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Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide Introduction

The following is a curriculum developed by Breathe California, Golden Gate Public Health Partnership based on IAQ Apprenticeships conducted in 2008/2009 with 6-8th graders with the after school programs Citizen Schools and After School Education and Safety Program. The layout of the curriculum is specifically modeled after Citizen Schools lesson template. The content of the curriculum comes from a variety of resources including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tools for Schools program and staff experience working on other youth health education projects. Links to supplemental resources can be found within the individual lesson plans. Funding for this project came from a 2007-2009 Region 9 EPA grant. At a minimum, this curriculum can be implemented with three, 1.5-2 hour sessions. If the students intend to present their findings to teachers, staff, and community members, it is necessary for someone to work with the students in-between sessions and/or complete some of the supplemental lessons. If there is only time for the core sessions, we recommend using Core Lesson 1b instead of Core Lesson 1a since 1b is easier for students to grasp all of the major components of IAQ in a short amount of time. Instead of trying to complete all of the supplemental lessons in this curriculum, we recommend educators focus on reinforcing student knowledge and skills by extending a few lessons into several sessions. Of the supplemental lessons, we recommend Lesson A as the most important in terms of building IAQ knowledge. Lesson B is especially valuable if students are to teach back their knowledge. Supplemental lessons C-G provide students with tools they can use to increase the effectiveness of their presentations. If you dont have time to complete C-G, perhaps describe the different lessons to the students and have them vote on which one they would like to focus on. The supplemental lessons you choose may also depend on available guest speakers. Finally, Supplemental Lesson H has many team building activities that can be added to any of the other lessons to foster group work and collaboration. Below are the components of the curriculum as well as some additional resources. If you use the curriculum or its components, please acknowledge Breathe California, Golden Gate Public Health Partnership. Also, we would like to hear how this curriculum works in your local areas and would appreciate hearing from you. Our contact information is: 2171 Junipero Serra Blvd, Suite 720. Daly City, CA 94014. Phone: 650-994-5868. Email: info@ggbreathe.org. 1) Lessons Learned - We recommend you begin with this document and then familiarize yourself with the lesson plans, handouts and materials. 2) Core Lesson Plans 1a: Learning about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) from Comic Book(s) 1b: Learning about IAQ from Jr Health Inspector 2: School Walkthrough 3: IAQ Findings and Recommendations 3) Supplemental Lesson Plans a. Hands-On Workshops b. Public Speaking Skills c. Community Health Education d. Advocacy and Letter Writing Skills

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide


e. Excel Computer Skills f. ComicLife Computer Skills g. Team Building Exercises 4) Handouts a. Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) In Schools Comic Book (for Core Lesson #1a) b. Look What We Learned IAQ And Asthma Comic Book (for Core Lesson #1a) c. Jr. Health Inspector PowerPoint Slides (for Core Lesson #1b) d. Public Speaking Evaluation Rubric (for Supplemental Lesson B) e. Advocacy Letters Handout (for Supplemental Lesson D) f. PowerPoint and Design Handout (for Supplemental Lesson F) g. 5-minute Presentation Preparation Worksheet h. Human Bingo Worksheet 5) Hands-On Workshop Materials a. Green Cleaning Science and Math Questions b. Workshop Table Questions c. Workshop Table Information Sheet d. Dust Mite Picture (from www.pestcommand.com) e. Wikipedia Cockroach Picture f. Wikipedia Mouse Picture g. SFEnvironment Easy and Safe Cleaning Products FactSheet h. Cigarette Ingredients from: http://www.tricountycessation.org/tobaccofacts/CigaretteIngredients.html 6) School Walkthrough Materials a. Tools for School Teacher Checklist Sample b. Tools for Schools Brainstorming Poster c. Temperature, Humidity and CO2 log d. Log of factors influencing C02 and O2 levels e. Using Scientific Method for Classroom Walkthrough f. Scientific Method Worksheet from: http://www.scientificmethod.com/guidewrksheet.html 7) Student Samples a. Excel Chart b. PowerPoint c. Comic Book Page Additional Resources The National Education Association Health Information Network (NEA-HIN) has also created a series of K-12 lesson plans through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Lesson complementary to this curriculum can be found at http://www.neahin.org/Lesson_Plan/iaqlessonplanindex.html. The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute has a curriculum for elementary school students to increase asthma awareness. Lesson plans can be found at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/lung/asthma/school/index.htm

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide


Adbusters has a media empowerment kit for high school teachers including lesson plans for creating print ads. https://www.adbusters.org/cultureshop/mediakit. Several documents from their website are included on the CD in the folder labeled Additional Resources. The PBSKids Dont Buy It program also has several resources for media literacy: http://pbskids.org/dontbuyit/advertisingtricks/ Shelly Rosenblum has several student IAQ resources on his personal website: http://www.shellyjeri.net/My_Homepage_Files/Page1.html

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Lessons Learned
Overall Facilitators: Afterschool programs with staff support (who were linked to families, teachers, and school structures) were a critical component of the program. Afterschool staff helped on several levels including creating buy-in from school administrators/personnel for the project and dealing with any disciplinary issues that came up. School administration support was important for getting classroom teachers to complete and return Tools for Schools checklists and for facilitating action from student recommendations. Prior to implementing the curriculum or within the first week it is important to work with the administration directly or indirectly through the after school program to have class-room teachers complete the Tools for Schools Checklists. Students will need these returned before they complete the second core lesson plan. Multiple teachers in the room enhanced our ability to have several projects during one session and to address different student abilities. Guest speakers helped reinforce the material while exposing students to different professionals working on IAQ. Speakers were contacted early to secure dates. Elementary schools within walkable distances allowed for easy field trips in which middle school students were able to present their work to elementary school students. Elementary schools were contacted several weeks prior to the presentation to confirm dates and to address logistics. Funding for disposable cameras and photograph development allowed the students to be active observers of their indoor environments. Funding for staff time was also important as each session took several hours of preparation time, gathering materials, creating strategies to engage the students, and moving forward the projects objectives. Out of classroom activities included editing advocacy letters, typing/editing students public speaking scripts, consolidating students powerpoint slides, and talking with after school staff re: classroom dynamics and logistics. Staff computer knowledge and school computers allowed us to teach students computer skills (Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Comic Life) which increased their abilities to give professional presentations. Consistent opening and closing sessions allowed for improved public speaking skills and enhanced team dynamics. At one school, each session started with students pairing up, interviewing their neighbor with questions pertaining to the days lesson/activity, and then sharing back to the classroom what they learned about each other. Closing involved standing in a circle and saying one word for what they were feeling/thinking after the days session.

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide


Notecards for students to document their thoughts, feelings and intended actions (head, heart, feet) following peer presentations allowed for quick qualitative evaluations of these activities. Awarding students with certificates following completion of the apprenticeship gives them recognition for their work and can help increase campus IAQ awareness if they are awarded at an assembly or recognized in the school newsletter.

Overall Challenges: Accessing schools - It is difficult for some teachers to make time for outside presentations during school hours. To overcome this barrier, it is important to highlight components of the curriculum that match state guidelines. Working with afterschool programs and/or personal networks are other ways to gain school access. Baseline differences in student skills Many of the classes were mixed grade levels (6-7 or 7-8). This explains some skill variance but there was also a difference in maturity and skills within grades. Some students could write an essay while others were still struggling with sentences. Time limitations - If students did not have enough time to complete their projects, components had to be completed in the office by staff. This could be disempowering for students. Also, closing sessions (which provide students with time to reflect, teach back, and build team dynamics) were sometimes compromised by ambitious agendas that did not allow enough time for project completion.

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Core Lessons Core Lesson #1a: Learning about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) from Comic Book .......................... 2 Core Lesson #1b: Learning about IAQ from Jr Health Inspector .................................................. 4 Core Lesson #2: School Walkthrough ............................................................................................ 5 Core Lesson #3: IAQ Findings and Recommendations................................................................. 6

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Core Lesson #1a: Learning about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) from Comic Book Overall Objectives: Students will understand the importance of IAQ Students will be able to identify common sources of indoor air pollution Students will learn vocabulary for talking about the indoor environment and public health Agenda: 1. Opening: 15 Minutes 2. Review Agenda & Establish Ground Rules 10 Minutes 3. Activity: IAQ worksheet 20 Minutes 4. Activity: Read IAQ Comic Book in Groups 30 Minutes 5. Teach Back 10 Minutes 6. Closing & Clean up 5 Minutes Preparation and Space Set up: Tables for group work Vocabulary: Public Health, Environment, Indoor Air Quality, Asthma, Ventilation, Pollution Sources Materials, Equipment and Handouts: Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) in Schools Comic Book; Look What We Learned: IAQ and Asthma Comic Book; Human Bingo & IAQ worksheet copies; Flip chart with agenda, Tape, Pens Opening: Introduce apprenticeship and staff. Use the Human Bingo Worksheet or the following mini-interview exercise as an icebreaker. Instruct students to: 1) Turn to your neighbor and ask him/her 2 questions: a. What is your favorite environment? b. What are you hoping to get out of this apprenticeship? 2) Report back to the group what you learned. Review Agenda & Establish Ground Rules Provide apprentices with a visual agenda. Ask students to brainstorm things that are important for classroom dynamics. Describe how many of the activities in the apprenticeship will be done in small groups and explain the possible roles they can plan in groups (ex: facilitator, note-taker, speaker, etc). Activity 1: IAQ Worksheet. Objective: Students will complete worksheet which will increase the teachers understanding of their baseline IAQ knowledge and general interests (which can be used to tailor future activities). Activity 2: Read IAQ comic book Objective: Students will increase knowledge about IAQ and practice group dynamics (facilitator, notetaker, participant). Divide class into groups. Each group will receive pages of the Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) in Schools Comic Book to review*. First 10 minutes - individual reading followed by 20 minutes of group discussion re: key points & lessons learned. Each group will select one person to teach back to the larger class. Example groups by comic book topics: General air quality & asthma - p.3-4, 6, 11-12, 25 (6 pages) Pollutants - p. 8-10, 17, 26 (5 pages) Ventilation - p. 5, 13-16, 24-25 (7 pages) IAQ Solutions - p. 18 23 (6 pages) Alternatively, have students individually read the Look What We Learned: IAQ and Asthma Comic Book and then share what they found most interesting. What questions do students have after reading these? What would they do differently if they were to create their own comic book? What other tools can be used to share information? (skits, videos, photographs, etc).

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide


Teach Back Objective: Students will have an opportunity to practice public speaking and peer-education. A designated speaker from each group will summarize the groups discussion. Notes: *Ideally, there would be time for each student to read the complete Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) in Schools Comic Book and then break-out into groups to focus on a particular section. The National Education Association Health Information Network IAQ Lessons #1, 15,18 and 21 are complementary to this session and can be found at http://www.neahin.org/Lesson_Plan/iaqlessonplanindex.html.

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Core Lesson #1b: Learning about IAQ from Jr Health Inspector Overall Objectives: Students will understand the importance of IAQ Students will be able to identify common sources of indoor air pollution Students will learn vocabulary for talking about the indoor environment and public health Agenda: 1. Junior Health Inspector Presentation 60 minutes Preparation and Space Set up: Theatre style seating facing white wall or screen for PowerPoint presentation Vocabulary: Environmental, Environmental Health, Environmental Health Inspectors, Environmental Health Hazards, Asthma Triggers, Unintentional Injuries Materials, Equipment and Handouts: Green Cleaning Demonstration Materials; Prizes for answering questions; Projector, Computer, Jr Health Inspector Pre and Post tests, Jr Health Inspector PowerPoint Presentation, Screen Activity 1: 60 minute Jr Health Inspector Presentation Notes: The Junior Health Inspector Presentation was designed by Kathy Estrada with the City of Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services for 4th graders. Older students may observe the presentation as it is delivered to younger elementary school students, take notes, and then teach back the lessons learned to their faculty. This has been used as a successful strategy to motivate teachers to complete IAQ checklists. The National Education Association Health Information Network IAQ Lessons #1, 15,18 and 21 are complementary to this session and can be found at http://www.neahin.org/Lesson_Plan/iaqlessonplanindex.html.

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Core Lesson #2: School Walkthrough Overall Objectives: Students will learn skills for organizing findings from Tools for Schools (TfS) checklists Students will practice tools for inspecting classrooms for potential IAQ hazards Students will learn to read and document findings from CO2/temperature/humidity monitor Agenda: 1. Opening 15 minutes 2. Activity: Strategy Chart 30-45 minutes 3. Activity: Walkthrough 30-60 minutes 4. Teach Back - Findings & Recommendations 15-30 minutes 5. Closing & Clean up 10 min Preparation and Space Set up: Purchase disposable cameras for students. Prepare Strategy Chart: Columns = Room Numbers; Rows= TfS Checklist Items. Vocabulary Ventilation, Environmental Inspection, Humidity Materials, Equipment, and Handouts Cameras, Flashlight, Clipboards, CO2 monitor, & long stick with synthetic feather taped to end. Give each group a clipboard, notebook paper, pen, camera, and any relevant handout (such as the Temperature, Humidity, CO2 log or Log of factors influencing Co2 and O2 levels). Flip Chart, Strategy Chart, stickers for students to mark problem areas, Completed TfS Checklists from teachers. Opening: Introduce any guest speakers (this is a session where you may want to invite a local Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) representative to perform school walkthrough). Instruct students to: 1) Turn to your neighbor and ask him/her 2 questions: a. What have you learned about IAQ? b. What IAQ hazards do you think well find in the classrooms? 2) Report back to the group what you learned Activity: Strategy Chart. Students will review TfS checklists completed by teachers and record findings on strategy chart. They will then prioritize which classrooms they want to focus on for the walkthrough and what common problems they should look for. Activity: Walkthrough. Objective: Students will use knowledge gained through apprenticeship to inspect school for IAQ hazards. If available, students will learn how to read and record data from CO2/temperature/humidity monitor. Students will visits classrooms, record notes and take pictures. Assign 1-2 students to check air flow with feather and another to record CO2, humidity, and temperature in each classroom. Assign student(s) to complete any missing items from the teachers TfS checklists for each classroom. Report Back: Students will share their findings from the walkthrough. Facilitation questions: What were the positive things you found related to air quality? (ex: no carpets in rooms, open windows, etc). What were some of the things you found that are signs for potential indoor air quality hazards? (i.e. water stains, pets, stuffed animals, art supplies, cleaning supplies, open food, entry points for pests, etc). Document conversation and findings on flip chart. Notes: Product option for CO2 monitor: T1M8 Desktop Air Quality Monitor for $179.95 ($193.47 with tax) The National Education Association Health Information Network IAQ Lesson #4 is complementary to this session and can be found at http://www.neahin.org/Lesson_Plan/iaqlessonplanindex.html.

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Core Lesson #3: IAQ Findings and Recommendations Overall Objectives: Students will learn how to critically think about IAQ findings Students will learn tools for making recommendations about IAQ to school personnel Agenda: 1. Opening 15 Minutes 2. Activity Review Photographs. Continue Brainstorming 30 Minutes Findings & Recommendations 3. Activity: Design a presentation 30 min 4. Teach Back : Practice Presentation 10 min 5. Closing & Clean up 5 Minutes Preparation and Space Set up: Print photographs from walkthrough and label them 1, 2, 3, etc. Vocabulary: Findings, recommendations, Materials, Equipment and Handouts Flip chart, pens, developed photographs from walkthrough, notes from Core Lesson #2 Report Back. Opening Instruct students to: 1) Turn to your neighbor and ask him/her two questions: a. What did you think was most interesting about the walkthrough? b. What surprised you the most about the walkthrough? 2) Report back to the group what you learned Activity: Review Photographs. Place pictures on tables. Separate the class into small groups and have them rotate between the tables. Instruct each group to discuss and document which pictures from each table are the most important for highlighting IAQ problems and solutions. For example, one student in the past wrote: Table A, picture #1 because the dust is blocking the vent so that stops the air from coming out. Teach Back: Have students individually or in groups teach back about the IAQ findings in their photographs. Activity: Designing a presentation. Facilitate a discussion about a student presentation. How do students want to convey the information they have found? (Skit, Speech, PowerPoint, Poster, other?) Who is going to be the audience? Is there enough time to work on this type of presentation? What skills/material are available? Notes: The National Education Association Health Information Network IAQ Lessons #4 and #10 are complementary to this session and can be found at http://www.neahin.org/Lesson_Plan/iaqlessonplanindex.html.

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide Supplemental Lessons


Supplemental Lesson A: Hands-On Workshops ....................................................................................................................2 Supplemental Lesson B: Public Speaking Skills ....................................................................................................................3 Supplemental Lesson C: Media Literacy................................................................................................................................4 Supplemental Lesson D: Advocacy and Letter Writing Skills ................................................................................................5 Supplemental Lesson E: Excel Computer Skills .....................................................................................................................6 Supplemental Lesson F: PowerPoint Computer Skills ............................................................................................................7 Supplemental Lesson G: ComicLife Computer Skills.............................................................................................................8 Supplemental Lesson H : Team Building Exercises................................................................................................................9

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Supplemental Lesson A: Hands-On Workshops Overall Objectives: Students will learn how to make green cleaning solutions Students will understand IAQ tobacco hazards Students will be able to identify pests and alternative solutions to pesticides Agenda: 1. Opening 10 Minutes 2. Review Agenda and Set Context 5 Minutes 3. Activity: Green Cleaning & Tobacco Stations 30 min 4. Activity: Mini Presentations 20 min 5. Closing & Clean up 10 Minutes Preparation and Space Set up: Pests, Tobacco and Green Cleaning stations Vocabulary: Toxics Use Reduction Integrative Pest Management (IPM) Materials, Equipment and Handouts: Baking soda, vinegar, mixing bowls, measuring tools, chart paper, pens, models, pest info, tobacco info, lung models, cameras, Workshop Table Questions Workshop Table Information Sheet Green Cleaning Science and Math Questions Opening Instruct students to: 1) Turn to your neighbor and ask him/her two questions: a. Do you know anybody who smokes tobacco? b. Why do you think people start to smoke? 2) Report back to the group what you learned Activity Building IAQ knowledge Objectives: Students will increase knowledge about the health affects of chemicals in their environment, including cleaning chemicals and tobacco smoke. They will also learn methods and skills to reduce their exposure. Students divide into 2-3 teams. Students spend 10-15 minutes at each table and then rotate. Table 1: Students will learn how to create cleaning supplies with baking soda, vinegar & lemon juice. Table 2: Students will learn common pests that can contribute to poor IAQ and how to get rid of them without pesticides. Table 3: Students learn about lung anatomy and what happens during an asthma episode or after chronic smoking. Teach-Back: Students will work in groups to present what they learned at the stations. 10 minutes for preparation. Each group gets 5 minutes to present. Notes: These sessions were very successful especially with questions that tied back to students school work.

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Supplemental Lesson B: Public Speaking Skills Overall Objectives: Students will learn tools for effective public communication Agenda: 1. Opening 10 Minutes 2. Review Agenda and Set Context 5 Minutes 3. Activity: Public Speaking 101 30 min 4. Activity: Mini Presentations 35 min 5. Closing & Clean up 10 Minutes Preparation and Space Set up: Vocabulary Eye contact & Body Language, Audience Engagement, Voice Projection Materials, Equipment, and Handouts: Chart paper, pens, Public Speaking Handout, Presentation Preparation Handout. Opening Instruct students to: 1) Turn to your neighbor and ask him/her two questions: a. Who is your favorite public speaker? b. What makes him/her a good speaker? 2) Report back to the group what you learned Activity: Objective: Students learn basic public speaking skills. Facilitate discussion on admired public speakers and their qualities. Pass out public speaking handout and grading rubric. Provide mini-skits with a good and bad example of public speaking Activity: Objective: Students practice public speaking skills. Ask students to write down their first, second and third choices for topics to present on (for example asthma, tobacco, green cleaning). Assign students into groups based on their interests. Instruct students to complete Presentation Preparation Handout. Notes: The National Education Association Health Information Network IAQ Lesson #13 is complementary to this session and can be found at http://www.neahin.org/Lesson_Plan/iaqlessonplanindex.html.

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Supplemental Lesson C: Media Literacy Overall Objectives: Students will learn about spoof ads as a community education tool Students will learn skills for increasing visual effectiveness of printed materials Agenda: 1. Opening 10 Minutes 2. Review Agenda and Set Context 5 Minutes 3. Activity: Health Education 101 15 min 4. Activity: Create spoof ads 40 min 5. Teach Back 15 Minutes 6. Clean up 5 min Preparation and Space Set up: Cut advertisements out of magazines for students to use for spoof ads. Tables for students to work on, sink if using paint. Vocabulary: Spoof Ads, Social Marketing, Materials, Equipment and Handouts: Art supplies (paper, paint, brushes, pens, pencils, etc). Media Literacy Handout. Additional materials https://www.adbusters.org/gallery/spoofads (spoof ad examples) or http://pbskids.org/dontbuyit/advertisingtricks/ Opening: Instruct students to: 1) Turn to your neighbor and ask him/her two questions: a. What is your favorite commercial? b. What makes it good? 2) Report back to the group what you learned Additional Activity: Contour drawing students will go outside (weather permitting) and get into pairs. Each student will get 10 minutes to draw his/her partner without looking at the page. Activity 1: Tricks to get peoples attention Begin with short intro about the color wheel, composition and fonts. Discuss alignment and how to bring the audiences eyes to a focus spot Activity 2: Social Marketing and Advocacy Objectives: Increase students skills with social marketing Students will make spoof ads to communicate a message about health and the environment. Sample Script: Does anybody know what intervention means? Going to individuals and talking about health is one form of intervention. What would be more efficient? Talking with every single student in the school or placing ads in the hallways that all students can see? Today we are going to make our own ads to increase the communitys awareness about IAQ. One effective way to make an ad is to change the meaning of an existing ad. [Show sample spoof ads]. By the sink, there are materials to make your own spoof ads. This is a creative activity and thats why we started with the drawing exercise to get out right side of the brain to work. Teach Back -Students will stop working on their spoof ads and think about how they want to present their work to the group (5 min). They will then stand up in the front and practice public speaking skills (10 minutes) Notes: Students may need 2-3 sessions to complete spoof ads. To increase school-wide participation, this can be turned into a competition. Apprentices can grade ad submissions and award winners. The National Education Association Health Information Network IAQ Lesson #3 is complementary to this session and can be found at http://www.neahin.org/Lesson_Plan/iaqlessonplanindex.html.

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Supplemental Lesson D: Advocacy and Letter Writing Skills (including word processing if resources and time allow) Overall Objectives: Students will understand three levels of public health intervention (individual, community, institution) Students will learn skills for writing an effective letter Optional: Students will learn how to use Microsoft Word Agenda: 1. Opening Ritual 10 Minutes 2. Review Agenda and Set Context 5 Minutes 3. Activity: Public Health Interventions 30 minutes 4. Activity: Computer Stations #2 30 min 5. Teach Back, Closing and Clean up 10 Minutes Preparation and Space Set up: Computer Lab with Word (optional) Vocabulary: Public Health Interventions, Legislators, Advocacy, Buy-in, Stakeholders, Institutional or Structural Change, Materials and Equipment Computers, Projector, notebook paper, pens, examples of advocacy letters (such as those from Amnesty International, Environment Petitions, etc) for students to use as a template, Advocacy Letters Handout Opening: Instruct students to: 1) Turn to your neighbor and ask him/her two questions: a. What do you want to change in the world? b. Who do you think could help you make this change? 2) Report back to the group what you learned Activity 1: Public Health Interventions Objectives: Increase students understanding of the ecological model of public health including individual, community, institutional, and policy interventions. Sample Script: Does anybody know what intervention means? [If students have already discussed this, remind them of the different interventions used so far]. Going to individuals and talking about health is one form of intervention. What would be more efficient? Educating every student about the importance of IAQ or working to decrease the IAQ hazards in the school (for example, banning smoking in schools). One is a form of individual intervention and the other is a form of policy intervention. Activity 2: Students will hand write (or type) an advocacy letter for creating some kind of environmental change (or to increase support for an environment activity they already know about). Provide students with presentation about how letter writing campaigns have historically made changes and basic guidelines for writing an effective letter. Activity 3: Students will go on-line and find the contact information for who they want to send their letter to and/or to find additional information to support their letter. If computers are not available, provide hard copies of addresses for local representative. Notes: Students may need 2-3 sessions to complete letters. Alternative Activity: Give students letter templates they can put into their own words. How can you ensure letters will be used (provide stamps, envelopes, etc for completed letters, publish in school or local newsletter)? The National Education Association Health Information Network IAQ Lesson #12 is complementary to this session and can be found at http://www.neahin.org/Lesson_Plan/iaqlessonplanindex.html.

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Supplemental Lesson E: Excel Computer Skills Overall Objectives: Students will learn how to perform calculations in Excel Students will learn how to make a graph in Excel Agenda: 6. Opening Ritual 7. Review Agenda and Set Context 8. Activity: Computer Stations 9. Teach Back, Closing and Clean up Preparation and Space Set up: Computer Lab Vocabulary: Excel: Cell, Row, Column, Chart

10 Minutes 10 Minutes 60 minutes (may need 15 minutes to collect data) 10 Minutes

Materials, Equipment and Handouts Computers, Projector, Excel Lesson Handout Opening: Instruct students to: 3) Turn to your neighbor and ask him/her two questions: a. Please describe your favorite computer program. b. How are computers helpful? 4) Report back to the group what you learned Activity 1: Excel: Introduction, Today, we are going to learn a computer program called Excel. This program can be helpful for your math homework. It can also be used to make charts for your science homework. Note: If the students have been measuring CO2, temperature and humidity, have them type the dates for each measurement in column A and the CO2 readings for column B. If no data has been collected, spend 15 minutes having students counting the number of IAQ hazards in the room for each of the following categories (chemical perfumes, cleaning supplies, etc; mold water leaks, overwatered plants, etc; dust- clutter, stuffed animals, etc; ventilation (blocked windows or vents). In Column A, type the different IAQ hazard categories. In column B, type the total number of violations for each category. Instruct the students on how to create a line or column graph if they have the dates & CO2 data or a pie chart if they describe the numbers of different IAQ hazards. Also, show students how they can add, subtract, find averages, and percentages using Excel. Teach Back: What patterns did you observe in your graphs? Notes: Excel: Use numbers from project to make it relevant. Make graph with step by step instructions ahead of time. Students type in same #s with model on projector and then make graph. Work with math teacher to demonstrate specific homework assignment on Excel. Allow time for them to play with formatting. 1-2 sessions (1.5 hrs each).

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Supplemental Lesson F: PowerPoint Computer Skills Overall Objectives: Students will learn skills to make a Powerpoint (PPT) Slide Agenda: 10. Opening Ritual 10 Minutes 11. Review Agenda and Set Context 10 Minutes 12. Activity: Computer Stations #1 30 minutes 13. Activity: Computer Stations #2 30 min 14. Teach Back, Closing and Clean up 10 Minutes Preparation and Space Set up: Preferred: Electronic versions of student pictures from walkthrough Computer Lab Vocabulary: Slide, Background, Layout, Visual Appeal Materials, Equipment, and Handouts Computers, Projector, Student PowerPoint Example, PowerPoint Handout Opening: Instruct students to: 5) Turn to your neighbor and ask him/her two questions: a. What qualities make a good movie? b. What makes a good presentation? 6) Report back to the group what you learned Activity 1: PowerPoint Demonstration: Activity 2: Create one introductory slide and one slide about something related to Indoor Air Quality Teach Back: Students share their slide to the group Notes: PowerPoint: Ambitious to teach PPT & Excel but amazing what some students were capable of. Important to know latest versions of software. Make sure you have adaptors so you can use same model for large screen as students are using. Have student demonstrate on large screen to set pace. Allow adequate time to create a PPT (4, 1.5 hr sessions) and time to practice their final presentation. Providing the students the option to go online for research/graphics can be distracting. Provide pictures they can select from rather then having them search online (where they often get distracted). Keep demonstrations simple.

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Supplemental Lesson G: ComicLife Computer Skills Overall Objectives: Student will learn skills to make a Comic Life page Agenda: 15. Opening Ritual 10 Minutes 16. Review Agenda and Set Context 10 Minutes 17. Activity: Computer Stations #1 30 minutes 18. Activity: Computer Stations #2 30 min 19. Teach Back, Closing and Clean up 10 Minutes Preparation and Space Set up: Need: Electronic versions of student pictures from walkthrough. Computer lab with Comic Life Vocabulary: Story line, design, Materials, Equipment Computers, Projector Opening: Instruct students to: 7) Turn to your neighbor and ask him/her two questions: a. What is your favorite comic book character? b. Have you ever made a comic book before? 8) Report back to the group what you learned Activity 1: Comic Life Demonstration: Activity 2: Create 1 comic page including at least 3 pictures & 3 bubbles Teach Back: Notes: Comic Life: The entire apprenticeship could be focused on creating a comic book. Students could take photos and learn about the problem for 5 sessions and then spend 5 sessions creating book and 2 sessions presenting. The organization EarthTeam has a lot of experience working with students and creating comic books and other media social marketing tools: www.earthteam.org Comic Life can be downloaded for free 30 day trials (MAC and PC) from http://plasq.com/comiclife-win and costs ~ $30 to purchase (discounts for buying in bulk for multiple users)

Middle School IAQ Apprenticeship Curriculum Guide

Supplemental Lesson H : Team Building Exercises Overall Objectives: Students will learn more about their peers Students will increase skills for working in a team Team Building Exercises: 1. Human Bingo 10 Minutes 2. Yarn Exercise 15 Minutes 3. Chair Exercise 15 Minutes 4. Mini Interviews 20 min 5. Closing & Clean up 10 Minutes Preparation and Space Set up: Vocabulary: Cooperation, Leadership, Team, Facilitation, Support, Materials and Equipment: Yarn, chairs Human Bingo Exercise See details on Human Bingo Worksheet Yarn Exercise Students stand in a circle (outside, weather permitting). They say one adjective that helps class room dynamics and toss the ball to someone else. After every student has yarn, ask them to one at a time say an adjective that hurts classroom dynamics and let go of the yarn. Students visualize how actions bring people together or break them apart. Chair Exercise - Students sit in chairs with one student remaining standing. The person standing says something about him/herself. A chair is pulled away and students who share the same truth have to find a chair to sit in. The person standing is the next one to share a truth. Mini-Interviews Instruct students to: 1) Turn to your neighbor and ask him/her two questions: a. What are your talents? Drawing, public speaking, writing, working with others. b. What do you think makes a good team? Report back to the group what you learned Notes: These could be integrated into the core lesson plans as break activities if time allows