by common consent, to be pausing, to watch the result of the struggle between GRANT and PEMBERTON -- as the Romans and Albans watched with breathless interest the fierce combat of the Horatti and the Curat[???], on whose issue a nation's fate hung suspended. The stubborn defence, and the strenuous efforts to reinforce, proclaim the vast importance which the rebels attach to the retaining of this stronghold -- while the lofty heroism and stern determination brought to bear on the prosecution of the siege show no less clearly what high value the Union attaches to its capture. Apart from opening the Mississippi, and cutting the Confederacy in two, the moral effect of this grand success would be incalculable. The inertness of our armies would at once give place to activity. Tennessee would, within a few weeks, be as free from rebel marauders as Missouri is now. The day of emancipation, from an odious conscription, from a detested tyranny, for the whole Southwest, would have fully come. All hearts would pulsate with renewed courage and ardor, as the great goal we have so long struggled to reach opened full to the view. The rebellion would reel and totter to its fall. The end of this grim, giant iniquity would be at hand. No wonder that the issue of the transactions around Vicksburgh is watched by the whole country with an interest so profound and absorbing! Gov. JOHNSON returned here last week, after an absence of several weeks, during which he was enabled to perfect his arrangements in regard to the raising of his 25,000 troops. He was greeted very warmly on his arrival. He spoke but few words to the crowd that escorted him home, but agreed at an early day to speak more fully to the people here, on the great issues of the day. He is sanguine of success in the important work he has undertaken. He has issued a recent order directing free transportation to be given to all Tennesseans who desire to come to Nashville with the view of joining any of the Tennessee regiments now forming in this vicinity, or that may be already in the field. Every patriotic heart will bid him God-speed in his noble enterprize, and will hail rejoicingly the deliverance of East Tennessee from the fierce bands of plunderers and sometimes assassins, who have covered so many loyal homes there with sackcloth, and subjected the liberties of the people to the most grinding oppressions. Nashville is strong in hospitals, if this be not a solecism. Nearly all its churches and public buildings, such as High Schools, University, Medical College, Gun Factory, are devoted to the use of the sick and wounded. There are 24 hospitals here, containing each an average about 200 patients. I have examined several of them, and find their condition excellent, comparing well with that of the Washington City hospitals, which are often made the subject of high encomium. They are much superior, I learn, to those of Louisville and Cincinnati, as a rule. The buildings used for the purpose here are nearly all spacious, with superb ventilation, and from being located many of them on the outskirts of the city, and on elevated ground, enjoy fresh, cool air, with wide and beautiful views of the surrounding country -- a circumstance of great importance to the valetudinarian. Our brave, suffering soldiers well deserve all the comforts that can be rendered them. Parched as the ground was here when I last wrote you, it is now men owed by recent copious and enriching rains. The beauteous valley of the Cumberland smiles, and Nature, all around us, is adorned in her comeliest robes. C.V.S. CINCINNATI, Wednesday, June 17. The Commercial's Murfreesboro special says that MORGAN appeared at Lebanon, in our rear, it is thought for the purpose of assisting the citizens to harvest the crops now ready. Rebel deserters report the impression from their army that BRAGG is about to assume the offensive. STRAWBERRY EXHIBITION. -- Mr. JUDD, of the Agriculturist, has made arrangements for a great exhibition of strawberries at his rooms in the TIMES Building, No. 41 Park-row,

similar to the one given last year. The exhibition will be open to-day and tomorrow. Liberal premiums are to be given for the best varieties.

June 21, 1863

Execution Of Spies At Franklin, Tenn.; INTERESTING NARRATIVE OF THE CONCLUDING SCENES. THE TRIAL. PREPARATIONS FOR THE EXECUTION. THE EXECUTION AND BURIAL. THE OBJECT OF THEIR VISIT.
Correspondence of the Cincinnati Commercial. FRANKLIN, Tuesday, June 9, 1863. When the history of this most bloody war is written, few, if any, incidents will be of more thrilling interest than the capture, trial and execution of Col. WILLIAMS and Lieut. PETERS. We had been besieged for four or five days by Gen. FORREST, our communications with Nashville cut off, and most of the time fighting, and were almost, hourly looking for a general assault upon our feeble garrison. Col. BAIRD, of the Eighty-fifth Indiana, had made the best possible disposition of our forces, and all were resolved to sell Franklin as dearly as possible. But last night the dull monotony of dodging shells was relieved, and excitement was carried to the highest pitch, as two fine-looking officers, dressed in what appeared the Federal uniform, and mounted on splendid horses, rode up to Col. J.P. BAIRD's headquarters, and introduced themselves as Col. ACTON and Major DUNLAP, of the United States regular army. They stated that they had, a few days before, been ordered by the War Department to report to Gen. ROSECRANS, for duty as Special Inspectors of the Army of the Cumberland. That they had entered upon their new field of duty the day before, fully equipped and accompanied by two orderlies. They showed proper papers from Adj't-Gen. THOMAS and Gen. GARFIELD, Chief of ROSECRANS' Staff, and stated that, after leaving Murfreesboro, they took the direction of Eaglesville; and, when near that place, they went into a house for dinner; that while at dinner they went surprised by a party of about twenty rebel scouts, who captured their Orderlies, and came so near capturing them as to make it necessary to leave their coats and other baggage; that they were, unfortunately, out of funds, and wished the loan of $50 of Col. BAIRD, that they might go to Nashville to refit themselves before going further on duty. Col. BAIRD, although very suspicious that all was not right, felt compelled to recognize them, with such perfect papers from so high a source. He gave them the $50 and a pass to Nashville, upon receiving which the two started off at full speed in the direction of Nashville. But they had scarcely disappeared in the dark when Col. WATKINS, of the Sixth Kentucky cavalry, and Col. BAIRD both felt such intense anxiety lest they might have been imposed upon, that it was instantly resolved to pursue and arrest the two gents, and hold them until they could learn from Gen. ROSECRANS the truth of their statements. As no time was to be lost, the gallant Col. WATKINS, accompanied by a single Orderly, started in pursuit, and dashing forward toward our pickets, luckily came in sight of them. He hailed them and ordered them to Col. BAIRD's headquarters. Undoubtedly the first impulse of these spies was to resist, which they could have done desperately, as they were both well armed, out the cool courage of Col. WATKINS induced them to return. (Col. WILLIAMS afterwards stated that he put his hand on his pistol to shoot Col. WATKINS, but the hope of not being detected caused him to desist.) After Col. WATKINS had brought the spies to BAIRD's quarters, Col. BAIRD and Col. WATKINS questioned them very closely, but could get no clue to anything that would raise a reasonable suspicion, until Gen. ROSECRANS telegraphed that he had no such officers in his Department. The prisoners were then informed that they were suspected, and were under arrest until they could properly explain themselves. They showed correct maps of our lines, and seemed well acquainted with all the officers of the regular army. Cols. BAIRD and WATKINS then searched their persons, and the first thing, upon examining the sword of Col. AUTON, revealed the fatal marks (C.S.A.) -- the die was cast and the blood rushed to the cheeks of the almost petrified prisoners. They acknowledged they were trapped, and at once confessed their real names, rank and position. The Colonel acknowledged himself to be Col. LAWRENCE WILLIAMS, of the Second Regular cavalry, at the breaking out of this war, and was recognized by Col. WATKINS as a fellow-soldier

of that regiment; he had entered the Confederate service, and was now Chief of Artillery on Gen. BRAGG's Staff. That he entered upon this most hazardous enterprise fully aware of his fate if detected, but refused to disclose the nature of his business. The younger man said he was Lieut. WALTER G. PETERS, of Gen. WHEELER's Staff, and showed some excitement, but Col. WILLIAMS was perfectly cool after the first moment of detection. Col. BAIRD now telegraphed the facts to Gen. ROSECRANS, and received the laconic reply, to try the prisoners by Court-martial, and if found guilty, hang them at once, to prevent all possibility of FORREST profiting by their information. Now came the severe struggle -- the prisoners had confessed their guilt; but to hang two such men of their rank was a terrible task; but Col. BAIRD was equal to the emergency, and knowing the exigencies of the service, proceeded promptly to obey Gen. ROSECRANS' order. A court-martial was called by Col. BAIRD to sit at once. The following was the detail: Col. JORDAN, Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, President; Lieut.-Col. VAN VLECK, Seventy-eighth Illinois infantry; Lieut.- Col. HOBLITZELL, Fifth Kentucky cavalry, Capt. CRAWFORD, Eighty-fifth Indiana infantry; and Lieut. WHARTON, U.S. Engineers, Judge-Advocate. The charges and specifications were duly presented, and the Court thus sitting, at the dead hour of night, after carefully and patiently hearing the confessions and other evidence, performed the sad and painful duty of finding the prisoners guilty of being spies, and Col. BAIRD, under ROSECRANS' order, approved the finding, and sentenced the colonel, WILLIAMS, and lieutenant, PETERS, to be hung by the neck until dead. At 4 o'clock this morning. Col. BAIRD informed the prisoners of their awful fate, and could not refrain from shedding tears as he announced it to them. Col. WILLIAMS received his sentence with the most perfect coolness, but begged that, as his father had fallen in our country's service at Monterey during the Mexican war, he be shot, and asked mercy for Adjutant PETERS, but as the order from Gen. ROSECRANS was imperative, no clemency could be shown. After the sentence of the prisoners was announced, they began to prepare to meet their fate. They made their wills and wrote letters to their friends, full of the deepest affection, and tenderness of manly nature. A Chaplain was called and the prisoners partook of the sacrament, and joined in prayer with great fervency. They did not attempt to sleep, but spent the whole time in either writing or conversing. At the request of Col. WILLIAMS, Col. WATKINS took charge of his effects, which consisted of $1,175 in Confederate money, a fine watch and some private papers. Lieut. PETERS had very few effects about his person -- the only one of importance being a gold locket, containing a likeness of his wife, with a fine gold chain attached. He requested it buried with him, which was faithfully done. At 9 o'clock A.M. to-day, Capt. ALEXANDER, who had taken charge of the execution, reported the scaffold and gallows ready. The infantry and cavalry were formed in hollow square about the place of execution; at 9 1/2 o'clock the prisoners were brought forward by the guard. They marched with firm tread, and mounting the scaffold, took an affectionate kiss and leave of each other, when the halter was placed about their necks, and they were launched into eternity. Thus two officers, who were born and bred gentlemen, one a regular army officer of the United States service, who had been nurtured and instructed by our Government to skill and position, expiated their crimes of treason against the Government they were taught to love and respect. They were decently buried, and their wills and requests will be faithfully carried out, and here the curtain drops on one of the most sad and painful scenes of this accursed rebellion. Two men in the prime of life, with all the rank and position that talent could give, meeting an ignominious death at the hands of a Government they should have loved and defended. If the whole truth could be known, it would doubtless appear that these two men, of such high military rank, were about laying or consummating plans on a most gigantic scale for the overthrow of ROSECRANS' army. Protected by the forged papers they had in their possession, had they succeeded in getting the countersign, on the night of their visit here, they could have marched a brigade of rebels into our forte here, and captured our whole command, without resistance; but, if true, as they stated, they had inspected our whole front, they could have given BRAGG such information as would have led to the most appaling disasters to ROSECRANS' whole command. And when the verdict of justice is fairly given, in the heroes of this war, Col. J.P. BAIRD, of the Eighty-fifth Indiana, and Col. WATRINS, of the Sixth Kentucky cavalry, for arresting and bringing those spies to their condign punishment, will stand very prominent. So gallantly defending this place against FORREST's siege, is a greater honor than a great victory on a bloody field. A.V.B.

The New York Times headline, November 28, 1864
Nov 28,1864 THE WAR IN TENNESSEE.; Hood’s Army Concentrating at Columbia, Tenn.–Gen. Thomas’ Army Near Columbia, in Hood’s Front–A Battle Expected–Communication by Telegraph to Columbia Interrupted. Skirmishing Between Pulaski and Columbia Our Forces Behind Duke River. The Situation of Hood’s Army–Gen. Thomas’s Whereabouts–Something Likely to Happen–Gillem’s Defeat–A Massacre. THE REBEL SITUATION IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE. NASHVILLLE, Tenn., Saturday, Nov. 23. HOOD‘s army, numbering probably forth thousand men, have been for several days past concentrating south of Columbia, Tenn. Our forces In the meantime have evacuated Pulaski, Huntsville and Decatur, which places are now is the hands or the rebels. Our forces are near and about Columbia, in HOOD‘s front. They are commanded toy Gen. THOMAS. On the 24th inst. some severe skirmishing occurred, resulting in a loss to the Federals of 44 killed and wounded. The rebel loss is estimated 264. Among the killed was one rebel Colonel. Large bodies of troops are here massed in HOOD‘s front, and some heavy fighting may be expected in that direction in a few days. Communication by telegraph to Columbia has been interrupted since yesterday. There are rumors in circulation that there was heavy fighting yesterday between the opposing armies, but no official advices of an engagement have yet been received. NASHVILLE, Tenn., Sunday, Nov. 27 — 10:20 P.M. There has been smart skirmishing between Pulaski and Columbia for some days. We have fallen back behind Duck River. Fart of FORREST‘s forces have also crossed the river, on our right flack, and are aiming to strike the road in our rear. HOOD‘s main army is supposed to be moving on the pike road toward Shelbyville and Wartrace. NASHVILLE, Tenn., Monday, Nov. 21, 1864. Since my last, regarding the movements of BEAUREGARD‘s army, some little changes have transpired; and, possibly, the enemy may grow bold in this quarter, since any attempt on his part to even annoy the moving columns of ―Tecumseh‖ would prove fruitless. The excess of folly was committed by BEAUREGARD, when he marched his army four hundred miles to the rear of the Federal front. ―Like ships that sailed for sunny isles, But never came to shore.‖ I think we will be the fate of this foolish Frenchman, who reached the acme of his renown in Charleston harbor, in April, 1861. The last information I gave you concerning the whereabouts of the rebel Army of Tennessee found BEAUREGARD quietly located at the mansion of Dr. STOUT, of Corinth, with STEWART‘s corps, consisting of about 10,000 men, there and thereabouts. I have reason to believe that just the same state of things exists to-day in that quarter of the Confederacy. Host of S.D. LEE‘s corps at that time was at Jack son, the terminus of the railroad. FRANK CHEATHAM‘s corps was at Florence, where also was HOOD, the General Commanding in the field. The following changes have taken place, it is believed. That STEPHEN D. LEE has removed his entire corns from Jackson to South Florence, and that FRANK CHEATHAM has crossed the river with his corns, and made headquarters at Waynesboro, a small town situated on or near Greene‘s Creek, a branch of Duck River, and about half way between Columbia, Tennessee, and Florence, Alabama. FORREST is in command of all the cavalry, which is strong, and in good trim, and holds undisputed possession of the entire country within a radius of thirty miles of Florence. Supplies reach the rebel army daily, the

railroad being in good running order from Corinth (the base) to South Florence. The latter place is bridged with Florence proper, which is directly opposite. A gentleman who has lately arrived from Tuscumbia, which is on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, between Iuka and Florence, reports that the rebel means of transportation are scanty, but that enough supplies reach Corinth daily to distribute liberally among the men. He says the animals suffer, and reports that, in consequence, at least one-third of the cavalry are located between Corinth and Booneville, on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, and adds that the corn-cribs of Tishamingo County and other portions of Northern Mississippi groan with the weight of grain. The rivers and creeks are all high, and the country through which BEAUREGARD is operating abounds with them. I can indorse this latter sentence, as I came near getting drowned one night in April, 1652, while fording the multiplicity of creeks which lie between Waynesboro and Savannah. I was in company with Mr. SHEPPARD, of the World, and, being anxious to reach Pittsburgh Landing, where a battle was raging, the thunders of which we had listened to forty miles off, we took the chances, and barely escaped with our lives. This gentleman, while in conversation with one of the editors of the Union, of this city, says that he had the run of the rebel camps, and gives 40.000 men as his careful estimate of the number of BEAURECARD‘s troops, 15,000 of whom are cavalry. The latter is not doubted by the authorities here, as it is known that FORREST has a very strong force of mounted men. All the cavalry connected with the rebel army of Tennessee, except IVERSON‘s brigade, are with him, and it must he remembered that FORREST‘s own independent command, with which he has ranged all over this section, never numbered less than six thousand brave men, and it is known that he has received heavy reinforcements lately from some point. There have been several slight skirmishes during the past week; between portions of the rebel cavalry, under Gen. RODDY, and portions of our own under Gen. CUXTON, neither party, as I have learned, sustaining much loss. At one lime last week, the rebel cavalry showed themselves between Waynesboro and Mount Pleasant, but were driven back by our cavalry under Col. SPAULDING. There is no other news of interest that I can learn regarding BEAURECARD, and I guess this is about all that is known at headquarters. What the Intentions of the rebel commander are is merely a matter of conjecture, us no movements of his have transpired of sufficient importance to develop his real object. I consider that BEAUREGARD feels in about the same humor the individual did who drew the elephant. Certainly, since establishing himself with a reliable base, he has had ample time to demonstrate in this vicinity to his heart‘s content There was a time little attention to the movements or intentions of the lymphatic Creole, as though long ago he had ceased to exist. Situated so near the rebel army as we are now, gives rise to many opinions and conjectures, while patched about, and canard‘s of the most absurd nature ‗ secure patronage. One of the liveliest of yesterday was to the effect that BEAUREGARD would attempt to recapture either memphis or Vicksburgh. Again, last evening, either. If he does not fight Gen. THOMAS in Middle Tennessee, he will run away. You will ask, ―What for? Where will he go?‖ Well that‘s just what I want to know. GEN. THOMAS‘ ARMY. Gen. THOMAS‘ forces are very properly located — so cleverly that Gen. BEAUREGARD cannot run the risk of playing too bold a game. Beside, we have been and are being heavily reinforced, and our entire cavalry arm is being overhauled and reorganized by Gen. WILSON, from the Army of the Potomac. The bulk of our army is at Pulaski, on the Decatur and Nashville Railroad, in splendid condition, the men being well fed and well clothed, with money in their pockets. The new troops are distributed judiciously, and put through a vigorous system of drill three times a day. Pulaski is a very pretty town, near the Alabama State line, between sixty and seventy

miles south from Nashville. Gen. STANLEY commands the Fourth Corps and Gen. Cox the Twenty-third Corps. Both are excellent officers. The whole are under the command of Gen. SCHOFIELD in the field, whose headquarters are at Spring Hill, a small place between Franklin and Columbia. Gen. SCHOFIELD is greatly beloved as an officer and a man. His presence upon all critical occasions is fully appreciated, while his unadulterated patriotism fills the space in which he moves. His operations from Chattanooga to Atlanta Rave the most unbounded evidences of his great military sagacity. Beside, he is a superb fighter, and a clever gentleman. Gen. THOMAS is still in this city, with headquarters at the St. Cloud Hotel. I think there will something lively transpire in less than a month in this department, even if the movements of BEAUREGARD do not necessitate some such event before. As long as the latter-named officer remains at Corinth, with his army hovering about Florence, little notice will be taken of him. He is not doing us or the Government the least harm so long as he remains in status quo. If he robs or molests the people down that way, loyalty does not receive a very painful wound, and the main sufferers will be those who contributed largely toward bringing about the present state of disorder. FROM KAST TENNESSEE. There are some extremely ugly rumors, and documents to match, being received from East Tennessee regarding the defeat sustained by GILLEM on the 13th lost. As I am very careful about language I employ in reference to United States officers and soldiers, I shall just briefly mention the fact that it is believed in certain official circles in this city, that GILLEM was the victim of jealousy on the part of some other general officers at Knoxville. According to Information received by Gen. THOMAS and Gov. JOHNSON, GILLEM, after ascertaining beyond a doubt, that he was being pressed by three brigades, commenced falling back with his little brigade of three regiments, and at the same time called upon two Brigadiers at Knoxville for not only reinforcements, but food for his brave men, who had been three days without rations of any kind, except fresh meat. He kept falling back in good order, all the while crying for help, but no assistance came to him until his routed army arrived at Strawberry Plains. Here he was met by three hundred men of the Ninth Michigan Cavalry, who bad left Knoxville on the morning of the 14th, six days after they had been called for. According to all accounts, and I have seen several letters addressed to Gov. JOHNSON and Gen. MILLIGAN, the deportment of GILLEM during the dreadful confusion of his troops, was grand in the extreme. Parson BROWNLOW writes that the disaster might have been averted, but that a lack of harmony prevailed among the officers in command at Knoxville. Parson BROWNLOW‘s son says that GILLEM, regardless of danger, acted as few general officers could act under the circumstances. His gallant endeavors to stay the rout, he says, was unexampled. On Thursday last, Gens. AMMEN, TILLSON and GILLEM, were acting in concert, and after a little skirmishing, drove the enemy from Strawberry Plains, with no loss on either side. NOTHING FROM SHERMAN. Of course, nothing from SHERMAN since my last, giving you a full account of his start, and connecting incidents, I have met several officers who assisted in making good the wreck of the Western and Atlantic Railroad, and they assert that the work of destruction was made complete. In several places along the road this side of Kingston, the parties detached for the purpose of tearing up the track were shot at by guerrillas, who hovered in our rear. In one place, near Calhoun, some fellows were captured who were recognized by the soldiers and citizens as guerrillas and marauders of the worst class. There were four of them in all. They were bad men, and it was deemed judicious to send them to their account, like Hamlet‘s father, with all their imperfections on their heads. This was accordingly done. They were blindfolded and shot to death. Cassville, near the railroad, a dangerous place for honest men,

was burned. This was a very pretty little town. I took breakfast there one time last Summer. Two elegant-looking ladles sat with me at the table. While myself and a friend were enjoying our repast, we were astonished to hear one of these elegant ladies ejaculate,‖I wish the G — d, d — d Yankees were all in h — ???!‖ It so happened that myself and friend about that time had eaten enough. I settled the bill, and we left. I guess it‘s a good thing that Cassville is among the things that were. It was a Babylon in a small way. A multitude of such incidents as these occurred along the road. The bridge at Resaca is not yet destroyed, but it will be if the guerrillas get too numerous. Everything but small private buildings and cottage houses was destroyed at Atlanta and Rome. Rome! — that‘s the grandest monosyllable in the English language. AN UNPARALLELED SLAUGHTER — ONE HUNDRED UNION MEN BUTCHERED IN GEORGIA. The bloodiest tragedy of modern times was enacted on Thursday last in Northern Georgia, at a small place called Elijah, sixty miles northeast of Dalton. A short time after the occupation of Northern Georgia by our forces last Spring, 125 men, deserters from the rebel array and others, formed themselves into a company, to be known as the Walker County Home Guards, and selected a crave fellow, named ASHWORTH, as their leader Upon many occasions have these hardy men done the cause some service. Three hundred rebels, under TOM. POLE EDWARDS, on the day above-mentioned, came across ASHWORTH‘s party, and took them all prisoners, including Col. ASHWORTH himself. A man named MARKHAM. who was an eye-witness of subsequent events, says that the prisoners, after their surrender, were marched into a patch of woods hard by, when just one hundred out of the hundred and twenty-five wore selected, declared to be deserters from the Confederate army and sentenced, part of them to be shot and part of them to be hung. Preparations were immediately made to carry the order into execution, and two hours later the hundred poor fellows were launched into eternity, nineteen of whom were hung. The twenty-five that escaped death were released, after being compelled to witness the execution of their companions, upon the promise that they would join the rebel army. Col. ASHWORTH was taken away. As he was once a rebel soldier, there is no telling what unheard-of cruelties are in store for him. This TOM POLK EDWARDS is a citizen of Tennessee, and is respectably connected. Gen. S???MAN, I learn, will make an attempt to have this Rang of murderers captured. If he is successful, there will be more bloody work. BENJAMIN C. TRUMAN.

Nov 29, 1864

THE WAR IN TENNESSEE.; Reported Retreat Of Gen. Thomas To Franklin, Tenn.
LOUISVILLE, Ky., Monday, Nov. 28. Gen. THOMAS is reported to have retreated to Franklin, Tennessee. The military authorities here say that if the report is correct, Gen. THOMAS must be preparing to receive the large reinforcements now on their way to him before giving battle to HOOD, and that he has fallen back for no other purpose.

New York Times headlines, November 29, 1864

Gen. Beauregard’s Army at Pulaski Gen. Thomas Falls Back to Duck River Beauregard Reinforced by Dick Taylor Gen. Hood Sick at Florence, Ala. Beauregard’s Entire Army 43,000 Strong Brief Description of Prominent Points in Middle Tennessee.; THE SITUATION.

NASHVILLE, Tenn., Friday, Nov. 25, 1864. Only a few days have transpired since my last letter; but during that time the relative positions of our own and BEAUREGARD‘S armies have experienced changes of material interest. On Saturday last, BEAUREGARD‘s advance was at Waynesboro, Tenn., as you will recollect, under Gen. FRANK CHEATHAM, of this city. This advance comprised one corps. The other two corps, respectively commanded by Gens. STEWART and LEE, were at Florence, Ala., and Corinth, Miss. BEAUREGARD‘s headquarters being at the latter place, and HOOD‘s at Florence. On Tuesday, the whole rebel army, reinforced by DICK TAYLOR, with nine thousand men, was in motion. Almost the entire force having reached Tennessee, FRANK CHEATHAM, with his corps and about three thousand of FORREST‘s cavalry, moved toward Pulaski, and were encamped on the night of the 22d within twenty miles of that place. This is quite correct, and is known at all headquarters. In the way of receiving information, the rebel leaders have very little advantage of us in this section of the country, as our officers and soldiers know every foot of the ground hereabouts; while, in addition, we are surfeited with news brought in by reliable Union men, who are quite numerous in Middle Tennessee. Northern Alabama and Northern Mississippi. The movement is a formidable one, by the way, and, evidently, BEAUREGARD means business. He has, no doubt, left Corinth, as HOOD‘s illness requires his presence in the field. HOOD is suffering with rheumatism, it is said, but still remains at Florence. From a multiplicity of sources, we learn that the rebel officers boast of striking Nashville. By a glance at the map, it will be seen that they menace us to no inconsiderable degree; and, had our army remained at Pulaski, a flank movement on their part could have been easily performed — our line of communication would have been threatened, and Nashville placed in imminent danger. As it is, everything is all right on our side, as will be seen. Leaving the movements of the enemy, on Tuesday night, Gen. THOMAS issued orders for his army to fall back from Pulaski to Columbia, Tenn., the commencement of which took place Wednesday morning, and while I write, nearly our whole army is this side of Duck River, which passes Columbia, about a mile to the north. Thus, you see, it draws‘ the rebel army from its base, and places a great obstacle, in the shape of a river, between our own and BEAUREGARD‘s army. As most any one would naturally conjecture, matters cannot remain this way long; and, in all probability, a great battle will occur in a short time upon the soil of Tennessee, the thunders of which will echo along the banks of Stone River, and die away reverberating among the cedar forests and mountain spurs of the old battle-field itself. There are various opinions rife regarding the enemy‘s intentions. Some think that BEAUREGARD is going to pitch right in and whip THOMAS and take Nashville. Others think that he is going to pitch right in and not whip THOMAS, and not take Nashville. Some think that at this late day, he will make an attempt, via Huntsville and the Cherokee country, to catch SHERMAN, while others think that he will pass to our left, and attempt to place his army upon the Chattanooga Railroad, between our forces here and those at Bridgeport. In the latter case, he would take many risks of having his army cut off, and again, we have a move ahead of him should he attempt scheming in any such unmilitary manner. And, this sure, I do not believe he will go

Shermanward. So, in my opinion, it resolves itself down that he must fight, or retreat in the same way he came. Time will develop this, and further speculation is unnecessary and useless. The most serious aspect presented thus far is the loss to us again of Northern Alabama and portions of Middle Tennessee, where a great many true men reside, and where a great deal of work by Government has been expended. Very little Government property, however, will be abandoned, as no supplies or anything of that sort have accumulated directly south of Nashville since the Forrest raid some six weeks ago. From all that I can learn, especially since the junction formed by DICK TAYLOR‘s army, BEAUREGARD‘s forces are numerically stronger than has generally been reported. We must not deceive ourselves; and I think I about hit the exact number when I put it at 43,000, all told, as follows: Stephen D. Lee‘s corps, about…………..6,000 Stewart‘s corps, about……………………………6,000 Frank Cheatham‘s corps, about………………8,000 Dick Taylor‘s army………………………………….9,000 Forrest‘s cavalry…………………………………..14,000 Total…………………………………………………….43,000 FORREST, it will be remembered, is a Lieutenant-General, and has all the cavalry in BEAUREGARD‘s army, as well as his old independent command, under his sole charge. It is known that he has been reinforced from various sources, and the figure given above, although it may seem quite large, is certainly not in excess of his command of horse, well armed and equipped. As the war has again been transferred to Middle Tennessee, I will give you a brief description of some of the most important prominent points. Columbia, at which place the Federal army, under Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, is at present located, is situated in Maury County, upon a slight eminence, upon the south bank of Duck River, about forty-five miles south from Nashville. This place was first captured by Gen. BUELL, in March, 1862, and held by Gen. NEGLEY until the retrograde movement of the former in September of the same year. From that time it remained in rebel possession until Gen. ROSECRANS advanced upon Tullahoma, in July, 1863, since which time it has remained in our hands. It is the seat of justice of one of the most flourishing counties in the State, and before the war, contained three thousand inhabitants. It is the centre of a fine cotton-growing county, and is the home of the Polks and the Pillows, and other celebrated families. Nearly all of Maury County was put to cotton this year. Duck River is an east branch of the Tennessee, and at this time of the year it is very deep and difficult to ford. It rises in the mountains near the line of Marion County, and pursues a comparative course of 150 miles northwest, through the counties of Franklin, Bedford, Maury, Hickman, Williamson, Dickson and Humphreys, passing the towns of Columbia, Shelbyville and Centreville. It is navigable for boats following the bends about 100 miles, and is declared a public highway as high as Shelbyville. Franklin, at which place are our reserves, is a beautiful town upon the Nashville and Decatur Railroad, 18 miles from this city. It is situated in Williamson County, upon the south bank of Big Harpeth River, and contained a population before the war of nearly 2,000 people. No place, I believe has changed hands so often as this, it having been at least a dozen times, first in rebel then in Federal possession. Big Harpeth

River has its source in Bedford County, and flows northwest through Williamson, past the town of Franklin, enters Davidson County, and falls into the Cumberland River 35 miles below, this city, after a general comparative course of 60 miles. Pulaski, at which place the rebel army under Gen. BEAUREGARD is at present located, is the seat of justice of Giles County, and before the war was a flourishing town, containing nearly 3,000 inhabitants. It is pleasantly situated on Richland Creek, a north branch of the Elk River, and is 70 miles by rail south of Nashville. It is 44 miles northwest of Huntsville, Ala., and 50 miles east northeast of Florence. Ala. In conclusion, I will add that ere this, in all probability, the towns of Huntsville, Athens and Decatur, all situated in Northern Alabama, the former the home of JERE CLEMENS, are in rebel possession. BENJAMIN C. TRUMAN.

TENNESSEE.
______ A Severe Battle at Franklin, Tenn. ________ HOOD DEFEATED BY THOMAS. ________ The Rebels Desperately Assault Our Works. ________ They are Repulsed with Fearful Carnage. __________ Six Thousand Rebels Killed and Wounded. _________ TWELVE HUNDRED PRISONERS CAPTURED ____________ Our Loss Less Than One Thousand. ____________ MAGNIFICENT BEHAVIOR OF OUR TROOPS __________ Full and Graphic Account from Our Special Correspondent. __________ OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT. __________ Washington, Thursday, Dec.1.

The following official dispatch concerning the report of the victory in Tennessee, has been received at headquarters: FRANKLIN, Tenn., Wednesday, Nov.30. Major-Gen. Thomas: The enemy made a heavy and persistent attack with two corps, commencing at 4 P.M., and lasting till after dark. He was repulsed at all points with heavy loss — probably of five or six thousand men. Our loss is probably not more than one-fourth of that number. We have captured about one thousand prisoners, including one Brigadier-General. (Signed,) JOHN SCHOFIELD Major-General. __________ OUR SPECIAL ACCOUNT. __________ Special Dispatch to the New-York Times. FOUR MILES SOUTH OF NASHVILLE. Thursday, Dec.1. Gen. SCHOFIELD yesterday fought one of the prettiest fights of the war, resulting most disastrously to the rebels, with little loss to ourselves. After three days‘ skirmishing, the rebels crowded our first line of works yesterday afternoon, and at 4 P.M. made a most desperate attack on our right and centre, forcing our lines to our breastworks, which were thrown up from river to river in an open field on the Cumberland Pike, which ran through the centre of the field. At least half the rebel force engaged endeavored to pierce our centre, and come down viciously on WAGNER’S Division, which, after desperate fighting, fell back, and MANY’S rebel division, of FRANK CHEATAM’S corps, got inside our works and captured two guns. Our centre was not broken, however, and, better still, Gen. WAGNER successfully rallied our troops, who charged on the enemy, recaptured the two guns, and drove the division over the breastworks, capturing one entire brigade and its commander. At 4:30 o’clock the battle was waged with unabating vigor, the enemy having made during a half hour several attempts to break our centre. The Federal position was a magnificent one, and the result of these four days‘ work were magnificently grand. All this while the rebels had appeared in front of our right. The plan was to pierce our centre and crush our right wing before dark. A portion of our infantry were engaged three-quarters of an hour firing on the rebel columns who stood their ground like madmen. During the every charge made on our right and centre, volleys of grape and canister were hurled into their lines, and only darkness prevented their sacrifice being more awful. It is said that no canister shot was used by the rebels during the day, but fired shot and shell.

After the first break of WAGNER’S division and its recovery, our line never budged a step. All was quiet after 10 P.M. It was not only one of the prettiest but cleanest battles of the war. The excessive slaughter of the enemy was owing to our wholesale use of canister and grape, and our selection of ground. The battle was fought in an open field, with no trees or undergrowth, or other interruption. The enemy’s loss in killed and wounded approximates 7,000, and we have over 1,200 prisoners, and one general officer and several field officers. The Colonel of the Fifteenth Mississippi, a Northern man, of Illinois, was wounded and taken prisoner. Four-fifths of his regiment were killed, wounded or captured. Our loss does not reach a thousand, hors du cambat. Gen. Bradley, of Illinois, while gallantly leading his troops, was severely wounded in the shoulder. Our loss in field officers is very small. Our troops behaved handsomely. SCHOFIELD commanded on the field, STANLEY on the right, and Cox on the left. Gen. Stanley was wounded slightly in the neck, but remained on the field and is all right today. I have told you all along the programme of Gen. Thomas would electrify you, and this is but the epilogue of the battle to come off. After our dead, wounded and prisoners were cared for, our army fell back to this point, and are in line of battle while I write. Up to this time, 3 P.M., the enemy has not made his appearance. The Third Corps of Veterans are in readiness, and a battle is expected before daylight tomorrow. All Government work is suspended, and all are under arms, from Gen. DONALDSON down to the unscientific laborers. The falling back of our troops was accomplished at 8 o‘clock this morning, and bridges burned across Harpeth River to retard the transportation of rebel supplies. The cavalry was handled prettily by Gen. WILSON, between Spring Hill and Triune. A.J. SMITH’s corps is in line of battle, and the situation is particularly grand. Forts Negley, Morton, Cairo and Houston are alive, and the infantry movement perfectly satisfactory. Something must immediately transpire, as Gen. THOMAS is ready to strike no matter how the rebels move. BENJ. C. TRUMAN

New York Times headline, December 2, 1864
Hood’s Advance at Spring Hill, Tenn., Thirty-two Miles South of Nashville. NASHVILLE, Wednesday, Nov. 30 — Midnight RECEIVED Dec. 1 — 9 A. M. Heavy skirmishing for the past few days, and still going on between our troops and FORREST. There was a sharp fight yesterday at Spring Hill, twelve miles south of Franklin. Our cavalry was driven back on our infantry lines which checked the enemy. A squad of rebel prisoners were in charge of these troops, when the rebel cavalry made a dash on them, releasing their men and capturing ours. A train was attacked near Harpeth River. The engineer detached the locomotive, and both are

supposed to be captured. The rest of the train was saved. A squad of rebel cavalry dashed across the Chattanooga line yesterday, near Cheshire, tearing up the track. The train was detained all night, but came in next morning. Our troops have fallen back around Franklin. The main part of HOOD‘s army is across Duck River. Every indication of a heavy battle in a few days, but we are confident of the result.

December 3rd New York Times account of the Battle of Franklin FROM NASHVILLE
———————

The Position of the Opposing Armies.
——————— NO FIGHTING SINCE WEDNESDAY ——————— Hood Demonstrating Toward Murfreesboro ——————— Further Details of the Battle of Franklin ———————

THE REBEL GENERAL CLEBURNE KILLED
——————— The Rebel Loss Fully Six Thousand — Our Loss One Thousand ———————
GEN. THOMAS MASTER OF THE SITUATION

——————— Nashville, Friday, Dec. 2 I have received full accounts of the late battle at Franklin, and its antecedents, which was one of the most brilliant in its general results of the war. For three days sharp skirmishing was kept up during the retirement of our army from Duck River to Franklin, during which time a multiplicity of exploits and successes resulted to the Federal arms.

Gen. Cox conducted the rear guard, and on the 29th ultimately achieved a splendid victory over the rebels at Spring Hill, while General Wilson’s cavalry gained a series of important successes over Forrest’s advance, under Roddy, on the pike between Turner‘s and Spring Hill. During the afternoon of the 30th ultimately the rebel army was sorely pressed under Hood, who had Cheatam’s and Stewart’s corps, and a portion of Dick Taylor’s command, numbering in all over 22,009 men. Owing to Cox’s gallant check at Spring Hill, and portion of the Fourth and Twenty-third Corps were enabled to gain Franklin early in the day, where they threw up a line of breastworks, extending from one end to the other of the curve in the river, behind which our entire infantry command took position. At precisely four o’clock (afternoon) the entire rebel force made a charge, and succeeded in making a temporary break in our centre, commanded by Wagner. With characteristic impetuosity the soldiers composing Cheatham’s Corps dashed into the breastworks, and cooperating with the attacking party on their left, attempted to envelop and destroy our right. In the nick of time the troops of Wagner were rallied, and throwing their whole force on the rebel column, drove back the storming party in great disorder, capturing several hundred prisoner. Four hours after the rebels charged on these lines, but were repulsed as often with great slaughter. The rebels numbered at least two to our one, as nearly half of the Fourth and Twenty-third Corps were in reserve. The rebels loss in killed is three times ours, while their wounded is at least six times as large as ours. The wounded of our men are mostly in the head, arms and body. The artillery fire of the enemy was great precision, but their ammunition consisted chiefly of shot and shell, while for two hours immense quantities of more murderous missles were hurled with fearful fury into the rebel lines. All the attempt of the rebels to gain a permanent advantage were frustrated, and at dark the Federal position was uncharged, while the rebels retired, under cover of the woods, south of the Columbia pike. The rebel loss, as before stated, is fully 6,000, including over 1,000 prisoners, an unusual number of whom were officers. Our loss reached a total of about 1,000. An artillery duel was kept up till nearly midnight, when our troops commenced crossing Harpeth River, bringing all our trains and paraphernalia over in safety before daylight. The army then retired to within four miles of this city, at which point our frontline confronts the enemy. The falling back of the army is in accordance with the programme, and the battle at Franklin, although of the most brilliant kind, was an impromptu affair, and brought about owing to the necessity of checking the rebel advance to secure a safe crossing of the river by our troops. —————– LATER

Nashville, Friday, Dec. 2 Additional reports received increase the magnitude of the late victory at Franklin. Thirty stands of colors were captured by our forces. The Fortyninth Indiana captured five, the Eighty-eighth Illinois three, Reilly’s old brigade eight, and the Twenty-third Corps captured four. Gen. Stanley, commanding the Fourth Corps, had a very narrow escape, having had a horse killed under him, and was shot in the right shoulder, the ball travelling the back and going out of the left shoulder. He is in the city, and though suffering considerably, is still attending to duty. It is confirmed that Gen. Cleburne, of Tennessee, is killed. Gen. Kimball, commanding the Second Division of General Stanley’s Corps, in the heat of the battle passed a rebel MajorGeneral, who told him he was mortally wounded. His men succeeded in carrying off his body. It is believed that Hood’s main army is threatening Murfreesboro. Forrest’s rebel cavalry is demonstrating on our front and right flank. Commander Fitch is here with a fleet of boats and Iron-clads. Sufficient forces have arrived to insure not only the safety of Nashville, but another Union victory, is case of a battle, under any circumstances. The military men all unite in the opinion that Gen. Stanley and Schofield conducted the retirement from Pulaski in the face of the enemy with admirable skill, and crowning all with a magnificent Union victory at Franklin.

New York Times headline, December 4, 1864 – The Battle of Franklin
FURTHER DETAILS OF THE BATTLE AT FRANKLIN. CINCINNATI, Saturday, Dec. 3. The correspondent of the Gazette, writing from Nashville, gives the following particulars of the battle of Franklin, Tennessee: The plan of the battle was very simple. We had no time in fact to get up a complete plan, as the enemy pressed us too sorely and obliged us to fight him. The original plan was to withdraw the force of Gen. SCHOFIELD until the meeting of our reinforcements, and then give battle in the vicinity of Nashville, but the over-sanguine rebels pressed us too hard, and when SCHOFIELD perceived he could not avoid a contest, he drew up his army in line of battle in front of Franklin. At 3:30 the assault was commenced by the rebels. CHEATHAM‘s corps was on the right, STEWART‘s on the left and S.D. LEE‘s in reserve, on the centre. CHEATHAM threw his whole corps on WAGNER‘s division with great impetuosity, and, after an hours‘ desecrate fighting, he pushed WAGNER back on our second line, where WAGNER‘s men became mingled with those of COX‘s and RUGER‘s on our left and centre. The rebels

encouraged by their success in driving back WAGNER with loud cheers, advanced on our second line. Their order of advance was very peculiar — a semicircle of two regiments deep extending all around our lines, and behind each alternate regiment was placed four others — so that the assaulting columns were six regiments deep. Gen. HOOD appeared about 4 P.M. at the head of his command, and, pointing toward our lines, said: ―Break those lines, boys, and you have finished the war in Tennessee! Break them and there is nothing to oppose your march from Nashville to the Ohio River!‖ Loud and ringing cheers answered the words of the rebel leader, while the whole space in front of our lines was crammed with the advancing enemy. Capt. LYMAN, commanding an artillery brigade in the Fourth Corps, had placed his batteries in most favorable positions, and from these storms of shot and shell were hurled into the charging rebel ranks. With the most reckless bravery still the rebels rushed on, and when within a few hundred yards of our works our boys opened upon them a terrible fire of musketry, that it seemed as if it was impossible for anything to live before it. But no wavering was perceived in those advancing rebel lines. On they came to the very parapets of our works, and stuck their bayonets under the logs on our battlements. On the Columbus Pike the pressure upon our lines was so great that some of COX‘s and WAGNER‘s men temporarily gave way. Up to this time the brigade commanded by Col. OPDIKE, of the One Hundred and Twentyfifth Ohio, had been held in reserve. Col. OPDIKE, by the orders of Gen. STANLEY, rushed forward with his brigade to restore our broken line. The rebels who had crawled over our works, had not time to retire and COX‘s and WAGNER‘s men, who had broken away but a moment before, rallied and attacked the enemy on the flank, while OPDYKE charged on the front. A desperate hand-to-hand fight ensued with bayonets and the but-ends of muskets. A hundred rebels were captured here and the line was restored. For two hours and a half the battle now raged all along our lines. The men of the Fourth and Twenty-third Corps vied with each other in bravery. RILEY‘s brigade, of the Twenty-third Corps, fairly covered the ground in front of it with rebel dead. The rebel Gen. ADAMS was killed. He and his horse fell into a ditch in front of the One Hundred and Fourth Ohio. Seventeen distinct attacks of the enemy were repelled. At dusk the rebels were repulsed at all points, but the firing did not close until 9 o‘clock at night. At least 5,000 rebels were Killed, wounded and captured, while our loss will probably reach fifteen hundred. We have taken from the enemy thirty flags; some regiments, among them the Seventieth Ohio, taking half a dozen each. Gen. SCHOFIELD directed the battle from the fort on the north bank of the stream, where some heavy guns and the batteries of the Twenty-third Corps were placed, and which did great service in damaging the enemy‘s right wing.

New York Times story, December 4, 1864 – Gen. Thomas
GEN. THOMAS’ ARMY.; The Situation before Nashville. NO FIGHTING UP TO YESTERDAY. Our Position Eminently Satisfactory. A REBEL RAID ON GALLATIN. Further Details of the Battle of Franklin. Desperate and Fatal Charges of the Enemy. THE LATEST FROM GEN. THOMAS. REPORTS FROM NASHVILLE. REPORTS FROM LOUISVILLE.

WASHINGTON, Saturday, Dec. 3. The latest official information from the army of Gen. THOMAS is that he has so concentrated his forces at the fortifications of Nashville as to be prepared for any movement which Gen. HOOD may venture to make. NASHVILLE, Friday. Dec. 2. Gen. WOOD succeeds Gen. STANLEY in command of the Fourth Corps, Gen. STANLEY being unable to take the field, his desperate bravery at the fight at Franklin mainly contributing to turn what threatened to be a disastrous repulse into a most glorious victory. When part of Gen. STANLEY‘s command had ran away before the charge of the rebels, he rushed to the front, had a horse shot under him, and was himself wounded, yet still he led on the charge, waving his hat in the air and calling on his men to follow him. He succeeded in rallying his faltering troops, repelling seven successive charges made by the rebels. Col. OPDYKE, of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Ohio, commanding a brigade, specially distinguished himself in the engagement. Col. SCHOFIELD, a brother of Gen. SCHOFIELD, and his Chief of Artillery, distinguished himself by the admirable positions in which he placed the artillery, and the manner in which he fought. The great importance of the victory at Franklin cannot be over-estimated, as it checked Gen. HOOD‘s onward course and gave the Federals time to make due preparations to meet him. Gens. SCHOFIELD and STANLEY command corps in full. [SECOND DISPATCH.] NASHVILLE, Friday, Dec. 2. There has been slight skirmishing between ours and the rebel cavalry all day. A complete line of intrenchments encircle the city. A portion of our cavalry force encountered the rebel cavalry, three miles from this city, on the Franklin pike. The rebels could be plainly seen advancing toward them. Our troops then retired toward the city. Night coming on, but few occasional shots were fired. It is rumored that Gen. HOOD is endeavoring to cross the Cumberland River with a large cavalry force. Many experienced officers predict a heavy battle to-morrow. Our forces occupy lines around the city, and are in line of battle. Three soldiers were shot and killed by the guards in the streets of the city this evening. Their names are ARTHUR L. CHEASY, of the Eighth Kansas, JOHN MCCARTLY, of the Thirtieth Indiana, and JOS. BRUNT, of the Seventh Illinois Cavalry. LOUISVILLE, Ky., Saturday, Dec. 3. The Journal, of this city, has the following: A letter from Nashville states that on Wednesday evening. CAPTON‘s brigade of cavalry, consisting of the Fourteenth Illinois, the Seventh Ohio, the Fifth Iowa, and the Eighth Michigan cavalry regiments, was surrounded by the rebels, and only escaped by the most desperate fighting. They cut their way through the rebel lines, and joined Gen. THOMAS in the rear of Franklin. The number of men made prisoners, and the loss in killed and wounded, was not light. The same evening a train of cars was captured by the rebels at Brentwood, nice miles from Nashville, on the Tennessee and Alabama Railroad. All citizens in Nashville engaged in no ostensible business have been ordered to leave the city. Six hundred and ninety-one rebel prisoners, captured by Gen. THOMAS in the battle at Franklin, arrived here last night on the train from Nashville. They will be sent forward to Camp Douglas as rapidly as possible, in order to make room in the military prisons here for further captures that may be made.

LOUSIVILLE. Ky., Saturday, Dec. 3. Yesterday the rolling stock of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad was ordered hither. To-day the order was countermanded. A street rumor representing that the Federals were repulsed at Clarkesville, grew out of a dash of the rebels into Gallatin yesterday, where they captured two hundred head of beeves. Our forces are pursuing, and will probably capture the raiders. LOUISVILLE, Ky., Saturday, Dec. 3. The Journal contains the following special dispatch this afternoon: NASHVILLE, Tenn., Friday, Dec. 2. The enemy has been wary to-day, and has demonstrated with great caution against our outer-line, which is carefully constructed and extends from river to river, with a radius of two and a half miles from the capitol, on the roads south of the city. The enemy‘s cavalry have been in plain view all day on the Franklin Pike. Just before dusk our cavalry pushed out toward the enemy‘s line, cautioning him to retire. Afterward the rebels were re-enforced. They then took up their own line at once and threw out skirmishers. Some skirmishing subsequently occurred; neither party sustaining any loss. No rebel infantry has yet been developed. Some firing occurred this afternoon on the left. Only a few shots were fired. The defenses are being hourly strengthened, and no apprehensions need be felt for the safety of the city.

New York Times headlines, December 5, 1864
THE BAR IN TENNESSEE.; Heavy Skirmishing in Front of Nashville. POSITION OF THE OPPOSING ARMIES. A Reconnoitering Expedition No Rebels Across the River. Surrender of a Blockhouse to the Rebels. ANTICIPATIONS OF A GREAT BATTLE. Rebel Views of Hood’s Movement. FURTHER DETAILS. Gen. Stanley’s Wound The Chattanooga and Nashville Railroad.

Special Dispatch to the New-York Times. NASHVILLE, Saturday, Dec. 3. After two days of wet weather, the clouds disappeared this morning, and the day has been magnificent. I have been on our right all day. Our line of battle extends around the suburbs of the city, our right and left, respectively, resting on the Cumber land River. The enemy‘s line of battle is just two miles from the city. Quite heavy skirmishing in front of Gens. A.J. SMITH and WOOD has been going on all the afternoon by sharpshooters on both sides. On the right of our centre, near Widow ACKLIN‘s place, the enemy‘s skirmishers became troublesome, taking refuge behind houses on Franklin, Granny White and Highborn pikes. Two houses were burned, several injured and ruined by our artillery. We used considerable artillery this afternoon on our right and right centre, but elicited no reply from the rebel artillery. The supposition is that they are short of this kind of ammunition. Several of our men were killed to-day by their sharpshooters, including two members of the Sixth Ohio Battery. The enemy‘s line can be seen quite plainly with the naked eve. All railroading south of this city has ceased to exist. Murfreesboro, Bridgeport and Chattanooga are deemed safe. Events of some moment are anticipated to-morrow. It may be considered an impossibility for the rebels to cross the river either on our right or left, as Commodore FITCH is here with a fleet of gunboats. Johnsonville has been evacuated. Everything was removed from all the railroads in safety. Thirty-three locomotives and trains were sent North this morning. Nashville and the

surrounding country for miles has been converted into a huge fortress. The destruction of rebel property in deface of the city will be almost incalculable. As almost all the rich property-owners hereabouts are rebel sympathizers, the rage manifested by this portion of the community at the approach of the rebel army, necessitating the destruction of their property, is unbounded. Gen. FRANK CHEATHAM, commanding one of the rebel corps, has his headquarters at the house of Mr. EDMONSON, on the Murfreesboro pike, four miles from the city. He told EDMONSON that HOOD had orders to go to Nashville or to hell. There is plenty of water in the river for boating purposes Vague rumors are afloat about FORREST crossing the river, and BEECKINRIDGE joining HOOD, all of which are untrue. The situation of our forces is considered perfectly satisfactory. BENJ. C. TRUMAN. NASHVILLE, Tenn., Sunday, Dec. 4. No new developments have taken place to-day, except that our army still encircles the city on the southeast, its wings resting on the Cumberland River. The enemy‘s lines are clearly to be seen from high points in the suburbs and from the capitol. They are in trenching themselves in a southwestern direction, about three miles from the city. During the day heavy skirmishing occurred on our left and progressed along the line to the centre. Many persons witnessed the cannonading. Along the right of our lines nothing of importance transpired to-day. The general opinion is that HOOD will attack the Federal forces in front of Nashville. A Federal cavalry force has patrolled the north bank of the river at the fords to prevent cavalry from crossing, as numerous unsuccessful attempts have been made by them to cross since the 1st inst. Johnsonville has been evacuated, and the road has been uninterrupted, and part of the trains from there are advancing to this point by land. It is rumored here to-day that FORREST has placed a pontoon bridge across the river above the city, and that MARMADUKE has occupied Johnsonville. Both are without foundation. The first blockhouse on the Chattanooga road, four miles from the city, defended by negroes, commanded by Col. JOHNSON, of the colored infantry, who surrendered Dalton, Ga., and was paroled, held out unit this afternoon, when they surrendered. Col. JOHNSON and a portion of his men escaping on a train. The remainder were captured. The train was fired into. Several jumped from the train into the river and escaped. Col. JOHNSON among them, who is in the city tonight. A reconnoitering party sent Thursday returned today, having gone eighty miles up the river. They report that no rebels were seen or heard of crossing the river, and none appeared upon the banks. A rebel deserter, who came in to-day, reports that Gen. S.D. LEE published an order to his men Friday morning, complimenting them on their bravery, devotion, & c, thanking them for the victory won at Franklin, and assuring them that if true to themselves now in front of Nashville, they would be soon enabled to enter and take possession of a vast amount of stores contained there. Two prisoners were brought in today, Lieut. HICKMAN, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, four miles from the city, and C.H. GARDY, of FORD‘s Forty-eighth Georgia Infantry. The water on the shoals is nine feet deep, and still rising. REBEL VIEW OF HOOD‘s CAMPAIGN. From the Sentinel. The news from Tennessee through United States papers, is of further retrograde without fight on the part of the Federal General This means, of course, further advance of the army of Gen. HOOD. By previous reports. Gen. FORREST was upon a flank movement. The next day tells the result. THOMAS fell back from Columbia to Franklin, twenty-five miles in twenty-four hours, a rapidity of movement which is a complement to his celerity, and evidence of the fright which hurried him. It was appropriately celebrated in New-York by a rise in gold. Franklin, at or near which point we are to suppose that HOOD had arrived. is only nineteen miles by rail from Nashville. Another

flanker by FORREST, will send THOMAS behind the fortifications of the latter city. What may be HOOD‘s further movements, we can only conjecture, so can the enemy. It would be a small thing for FORREST to do, to swing around Nashville and cut its Northern connections. HOOD has probably but to place the city in his rear to frighten THOMAS out of it. It would seem very clear that HOOD has already accomplished enough to restore almost the whole of Tennessee to our side of the military lines. He has but to march upon East Tennessee to regain complete possession there without a blow. Lost by the treachery of the Commander at Cumberland Gap, it may soon be ours again. Isolated, cut off and unsupported, Chattanooga would then become utterly untenable by the enemy. This would restore to us our line of railway through Knoxville and Chattanooga to the Southwest. The campaign would indeed be glorious that should close with such an advantage to our cause; and yet it is a consummation which seems within our grasp. It may be that HOOD iS striving for still more. It may be that Nashville is to be regained, and that the feet of his soldiers will press the soil of Kentucky here halt is called. We cherish large hopes from his enterprise, but trust that what is now in our-grasp will not be too much imperiled in an effort at more. If it shall please Heaven to favor us with the success which it now seems reasonable to expect in Tennessee, it will be an overwhelming rebuke of the braggart SHERMAN, and hundredfold compensation for the pigs he may steal, and the corncribs he may burn, while running the gauntlet in Georgia. We watt with solicitude and yet with cheering anticipations, for further tidings. Gen. Stanley‘s Wound — The Chattanooga and Nashville Railroad. LOUISVILLE, Dec. 3. Maj.-Gen. D.S. STANLEY left here by the mail-boat for his home at Yellow Springs, Ohio, this afternoon. His wound is rattier painful but not dangerous, and Col. SCOTT, the Surgeon-General of Kentucky, expresses the opinion that he will be able to reenter the service within fifteen or twenty days. Yesterday the rolling stock of the Chattanooga and Nashville Railroad, consisting of large numbers of trains, was ordered to Louisville. The order was countermanded to-day. The passenger train from Nashville has arrived three hours behind time.

New York Times headlines, December 6, 1864
THE WAR IN TENNESSEE.; THE BATTLE OF FRANKLIN. Gen. Stanley’s Account Interesting Particulars. REPORTS FROM LOUISVILLE.

CINCINNATI, Monday, Dec. 5. Major Gen. STANLEY, who was wounded in the battle of Franklin, arrived here yesterday. He says the reports of the battle that have reached the public have not been exaggerated. The rebels met with their heaviest losses in attacking our trains, which were of enormous size and value, and filled the roads for twelve miles. It was not intended that Franklin should be held longer than was necessary to get our property out of the way. The rebels had been pressing us very hard from Columbia, and at one time we were in great danger. HOOD lost his opportunity by not attacking in force at Spring Hill. SCHOFIELD‘s army consisted of the Fourth and Twenty-third Corps, together with a few regiments which had recently entered the service. They left Pulaski on the 23d of November, and were so closely pressed that at times it was thought the artillery wagon trains would have to be abandoned, but by good management they were all brought through safely. Gen. STANLEY

has been in nearly all the battles in Tennessee and Georgia, but he says that the musketry fire at Franklin was for an hour the most intense he ever witnessed, besides this we had twenty-eight guns in action, with full sweep of the rebel columns. A dispatch to the Commercial from Nashville says Murfreesboro, Bridgeport and Chattanooga are safe. Nashville and the surrounding country for miles have been converted into huge forts. The destruction of rebel property to facilitate the defense of the city has been immense. Almost all the rich property-holders hereabouts are rebel sympathizers. The advance of the rebel army has necessitated the destruction of property. The Federal position is perfectly satisfactory. LOUISVILLE, Ky., Monday, Dec. 5. The Journal of this morning, contains the following: NASHVILLE, Tenn., Sunday, Dec. 4. Nothing of special interest has transpired to-day along the lines. Our artillery was used at different points against the rebels, who are engaged in erecting breastworks within half a mile of ours. Prisoners brought in to-day say that Brig.-Gens. GIST, STAHL, GRAMBERRY and BROWN of the rebel army were killed at Franklin, and that Gen. CHRATHAL lost every Brigadier in his corps.

New York Times headlines, December 11, 1864
THE WAR IN TENNESSEE.; Our Loss in the Battle of Franklin Gen. Cheatham Shelled. Out Deserters Hood About to Make a Movement of Some Sort. The Latest from Nashville. The Evacuation of Johnsonville A Disorderly Retreat. Affairs at Nashville.

NASHVILLE, Tenn., Saturday, Dec. 10. The Federal loss in the battle of Franklin, as ascertained by official reports, is greater than at first supposed. In the Second Division of the Twenty-third Corps the loss was thirty-four officers and 588 men killed, wounded and missing. In the Second Division of the Fourth Corps, the loss was 49 officers and 1,191 men killed, wounded and missing. In the Third Division of the Fourth Corps, 27 officers and 276 men were killed, wounded and missing. A large proportion of the slightly wounded are in the hospitals. The loss to residents living near the line of the two armies, is estimated at over half a million of dollars. Gen. CHEATHAM, whose headquarters were at the residence of Mr. A.V. BROWN, was shelled out from there yesterday by our batteries. The residence is reported as completely destroyed. On Sunday last, a small party of Confederates, about fifty in number, succeeded in crossing the Cumberland River, this side of the Shoals. Three of the number were captured and brought in yesterday. They claim that the whole party deserted from the rebel lines, and were making their way to their homes. Another prisoner was captured yesterday, and four deserters came into our lines to-day. The latter report that Gen. Hood is about to make a movement of some sort. Gen. COOPER‘s brigade, in its march from Johnsonville to Clarksville, was terribly harassed by guerrillas. Sixteen men of the Thirteenth Indiana were captured, thirteen

killed and three wounded. One of the latter, left for dead, escaped, and reported the above facts. The weather is very cold. About two inches of snow fell at Nashville yesterday and last night. The river is five feet deep on the shoals, and rising. NASHVILLE, Saturday, Dec. 10. The situation of affairs remains unchanged. In front of the Fourth Corps not a shot was fired up to 2 o‘clock this afternoon. Since then some slight skirmishing has occurred. Owing to the slippery state of the ground, the men find it impossible to move about. The rebels can be plainly seen from the front of the Fourth Corps standing about their camp fires. Hostilities may be said to have ceased on account of the bad weather. Deserters who come in say that the rebels have strong intrenchments, with two rows of chevaux de friese, with wires stretched around to strengthen them. Col. LOUIS JOHNSON, instead of Col. G. M.S. JOHNSON, commander of the Fortyfourth Colored Infantry, has received from the General-Commanding the highest praise for the manner in which he fought his troops at Mill Creek Station No. 2, having gallantly kept the enemy at bay for sixteen hours, and finally fought his way out, and reached Nashville with the loss of one hundred and fifteen men, killed and wounded. No report has yet been heard from the gunboats which went down the river yesterday morning. No cannonading has been heard here since their departure. The river is three feet deep on the shoals, and falling. From the Louisville Journal, Dec. 8. Prior to its evacuation, Johnsonville, on the Tennessee River, was garrisoned by a brigade of colored troops. It appears that the retreat from that place was hasty and somewhat disorderly. A large amount of Government property was destroyed by our troops, and the march from the Tennessee River to Clarksville, on the Cumberland, was marked with great demoralization. The wagon train was loaded down with stores, plunder not worth the hauling, and negro women and children. The officers placed no restraint upon the actions of their men, and they were allowed to straggle, pillage, burn and destroy. We are informed that every house standing near the line of march was fired and hurried to the ground. A guerrilla force hovered upon the rear and flanks of the brigade, and proved a great annoyance in the retreat. About forty of the black soldiers were killed and wounded by these partisan rangers. The officers took no precautions to keep off the enemy. In the contused straggle, the soldiers were bushwhacked by the wary enemy with the greatest ease. The brigade consisted of five regiments, and yet the troops were unable to protect their train. A number of the wagons were captured and burned by the guerrillas. Our officers ordered the destruction of a portion of the train to prevent it from falling into the hands of the bushwhackers. It is estimated that the destruction of private and Government property on the retreat will exceed a million dollars. If the facts are as they were related to us, the officer in command of the Colored Brigade should be held to a strict responsibility for the conduct of his men. There was no necessity for a panic-stricken, disorderly retreat, for, after leaving the Tennessee River, no enemy followed in pursuit, except a handful of mounted guerrillas. Gen. COOPER‘s brigade of white troops, which was cut off from the main army when Gen. THOMAS retreated from Franklin, has also arrived at Clarksville. For several days great fears were entertained for the safety of Gen. COOPER and his command. Both brigades were at Clarksville yesterday morning, making preparations to move up and join the main army at Nashville. Correspondence of the Boston Journal. NASHVILLE, Saturday Evening. Dec. 3, 1864. Everybody went to bed last night with the expectation of being roused from their slumbers at an early hour by the roar of artillery. But they were disappointed. The forenoon passed: 12, 1, 2 o‘clock came, and still all was quiet on the Cumberland.

A few moments afterward, however, an artillery firing commenced, which lasted till dark. It extended along the line from the left to right centre, chiefly in front of Gen. SMITH‘s corps, which occupies the light instead of the extreme left, as I reported yesterday. There was a little skirmishing, but there were few-casualties. It is confidently stated that the enemy will open the battle to-morrow morning. All our Generals were out in person examining the position on the right, where the enemy are heavily massed and where it is believed the great struggle will take place. Col. JOHNSON, of the colored Forty-fourth regiment, came in this morning. He fought from 11 o‘clock in the forenoon till 3 next mornings. He had two hundred and seventy-five men when the train was attacked by the rebels. He made his way to a block house, in which thirty men were stationed, and disposed his forces around it. For sixteen hours the unequal fight was kept up. ―Bravely they fought and well,‖ and what ever be said of the conduct of this officer at Dalton, he nobly redeemed his reputation for personal courage in his long fight yesterday. From the position of the ground, it was impossible for the rebels to charge him without exposing themselves to a deadly fire, and as every one of our officers would have been shot and each of their men enslaved, had they been captured, they would have given the assailants a desperate reception had the attempt been made. The firing on them was entirely by artillery. They made one charge on a portion of the besiegers, and dismounted several of them. They lost in killed, wounded and captured nearly 100 men — about 60 wounded, and 20 killed and 20 captured. It will be remembered that Gen. THOMAS would not recognize the parole of these officers, as it was not in accordance with the cartel, but it is not likely that Gen. FORREST would have seen it in that light had he captured the new regiment. The old regiment is believed to be at Mobile, working on the fortifications. A deserter who came within our lines yesterday informed the authorities that LEE had issued an address congratulating his men on their brilliant victory at Franklin, and assuring them that if they evinced the same devotion to their country and an equal courage, they would soon possess Nashville and its vast stores of supplies.

New York Times headlines, December 12, 1864
THE WAR IN TENNESSEE.; Reports from Nashville. The situation in Middle Tennessee–Relative Positions of the Two Armies–Further Particulars of the Franklin Fight.

Special Dispatch to the New-York Times. WASHINGTON, Sunday, Dec. 11. Dispatches received by the Government from Gen. THOMAS represent the position of affairs at Nashville unchanged. Gen. THOMAS says that the recent storm has interfered with army movements on either side for several days at least. NASHVILLE, Saturday, Dec. 10. The situation of affairs remains unchanged. In front of the Fourth Corps not a shot was fired up to 2 o‘clock this afternoon. Since then some slight skirmishing has occurred. Owing to the slippery state of the ground, the men find it impossible to move about. The rebels can be plainly seen from the front of the Fourth Corps standing about their camp fires. Hostilities may be said to have

ceased on account of the bad weather. Deserters who come in say that the rebels have strong intrenchments, with two rows of chevaux de friese, with wires stretched around to strengthen them. No report has yet been heard from the gunboats which went down the river yesterday morning. No cannonading has been heard here since their departure. The river is three feet deep on the shoals, and falling From Our Own Correspondent. NASHVILLE, Tenn., Sunday, Dec. 4, 1864. THE SITUATION The most splendid military exhibition of the war in this section may be witnessed, as I write, from Capitol Hill. The entire Federal lines of battle, almost from right to left, may be plainly seen with the naked eye. Over fifty thousand troops occupy our lines, which is just five miles. A.J. SMITH‘s corps is on the right, resting on the river, on low-ground, on what is known as the John Harding pike — a branch road of the Charlotte pike. What is known as the right wing extends east to within a hundred yards of the Franklin pike. Then comes the Fourth Corps, temporarily commanded by Gen. THOMAS J. WOOD, in place of Gen. STANLEY, who was wounded at Franklin. Gen. WOOD‘s headquarters is at the Widow ACKLIN‘s, on the Granny-white road. Our line of battle just escapes the exquisite grounds of this lady, although all of her ―nigger huts,‖ walls and fences have been torn down for breastworks. The centre extends east to beyond the Murfreesboro pike; then comes the left — the Twenty-third Corps — under Gen. SCHOFIELD, which extends to the river, Gen. STEEDMAN, with his command from Chattanooga, filling in, and in reserve, upon a high bank of the river, a few hundred yards south of the reservoir. Our extreme left rests upon a bank 76 feet above high-water mark. The rebel line of battle is plainly visible, about two miles from town. It is believed that DICK TAYLOR‘s forces, numbering nearly ten thousand strong, are in reserve. and it may be that this corps is operating near Murfreesboro. Gen. FRANK CHEATHAM is commanding the enemy‘s right wing. He has three divisions — Gens. GEORGE MANEY‘s, BATES‘ and ANDERSON‘s. It is a curious fact that these three General officers, commanding divisions, and the corps Commander, (CHEATHAM,) are citizens of Nashville. CHEATHAM was a ―sporting man;‖ MANEY was a lawyer, rather a fast young man; BATES was Attorney-General of the State when the war broke out, and was not universally admired; ANDERSON was Postmaster of this city, and is not considered a man of extraordinary mind. STEPHEN D. LEE‘s corps is in the centre, and STEWART commands a corps on the enemy‘s left. STEPHEN D. LEE‘s corps is composed of three divisions, and STEWART has four. In LEE‘s corps, PATRICK CLEBURNE (if not killed) commands a division, and so does Gen. STEVENSON. In STEWART‘s corps, QUARLES and WALKER command divisions. Gen. BATTLES, of this county, commands a brigade in GEO. MANEY‘s division. PAT. CLEBURNE, of Arkansas, (a native of Ireland,) is one of the most earnest and intrepid commanders in the rebel army, and is generally found conducting the enemy‘s rear upon all critical occasions. Teere are many rumors in regard to his death. Gen. GORDON, a prisoner, says that before he was captured, a report was rife that either CHEATHAM or CLEBURNE was killed. CHEATHAM has his headquarters at the residence of Mr. EDMUNDSON, on the Murfreeshoro pike, four miles from town. He can‘t very well be dead, of course. Mr. EDMUNDSON was in the city yesterday, and says that FRANK insists that HOOD‘s destination is Nashville; that he has orders to take this city or go to hell. This is all rebel blow, at any rate, and may be the inventions of FRANK himself. But, many of the prisoners report CLEBURNE killed, and venture a description of his fall. The story which would seem to most earnestly urge his death is told by our General, KIMBALL, and reiterated by his staff officers. Gen. KIMBALL says that during the thickest part of the Franklin fight he saw a rebel

General upon the ground, and that he gasped ―I‘m mortally wounded.‖ Before he could order his removal, WAGNER‘s division gave way, the line was changed, and the wounded man removed by rebel soldiers. I give you this as I hear it from various sources, but will add that I did not hear Gen. KIMBALL tell the story. It seems pretty generally believed, by the way, that either CLEBURNE or some other general officer was killed in the battle of the 30th ult. FORREST has command of the entire rebel cavalry, and has two divisions upon each flank. Gen. WILSON, late of the Army of the Potomac, commands all our cavalry, and is one of the most pertinacious soldiers in the service. His military skill and his bravery are a match for FORREST‘s cunning and intrepidity. Commodore FITCH commands upon the Cumberland, and assists in protecting our flanks to a considerable extent. He has one iron-clad up the river, above the position of our left wing, and another down the river near Hyde‘s Ferry, watching the enemy upon our right. There are, also, several other gunboats, of various shapes and sizes, patrolling the river from Carthage up to Clarksville down. At the latter place is a turreted craft, not unlike the ocean monitors. From Carthage to Clarksville, then, it will be almost an utter impossibility for the rebels to cross the river. As fast as HOOD advanced, after leaving Pulaski, he destroyed the Tennessee and Alabama Railroad, running from this city to Decatur. This would urge the belief that it was his intention to either cross the river and strike for Kentucky, or fall back toward Bridgeport, along the line of the Chattanooga road, if he falls to attack this place. On our left, quite a large body of our cavalry are across the river, but the enemy are wholly upon the Nashville side. THE FIGHT AT FRANKLIN. I must put in a little word for The TIMES in this connection. It was the first newspaper in the country, of course, (in this case,) that had the news of this fight, and my dispatch was the first one and the only one sent anywhere over the wires Wednesday night, 30th ult. I had previously sent you a dispatch that Gen. THOMAS intended to draw the enemy to this point. Subsequently I went to a party, and was returning home about 12 o‘clock Wednesday night. As I arrived at the St. Cloud I met Gen. MILLER, who informed me that Gen. THOMAS had just received intelligence of a great victory at Franklin. I went Into Gen. THOMAS‘ rooms, and he permitted me to send the news North. Well, speaking about the fight at Franklin, I will reiterate that it was, beyond a doubt, one of the most gallantly-contested battles, and the cleanest victory (won in an open field) of the war. Had HOOD succeeded in whipping us, he would have captured our entire wagon trains, and routed a large portion of our army. The real fight lasted just one hour and forty minutes, in which time six thousand of the enemy were placed hors du combat, while our own loss falls a little below a thousand. This dreadful check may be the cause of the delay in rebel demonstrations in our front, if that, indeed, is the programme. The enemy really at Franklin, was at least one-third stronger than our own forces. They fought us with two whole corps and part of another, while less than half of both the Fourth and Twenty-third were engaged upon our side. They charged, as if every man was iron-clad, four times against our works, and, with the exception of the first charge, were driven back in great disorder. Our artillery, too, made prodigious havoc in their ranks, actually mowing the brave men down or scattering them in confusion. I have one or two quite interesting items in connection with this fight, which I have omitted to mention: We lost two battle-flags, which were captured from WAGNER‘s division, during the panic which temporarily existed in that body, and we captured thirty-two stand of colors, the Twenty-third Corps getting the credit for twenty-two of them, and the Fourth Corps for ten. Many of these trophies are now to be seen at SCHOFIELD‘s headquarters. Gen. GORDON was captured by a stalwart fellow of the Sixteenth Kentucky, who grabbed him

by the coat-collar, actually ―yanking,‖ or ―Yankeeing‖ him, square off his feet. Gen. STANLEY, Commanding Fourth Corps, was evidently a target for both rebel artillery and infantry. He was actively engaged in rallying WAGNER‘s division, and the enemy‘s sharpshooters got a sight at him. He was twice (slightly) wounded in the neck, while two bullets passed through his clothes. A cannon-ball sent his horse to thunder, it going one way and its rider the other. Gen. BRADLEY was shot in the arm while upon the left of his brigade, leading his men back to a position from which they had wavered a little. I tell you what it is, it‘s mighty queer work, sometimes, fighting these fellows, especially when they get right well warmed up. Their demonstrations upon certain occasions are fearfully demoralizing. At such times a gill of ―fluid‖ is a quart of courage ―every pop.‖ The ladies of Franklin, most of whom are rebels, and beautiful rebels too, some of them are, assisted en masse, in caring for our wounded. Mrs. CARTER and her daughters contributed in this holy work. Mrs. Dr. CLIFF, a Union lady of renown, and Mrs. WILLIAMS, an estimable woman, threw open their houses for the reception of sufferers. Miss FANNY COURTNEY, decidedly loyal from the commencement, although she has two brothers in CHEATHAM‘s corps, made herself useful. Her sister, formerly Miss OCTAVIA COURTNEY, was some time ago married to Lieut. COCHNOWER, son of the merchant of that name in Cincinnati. She is an elegant lady, and waved a string of red, white and blue ribbons when Gen. NEGLEY entered Franklin nearly three years ago. When BUELL‘s retrograde movement took place, a little over two years ago, Miss FANNY COURTNEY, upon the approach of the rebel columns, saddled a horse, forded Harpeth River, and came to this city alone during night. FANNY is all right — I know her; she is pretty, too. You may recollect that, in a letter of mine, within a couple of weeks ago, in which I gave your readers a brief description of several towns along the Tennessee and Alabama Railroad, I stated that Franklin, of all other towns, had been most first in the hands of our forces and then in the possession of the enemy, and so on. Of course, just now, it is again in the Southern Confederacy. If the citizens of Franklin had been compelled to take the oath of allegiance to every Government that came along, they would have become frightfully profane by this time, and might practice swearing for a living. It is rumored that ISHAM G. Harris, the nomandic Governor of Tennessee, is with the advance of Hood‘s army. He is enjoying, at least, all the felicity that Moses did — he can look into Nashville. King ISHAM, as Governor JOHNSON calls him, has been a wanderer upon earth for a long time. Should he ever again visit the capital during the rebellion, he will no doubt bring with him the State archives, but it is rather hinted that he might forget that million-dollar school fund, which disappeared from Nashville just about the time ISHAM did. However, in all probability, HAREIS will not come, this trip. BENJAMIN C. TRUMAN.

New York Times headlines, December 13, 1864
THE WAR IN TENNESSEE.; Reports from Nashville. The situation in Middle Tennessee–Relative Positions of the Two Armies–Further Particulars of the Franklin Fight. Special Dispatch to the New-York Times. WASHINGTON, Sunday, Dec. 11. Dispatches received by the Government from Gen. THOMAS represent the position of affairs at Nashville unchanged. Gen. THOMAS says that the recent storm has interfered with army movements on either side for several days at least.

NASHVILLE, Saturday, Dec. 10. The situation of affairs remains unchanged. In front of the Fourth Corps not a shot was fired up to 2 o‘clock this afternoon. Since then some slight skirmishing has occurred. Owing to the slippery state of the ground, the men find it impossible to move about. The rebels can be plainly seen from the front of the Fourth Corps standing about their camp fires. Hostilities may be said to have ceased on account of the bad weather. Deserters who come in say that the rebels have strong intrenchments, with two rows of chevaux de friese, with wires stretched around to strengthen them. No report has yet been heard from the gunboats which went down the river yesterday morning. No cannonading has been heard here since their departure. The river is three feet deep on the shoals, and falling From Our Own Correspondent. NASHVILLE, Tenn., Sunday, Dec. 4, 1864. THE SITUATION The most splendid military exhibition of the war in this section may be witnessed, as I write, from Capitol Hill. The entire Federal lines of battle, almost from right to left, may be plainly seen with the naked eye. Over fifty thousand troops occupy our lines, which is just five miles. A.J. SMITH‘s corps is on the right, resting on the river, on low-ground, on what is known as the John Harding pike — a branch road of the Charlotte pike. What is known as the right wing extends east to within a hundred yards of the Franklin pike. Then comes the Fourth Corps, temporarily commanded by Gen. THOMAS J. WOOD, in place of Gen. STANLEY, who was wounded at Franklin. Gen. WOOD‘s headquarters is at the Widow ACKLIN‘s, on the Granny-white road. Our line of battle just escapes the exquisite grounds of this lady, although all of her ―nigger huts,‖ walls and fences have been torn down for breastworks. The centre extends east to beyond the Murfreesboro pike; then comes the left — the Twenty-third Corps — under Gen. SCHOFIELD, which extends to the river, Gen. STEEDMAN, with his command from Chattanooga, filling in, and in reserve, upon a high bank of the river, a few hundred yards south of the reservoir. Our extreme left rests upon a bank 76 feet above high-water mark. The rebel line of battle is plainly visible, about two miles from town. It is believed that DICK TAYLOR‘s forces, numbering nearly ten thousand strong, are in reserve. and it may be that this corps is operating near Murfreesboro. Gen. FRANK CHEATHAM is commanding the enemy‘s right wing. He has three divisions — Gens. GEORGE MANEY‘s, BATES‘ and ANDERSON‘s. It is a curious fact that these three General officers, commanding divisions, and the corps Commander, (CHEATHAM,) are citizens of Nashville. CHEATHAM was a ―sporting man;‖ MANEY was a lawyer, rather a fast young man; BATES was Attorney-General of the State when the war broke out, and was not universally admired; ANDERSON was Postmaster of this city, and is not considered a man of extraordinary mind. STEPHEN D. LEE‘s corps is in the centre, and STEWART commands a corps on the enemy‘s left. STEPHEN D. LEE‘s corps is composed of three divisions, and STEWART has four. In LEE‘s corps, PATRICK CLEBURNE (if not killed) commands a division, and so does Gen. STEVENSON. In STEWART‘s corps, QUARLES and WALKER command divisions. Gen. BATTLES, of this county, commands a brigade in GEO. MANEY‘s division. PAT. CLEBURNE, of Arkansas, (a native of Ireland,) is one of the most earnest and intrepid commanders in the rebel army, and is generally found conducting the enemy‘s rear upon all critical occasions. There are many rumors in regard to his death. Gen. GORDON, a prisoner, says that before he was captured, a report was rife that either CHEATHAM or CLEBURNE was killed. CHEATHAM has his headquarters at the residence of Mr. EDMUNDSON, on the Murifreeshoro pike, four miles from town. He can‘t very well be dead, of course. Mr. EDMUNDSON was in the city yesterday, and says that FRANK insists that HOOD‘s destination is Nashville; that he has orders to take this city or go to hell. This is all rebel blow, at any rate, and may be the inventions of FRANK himself. But, many of the prisoners report CLEBURNE killed, and venture a description of his fall. The story which would seem to most earnestly urge his death is told by our General, KIMBALL, and reiterated by his staff officers. Gen. KIMBALL says that during the thickest part of the Franklin fight he saw a rebel General upon the ground, and that he gasped ―I‘m mortally wounded.‖ Before he could order his removal, WAGNER‘s division gave way, the line was changed, and the wounded man removed by rebel soldiers. I give you this as I hear it from various sources, but will add that I did not hear Gen. KIMBALL tell the story. It seems pretty

generally believed, by the way, that either CLEBURNE or some other general officer was killed in the battle of the 30th ult. FORREST has command of the entire rebel cavalry, and has two divisions upon each flank. Gen. WILSON, late of the Army of the Potomac, commands all our cavalry, and is one of the most pertinacious soldiers in the service. His military skill and his bravery are a match for FORREST‘s cunning and intrepidity. Commodore FITCH commands upon the Cumberland, and assists in protecting our flanks to a considerable extent. He has one iron-clad up the river, above the position of our left wing, and another down the river near Hyde‘s Ferry, watching the enemy upon our right. There are, also, several other gunboats, of various shapes and sizes, patrolling the river from Carthage up to Clarksville down. At the latter place is a turreted craft, not unlike the ocean monitors. From Carthage to Clarksville, then, it will be almost an utter impossibility for the rebels to cross the river. As fast as HOOD advanced, after leaving Pulaski, he destroyed the Tennessee and Alabama Railroad, running from this city to Decatur. This would urge the belief that it was his intention to either cross the river and strike for Kentucky, or fall back toward Bridgeport, along the line of the Chattanooga road, if he falls to attack this place. On our left, quite a large body of our cavalry are across the river, but the enemy are wholly upon the Nashville side. THE FIGHT AT FRANKLIN. I must put in a little word for The TIMES in this connection. It was the first newspaper in the country, of course, (in this case,) that had the news of this fight, and my dispatch was the first one and the only one sent anywhere over the wires Wednesday night, 30th ult. I had previously sent you a dispatch that Gen. THOMAS intended to draw the enemy to this point. Subsequently I went to a party, and was returning home about 12 o‘clock Wednesday night. As I arrived at the St. Cloud I met Gen. MILLER, who informed me that Gen. THOMAS had just received intelligence of a great victory at Franklin. I went Into Gen. THOMAS‘ rooms, and he permitted me to send the news North. Well, speaking about the fight at Franklin, I will reiterate that it was, beyond a doubt, one of the most gallantly-contested battles, and the cleanest victory (won in an open field) of the war. Had HOOD succeeded in whipping us, he would have captured our entire wagon trains, and routed a large portion of our army. The real fight lasted just one hour and forty minutes, in which time six thousand of the enemy were placed hors du combat, while our own loss falls a little below a thousand. This dreadful check may be the cause of the delay in rebel demonstrations in our front, if that, indeed, is the programme. The enemy really at Franklin, was at least one-third stronger than our own forces. They fought us with two whole corps and part of another, while less than half of both the Fourth and Twentythird were engaged upon our side. They charged, as if every man was iron-clad, four times against our works, and, with the exception of the first charge, were driven back in great disorder. Our artillery, too, made prodigious havoc in their ranks, actually mowing the brave men down or scattering them in confusion. I have one or two quite interesting items in connection with this fight, which I have omitted to mention: We lost two battle-flags, which were captured from WAGNER‘s division, during the panic which temporarily existed in that body, and we captured thirty-two stand of colors, the Twenty-third Corps getting the credit for twenty-two of them, and the Fourth Corps for ten. Many of these trophies are now to be seen at SCHOFIELD‘s headquarters. Gen. GORDON was captured by a stalwart fellow of the Sixteenth Kentucky, who grabbed him by the coat-collar, actually ―yanking,‖ or ―Yankeeing‖ him, square off his feet. Gen. STANLEY, Commanding Fourth Corps, was evidently a target for both rebel artillery and infantry. He was actively engaged in rallying WAGNER‘s division, and the enemy‘s sharpshooters got a sight at him. He was twice (slightly) wounded in the neck, while two bullets passed through his clothes. A cannon-ball sent his horse to thunder, it going one way and its rider the other. Gen. BRADLEY was shot in the arm while upon the left of his brigade, leading his men back to a position from which they had wavered a little. I tell you what it is, it‘s mighty queer work, sometimes, fighting these fellows, especially when they get right well warmed up. Their demonstrations upon certain occasions are fearfully demoralizing. At such times a gill of ―fluid‖ is a quart of courage ―every pop.‖ The ladies of Franklin, most of whom are rebels, and beautiful rebels too, some of them are, assisted en masse, in caring for our wounded.

Mrs. CARTER and her daughters contributed in this holy work. Mrs. Dr. CLIFF, a Union lady of renown, and Mrs. WILLIAMS, an estimable woman, threw open their houses for the reception of sufferers. Miss FANNY COURTNEY, decidedly loyal from the commencement, although she has two brothers in CHEATHAM‘s corps, made herself useful. Her sister, formerly Miss OCTAVIA COURTNEY, was some time ago married to Lieut. COCHNOWER, son of the merchant of that name in Cincinnati. She is an elegant lady, and waved a string of red, white and blue ribbons when Gen. NEGLEY entered Franklin nearly three years ago. When BUELL‘s retrograde movement took place, a little over two years ago, Miss FANNY COURTNEY, upon the approach of the rebel columns, saddled a horse, forded Harpeth River, and came to this city alone during night. FANNY is all right — I know her; she is pretty, too. You may recollect that, in a letter of mine, within a couple of weeks ago, in which I gave your readers a brief description of several towns along the Tennessee and Alabama Railroad, I stated that Franklin, of all other towns, had been most first in the hands of our forces and then in the possession of the enemy, and so on. Of course, just now, it is again in the Southern Confederacy. If the citizens of Franklin had been compelled to take the oath of allegiance to every Government that came along, they would have become frightfully profane by this time, and might practice swearing for a living. It is rumored that ISHAM G. Harris, the nomandic Governor of Tennessee, is with the advance of Hood‘s army. He is enjoying, at least, all the felicity that Moses did — he can look into Nashville. King ISHAM, as Governor JOHNSON calls him, has been a wanderer upon earth for a long time. Should he ever again visit the capital during the rebellion, he will no doubt bring with him the State archives, but it is rather hinted that he might forget that million-dollar school fund, which disappeared from Nashville just about the time ISHAM did. However, in all probability, HAREIS will not come, this trip. BENJAMIN C. TRUMAN.

New York Times headlines, December 15, 1864
FROM KENTUCKY AND TENNESSEE.; Jesse’s Guerrillas Routed Affairs in Front of Nashville Murfreesboro all Right Advance of the Rebel Gen. Lyon. The Latest from Nashville. Arrival of the Steamer Arago at Fortress Monroe. LOUISVILLE, Wednesday, Dec. 14. Capt. BRIDGEWATER, with 125 men, went into Newcastle, Ky., and drove out the guerrilla JESSEE, with a loss to the latter of thirteen killed and wounded. BRIDGEWATER chased the guerrillas through Port Royal, and was only eight minutes behind at that place. It is thought the rebels would be captured by BRIDGEWATER‘s forces. Col. JOHNSON telegraphs that the rebel Gen. LYON‘s advance is moving on Russellville, Ky. His main force, 2,500 strong, is at Elkton. A special dispatch from Nashville, 13th, says the weather had considerably moderated. All our forts have done more or less firing to-day, but apparently with little damage to the enemy. Skirmishing between the lines was renewed, to-day, with greater earnestness than for some days past. The enemy yesterday fell back to his main line, but to-day has reinstated a force in his outer lines. Dispatches fully confirm our success at Murfreesboro. The rebel Gen. BATES‘ Division is within there miles of Murfreesboro. Nothing has been heard from the rebel brigade that crossed the Cumberland yesterday at Cumberland City. A dispatch received today from Gen. ROUSSEAU says Murfreesboro is all right, and he expressed confidence in his ability to hold the place against any force the enemy has at his command. The Louisville Democrat says: ―We are informed that Gen. LYONS‘ rebel forces burned the depot and several sheds at Hattonsville, on the Memphis Branch Railroad, yesterday. A a lot of bacon stored in the depot, and a large lot of tobacco under the sheds, awaiting shipments to this city, were destroyed. The rebels are conscripting everybody they can find.

NASHVILLE, Wednesday, Dec. 14. Yesterday afternoon a reconnoissance was made by three regiments from Gen. STEADMAN‘s corps, near the Murfreesboro pike. Sharp skirmishing occurred during the afternoon. There were no losses on the Federal side, except some half dozen wounded. Deserters who came in yesterday report that HOOD had altered his lines somewhat. Later and more, reliable information, however, asserts that the rebel forces are still in their former position. HOOD has been reported sick at Franklin with typhoid fever, but the reports are not credited. He is undoubtedly with his troops within a few miles of Nashville. A lot of Government wood was destroyed by a party of rebels ten miles up the river yesterday. A portion of the rebel Gen. LYON‘s command are reported to have burned some trestle work on the Edgefield and Kentucky Railroad, seventeen miles above Springfield, Tenn. The weather is moderating. There was a heavy rain last night. The water on the Shoals is eight feet deep, and is rising rapidly. The following is the report of the Purser of the Arago: The United States transport Arago, HENRY GA[???]EN, commanding, from Port Royal, S.C., 8th inst., with the United States steamer Augusta in tow, arrived at Fortress Monroe at 5:30 P.M., on Monday, the 12th inst. On her passage she encountered severe easterly gales, on account of which she was obliged to put back on the 9th inst. 100 miles. Sixty miles southwest Hatteras passed the Untied States steamer Canandaigua, steering southwest. Among the passengers by the Arago are some escaped Union officers from Columbia, S.C., and some officers wounded at the battle of Honey Hill. The exchange of prisoners under Col. MULFORD was [???] on in Charleston harbor.

New York Times headlines, December 19, 1864
VICTORY!; Sherman at Savannah–Thomas in Tennessee. GREAT NEWS FROM BOTH ARMIES The First Official Dispatch from Gen. Sherman. His Short Record of the Great Campaign. SAVANNAH INVESTED. Its Doomed Garrison of Fifteen Thousand Men and Hardee. SHERMAN’S ARMY IN SPLENDID ORDER The Quick Capture of Fort McAllister and Its Garrison. GREAT RAILROAD DESTRUCTION Sherman’s Most Agreeable Trip in Georgia. THE TENNESSEE NEWS The Great Triumph of Gen. Thomas Near Nashville. THREE DAYS’ FIGHTING. The Victory Over Hood’s Army Still in Progress. Over Ten Thousand Prisoners Captured in Three Days. FORREST KILLED. Fifteen Hundred of His Cavalry Captured. [OFFICIAL.] The following official reports were received this evening from Gen. THOMAS, dated at his headquarters near Franklin: HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, NEAR FRANKLIN, Tenn., Dec. 17, 1864. A report just received from Major-Gen. WILSON, states that at 6 P.M. to-day he attacked and dispersed STEVENSON‘s division of rebel infantry and a brigade of cavalry, capturing three guns. The Fourth United States Cavalry and HATCH‘s division of cavalry, handsomely supported by KNIPE‘s division of cavalry, did the work, making several beautiful charges, breaking the rebel infantry in all directions. Had it only been light, the rebel rear guard would have been entirely destroyed. As it is, it has been severely punished. The whole army will continue vigorous pursuit in the morning. This attack was made six miles beyond Franklin. (Signed,) GEORGE H. THOMAS, Major-General. HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF CUMBERLAND, NEAR FRANKLIN, Tenn., Dec. 17 — 8 P.M. We have pressed the enemy to-day beyond Franklin, capturing his hospitals, containing over 1,500 wounded and about 150 of our wounded, in addition to the above. Gen. KNIFE, commanding a division of cavalry, drove the enemy‘s rear guard through Franklin to-day, capturing about 250 prisoners and five battle-flags, with very little loss on our side. Citizens of Franklin represent HOOD‘s army as completely demoralized. In addition to the captures of yesterday, reported in my dispatches of last night, I have the honor to report the capture of Gen. RUCKER and about two

hundred and fifty prisoners of the enemy‘s cavalry, in a fight that occurred about 8 o‘clock last night between Gen. RUCKER and Gen. HATCH, of our cavalry. The enemy has been pressed to-day both in front and on both flanks. Brig.-Gen. JOHNSON succeeded in striking him on the flank just beyond Franklin, capturing quite a number of prisoners — number not yet reported. My cavalry is pressing him closely through, and I am very much in hopes of getting many more prisoners to-morrow. (Signed) Geo. H. THOMAS, Maj.-Gen. Other dispatches (unofficial) from Nashville, state that 1,000 prisoners were captured by WILSON, and that Gen. ROUSSEAU, commanding at Murfreesboro, reports FORREST killed and 1,500 of his men captured. The Superintendent at Nashville reports that the railroad from Nashville will be open to Franklin to-night, and will rapidly follow THOMAS, thus furnishing him supplies, and enabling him to push on after HOOD. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

New York Times Headlines, December 24, 1864
GEN. THOMAS’ ARMY.; Particulars of Hood’s Defeat and Flight. Eighteen General Officers and Seventeen Thousand Men Disabled. FIFTY-ONE CANNON CAPTURED. Hood’s Pontoons on the Tennessee Out of Reach of Our Gunboats. OUR ARMY STILL PURSUING. The Advance Across Duck River. HOOD’s ADVANCE AT PULASKI. THE VERY LATEST. THE BATTLE OF NASHVILLE. THURSDAY’S FIGHT. FRIDAY’S FIGHT. Special Dispatch to the New-York Times. FRANKLIN, TENN., Thursday, Dec, 22. The rebel retreat from Franklin to Duck River beggars all description. HOOD told his Corps Commanders to get off the best way they could with their commands. FRANK CHEATHAM told his aunt, Miss PAGE, that HOOD was ordered to Nashville against his own wishes, but he blames HOOD for not attacking SCHOFIELD at Spring Hill. HOOD ordered BATE to attack at Spring Hill, and he didn‘t do it. The rebel army is now beyond Columbia. During the rebel tarry in front of Nashville they captured but two locomotives and ten cars. The railroad is but little injured, and trains are running up to Spring Hill, but two small bridges destroyed. Trains were run to Murfreesboro‘ on Sunday. Telegraphic communication is all right with all points. But two small trestles are destroyed on the Johnsonville road. Johnsonville itself was not destroyed. The rebel lose, during the campaign, was 17,000 men, fifty-one cannon captured and eighteen general officers. The killed, at Franklin, numbered 1,400 the wounded 3,800 and 1,000 prisoners were taken. In the battles before Nashville and retreat to Columbia there were 3,000 killed [and wounded and 8,000 prisoners. The Federal loss in the battle at Franklin was 2,000, before Nashville not 4,000. The total Federal loss will not reach 7,000, with two generals slightly wounded. HOOD has a pontoon bridge above the shoals on the Tennessee River, where our gunboats can‘t reach it. HOOD marched on Franklin with 40,000 men, including cavalry, and 65 pieces of artillery. He lost just half his general officers, and counting in deserters which are coining in and stragglers which are being captured, he will lose nearly half his men. The rout is complete, although his army is not quite annihilated. B.C. TRUMAN. NASHVILLE. Friday, Dec. 23. The latest accounts from the front locate Gen. THOMAS headquarters at Rutherford Hill, yesterday morning, eight miles this side of Columbia. Since that time our forces have crossed Duck River, and have moved to a point south of Columbia. Our cavalry forces crossed at Hunter‘s Ford, below Columbia, and dashed into the town, the enemy meanwhile retreating without firing a shot. We captured

about fifty stragglers. The rebel force was, at last accounts, at Pulaski, yesterday morning. They are probably some distance south of that place to-day. They are closely followed by our cavalry. No particular damage was done to the town of Columbia by the passage through it of the two armies. At least one-third of HOOD‘s armies are without arms and equipments, everything which impedes their flight having been thrown away. Rebel deserters and prisoners report the only effective corps of HOOD‘s army to be S.D. LEE‘S. FORREST effected a junction with HOOD at Columbia on Tuesday evening. The water on the Shoals is fifteen feet deep, and at a stand-still. NASHVILLE, Friday, Dec, 16 — Midnight. The readers of newspapers do not know what correspondents suffer sometimes in mind. For Instance, imagine a poor fellow taking the chances of a battle all day, then riding several miles in the dark, with mud up to his horse‘s belly, to find ―the wires down east of Louisville,‖ This has been the case with the subscriber, and others, for the past two days. The fighting yesterday and today, as I have stated in a telegram which, may be, you have never received, has been grander and more magnificent in detail than anything I have ever witnessed upon a field of battle. Early in the morning the enemy‘s line of battle was within musket shot of Nashville, with both flanks resting upon the river, with Gen. FRANK CHEATHAM‘S corps on the rebel right, crossing the Lebanon, Murfreesboro and Nolensville Pikes; STEPHEN D. LEE‘S corps in the centre, crossing the Franklin, Granny White and Hillsboro Pikes, and STEWART on their felt, crossing the Harding and Charlotte Pikes, and resting on the river a few miles south of the city, and commanded by HOOD in person. Our forces were commanded by Gen. THOMAS, and moved upon the enemy in the following order: A.J. Smith upon the right, STEEDMAN on the left, and WOOD in the centre, with SCHOFIELD in reserve, and most of our cavalry, under Gens. JOHNSON, HATOR and WILSON, on the right. Beside, we had gunboats assisting in the protection of our ranks, which rested on the river. A.J. Smith moved out the Sixteenth Corps about 8 o‘clock, and skirmished with the enemy until a little before 1 o‘clock, with little or no loss to either side, making about a mile in that time. WOOD moved out the celebrated Fourth Corps about the same time, and charged two lines of works and captured them before he took his dinner. Gens. BEATY‘S and ??? divisions ??? with great ??? and enthusiasm, and were received in gallant manner by the rebels, who fought with their accustomed desperation. But two rebel batteries were brought to bear upon the two divisions, while six batteries of field artillery, and all the big guns on Fort Negley, and guns upon Casino and Confiscation, for more than an hour, were employed in hurling destruction into the rebel ranks. Immediately in front of Mrs. ACKLIN‘s house the charge was made with unbounded spirit. POST‘S brigade and a battery of artillery piled into the lines head over heels, and captured one hundred men and a section of artillery. Gen. STEEDMAN moved out his men, composed of a portion of his own division, detachments of troops belonging to the different corps with SHERMAN, and two brigades of colored troops, respectively commanded by Cols. THOMPSON and MORGAN. Gen. STEEDMAN‘S orders were to make a vigorous attack, for two reasons: Gen. THOMAS desired to get possession of a nasty fort upon our extreme left, which commanded our line for two miles to the right, and further, to deceive HOOD, as SMITH and SCHOFIELD were to turn the enemy‘s left, had any attempt to crush STEEDMAN taken place. But the rebels did not await the second charge of the two colored brigades, which went right up to the summit of the hill without much wavering, driving the enemy a Quarter of a mile, and capturing nearly a hundred prisoners. Up to noon STEEDMAN‘S troops were pretty actively engaged, the white and the black men, shoulder to shoulder, pitching in like fury, regardless of all considerations of color. At noon STEEDMAN had moved nearly a mile and a half, and had commenced to swing his extreme left in a little from the river. On our extreme right, our cavalry had about all they could conveniently attend to during the forenoon, experiencing slight repulses, owing to the fine positions of the enemy. Our infantry and cavalry got some very rough handling just about this time, but were helped out of their dilemma by the gunboats, which came along in the nick of time. The Carondelet threw about fifty 64-pound shells into the rebel left, driving the troops resting on the river in great confusion, and silencing a battery of artillery. In the afternoon STEEDMAN was not so busily engaged as he had been during the early part of the day.

His troops, however, were under fire all the while, and behaved with great gallantry. During all these charges, the colored troops hardly gave way. They were admirably handled by Cols. THOMPSON and MORGAN, both brave young men, and as they tugged up the hill the white soldiers upon either side rent the air with vociferations. The negroes, too, as they dashed inside of the works, shouted, screamed, yelled and threw up their hats, notwithstanding they had left nearly two hundred of their comrades behind, the bleeding victims of rebel shot and shell. As I said above, of the grand charge which I have described, STEEDMAN moved with little opposition, as the rebels, in contracting their lines, necessarily abandoned some strong positions in his front. WOOD‘S corps stood the brunt of the fight in the afternoon, and added new laurels to its well-known and well-earned fame. A little before 3 o‘clock, the Second and Third Divisions made two glorious charges upon a long line of rude rifle-pits. An entire battery of brass guns were captured, but most of the troops ran away, and but few prisoners were captured. Before dark another line of works were taken, WOOD‘S corps sustaining a loss of over one hundred men killed and wounded during the charge. He was above an hour from the commencement to the conclusion of this charge, during which time the enemy made very little use of his artillery. At dark the Fourth Corps was four miles from Nashville, having taken half a dozen lines of works, several cannon, and toward four hundred prisoners. Although WOOD‘S corps did the hardest fighting in the afternoon, A.J. SMITH, in conjunction with the cavalry and a portion of SCHOFIELD‘s corps, made a multiplicity of brilliant movements, resulting in the capture of two batteries of artillery, nearly a thousand prisoners, a wagon train, and Gens. LER‘s and CHALMER‘s headquarters‘ trains. This was in a great measure owing to the sagacity and skill of Gen. A.J. SMITH, who seems as much at home upon a field of action as one might well imagine. Portions of SCHOFIELD‘s corps were also eminently interested in the taking of the batteries, as were also HATCH‘s and JOHNSON‘s divisions of cavalry. The gunboats kept up their thundering all the latter part of the afternoon, and did considerable execution upon the enemy‘s left. At dark firing ceased, with the exception that our artillerists threw an occasional shell into the rebel lines. The enemy had been pushed over three miles all round since daylight, although at times the fighting was of the most stubborn character. The victory was one of the superbest of the war. Our troops drove the enemy at all points, extending our territory three miles south of our position in the morning. Some five distinct lines of rebel works were taken on the left and centre, and the rebel left broken. We captured eighteen guns, with caissons, &c., all in complete order. We also captured 1,600 prisoners, a large amount of small arms, and a number of wagons. It is believed that our own and the enemy‘s loss in killed and wounded, is about the same, each side losing between 1,200 and 1,500. The rebels used very little artillery, but used what they did to a purpose. The captured guns were all smooth bores but four, and of excellent workmanship. On account of the rolling condition of the country and the thinness of the forests, the movements of the troops upon both sides were witnessed to much advantage. At one time the entire front of STEEDMAN‘s and WOOD‘s troops and two corps of the enemy, could be seen distinctly from a safe position. Gens. Thomas, Smith, Schofield, Wood, Steedman, Wilson and other general officers, were upon the field all day. No general officer was injured, although WOOD like to have lost his head by a cannon ball twice. In point of splendor and magnificent results, today‘s affair was even more glorious than yesterday‘s. During the night, Gen. HOOD contracted his lines in a remarkable degree, resting his right a short distance east of the Franklin pike, and his left on the Harding pike, making his line of battle less than four miles from flank to flank, although it was double that number of miles in extreme length, owing to its zig-zag order upon and near the Franklin pike. He also retired his army from a naturally weak position and disposed his forces at the base of a range of detached spurs of the Cumberland. It was evident that he intended to make another stand, and it was also evident that the preservation of his rear and his line of retreat upon the Franklin pike, were objects of his particular attention. Gen. THOMAS evidently knew what HOOD‘s programme was as well as HOOD himself, and at daylight moved STEEDMAN out rapidly upon the left, with orders to swing in and cross the Murfreesboro‘ and Nolensville pikes. This was done with rapidity, but no captures were made owing to the rebel evacuation of their works on our left during the night.

WOOD and A.J. SMITH moved up to within musket shot of the rebel lines, while SCHOFIELD was held partly in reserve on the right and partly in a position to make a rapid dash in conjunction with our cavalry, upon the enemy‘s left, should the situation suggest such a demonstration. All this transpired before 9 A.M. I went out upon the Granny White pike, a little before night, and watched the movements of our right and the enemy‘s left until noon. The enemy had a very fine position at the base of a range of hills, extending from the Granny White to to the Harding pike. He was protected by a line of works which had been hastily constructed near the edge of the woods. GARRARD‘s and MCARTHUR‘s divisions had to advance through an open field over a mile in length. After getting within four hundred yards of the rebels our column went down upon their bellies, and crawled up some fifty or sixty yards closer. Three batteries followed up these two divisions, and when they halted commenced shelling the woods back of the rebel line and some houses on the pike, from behind which about fifty sharpshooters were banging away. Up to near 11 o‘clock this was the order of things in front of SMITH. About that time the rebels snowed their heads in great numbers above the works, and acted as though they intended to charge the three batteries. They came out of their works shortly after, and our batteries were retired temporarily to a safer position. Just before 12 SMITH‘s whole corps from right to left made a desperate charge, but could not carry the works. About half past 12 the attempt was again made, and a portion of the works were carried. MCARTHUR ordered up two six-gun batteries upon his left, and one battery upon the right of his division, his own and GARRARD‘s men made a charge, the three batteries being advanced so that an enfillading fire could be got in. The whole manoeuvre was grand in projection and execution. The artillery did frightful work along the rebel line, our infantry carrying the works during a temporary panic, which was caused by the vigorous hurling of grape and canister into the rebel ranks. In this charge over two hundred of the enemy were captured. SMITH‘s whole line then advanced, his right swinging around a little from off the Hardin pike and a portion of the Twenty-third corps falling and making up the gap between the Sixteenth and HATCH‘s division of cavalry. It was now quite 1 o‘clock, and a most terrible cannonading had opened all along our left and centre. Knowing that WOOD and STEEDMAN had a certain amount of work to perform to bring up with SMITH. I went over upon the left and centre, where I spent the afternoon until dark, and witnessed, in an unsafe position, more thrilling sights than I have ever seen before. The rebel bullets were whizzing quite uncomfortably, but their artillery, which is the thing that generally produces the demoralization, remained comparatively quiet, and I, in company with two other correspondents, took the chances of the former. The Sixth Ohio, and a battery of the Fourth Regular Artillery, took a position upon an open field, about fifty feet in the rear of our infantry; to the right of BEATTY‘s division a Michigan battery and two Ohio batteries, took up a position in an open field, near and upon WOOD‘s extreme right, while two batteries got in on the left. From 1 till 2 o‘clock these thirty-six guns shelled the rebel position, which was very strong in WOOD‘s front, and particularly strong in front of STEEDMAN. At precisely 2 o‘clock it commenced to rain, and rained hard during the balance of the day. A little after 2 the Third and First Divisions of WOOD‘s corps made a desperate charge upon the rebel line which was located upon a slight elevation. The firing lasted fully twenty minutes, when the rebels retired in considerable disorder, leaving their dead and wounded and forty odd prisoners in our hands. The rebels had parallel works on this hill, and the two divisions, without orders, with the wildest enthusiasm, charged the other line of works in the face of a deadly volley of musketry and a shower of grape from four Napoleon guns. Really, I discovered no signs of wavering, and the whole drama was in full show. In ten minutes after they rushed into the works, captured three hundred men and the battery, which was ??? splendid one of four guns. Every member of the battery — the Second Louisiana — was either killed, wounded or captured. SMITH and WOOD were now on an even line, and a frowning-looking eminence, topped with strong works, three regiments of Tennessee infantry and STAMFORD‘s Mississippi battery ??? before STEEDMAN, who, at this juncture, was in conversation with Wood. Capt. TRACY informed me that the two colored brigades would be ordered to storm the hill. I crossed the Franklin pike to see Col. THOMPSON, commanding one of the colored brigades, who is a particular friend of mine, when I heard the orders given for the

assault. Immediately the two brigades of colored men started up the hill. I crossed back to the right of the Franklin pike, where I could see the whole movement, without placing myself in too great danger. When within about a hundred yards of the crest of the hill the our guns and the infantry poured a broadside into the negroes, when a frightful panic took place upon STEEDMAN‘s right, resting on the pike. The movement ceased for a few moments, when a couple of our batteries commenced an enfilading fire, and the assaulting party, with an additional brigade of white troops, again attempted the ascent. The rebel infantry blazed away at a fearful rate, and the artillery discharged sixteen shots of cannister, which made the assaulting column reel, waver and almost fall back. This was the most exciting picture I had ever seen so close, as I stood, in company with Capt. BOYD, of Gen. MILLER‘s Staff, about two hundred feet to the right of the assaulting party. After a manly struggle, with the loss of over two hundred men killed and wounded in the colored brigades, including eight officers; the party reached the top, and with a yell, went over the works, captured the entire battery and nearly three hundred prisoners. The guns were of the James pattern, were manufactured at Columbus, Ga., and were quite warm when I arrived. Every caisson had been smashed by our artillery, and most of the horses killed, although the guns were in good order. The men composing this battery stood like men to their post — 32 out of 70 being killed and wounded. Every officer was killed. As soon as the hill was taken, the colored troops pitched after the retreating rebels, chasing them through a valley nearly a mile. Firing wholly ceased upon the left, which had swung around nearly a mile and a half in two hours. WOOD‘s corps carried another line of works, without much opposition, however, although POST‘s and STRAIGHT‘s brigades pitched in like good fellows. This was a little before 4 o‘clock, and, when all was quiet upon the left and centre, a tremendous crash took place upon the right. It only lasted about ten minuses, but the firing was awful during that time. I started to go over to the right, but when half way over, met Capt. BURROUGHS, of Gen. THOMAS‘ staff, who told me that SMITH had made a glorious charge, and with the assistance of SCHOFIELD, had taken twelve guns, two general officers, and fifteen hundred prisoners. As I told you in the start, SCHOFIELD had a certain plan to carry out if the opportunity presented itself. It did, While SMITH was making a charge, SCHOFIELD threw his whole corps away round to the right, and shut up toward A.J. SMITH‘s corps in front, the two corps grabbing the number of guns and prisoners stated above in the operation. Darkness came abruptly on, and hostilities ceased. As near as I can judge our loss is about two thousand in Killed and wounded. The enemy‘s loss in killed and wounded is smaller. We captured about four thousand prisoners and two general officers. Gens. SMITH and SCHOFIELD captured 12 guns, and I saw WOOD‘s and STEEDMAN‘s corps capture a like number, while HATCH captured a section of artillery on our extreme right. I started for the city a little before 7 o‘clock, at which time all was quiet at the front, and all of our dead, and our own and the rebel wounded had been cared for. Our front occupied a position between eight and nine miles from the city. Rebel prisoners admit their defeat, and deplore their great loss in artillery and prisoners. Orders were issued last night for 5,000 rations for prisoners. Gen. JACKSON, captured by SMITH, is a Major-General, and is an old man. SMITH is a middle-aged man, and pays a high compliment to our troops, who, he says, are brave in a fight and magnanimous after victory. LOSSES. The following summing up of the relative losses of both armies during the two days‘ fight may be considered quite accurate: Rebel killed and wounded, Thursday…. 1,500 Rebel killed and wounded, Friday……. 2,000 — 3,500 Rebel loss in prisoners, Thursday…… 1,600 Rebel loss in prisoners, Friday……….. 4,000 — 5,600 and two general officers. Rebel loss of cannon, Thursday…………… 18 Rebel loss of cannon, Friday……………… 26 — 44 The Federal loss in killed and wounded in the two days‘ fight, I think, will exceed the enemy‘s by a thousand. No prisoners are reported taken by the rebels. Total rebel loss………………………….. 8,100 Total Federal loss……………………….. 4,500 Allowing our loss in killed and wounded to be one thousand more than the enemy‘s even, gives us the advantage of 3,600 men, 2 general officers, 44 cannon, 5,000 small arms, &c., &c. BENJAMIN C. TRUMAN.

New York Times headlines, December 25, 1864
Before the Battle.; PERSONAL. NASHVILLE., Tenn, Tuesday, Dec. 13, 1864. The theatre of war has again been transferred to Middle Tennessee, and naturally, all eyes are turned in this direction. Military matters and events it seems, are uncertain, like changes in the weather, and the like. That man who, three months ago, would have dared to announce the fact that HOOD‘s army would have been encamped within gunshot of Nashville, in December, 1864, would have been declared insane. Any person who would have cogitated upon such an event, would have involuntarily esteemed himself an ass. But such is the state of affairs. The rebel Army of Tennessee and the Army of the Cumberland confront each other precisely upon the ground they did just two years ago. ROSECRANS left this city on Christmas Day, 1862, and fought, and won a victory on the banks of stone River, near Murfreesboro, thirty miles from Nashville, a week after. Three hundred miles nearly, were the obstinate enemy pushed into the very bowels of Georgia, in the space of nineteen months, while tens of thousands of brave men upon each side were hurried to untimely graves. Three short months elapse, and we find the rebel army back where it was two years ago, numerically stronger, and more defiant, and better soldiers than Europe ever saw. But, ah! is there any one so unwise as to compare the interior of the situation of to-day with that of two years ago? I suppose not; I trust not. It cannot be possible that men of sense are impressed with the idea that the bloody battles of ―Stone River,‖ ―Chickamauga,‖ ―Mission Ridge,‖ ―Lookout Mountain,‖ ―Resaca,‖ ―New-Hope Church,‖ ―Kenesaw,‖ ―Peach-tree Creek,‖ and other sanguinary contests were fought in vain — that the blood of SILL KIRK, LYTTLE, HARKER, the great MCPHERSON, and fifty thousand other noble fellows has been spilled for nothing. God forbid that such an impression should become rife. No: the Federal situation, as I have many times informed you, is perfectly satisfactory. The rebels present a bold front, indeed; but they have no rear. Their army is like a snake with his guts snapped out. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS is pretty well known. I will merely add that he says everything is all right. It is known here and in Washington that he can whip and drive off HOOD‘s army to-day. He aims to annihilate Hood and his army. Time will tell. Since my last, no material change in the movements of national or rebel troops, can be chronicled. While I write, the brightest moon, if you please, shines upon the coldest night I ever saw in Tennessee. Three days ago a violent storm of sleet ceased, and gave birth to a spell of cold weather, which makes even the sturdy Michiganders squeal. This sort of weather is still on hand, and absolutely nothing has transpired for nearly a week. Saturday and Sunday not a gun was fired, the soldiers‘ time being chiefly occupied in feeding the roaring fires which blazed for miles around. Our troops, with plenty to eat and drink, with warm clothes, heavy blankets, good fires and shelter tents, have suffered with the cold. Must not the suffering on the rebel side, among the private soldiers, be intense? They are thinly clad, poorly shod, badly fed, with no tents and few blankets, and with thinner blood in their systems than that which courses through the veins of our own soldiers. This state of affairs can be relied upon. Rebel correspondents, more than two months ago stated, grandiloquently, that the ―boys, blanketless and shoeless, started off upon their march for Tennessee, rending the air with their vociferations of joy.‖ Gen. HARDING, Mrs. A.V. BUREN and ladies and gentlemen of reliability within the rebel lines, send in the intelligence that the whole neighborhood has been stripped of carpets, which are cut up and made into blankets. Other statements, of a reliable character, are to the effect that the rebels are suffering for substantial food and clothing. Statements which I made in my last letter, regarding HOOD‘s sweeping process of conscription, are corroborated by many who have escaped within our lines. His conscription, however, cannot injure us in the least. He gathers to his ranks a worthless crowd, who are traitors at heart, but unwilling to fight — a set of men who have invited this thing all

along, and who have devoted their leisure in abusing the Government and slandering the patriots who are acting in its defense. As the war goes on brave men get braver. For instance; LYTTLE was killed at the head of his column, MCPHERSON was shot through the heart while rallying his troops. Gen. DODGE had a piece of his head chopped off while inspecting his lines. The rebel Gen. GRACLE‘s life has just been cut off while personally examining his position. Hundreds and thousands of other brave men have perished in like manner. During the siege of Atlanta, which may be considered to have lasted from the date of MCPHERSON‘s death to the capture of the city, I was impressed with the conduct of the general officers assisting in that campaign. The rebel strength, in the way of fortifications, lie in front of Atlanta, upon both sides of the railroad. The headquarter-camps of Generals PALMER, JOHNSON, BAIRD, KING, CURTISS, JEFF, C. DAVIS, MORGAN, and others, were less than a mile from the rebel batteries. Gen. THOMAS‘ headquarters was a half mile further in the rear, but really in the worst place of all. His headquarters was immediately in the rear of SNYDERMASTER‘s battery — the first one which opened upon Atlanta, which was on Saturday, the 23d of July. For weeks three rebel batteries of 32 and 64-pound guns kept up an incessant fire of shells, by day and night, upon SNYDERMASTER, about half of which, however, having ―full???rations,‖ went thundering into General THOMAS‘ camp. Several unexploded shells, shaped like a water-bucket, were on exhibition there at one time. They had been thrown from those 60-pounder guns stolen by FLOYD from the Washington navy-yard. The camps of JOHNSON, BAIRD and KING for weeks were pretty well attended to by the rebel artillerists, who hurled enough shot and shell in that space to start several iron foundries. Gens. SHERMAN and THOMAS rode around their lines daily, often to the dismay of some of those who accompanied them. General officers, now-a-days, seem anxious to make a personal inspection of their lines and of their working parties. One day Gen. SHERMAN was riding close to the skirmish line in GEARY‘s front, when one of his staff officers launched off and remarked, ―He may go right square up and get shot, if he wants to, but I‘ll be — if I do.‖ Gens. BLAIR, LOGAN and DODGE might be seen at their front line of works almost daily. One afternoon Gen. PALMER sent word to BAIRD to open upon a certain battery which had been annoying some portion of his line. Gen. BAIRD ordered up the guns himself. As soon as they opened, the rebels directed their attention that way. BAIRD stood the whole fire, while portions of his staff, half a mile in the rear, took to trees. When BAIRD returned he laughed at them, and recommended that they improvise some ―gophers.‖ I rode out with Gen. BAIRD one night when he was around upon the right. He sneaks around upon neutral ground like an Indian. He actually hitched his horse upon the inside of his works, and went upon the outside, and occasionally told me to ―Go a little quiet along here,‖ and ―There‘s their line; stoop down a little,‖ and the like. BAIRD is very brave. CARLIN is just like him. When he was removed from brigade to division headquarters, last Summer, in front of Atlanta, he grumbled because he was so far off from his lines. I was visiting Gen. KING one day, and it happened that Gen. SCHOFIELD was moving his corps from left to right. This attracted the attention of the rebels in KING‘s front, and they shelled SCHOFIELD vigorously all the afternoon; but, unfortunately, more than half of them exploded in or near KING‘s camp. I must confess, I got slightly demoralized myself, and indulged in frequent potations of commissary, to renew my departing courage. Gen. KING laughed, as he watched the operations of his orderlies and ―strikers,‖ who were exceedingly overcome with fright. After the shelling had ceased, he called up the crowd, and put them all back in the ranks, adding, that he wouldn‘t have such a pack of infernal cowards about him. I could tell you a multiplicity of such stories. The above are from my own observation; and I am free to say that this war has developed one fact: that general officers are not to be found in the rear; and I can bear witness that no Commander, from the Chiefs down to Brigadiers‘ escaped danger during the campaign from Chattanooga to Atlanta. They seemed to have courted it, if one may judge by the way they pitched into it. Hardly an engagement occurs, either here or in the East, but what some of our general officers are either killed or wounded. Our loss was slight at Franklin and yet we had two general officers wounded. PERSONAL. Although COUCH ranks WOOD, the latter continues to command the Fourth Corps, in STANLEY‘s absence. This is as it should be, Gen. WOOD is an able and gallant officer, and has been in every fight in the

southwest. He has twice been wounded on the field of action, and, curious to relate, he was both times wounded in the same place. No officer is more beloved than WOOD. Gen. JAMES STEEDMAN was in town yesterday. His headquarters is on the Murfreesboro‘ pike, about one mile from town. Mr. JAMES HOOD, of the Chattanooga Gazette, is acting upon his staff, as Volunteer Aid-de-Camp. Gen. COUCH has been given a command of a division in the Twenty-third Corps. His division is one of the finest in the army. Citizens, who have arrived inside of our lines, report that no rebel general officer was killed, and but two wounded. This is the same as our own. They report that PATRICK CLEBURNE feigned dead to avoid capture, and that CHEATHAM‘s legs saved him. They report the rebel loss in killed and wounded three times larger than our own. Gen. HOOD was upon the field during the Franklin fight, and in exceeding danger during its progress. He had been out of a sick bed but a week. BENJAMIN C. TRUMAN.

New York Times headlines, December 25th, 1864
Hood Before Nashville Importance to the Rebels of Capturing the City Preparations for Defending it Lively Scenes Private Property Destroyed Advance in Prices Battle of Franklin Its Losses. NASHNILLE, Tenn., Saturday, Dec. 10, 1864. Nashville invested by a rebel army, and that army HOOD‘s, is a queer record to make, in view of the marvelously successful and brilliant results of the past Summer‘s campaign. Yet the redoubtable General, who fought at Atlanta and ran away from it with his army, has lived, by the process, to fight another day. And emulous, it may be, of the fame of SHERMAN, he has come to attempt the investing of a city on his own account, strong in the belief that he will capture it. A week has passed since his forces sat down before it. It has been a time of suspense, but of no serious fear or anxiety as to the result of anything HOOD might attempt against it. Today, even, the thunder of cannon from Union guns on the surrounding hill-tops has ceased to startle the most timid, and all prospect o‘ a little excitement from an attack seems to have disappeared. The Question ―Why don‘t he come?‖ is getting superceded by the other — ―Where is he gone?‖ But the town really has been invested. It may be still, though few persons seem to know anything positively about it — that is, whether HOOD, with his main army, is now lying just around the city, or is moving away from it, to try some less hopeless task. This latter is the prevailing opinion, among the uninitiated, at least. It will soon be known how well founded it is. But the week has been a lively one exceedingly. The telegraph has given your readers the ―situation‖ here from day to day, and what matters of interest connected with the army proper have been unfolded. I may sketch a few things observed from my own standpoint, which may be supplementary information gathered from other sources, and have for some readers an interest of their own. The importance of Nashville to the Union, and the splendor of the prize to the rebels, if HOOD could by any means capture it, every reader sees at a glance, Enormous supplies for the army had been accumulating here for months. Immense store-houses filled with provisions, with grain and hay, large quantities of coal and wood, of quartermaster, commissary and medical stores, cars and locomotives by the hundred, with the multiform machinery, all on the grandest scale, designed and adapted to carry on the various work demanded by more than 1,200 miles of military railroad — all this was a part, and only a part, of the prize of Nashville taken. To take it, would be, moreover, to liberate Tennessee from hated Federal occupancy and rule, to rally to the rebel standard hosts of Tennesseans whom necessity had forced to swear loathed fealty to the stars and Stripes; to restore to their homes, and perhaps, families, many in the rebel ranks, long weary of banishment and of the field, and in fine, to raise the drooping spirits of the Confederacy by a conquest that would go far to make amends

for all the disasters of the year‘s campaign! With such motives urging HOOD and his army to take Nashville, who will wonder that people here, expected at least, a most desperate effort to take it? The effort was not made, only perhaps because prepared for so fully. After the severe fight at Franklin, on the 30th November, this preparation began in earnest. The city at once became a hive of buzzing and efficient industry. Not Dido‘s ―tolling Tyrians‖ as Father has from his cloud, saw them pushing forward their infant city, evinced more enterprise and activity. The employees of the Government swarmed everywhere. Every pick, spade, axe, shovel was brought into important requisition. Breast works were thrown up, earth forts constructed, with cannon looking out from them threateningly all along the approaches to the city. Nashville was girded‘ with rifle-pits almost as rapidly as fairy Puck offered to ―put a girdle round about the earth.‖ From the reservoir, crowning an eminence on the southern bank of the Cumberland and straight across to Fort Negley, half a mile off, the trenches took their stern way through the University grounds, through the gardens and yards of private mansions, through all obstructions that arose in their path. Multitudinous hands seemed to finish the work, almost as soon as it was begun. The forts and stockades already built, caught the spirit of energetic preparation for a sudden emergency. Those inadequately manned or supported, received a full supply of men for all their needs, while cannon, muskets, ammunition and other warlike material were arranged promptly where their aid was demanded. Outside the defenses was much Government property, which the rebels would rejoice to seize upon if not secured. This was properly cared for. Immense droves of mules, many of the animals injured by hard service and released from work for a time to recruit, were driven from their suburban retreats through the town, and placed in secure corrals within the lines. Long trains of army wagons also passed through to the like place of safety. Single regiments, encamped two or three miles without the city, came into it, and were assigned to appropriate positions, with the main army which was now arriving. As the troops of Gen. THOMAS came in, they took their designated posts, pitching chiefly on the eminences, which run all around the city, and from all of which batteries were frowning. It was a picturesque and striking spectacle to see these hills lit up by night with countless camp fires, while the roar of cannon, heard once or twice within the week, all night at intervals, was relieved by the frequent sharp crack of the picket rifles; for the rebel lines were, in a short time, erected over against our own, and not only picket firing, but brisk skirmishing, heard distinctly in the city, has been for a week an almost daily occurrence. With the bustle and noise incidental to these movements, there has been little confusion or excitement, and less fear. I have not found the first man or we man yet that showed signs of alarm at the approach of the rebels or at the prospect of a successful assault by HOOD. Every one seems calmly confident of the safety of the place, and without uneasiness as to the result of the situation. Skirmishing between the lines is frequent. On Wednesday our skirmishers were advanced in considerable numbers, and over, a wide circuit, to discover the actual strength and position. A strong line started directly in front of the University grounds, advancing in plain sight of us, for more than half a mile, between the Lebanon and Murfreesboro pikes, till it drew the rebels‘ fire. For half an hour the rattle of musketry was so sharp that one might fancy a pretty serious engagement going on. Our line fell back gradually, the rebels proving themselves to be in force at that point. The damage done to private property between the lines is estimated as high already as half a million of dollars. Several fine dwellings have been shelled and burned. The Orphan Asylum still stands, but its fencing and barns have disappeared. The house of Mrs. A.V. BROWN, widow of the late Postmaster-General, situated three miles from the city on the Franklin pike, has become the headquarters of Gen. CHEATHAM, the family having sought an asylum several days ago at a friend‘s house within our lines. This house, a fine mansion of the olden time, and famous for the free hearted hospitality of its recent occupants, is reported shelled and demolished. Suburban Nashville is noted for its elegant residences; those lying along the Franklin pike being specially attractive. Should HOOD be really determined to tarry where he is, till forced away, as he doubtless will be presently, or should he undertake an assault upon the city in earnest, the record of devastation will find a terrible addition to what the rebellion has already written up, against this once beautiful place. One of the present serious effects

of the city‘s being encircled by the rebel army, is the cutting off the market supply from the surrounding country. This, during the Summer and Fall, had been considerable, the various articles furnished by the farmers, particularly vegetables, not bearing a higher price than in the Western markets. The prices have already begun to run up, with the prospect of swift, advance, unless the proper relief comes. This will appear from a recent order of the Provost-Marshal, Capt. BROOKE, fixing the following schedule of prices, all parties to be punished who transcend the prescribed Standard: ―Wood $15 ??? cord; beef 20c. ??? ???utton 18c.; Irish potatoes $3 ??? bushel; sweet potatoes $4 ??? bushel; turnips $2 50 ??? bushel; cabbages 50c. ??? head; butter 80c. ??? lb.; onions $4 ??? bushel; flour $15 ??? barrel; milk 15c. ??? quart.‖ Some of these prices seem moderate enough for the times. But without this military order, the prices would have doubled for most of these articles, and a large number of the population must have suffered distress, as many no doubt do even now. There is an immense population, requiring to be fed here the present Winter. What with hosts of contrabands, refugees and people whom the war has deprived of all employment, sweeping them clean of their worldly effects, subsistence would be hard enough under the most favorable circumstances. HOOD and his army fixed here will prove an added ingredient of terrible bitterness to their cup. This cup, however, they may not be forced much longer to drink. The battle of Franklin, fought on the 30th ult., proves to have resulted in heavier loss to our troops than at the first reports. It appears now that our whole loss in killed and wounded amounts to 2.165, and of this number 110 were officers. It was a terrific conflict truly, as all reports concur in representing it. Great as our loss was, it was but one-third that of the rebels, whose fierce charges on our open field were again and again repulsed. A large number of our wounded were but slightly wounded, and will soon be fit to return to duty. Of the officers, fifty-two have come in to the officers‘ hospital here, but one of whom. Major R.S. BOWEN. One Hundreth Illinois Volunteers, has died. A list of those wounded here I append for insertion, if the requisite room can be found for it in your columns. C.V.S.

New York Times, more headlines, December 25, 1864
THE WAR IN TENNESSEE.; AFFAIRS BEFORE THE BATTLE. General Aspect of the Situation The Gunboats Depredations by the Rebels Miscellaneous. NASHVILLE, Tenn., Saturday, Dec. 10, 1864. THE REBEL SITUATION. The great Austrian Field-Marshal Prince DELIGNE, was an extensive letter writer. In his correspondence with the Emperor JOSEPH, in 1789, at one time, he wrote: ―Here we are in this bulwark of the east, the gates of which we have not opened with rosy fingers, like Aurora, but with flaming fingers. The boldness and promptitude with which he crossed the Sare, the rapidity of his march to occupy the lines of Prince EUGENE, his audaciousness [The publication of the following letter, relating to the situation in Tennesse before the recent battle, has been deterred in consequence of the pressure upon our columns. But they have lost none of their interest.] — ED. TIMES. in reconnoitering as far as the palisades, and all this performed in a fortnight, are exploits worthy of the most splendid epoch in Marshal LANDON‘s life.‖ In a short time after, DE LIONE wrote as follows: ―If we had provisions, we should march; if we had balls and bombs, we should fight.‖ Now, it strikes me that Hoop is in pretty much the same embarrassing situation in 1864, near the Cumberland River, that DE LIGNE was in 1789, on the banks of the Sare. HOOD‘s army has made a tremendous march; and, after surmounting innumerable barriers and minor obstacles, is thundering at the very outskirts of this city. But that his supply of food and ammunition is exceedingly small, no one attempts to question. It is universally conceded that in the latter particular, HOOD stands in great need. He fell upon our columns at Franklin four lines deep with unbounded vehemence and fury, and made our sturdy men waver, right in the face of the most galling and disastrous artillery demonstrations imaginable. Had

HOOD been provided with sufficient cannon and a plenty of ammunition of the grape and canister order, with the grace of God, there might have been a slight difference in the situation. HOOD, at Franklin, worked under advantages and disadvantages, which will over give him historic mention. He had nearly three times our number of men, but we had artillery and position, the former of which we used to some purpose. The country in which the rebel army is located, and its rear, is quite rich, and will subsist HOOD‘s men and animals for some time. A large amount of grain of all kinds was raised in Giles, Bedford, Maury, Williamson, Rutherford and Davidson Counties, while nearly all the planters and farmers are wealthy. Horses, cattle, sheep, and hogs a bound in Middle Tennessee, and considerable attention had been paid to the raising of stock this season on account of the fabulously high prices paid for everything in the shape of provisions and grain by our Government. Large portions of Middle Tennessee, however, were put to cotton this year, the plantations, as a general thing, having been leased and run by northern men. Many crops were baled, and awaiting transportation, which, for some unknown and unkind reason, the Government has persistently refused to permit. It is feared that millions of dollars worth of this precious article will be destroyed. You will perceive that in the way of food there is no danger of HOOD‘s army starving yet awhile. This is due, in a measure, to the magnanimity of our Government, which has treated, from the occupation of Nashville, nearly three years ago, Tennesseeans with unwarlike considerations. Had our agents and quartermasters taken from these disloyal Tennesseeans all but the necessaries of life, HOOD‘s army could not have existed in a stationary position this long. He has to wagon his ammunition, and that portion of his supplies which he cannot pick up south of Nashville, from Florence. The Tennessee and Alabama Railroad is almost a complete wreck; but even if it were not, our forces removed all the rolling stock. If HOOD intends to attack this city, his delay must be occasioned by his lack of ammunition. He cannot certainly be expecting reinforcements, as there are none for him there are a multiplicity of rumors afloat, in regard to BEECKINRIDGE ―coming up,‖ but we don‘t happen to see it in that light, yet a while, in the least. If he does ―come up,‖ he must take a mighty circuitous route — BRECKINRIDGE‘s army cannot move through East Tennessee now. The rebel army in our front maintains about the same position that it did just one week ago, with the exception that HOOD has extended his line upon his left, and moved up portions of his centre a few hundred feet. Back of the rebel front whole forests are disappearing with astonishing rapidity. For firewood, alone, the enemy consumes an awful amount, while it is known that he is building strong lines of works some four miles south of the city. THE FEDERAL SITUATION. The Federal situation, since my last, remains materially unchanged. During the existing calm our breastworks and rifle-pits have been strengthened, and all of the hilts and detached mountainous spurs south and west have been converted into elaborate forts. The destruction of the country south of this city, including the very suburbs of Nashville, is almost complete. Whole forests have been leveled, beautiful groves which existed a week ago are no more, while all the farms and plantations about have been made desolate by the devastating genii of war. Horses and negroes, and wagons of every description, have been pressed into the service; cattle and hogs are among the things that were, most of which fell into the hands of ―private‖ foraging parties; houses, outhouses; fences, &c., have been destroyed, either through accident, vandalism, or military necessity. The only consoling thought accompanying this state of affairs is the fact that there are very few Union people to suffer. Very few of the wealthy residents of Nashville, or Davidson County, are, or ever have been loyal. Many of them have taken oaths of allegiance until they know them by heart; but that didn‘t make them loyal. I tell you what it is, you can tell a Secessionist just as quick as you look at one, if you only know how. Not merely because he hates ANDREW JOHNSON and reads the Cincinnati Enquirer, but because his complaint is chronic, and he shows it in his face. INCIDENTS. The gunboats have had several fights in the past three days, every engagement resulting successfully to our iron-clads. Twice since the fight which I informed you of in my last, have the rebels tried to block up the Cumberland River, and twice have their batteries been dismounted by Commodore FITCH. The fight on Thursday was quite an earnest and exciting affair, but not of a sanguinary nature. For three hours four of our iron-clads hammered away at eighteen guns which the enemy

had mounted some thirteen miles down the river. At the expiration of that time eight of the guns were dismounted and ten hauled off. Our boats Here not injured, and we lost no men. Very few on our side have been injured during the past four days — probably twenty exceeds our loss in killed and wounded. Their sharpshooters occasionally crawl up close enough to shoot some gunner dead. Two men of the Sixth Ohio Battery, which has been in constant use for nine days, were killed Friday morning. Two of our batteries have been firing day and night. They are located near Mrs. ACKLIN‘s residence, and have destroyed quite a number of superb mansions. All of the fine houses south of here are full of rebels, who have been constantly annoyed by the above-named batteries. Fort Negley fires an occasional shell, which generally goes upon an important mission, and generally performs it, too. It has the honor of smashing up the residences of Mrs. BUCKLEY, Mr. FELIX RAINS, the latter being killed, and Mrs. AARON V. BROWN‘s fine buildings at Melrose Park, The destruction of property by our artillery stone during the past week, approximates a million of dollars. Many buildings within the rebel lines have been burned during the week, although no cause can be given but accident. All houses upon the enemy‘s side are protections for sharpshooters, and, of course, their preservation, not their destruction, is requisite. It has all along been feared that HOOD, while boldly performing in our immediate front, might suddenly turn, throw his entire force upon Murfreesboro, pass through and burn the bridge at Bridgeport, and settle at Chattanooga and Knoxville, Now, maybe, this was his programme, for he sent a portion of CHEATHAM‘s corps to Murfreesboro, when ROUSSEAU, who is in command, sent out two brigades under MILROY, who attacked the rebels under Gen. BATE, of this city, six miles from our fortifications, and after a fair field fight, drove the enemy off with a loss of three hundred prisoners and six pieces of artillery. MILROY subsequently went back to his fort, carrying with him his captives and cannon. At one time it was reported that Gen. GRANGER‘s brigade had been captured, and as no news could be had from the South we were at a loss to know what had become of Gen, GRANGER and his brigade, which had been ordered to Stevenson as soon as the evacuation of Huntsville should be made complete. In fact, what had become of Knoxville, Chattanooga, Bridgeport, Stevenson and Murfreesboro, was not known outside of those places, until Friday, when the telegraph was reestablished via Cumberland Gap. and immediately Gen. THOMAS received the good news that all of the above named places, including ROUSSEAU‘s command at Murfreesboro, GRANGER‘s at Stevenson, MEAGHER‘s at Chattanooga and STONEMAN‘s at Knoxville, were safe. The dispatch also gave the cheering intelligence of MILROY‘s victory over BATE, and of STONEMAN‘s advance in East Tennessee. COOPER‘s brigade, which was given up as lost, made its appearance at Clarksville a few days ago, and is on its way here. It marched from Centreville to within ten miles of Nashville, where HOOD had prepared a trap to gobble the command. Some patriot informed COOPER of the situation, when he turned his command toward Clarksville and marched it twenty miles at night, making fifty-one miles in twenty-four hours. This is the best march of the war. Up to the present time no doubt exists as to the rebel army being in our front in great force. Yesterday was a frightful day, a violent storm of sleet, hail, rain and snow raging from morning till night. There was less picket-firing than on any other day during the week. Cannonading upon our side was kept up as usual from the Sixth Ohio Battery. All day long the rebels were engaged in throwing up a huge work near the Franklin pike, and another near the Granny white pike. It is believed that they intend to mount some artillery. From these points a shell could be thrown into the centre of the city. On Thursday a portion of the Fourth corps made a heavy reconnoissance out upon the Murfreesboro‘ pike, but were driven in by the enemy, who showed themselves in great force. On the same day a portion of A.J. SMITH‘s command made a reconnoissance out upon the Charlotte pike, the enemy falling back as we advanced and following us up as we retired at night. Few deserters come in at present. Probably not over thirty have come in during the week. Those who have come in don‘t appear to know much. It is believed that if HOOD falls back large numbers of Tennesseeans will desert. From all reports our out-of-town folks are entertaining the rebel officers in great style. HOOD has his headquarters, it is said, at the house of Gen. HARDING, on the Harding pike. HARDING sent in word here yesterday that all of his stock had been taken, and that his own and neighbors‘ carpets had all been taken and cut up for

blankets. The loss of the rebels in the late fight at Franklin is acknowledged to be large. Rebel citizens from that neighborhood say that it will not fall below seven thousand in killed, wounded and missing. Our own loss exceeds one thousand. Gen. STANLEY will report again for duty in twenty days. The bone in Gen. BRADLEY‘s arm was not touched, and his recovery is looked for in a few days. The formation of Quartermasters‘ brigades, some three months ago, proves to have been a foresight. CRANE‘s and LEVIN‘s brigades, nearly nine thousand strong, have been in the trenches for nine days, doing the work of soldiers. They have built a very fine work, which has been called Fort Peterson. Everybody connected with the Government in any capacity have, during this excitement, shown themselves to be true patriots. We experience quite a loss in the abandonment and destruction of our block-houses along the lines of railroads which have fallen into the enemy‘s possession. Some of them were artideryproof, but not sufficiently provisioned to stand a siege. Orders which were given for the general evacuation of these miniature forts, failed to reach some of the blockhouses, and two or three cases are recorded where some excellent fighting took place. Johnsonville has been evacuated. The last party which left there, arrived here via Clarksville this morning. All the rolling stock had been removed to Nashville nearly two weeks ago, at HOOD threatened the road when marching his army through Waynesboro. All the buildings, some of which are five hundred feet long, were left standing, as the most the enemy can do is to destroy them. About ten thousand dollars worth of Quartermaster‘s stores were destroyed. The rebels have attempted to cross the river north and south of here, but have been unsuccessful in all their attempts. Our gunboats patrol the river from Carthage to Clarksville, while at least half of our cavalry are on the other side of the river. The excitement among the people has died away to some extent, and things are more quiet in the city than during the former part of the week. Yet, like Micawber, every one is anxiously ―waiting for something to turn up.‖ BENJAMIN C. TRUMAN.

Triune
June 6, 1863

GEN. ROSECRANS' DEPARTMENT.; Simultaneous Attacks By The Rebels On Franklin And Triune. A VICTORY AND A DEFEAT
NASHVILLE, Friday, June 5. News from Franklin up to 2 o'clock to-day, is that Col. BAIRD, commanding the garrison, was attacked by 1,200 rebel cavalry yesterday, who drove his forces back into their intrenchments. They rallied, however, and repulsed the enemy with heavy loss to the latter. Simultaneously an attack was made upon the forces at Triune. They were repulsed with a loss of 200 men, 400 horses, and a lot of camp and garrison equipage. Gen. GRANGER has ordered all houses of ill-fame to be vacated by the 8th inst. There is great excitement among the "fancy." Six hundred and seventy-nine National soldiers arrived in the city this morning, representing 114 different regiments. They will be sent to their respective commands.

June 12, 1863

THE WAR IN TENNESSEE,; A Skirmish At Triune, Tenn. The Rebels Repulsed Paroled Soldiers En Route To Their Regiments.
NASHVILLE. Tenn., Wednesday, June 10. There was a skirmish at Triune yesterday. About 500 rebels dashed into the camp of the Sixth Kentucky cavalry, but were repulsed. The rebel commander was shot from his horse, and is reported dead. Another rebel officer was also wounded. Two National soldiers were slightly wounded. CINCINNATI, Thursday, June 11. Twelve hundred paroled National soldiers passed through Louisville yesterday to join their regiments in Gen. ROSECRANS' army. Hon, JOHN BROUGH addressed a large Union meeting at Marietta yesterday.

June 14, 1863

THE WAR IN TENNESSEE.; ANOTHER FIGHT AT TRIUNE THE REBELS REPULSED. National Soldiers To Be Executed For Desertion.
NASHVILLE, Tenn., Friday, June 12. The rebels made another attack on Triune, Tenn., yesterday. At about 5 A.M., General FOREST, with 5,000 rebel cavalry and two batteries attacked the cavalry division commanded by General MITCHELL. The Federals formed in line of battle, and replied vigorously to the fire of the rebels, who retreated as the Federals advanced. The Federals pursued the rebels six miles, when scouts were sent out, who reported that the rebels were still retreating. The pursuit of the rebels was then abandoned. The rebels lost 21 killed, 60 or 70 wounded, and 10 prisoners. The Federal loss is six killed, and among them is Lieut. N.C. BLAIR, of the Fourth Indiana cavalry. Lieut. BLAIR's body arrived here to-night. Several executions of Federal soldiers for desertion will take place next week. There was a grand review of the troops here today. The weather is very hot. In the river the water is twenty inches deep on the shoals. MURFREESBORD, Saturday, June 13. The Chattanooga Rebel, of the 11th inst., has the following: "JACKSON, Miss., Tuesday, June 9, One of our officers who was captured by

Gen. GRANT, and who subsequently escaped, arrived here this morning. He reports that the Yankee army is much depressed by reason of Gen. JOHNSTON massing a heavy force, and by the fact that certain death awaits them. Their officers say it is certain defeat or annihilation." Capt. THOMPSON, of the staff of Gen. ROSECRANS, under a flag of truce, delivered the effects of the two spies hung at Franklin to Lieut.-Col. WEBB, of the Fifty-first Alabama regiment, this evening. One of the party receiving the flag remarked to Capt. THOMPSON, "So you have hung two of our spies." He then added that one of them (ORTON) was his particular friend, and was Inspector of Constructions on Gen. WHEELER's Staff. He did not know the man PETERS. He admitted that the execution was just, and in accordance with military law.

Nolensville
June 6, 1863

Spring Hill
June 6, 1863

Murfreesborough
June 6, 1863

Tullahoma
June 6, 1863

Shelbyville
June 6, 1863

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