Office of Elementary Education

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Grade 1 Science Instruction Unit Guide Standard 3: Life Science

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

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Table of Contents Standard 3: Life Science Topic
Maryland State Curriculum for Science Skills and Processes Maryland State Curriculum for Science Alignment Vertical Content Map Planning Guide Instructional Support for Science Objectives Materials From Insect Enhancement Resource Word Cards and Vocabulary Sort Careers in Life Science Concept Attainment for Insects Literature To Support Life Science netTrekker Directions Websites To Support Life Science Formative Assessments Science Assessment Collection Windows Teacher Directions for Unit 3Standard 3 Assessment Answer Key for Unit 3 Standard 3 Assessment

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4-6 7-11 12-17 18-46 47-81 82-137 138-158 159-166 167-176 177-190 191-196 197-202 203-215 216 217-229

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

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Maryland State Curriculum for Science
WCPS 2010-2011 Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

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Standard 1.0 Skills and Processes ± Students will demonstrate the thinking and acting inherent in the practice of science. A. Constructing Knowledge 1. Raise questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of them by making careful observations and trying things out. a. Describe what can be learned about things by just observing those things carefully and adding information by sometimes doing something to things and noting what happened. b. Seek information through reading, observation, exploration, and investigations. c. Use tools such as thermometers, magnifiers, rulers, or balances to extend their senses and gather data. d. Explain that when a science investigation is done the way it was done before, we expect to get a very similar result. e. Participate in multiple experiences to verify that science investigations generally work the same way in different places. f. Suggest things that you could do to find answers to questions raised by observing objects and/or phenomena (events such as, water disappearing from the classroom aquarium or a pet¶s water bowl). g. Use whole numbers and simple, everyday fractions in ordering, counting, identifying, measuring, and describing things and experiences. B. Applying Evidence and Reasoning 1. People are more likely to believe your ideas if you can give good reasons for them. a. Provide reasons for accepting or rejecting ideas examined. b. Develop reasonable explanations for observations made, investigations completed, and information gained by sharing ideas and listening to others¶ ideas. c. Explain why if is important to make some fresh observations when people give different descriptions of the same thing.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

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C. Communicating Scientific Information 1. Ask, ³How do you know?´ in appropriate situations and attempt reasonable answers when others ask them the same question. a. Describe things as accurately as possible and compare observations with those of others. b. Describe and compare things in terms of numbers, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion. c. Draw pictures that correctly portray at least some features of the thing being described and sequence events (seasons, seed growth). d. Have opportunities to work with a team, share findings with others, and recognize that all team members should reach their own conclusions about what the findings mean. e. Recognize that everybody can do science and invent things and ideas. D. Technology 1. Design and make things with simple tools and a variety of materials. a. Make something out of paper, cardboard, wood, plastic, metal, or existing objects that can actually be used to perform a task. b. Recognize that tools are used to do things better or more easily and to do some things that could not otherwise be done at all. c. Assemble, describe, take apart and reassemble constructions using interlocking blocks, erector sets and the like. d. Recognize that some kinds of materials are better than others for making any particular thing, for example, materials that are better in some ways (such as stronger and cheaper) may be worse in other ways (such as heavier and harder to cut). e. Explain that sometimes it is not possible to make or do everything that is designed.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

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D. Technology 2. Practice identifying the parts of things and how one part connects to and affects another. a. Investigate a variety of objectives to identify that most things are made of parts. b. Explain that something may not work if some of its parts are missing. c. Explain that when parts are put together, they can do things that they couldn¶t do by themselves. D. Technology 3. Examine a variety of physical models and describe what they teach about the real things they are meant to resemble. a. Explain that a model of something is different from the real thing but can be used to learn something about the real thing. b. Realize that one way to describe something is to say how it is like something else.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

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Maryland State Curriculum for Science
Standard 3.0 Life Science The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time. A.DIVERSITY OF LIFE 1. Compare and explain how external features of plants and animals help them survive in different environments. a. Use the senses and magnifying instruments to examine a variety of plants and animals to describe external features and what they do. b. Compare similar features in some animals and plants and explain how each of these enables the organism to satisfy basic needs. Insects, Investigation 1, Parts 1-3 HM Themes 1-10 Science Correlation Other Correlations

Insects, Investigation 1, Part 1 Insects, Investigation 3, Part 2 Insects, Science Stories, pp. 6-15

c. Use the information collected to ask and compare answers to questions about Insects, Investigaton1, Part 1 how an organism's external features contribute to its ability to survive in an Insects, Investigation 6, Parts 1-3 environment. Insects, Science Stories, pp. 6-15 d. Classify organisms according to one selected feature, such as body covering, and identify other similarities shared by organisms within each group formed. Insects, Investigation 1, Part 2 Insects, Investigation 3, Part 3 Insects, Investigation 5, Parts 3

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

Page8

Standard 3.0 Life Science The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time. B.CELLS 1. Describe evidence from investigations that living things are made of parts too small to be seen with the unaided eye. a. Use magnifying instruments to observe parts of a variety of living things, such as leaves, seeds, insects, worms, etc. to describe (drawing or text) parts seen with the magnifier. b. Use information gathered from observations to compare the descriptions (drawings or text) of the different parts seen. c. Describe some of the ideas or questions that might result from examining organisms more closely.

Science Correlation

Other Correlations

Insects, Investigation 1, Parts 1-3 Insects, Investigation 3, Parts 1-3

Insects, Investigation 5, Parts 1-3 Insects, Investigation 6 Parts 1-3 Insects, Science Stories, pp. 12-25

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

Page9

Standard 3.0 Life Science The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time. 2.Provide evidence that all organisms are made of parts that help them carry out the basic functions of life. a. Gather information and direct evidence that humans and other animals have different body parts used to seek, find, and take in food. b. Investigate and identify parts of the body that alert humans and other animals to danger and help them to fight, hide or get out of danger. c. Describe some parts of plants and describe what they do for the plant. d. Respond, giving reasons to support the response, to the statement "All living things are made of parts." C.GENETICS

Science Correlation

Other Correlations

Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2

HM Themes 1-10

Grade 2 New Plants

HMThemes 1-10 1. Explain that there are differences among individuals in any population. a. Examine a variety of populations of plants and animals (including humans), to identify ways that individual members of that population are different from one another. b. Make a list of possible advantages and disadvantages of differences of individuals in a population of organisms. Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

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Standard 3.0 Life Science The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time. 2.Recognize that all living things have offspring, usually with two parents involved. a. Examine a variety of living things and their offspring and describe what each parent and offspring looks like. b. Identify similarities and differences among the offspring and between the offspring and each parent. c. Based on observations, construct an appropriate response to the question "Are parents and offspring more similar than they are different?" E.FLOW OF MATTER AND ENERGY 1. Describe some of the ways in which animals depend on plants and on each other. a. Examine organisms in a wide variety of environments to gather information on how animals satisfy their need for food. y y y Some animals eat only plants Some animals eat only other animals Some animals eat both plants and other animals

Science Correlation

Other Correlations

HM Themes 1-10 Investigation 1 Part 1 Investigation 5 Part 1

HM Themes 1-10

Investigation 1 Part 1 Investigation 5 Part 1 Investigation 6 Part 1

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

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Standard 6.0 Environmental Science Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the interactions of environmental factors (living and non-living) and analyze their impact from a local to a global perspective. B.ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES 1. Recognize that caring about the environment is an important human activity. a. Recognize and describe that individual and group actions, such as recycling, help the environment. b. Recognize and describe that individual and group actions, such as littering, harm the environment. c. Give reasons why people should take care of their environments.

Science Correlation

Other Correlations

HM Themes 1-10 Consider fostering a classroom environment that continuously cares for the environment. Be sure to include discussion about how human actions can harm or help the environment.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

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Vertical Content Map for Life Science
Kindergarten Grade 1 Grades 2&3

3.0 Life Science ~ The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time. A. Diversity of Life 1. Observe a variety of familiar animals and plants to discover similarities and differences among them. a. Identify and describe features (observable parts) of animals and plants that make some of them alike in the way they look and the things they do. b. Compare descriptions of the features that make some animals and some plants very different from one another. c. Identify a feature (wings, for example) that distinguishes one group of animals from other groups and observe a variety of animals that have that feature to describe other similar external features they might share. d. Compare ideas about how the features of animals and plants affect what these animals and plants are able to do. A. Diversity of Life 1.Compare and explain how external features of plants and animals help them survive in different environments. a. Use the senses and magnifying instruments to examine a variety of plants and animals to describe external features and what they do. b. Compare similar features in some animals and plants and explain how each of these enables the organism to satisfy basic needs.

Instructional Note: Have the students observe and compile a list of variety of animals or plants. Students can classify animal or plants by the c. Use the information collected to ask and compare observable features. answers to questions about how an organism's external features contribute to its ability to survive in an environment. d. Classify organisms according to one selected feature, such as body covering, and identify other similarities shared by organisms within each group formed.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

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Kindergarten

Grade 1

Grades 2&3

3.0 Life Science ~ The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time. B. Cells 1.Describe evidence from investigations that living things are made of parts too small to be seen with the unaided eye.
None Provided By MSDE

B. Cells 1. Explore the world of minute living things to describe what they look like, how they live, and how they interact with their environment. a. Use magnifying instruments to observe and describe using drawings or text (oral or written) minute organisms, such as brine shrimp, algae, aphids, etc. that are found in different environments. b. Describe any observable activity displayed by these organisms. c. Provide reasons that support the conclusion that these organisms are alive. d. Use information gathered about these minute organisms to compare mechanisms they have to satisfy their basic needs to those used by larger organisms.

+

a. Use magnifying instruments to observe parts of a variety of living things, such as leaves, seeds, insects, worms, etc. to describe (drawing or text) parts seen with the magnifier. b. Use information gathered from observations to compare the descriptions (drawings or text) of the different parts seen. c. Describe some of the ideas or questions that might result from examining organisms more closely.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 14

Kindergarten

Grade 1

Grades 2&3

3.0 Life Science ~ The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time. 2.Provide evidence that all organisms are made of parts that help them carry out the basic functions of life. None Provided By MSDE a. Gather information and direct evidence that Instructional Note: Have the students observe humans and other animals have different body parts organisms under a microscope. Students can use used to seek, find, and take in food. drawings to describe what the magnified organism looks like. b. Investigate and identify parts of the body that alert humans and other animals to danger and help them to fight, hide or get out of danger. c. Describe some parts of plants and describe what they do for the plant.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Kindergarten

P a g e 15 Grade 1 Grades 2&3

3.0 Life Science ~ The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time. C.GENETICS 1.Observe, describe and compare the life cycles of different kinds of animals and plants. a. Identify and draw pictures that show what an animal (egg to frog) and a plant (seed to tree) looks like at each stage of its life cycle. b. Describe and compare the changes that occur in the life cycle of two different animals, such as a frog and a puppy and two different plants, such as a rosebush and a maple tree. c. Identify and describe the changes that occur in humans as they develop.
y y y

C.GENETICS 1. Explain that there are differences among individuals in any population. a. Examine a variety of populations of plants and animals (including humans), to identify ways that individual members of that population are different from one another. b. Make a list of possible advantages and disadvantages of differences of individuals in a population of organisms

C.GENETICS 1.Explain that there are identifiable stages in the life cycles (growth, reproduction, and death) of plants and animals. a. Investigate and describe that seeds change and grow into plants. b. Compare and describe the changes that occur in humans during their life cycle (birth, newborn, child, adolescent, adult, and elder). c. Given pictures of stages in the life cycle of a plant or an animal, determine the sequence of the stages in the life cycle. d. Provide examples, using observations and information from readings that life cycles differ from species to species.

Size Weight Appearance of different parts

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 16 Grade 1 Grades 2&3

Kindergarten

3.0 Life Science ~ The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time. 2.Recognize that all living things have offspring, usually with two parents involved. a. Examine a variety of living things and their offspring and describe what each parent and offspring looks like. b. Identify similarities and differences among the offspring and between the offspring and each parent. c. Based on observations, construct an appropriate response to the question "Are parents and offspring more similar than they are different?"

None Provided By MSDE

None Provided By MSDE

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 17

Kindergarten

Grade 1

Grades 2&3

3.0 Life Science ~ The students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time. E. Flow of Matter and Energy 1.Describe some of the ways in which animals depend on plants and on each other. None Provided By MSDE a. Examine organisms in a wide variety of environments to gather information on how animals satisfy their need for food. y y y Some animals eat only plants Some animals eat only other animals Some animals eat both plants and other animals E. Flow of Matter and Energy 1. Recognize that materials continue to exist even though they change from one form to another. a. Identify and compile a list of materials the can be recycled. b. Identify what happens to materials when they are recycled. c. Observe and record the sequence of changes that occur to plants and animals that dies and decay. d. Ask and develop possible answers to questions about what happens to the materials that living things are made of when they die.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 18

Standard 3: Life Science Planning Guide
Time Session 1 Curricular Connection 3.A.1 a-d Lesson Introduction Consider using one of the following ways to get the excited about the life science unit: y Mystery Box ~ Include items in the box that the students will be interacting with during this unit of study. Students use the items to talk about what they know and what questions they have. Read aloud a nonfiction book about organisms. Have a variety of stuffed animals, pictures, models, etc. on hand to get the students to talk about what they know and what questions they have. Students had experiences with fish and worm in Kindergarten. Have the students share what they remembered from Kindergarten. Some of the teachers may have their science notebook from their unit of study. Vocabulary external features organism survive environment Assessment Focus Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? Responses will vary. Notes

Please be sure to make connections to other organisms throughout this unit.

y

y

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 2 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 1 Part 1 Mealworms 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 1-12 Wrapping Up Part 1 2. Step 13-14

P a g e 19 Vocabulary mealworm air water food space vial hand lens observe record Assessment Focus Questions What do insects need? What are the structures and behaviors of mealworms? Insects need air, water, food, and space. Live inspects should be handled with care and respect. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? What do insect eat?

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 1 Part 2 Larva, Pupa, Adult 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 1-3 Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 20 Vocabulary structures behaviors segments Assessment Focus Questions How do mealworms grow and change? What are the structures and behavior of mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults? Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors. The structures of some insects change as the insect grows. As they grow, they molt their hard external covering. Adult insects have a head, thorax, and abdomen. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism?

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 4 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 1 Part 2 Larva, Pupa, Adult 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 4-6 ~ Observing Molting Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 21 Vocabulary molting larva Assessment Focus Questions How do mealworms grow and change? What are the structures and behavior of mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults? Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors. The structures of some insects change as the insect grows. As they grow, they molt their hard external covering. Adult insects have a head, thorax, and abdomen. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 5 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 1 Part 2 Larva, Pupa, Adult 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 7 ³Eggs´ Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 22 Vocabulary droppings Assessment Focus Questions How do mealworms grow and change? What are the structures and behavior of mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults? Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors. The structures of some insects change as the insect grows. As they grow, they molt their hard external covering. Adult insects have a head, thorax, and abdomen. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 6 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 1 Part 2 Larva, Pupa, Adult 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 8-9 ~ Pupae Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 23 Vocabulary pupa Assessment Focus Questions How do mealworms grow and change? What are the structures and behavior of mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults? Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors. The structures of some insects change as the insect grows. As they grow, they molt their hard external covering. Adult insects have a head, thorax, and abdomen. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 7 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 1 Part 2 Larva, Pupa, Adult 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 10-12 ~ Adult Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 24 Vocabulary adult darkling beetle Assessment Focus Questions How do mealworms grow and change? What are the structures and behavior of mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults? Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors. The structures of some insects change as the insect grows. As they grow, they molt their hard external covering. Adult insects have a head, thorax, and abdomen. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 8 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 1 Part 2 Larva, Pupa, Adult 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 13-14 ~ Adult Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 25 Vocabulary darkling beetle head thorax abdomen wing antenna leg Assessment Focus Questions How do mealworms grow and change? What are the structures and behavior of mealworm larvae, pupae, and adults? Insects have characteristic structures and behaviors. The structures of some insects change as the insect grows. As they grow, they molt their hard external covering. Adult insects have a head, thorax, and abdomen. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features. Visit FOSSweb.com for the audio version of this science story.

Session 9

3.A.1.a-d, 3.B.1.a-c 3.B.2.a-b, d

FOSS: Insects Investigation 1 Part 2 Larva, Pupa, Adult Science Stories: So Many Kinds, So Many Places Refer to the Science Stories folio for lesson plans.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.C.2.a-c FOSS: Insects 10 Investigation 1 Part 3 Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 1-7 Wrapping Up Part 3 2. Steps 9-10 Session 11 3.A.1.a-d, 3.B.1.a-c 3.B.2.a-b, d FOSS: Insects Science Stories: What Makes an Insect and Insect? Refer to the Science Stories folio for the lesson plan. Session 12 3.A.1.a-d, 3.B.1.a-c 3.B.2.a-b, d FOSS: Insects Science Stories: Variation Refer to the Science Stories folio for the lesson plan. Session 13 3.A.1.a-d, 3.B.1.a-c 3.B.2.a-b, d FOSS: Insects Science Stories: Environment Refer to the Science Stories folio for the lesson plan.

P a g e 26 Vocabulary eggs life cycle living dead parent offspring Assessment Focus Question How do new mealworms begin? The lifecycle of the beetle is egg, larva, pupa, and adult, which produces new eggs. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Visit FOSSweb.com for the audio version of this science story. Notes Guiding Question How would you describe and compare the appearance of the parent and offspring?

Visit FOSSweb.com for the audio version of this science story.

Visit FOSSweb.com for the audio version of this science story.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 14 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 1 Reflection and Assessment 3.B.2.a-b, d Session 15 3.A.1.a-d, 3.B.1.a-c 3.B.2.a-b, d FOSS: Insects Investigation 5 Part 1 Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 1-8 Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 27 Vocabulary Assessment Notes

caterpillar painted lady

Focus Questions What do insects need? What are the structures of the butterfly larva? Caterpillars need air, water, food, and space. Caterpillars have segments, a head, six legs, prologs, and they make silk. Caterpillars have bristles and colors. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation.

Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? What do insects eat?

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 16 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 5 Part 1 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 9-10 ~ Caterpillars Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 28 Vocabulary Assessment Focus Questions What do insects need? What are the structures of the butterfly larva? Caterpillars need air, water, food, and space. Caterpillars have segments, a head, six legs, prologs, and they make silk. Caterpillars have bristles and colors. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 17 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 5 Part 1 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 11 ~ Molting Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 29 Vocabulary Assessment Focus Questions What do insects need? What are the structures of the butterfly larva? Caterpillars need air, water, food, and space. Caterpillars have segments, a head, six legs, prologs, and they make silk. Caterpillars have bristles and colors. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 18 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 5 Part 1 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 12 ~ Silk Formation Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 30 Vocabulary Assessment Focus Questions What do insects need? What are the structures of the butterfly larva? Caterpillars need air, water, food, and space. Caterpillars have segments, a head, six legs, prologs, and they make silk. Caterpillars have bristles and colors. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 19 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 5 Part 1 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 13 ~ Pupations Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 31 Vocabulary Assessment Focus Questions What do insects need? What are the structures of the butterfly larva? Caterpillars need air, water, food, and space. Caterpillars have segments, a head, six legs, prologs, and they make silk. Caterpillars have bristles and colors. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 20 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 5 Part 2 Chrysalises 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 1-2 Wrapping Up Part 2 2. Step 3-4

P a g e 32 Vocabulary chrysalis pupate Assessment Focus Questions How do butterfly larvae change into butterflies? Painted lady caterpillars pupate in a chrysalis. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 21 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 5 Part 3 Butterflies 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 1-8 Wrapping Up Part 3 2. Step 9-10

P a g e 33 Vocabulary proboscis waste butterfly nectar water fountain Assessment Focus Question What is the life cycle of butterflies? Butterflies have complete metamorphosis: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. How do butterflies eat and drink? Butterflies drink water from the fountain with a straw-like mouth. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism?

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 22 3.B.1.a-c Science Stories: Insect Life Cycle 3.B.2.a-b, d Refer to the Science Stories folio for the lesson plan. Session 23 3.A.1.a-d, 3.B.1.a-c 3.B.2.a-b, d 3.A.1.a-d, 3.B.1.a-c 3.B.2.a-b, d FOSS: Insects Investigation 5 Reflection and Assessment FOSS: Insects Investigation 3 Part 1 Eggs Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 1-6 Wrapping Up Part 1 2. Step 7-8

P a g e 34 Vocabulary Assessment Notes Visit FOSSweb.com for the audio version of this science story.

Session 24

insect

Focus Questions How do insects begin their life? What do insect eggs look like? Responses may vary. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation.

Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism?

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 25 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 3 Part 2 Milkweed Bugs 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 1-15 Wrapping Up Part 2 2. Step 16-17

P a g e 35 Vocabulary milkweed bug hatch nymph habitat Assessment Focus Questions What do milkweed bugs need? How do their needs compare to those of other insects? Milkweed bugs need air, water, space and sunflower seeds for food. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism?

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 26 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 3 Part 3 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation Growing Milkweed Bugs 1. Step 1 Closure 2.Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 36 Vocabulary Assessment Focus Questions What if the life cycle of milkweed bugs? Do all insects go through larval and pupal stages? How are all adult insects the same and different? Milkweed bugs molt so they can grow. Bugs eat with a straw-like mouth. Female bugs lay many small eggs. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 27 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 3 Part 3 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Step 2 ~ Molting Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 37 Vocabulary Assessment Focus Questions What if the life cycle of milkweed bugs? Do all insects go through larval and pupal stages? How are all adult insects the same and different? Milkweed bugs molt so they can grow. Bugs eat with a straw-like mouth. Female bugs lay many small eggs. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 28 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 3 Part 3 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Step 3 Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 38 Vocabulary Assessment Focus Questions What if the life cycle of milkweed bugs? Do all insects go through larval and pupal stages? How are all adult insects the same and different? Milkweed bugs molt so they can grow. Bugs eat with a straw-like mouth. Female bugs lay many small eggs. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 29 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 3 Part 3 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 4-5 ~ Adult Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 39 Vocabulary male female Assessment Focus Questions What if the life cycle of milkweed bugs? Do all insects go through larval and pupal stages? How are all adult insects the same and different? Milkweed bugs molt so they can grow. Bugs eat with a straw-like mouth. Female bugs lay many small eggs. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 30 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 3 Part 3 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Step 6 ~ Reproduction Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 40 Vocabulary Assessment Focus Questions What if the life cycle of milkweed bugs? Do all insects go through larval and pupal stages? How are all adult insects the same and different? Milkweed bugs molt so they can grow. Bugs eat with a straw-like mouth. Female bugs lay many small eggs. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 31 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 3 Part 3 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 7-9 ~ Maintenance Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 41 Vocabulary Assessment Focus Questions What if the life cycle of milkweed bugs? Do all insects go through larval and pupal stages? How are all adult insects the same and different? Milkweed bugs molt so they can grow. Bugs eat with a straw-like mouth. Female bugs lay many small eggs. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 32 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 3 Part 3 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Step 10 ~ End of the Life Cycle Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 42 Vocabulary Assessment Focus Questions What if the life cycle of milkweed bugs? Do all insects go through larval and pupal stages? How are all adult insects the same and different? Milkweed bugs molt so they can grow. Bugs eat with a straw-like mouth. Female bugs lay many small eggs. Students should also include other observations they made about their mealworms during this investigation. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? How would you describe and compare the appearance of the parent and offspring? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 33 3.B.1.a-c Science Stories: Life Goes Around 3.B.2.a-b, d See the Science Stories folio for the lesson. Session 34 3.A.1.a-d, 3.B.1.a-c 3.B.2.a-b, d 3.A.1.a-d, 3.B.1.a-c 3.B.2.a-b, d FOSS: Insects Investigation 3 Reflection and Assessment FOSS: Insects Investigation 6 Part 1 Guiding the Investigation 1. Steps 1-9 Wrapping Up Part 1 2. Step 10-11

P a g e 43 Vocabulary Assessment Notes Visit FOSSweb.com for the audio version of this science story.

Session 35

cricket chirping ovipositor

Focus Question What is the life cycle of crickets? Young crickets are nymphs, like milkweed bug nymphs.

Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? What do insects eat?

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 36 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 6 Part 2 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Step 1-3 Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 44 Vocabulary ant tunnel Assessment Focus Questions What are the structures and behaviors of ants? Ants have six legs, three body parts (head, thorax, abdomen), and antennae. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 37 3.B.1.a-c Investigation 6 Part 2 3.B.2.a-b, d Guiding the Investigation 1. Step 4-7 Closure 2. Have the students share the observations they recorded in their science notebooks.

P a g e 45 Vocabulary Assessment Focus Questions What are the structures and behaviors of ants? Ants have six legs, three body parts (head, thorax, abdomen), and antennae. Notes Guiding Questions How would you describe the external features of this organism and what do they do? How do the external features help them to survive in their environment? How do the external features help them to seek, find, and take in food? Do any of their external features help them to fight, hide, or get out of danger? How would you compare these features to another organism? On observation days, students can interact with materials for exposure to other organisms. Students should be encouraged to describe and compare features.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Time Curricular Lesson Connection Session 3.A.1.a-d, FOSS: Insects 38 3.B.1.a-c Science Stories: Same But Different 3.B.2.a-b, d Refer to the Science Stories folio for the lesson plan. Session 39 3.A.1.a-d, 3.B.1.a-c 3.B.2.a-b, d FOSS: Insects Investigation 6 Reflection and Assessment Reflection for Standard 3: Life Science

P a g e 46 Vocabulary Assessment Notes Visit FOSSweb.com for the audio version of this science story.

Session 40 Session 41 Session 42

Unit 3 Assessment

Unit 3 Assessment

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 47

Instructional Support for Science Objectives

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 48

3.A.1.a Use the senses and magnifying instruments to examine a variety of plants and animals to describe external features and what they do.

Resources to Support 3.A.1.a
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.
WCPS 2010-2011 Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 49

3.A.1.b Compare similar features in some animals and plants and explain how each of these enables the organism to satisfy basic needs.

Resources to Support 3.A.1.b
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.
WCPS 2010-2011 Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 50

3.A.1.c Use the information collected to ask and compare answers to questions about how an organism's external features contribute to its ability to survive in an environment.

Resources to Support 3.A.1.c
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192
WCPS 2010-2011 Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 51

Lesson Seeds Compare a Bear and a Bee

How are bears and bees alike? How are they different? Think of many ways.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 52

Writing About Science

My Secret Animal
Choose two organisms to describe and compare. Share your writing with a partner. Have them guess the names of the organisms you wrote about.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 53

3.A.1.d Classify organisms according to one selected feature, such as body covering, and identify other similarities shared by organisms within each group formed.

Resources to Support 3.A.1.d
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 54

Lesson Seeds
Observing characteristics common among mammals ~ Observe a variety of animals from this group to determine similarities among them. Students might observe mice, hamsters, dogs, cats, and rabbits. They will find that most of the animals in this group; a)live on land; b) have internal skeletons and hair or fur on their skin for body coverings; c) have one or two pairs of legs for locomotion; d) have glands that produce milk to feed their young; e) bear their young alive. Animals with these characteristics are called mammals. Resource:The Everyday Science Resource, Lowery

Seriating animals ~ Obtain a number of seashells of the same kind. Have students arrange the shells from smallest to largest or by some sequence in their color patterns. Some students might research factors about animals to seriate them. For example, animals can be ordered from slow moving (snail or slug) to fast moving (cheetah or swift), from small land animal (shrew) to large land animal (elephant), small water animal(gobie) to large water animal (whale or shark), and small flying animal (eagle or condor). Resource:The Everyday Science Resource, Lowery

Classifying animals by observable characteristics ~ Prepare a set of ten pictures of birds or sets of other animals. Ask students to note differences in coloring, marking, size, shape, and other features. Next, ask them to note at least three ways in which the animals are alike. Now ask each of them to bring one picture of some animal to school. Divide the bulletin board into four sections with a picture of one animal in each (selected for diverse characteristics). Ask the students to place their pictures in the section where the poster animal is most like theirs. As pictures are placed, have students give their rationales. They can discuss the characteristics of the animals in each group. When finished, have them divide one group of pictures into two or more groups. The subdividing process can continue as long as characteristics of the animals suggest their grouping. Resource:The Everyday Science Resource, Lowery

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 55

I Have, Who Has

I have an animal with six legs, who has one with eight legs? I have a spider, who has an animal with an exoskeleton and lives in the ocean? I have a starfish, who has an animal with gills? I have a trout, who has an animal with stereoscopic vision?

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 56

I have a gorilla, who has an animal with feathers?

I have a (bird, peacock), who has an animal with webbed feet? I have a duck-billed platypus, who has another water dwelling animal? I have a dolphin, who has a marsupial?

I have an opossum, who has a feline?

I have a tiger, who has an animal with wings and scales?
WCPS 2010-2011 Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 57

I have a butterfly, who has a cold blooded animal that lives the first part of it¶s life in water? I have a frog, who has two types of animals that are warm-blooded? I have birds and mammals, who has animals that lay leathery eggs? I have reptiles, who has the type of animal that would have a queen? I have a bee, what type of animal can live in any climate?

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 58

I have humans, what type of animal communicates by dancing? I have insects, who has a type of animal that provides milk for its¶ young? I have mammals, who has an animal that hibernates?

I have a bear, who has an extinct animal?

I have a dinosaur, who has an insect?

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 59

3.B.1.a Use magnifying instruments to observe parts of a variety of living things, such as leaves, seeds, insects, worms, etc. to describe (drawing or text) parts seen with the magnifier. Resources to Support 3.B.1.a
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 2-6 Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 60

3.B.1.b Use information gathered from observations to compare the descriptions (drawings or text) of the different parts seen.

Resources to Support 3.B.1.b
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 2-6 Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.
WCPS 2010-2011 Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 61

Writing About Science

The baby dolphins are hungry! They¶re supposed to be eating fish, but they don¶t know what fish look like. Help the baby dolphins by describing a fish. Be sure to tell about the shapes of the fish¶s body parts and about all of its colors.

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 62

Writing About Science

We know stories sometimes give plants and animals attributes they don¶t really have. Write a story about how the zebra got its real stripes (vary this to fit an animal familiar to students).

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 63

3.B.1.c Describe some of the ideas or questions that might result from examining organisms more closely.

Resources to Support 3.B.1.c
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Page 2-6 Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.
WCPS 2010-2011 Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education

P a g e 64

3.B.2.a Gather information and direct evidence that humans and other animals have different body parts used to seek, find, and take in food.

Resources to Support 3.B.2.a
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus Safari Montage

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.

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Lesson Seeds

How do animals eat? Have the students create models of different mouth structures. For example, using a clothes pin for a bird, straw for a butterfly, tongue depressor with tape for frog, etc.

Observing that the physical characteristics of birds are related to the food they eat ~ Select pictures of birds on the basis of their bills and/or feet. Discuss how certain characteristics seen are as specialized for gathering and eating certain foods. Bill is like a long pointed nail ~ useful for digging into tough tree bark to pull out insects (woodpecker). Bill is small, short, and pointed ~ useful for cracking open seeds and nuts (canary meadowlark). Bill is like a sharp hook ~ useful for tearing meat from the bones of animals (owl, hawk). Bill is like a shovel ~ useful for scooping plants and small fish from water (duck, swan). Feet have long toes, two forward and two backward ~ useful for holding onto vertical tree trunk (woodpecker). Feet have short, curved toes, three forward and one backward ~ useful for perching on round tree limbs (robin, swallow). Feet have sharp talons ~ useful for grasping and holding animals securely (eagle, hawk). Feet are webbed ~ useful for paddling in water and walking on mud (duck, pelican).

On the basis of bills and feet, students can tentatively sort bird pictures into categories as seed-eaters, insect-eaters, and meat-eaters. Let them check their classifications by researching various bird books. Resource:Everyday Science Thinking, Lowery
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Observing that the physical characteristics and actions of animals are related to their acquisition of food ~ Let students look at numerous pictures of animals and discuss the types of food each eats and whether or not each has a physical characteristic or ability that enables it to capture and eat the food. For example, meat eaters and plant-eaters have teeth specially adapted for the type of food each eats; the long neck of a giraffe enables it to feed on high leaves in trees; the sacks on the legs of bees enable them to carry pollen to their hives. Resource:Everyday Science Thinking, Lowery

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Writing About Science

Find pictures of the following animals and draw their teeth: a cow, a dog, a rabbit, and a shark. Think about the foods each animal eats. Then write down how each animal¶s teeth help them chew the food they eat.

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3.B.2.b Investigate and identify parts of the body that alert humans and other animals to danger and help them to fight, hide or get out of danger.

Resources to Support 3.B.2.a
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.
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Writing About Science

Why do snakes slither? Why does a bird fly? Choose any animal and describe how that animal moves. Make sure to explain why this type of movement best suits this animal in its environment.

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3.B.2.c Describe some parts of plants and describe what they do for the plant.

Resources to Support 3.B.2.c
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: New Plants

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 85-97 Grade 2

Notes

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.

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3.B.2.d Respond, giving reasons to support the response, to the statement ³All living things are made of parts.´

Resources to Support 3.B.2.d
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.
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3.C.1.a Examine a variety of populations of plants and animals (including humans), to identify ways that individual members of that population are different from one another.

Resources to Support 3.C.1.a
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.
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3.C.1.b Make a list of possible advantages and disadvantages of differences of individuals in a population of organisms.

Resources to Support 3.C.1.b
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Investigation 1 Parts 1-2 Investigation 3 Parts 1-3 Investigation 5 Parts 1-3 Investigation 6 Parts 1-2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.
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3.C.2.a Examine a variety of living things and their offspring and describe what each parent and offspring look like.

Resources to Support 3.C.2.a
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Investigation 1 Part 2 Investigation 3 Part 2 Investigation 5 Part 2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.

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Writing About Science

A farmyard kitten has become separated from his mother. He asks a chick, a pig, and a horse if they are his mother. Write a song that starts ³You¶re a kitten not a chicken and let me tell you why. A chicken has«You¶re a kitten not a pig and let me tell you why. A pig has«´

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3.C.2.b Identify similarities and differences among the offspring and between the offspring and each parent.

Resources to Support 3.C.2.b
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Investigation 1 Part 2 Investigation 3 Part 2 Investigation 5 Part 2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.

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Office of Elementary Education

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Lesson Seeds
Observing that animals reproduce their kind ~ Have students find pictures of animals and their young (e.g., deer and fawn, bear and cub, horse and colt, bird and fledgling). They can describe the characteristics of the adults and the young. Have them make a list of the traits that are present in both parents and offspring. Resource:The Everyday Science Resource, Lowery

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Writing About Science

A mother cat doesn¶t recognize one of the babies because it is a different color from the rest of the other kittens. Write her a letter informing her that, though some of her kittens will vary in their coloring and markings, they are still hers. Remind her that kittens don¶t have to look exactly like their mother.

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3.C.2.c Based on observations, construct an appropriate response to the question ³Are parents and offspring more similar than they are different?´

Resources to Support 3.C.2.c
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus FOSS: Insects

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Investigation 1 Part 2 Investigation 3 Part 2 Investigation 5 Part 2 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

Safari Montage

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.

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Office of Elementary Education

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3.E.1.a Examine how organisms in a wide variety of environments to gather information on how animals satisfy their need for food. y Some animals eat only plants y Some animals eat only other animals y Some animals eat both plants and other animals Resources to Support 3.E.1.a
Name of Resource
ScienceSaurus Safari Montage

Where Can the Resource Be Found?
Pages 98-155 Eyewitness: Insects Bill Nye: Insects Rain Forest Little Creatures Who Run the World Peep: Peep¶s New Friend Beetlemania The Unknown World Bill Nye: Invertebrates Bill Nye: Forests America¶s Endangered Species: Don¶t Say Good-Bye

Notes

These videos may be used to enhance science investigations. The videos are not intended to replace investigations or to be used as a stand-alone activity. Please select chapters or segments within the videos to meet the needs of your students.

PLEASE BE SURE TO VISIT netTrekker FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. SEE DIRECTIONS ON PAGE 192.

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Writing About Science

We know that animals eat plants or other animals for food, and then they may also be eaten by bigger animals. Listen to the story of The Old Woman Who Swallowed a Fly and draw the same story using different plants, insects, and animals in sequence. After that, use the pictures to help you write a story about it.

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Materials from Insect Enhancement Resource

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Focus Question/Objective: How do scientists share their observations in a drawing? CC: 1.C.1.c Draw pictures that correctly portray at least some features of the thing being described.

Lesson Rationale During the Insect Unit, students are to record their observations about their insects. Students will be more successful if they are given the opportunity to see good models of scientific drawings and create a classroom rubric before they begin the insect unit.

Materials Needed y y y y y y Overhead or Document Camera Copy Bee Drawing for each group Additional examples of scientific drawings (See your library or the FOSS Science Stories) Student Copy of Drawing Paper Copy of Rubric Zip lock bags with 6 tinker toys or objects such as cars, silk flowers, etc.

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Lesson Seed 1. As scientists we make observations. It is important that we record our observations. One of the ways we can record our observations is with drawings. Today we are going to observe and record with a drawing. Before we begin I want us to look at some drawing others have done so that we can determine what our drawings should include. 2. Sharing example of scientist drawings. ~ Bee ~ Look at this drawing. Do you think it is a good drawing? Why or why not? Students talk in their groups. (Students should determine that it is a good drawing since it is a clear drawing and all the parts are labeled.) 3. I found some books with pictures and drawings. Let·s look at an example of a scientists drawing. Is this a good drawing? Why or why not? 4. Introduce rubric ~ have students help determine what is a great drawing, a good, an ok, and a not good drawing for the rubric. (Example: Great- Drawing is clear, all parts labeled with additional detailed information, Good -Drawing is clear and all parts are labeled, Ok ± Drawing is somewhat clear or clear but some the parts are not labeled, Not Good ± Drawing is unclear and many parts are not labeled.) 5. Each group will get a bag of items. You will have 1 minute to look at the items and select an item you want to draw or you may choose to draw something from your classroom or from home. 6. Set the time for 1 minute. Distribute drawing paper as students are selecting an object. 7. You will now have 10 minutes to complete make an observation and complete your drawing. While you are working music will be playing and, we should be able to hear the music. Your voices are too loud if I can·t hear the music. 8. Teacher circulates and refers the students to the rubric ~ good vs. great 9. Closure: Would someone like to share their drawing and tell us what they would score their drawing and why? ~ At the carpet depending on time. Assessment: Use rubric to score drawings ~ have the students revise their drawings

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How do scientists share their observations in a drawing?

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Object: BEE

Antennae Head

Eye

Abdomen

Wing

WCPS 2010-2011

Stinger

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Name of Object:

My Score
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Assessment

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Name _____________________ Insect Pre-Assessment

Directions: Read the questions. Color in the circle beside each correct answer. You may color in more than one circle.

1. six

How many legs does an insect have? four

eight ten
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2. How many parts does an insect·s body have? two three four five

3. Which two of these animals are insects? worm spider fly bee

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4. What do we call a group of ants living together? class colony family pack

5. Which three of these things do insects eat? fruit trash metal wood

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6. What do we call the larva of a butterfly? katydid caterpillar cocoon earthworm

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Name ______________________ Insect Chart

Directions: Complete the chart to show what you know about insects. Insect Name What It Eats Where It Lives An Interesting Fact

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Name _____________________

Directions: Use the Venn diagram to compare 2 insects you have observed.

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Observation Calendar

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Insect Observations for: ____________________________

Month:

(Circle One)

March

April

May Wednesday _____ Thursday _____ Friday _____

Monday _____

Tuesday _____

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Centers

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Insect Stories

Directions: Write a fictional story about one of the insects in our classroom. In your story be sure to include 3 interesting facts about your insect.

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Reading About Insects

Directions: Pick a book from the basket to read. Complete the News Flash organizer. Share your News Flash with a friend.
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Name____________________________

NEWS FLASH

Today I read about ______________________. Here are three interesting facts from my reading.

1. 2. 3.

___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________

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Scientific Drawing

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Reading Insect Stories

Directions: Pick a book from the basket to read. Complete the organizer. Share your organizer with a friend.

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Name ____________________________

Title of Story: _________________________ Today I read about _______________________. This insect is like a real insect because« This insect is not like a real insect because«

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You won·t believe what·s in my jar! Lesson Seed
Objective: The students will use the details from their observation calendars to write riddles about insects.

Lesson Description: After the students have observed all the insects from the unit, have them use their observation calendars to write riddles about an insect they choose. Students can trade riddles and guess which insect the riddle is about. Assessment: Students are able to write riddles with good hints based on the clear observations recorded on the observation calendar.

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Mealworm Measure Up! Lesson Seed with Math Component
Objective: The students will use objects to compare measurement to the nearest centimeter.

Lesson Description: This lesson incorporates math with science. The students use their mealworm as a benchmark measurement to find other objects in their environment that are longer or shorter than their mealworm. This lesson can be done with other insects as the benchmark and the use of measurement to the nearest inch.

Assessment: Students are able to correctly identify objects that are longer or shorter than their mealworm. Name _________________________
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Mealworms Measure Up!

Now that you and your mealworm are friends, it·s time to measure up«.

My mealworm measures ________centimeters long.

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Items longer than my mealworm

Items shorter than my mealworm

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Insect Time Line

Extension Idea

:

The insects will change as time passes. You may want to make a time line in addition to keeping a calendar. Get a long strip of paper (adding-machine tape or strips of paper taped together), divide it into equal-sized squares, and number the squares starting with 0. Time lines may extend 70, 80, or more days. Copy the insect images from the stages posters. Cut and paste the images of each observed change in the proper place on the time line.

Mealworm

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

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Insect Hunt

Extension Idea

:

Either as a whole-class activity around the school or as an individual activity at home, have students look for and keep track of insects they see. Instruct students to only observe the insects, not collect them. Students can record their findings on an insect-hunt chart like the one on the next page. Students can draw a picture or list the name of the insect and list the places they saw it.

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Name _________________________

Insect Hunt

Insect

Where I Found It

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Seek and Find Insects

Extension Idea

:

Have the students draw a garden scene with flowers, trees, grass, and so forth. Have them include insects ~ some that are brightly colored and some that are camouflaged. Students can exchange drawings to see if they find each other·s camouflaged insects.

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Invent an Insect
Extension Idea

:

Ask students to use what they know about insects to design a new insect. They may create any type of insect as long as it has the characteristics of an insect (three body parts and six legs.) Remind students to think about whether their insect will have features that camouflage or advertise it. Students can name and label their insect. Students can also write a brief description of their insect.

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Beetle
Sue Chehrenegar

The beetle crawls on leaf and twig, Not caring that it isn't big. It eats its fill, and then, well fed, The beetle, its elytra spread, Does fly to other bush or tree, Where more morsels it hopes to see.

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Bugs
By Meish Goldish
(to the tune of "When the Saints Go Marching In")

Oh, when the bugs go marching in, marching in, and the beetles, marching in. Oh, Oh, Oh, Oh, when the bugs begin to crawl, when the bugs begin to crawl, how I'll see the roaches and termites, when the bugs begin to crawl.

Oh, when the bugs go Oh, how I'll see the ants Oh, when the bugs go

Oh, when the bugs come flying in, flying in, and mosquitoes, flying in. Oh, Oh, Oh, Oh, when the bugs begin to buzz, when the bugs begin to buzz, how I'll hear the bees and cicadas, when the bugs begin to buzz.

Oh, when the bugs come Oh, how I'll see the moths Oh, when the bugs come

Oh, when the bugs begin to leap, to leap, and the crickets, to leap!

Oh, when the bugs begin Oh, how I'll see the fleas Oh, when the bugs begin

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Caterpillars Brod Bagert

They came like dew drops overnight Eating every plant in sight, Those nasty worms with legs that crawl So creepy up the garden wall Green prickly fuzz to hurt and sting Each unsuspecting living thing. How I hate them! Oh, you know I'd love to squish them with my toe. But then I see past their disguise, Someday they'll all be butterflies.

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Cricket by Mary Ann Hoberman

A cricket's ear is in its leg, A cricket's chirp is in its wing. A cricket's wing can sing a song. A cricket's leg can hear it sing.

Imagine if your leg could hear. Imagine if your ear could walk. Imagine if your arm could talk.

Would everything feel upside down And inside out and wrong side through? Imagine how the world would seem If you became a cricket, too.
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Crickets
Helen Wing

What makes the crickets "crick" all night And never stop to rest? They must take naps in daytime So at night they'll "crick" their best. I wonder if they just take turns And try to make it rhyme' Or do a million crickets Keep "cricking" all the time?

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Every Insect
by Dorothy Aldis

Every insect (ant, fly, bee) Is divided into three: One head, one chest, one stomach part. Some have brains. All have a heart. Insects have no bones No noses. But with feelers they can smell Dinner half a mile away. Can your nose do half as well? Also you'd be in a fix With all those legs to manage: Six.

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Firefly
Meish Goldish

Firefly, firefly, Wow, how you glow! Under your body You light up below! Firefly, firefly, Wow, how you shine! At night in the dark I can see you just fine!

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Fly
A fly flies by, quicker than the eye! On two thin wings, it darts up high. Those tiny wings can really fly! Beating 200 times a second - oh, my! The fly goes Buzz as it flaps in the air. The Buzz you hear are the wings going by! So if a fly ever catches your eye Don't ask why it buzzes - you now know why!

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Grasshopper
Hop, Hop, Hop My, what strength A grasshopper hops Twenty times its length Hop in the grass Or on a single blade, Hop in the sun Or hop in the shade. Farmer says, "Grasshopper, Stay off my crop!" There goes the grasshopper, HOP, HOP, HOP

WCPS 2010-2011

Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education THE ANTS CAME MARCHING
The ants came marching one by one, Hurrah! Hurrah! The ants came marching one by one, Hurrah! Hurrah! The ants came marching one by one The little one stopped to suck his thumb. They all go marching down around the town. Boom, Boom, Boom. The ants came marching two by two, Hurrah! Hurrah! The ants came marching two by two, Hurrah! Hurrah! The ants came marching two by two The little one stopped to tie his shoe. They all go marching down around the town. Boom, Boom, Boom. Other Verses: The ants came marching three by three... The little one stopped to climb a tree. The ants came marching four by four.... The little one stopped to shut the door.... The ants came marching five by five... The little one stopped to take a dive... The ants came marching six by six.... The little one stopped to pick up sticks.... The ants came marching seven by seven.... The little one stopped to say 'my heaven'... The ants came marching eight by eight... The little one stopped to shut the gate... The ants came marching nine by nine... The little one stopped to scratch his spine... The ants came marching ten by ten The little one stopped to say THE END!

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The Insects' World Ethel Jacobson Insects are creatures with three pairs of legs, Some swim, some fly; they lay millions of eggs. They don't wear their skeletons in, but out. They come in three parts. Some are bare; some have hair. Their hearts are in back; they circulate air. They smell with their feelers and taste with their feet, And there's scarcely a thing that some insects won't eat: Flowers and woodwork and books and rugs, Overcoats, people, and other bugs. When five billion trillion keep munching each day, It's a wonder the world isn't nibbled away!

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Ants The busy ant works hard all day, And does not stop to rest or play. He carries things ten times his size, And never pouts, or whines, or cries. And even climbing flower stalks, He always runs, he never walks. He loves his work, he¶s always ready. He¶s never out-of-breath or sweaty. And even though I¶m amazed by him, I¶m really not very fond of him.

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Baby Seeds

In a milkweed cradle, snug and warm, Baby seeds are hiding, safe from harm. Open wide the cradle, hold it way up high, Come along now wind, help them fly.

Tune: ´If You·re Happy and You Know Itµ

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The Beetle

Beetle, beetle up in the tree, Fly down and show your armor to me! Shiny brown, black, or green, You're the toughest bug I've ever seen!
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Changes
I'm a little mealworm, Short and wiggly. Here's my antenna, Cute and jiggly. Now I am a pupa, Squat and white. How did this happen? I'm a sight. Now I am a beetle. What is this? I really hate Metamorphosis. Jon Scieszka

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Fuzzy Wuzzy Fuzzy, wuzzy, creepy, crawly, Caterpillar funny, You will be a butterfly When the days are sunny.
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Grasshopper

The first grasshopper jumped right over the second grasshopper¶s back.

Oh, the first grasshopper jumped right over the second grasshopper¶s back.
The first grasshopper jumped right over the second grasshopper¶s back.

Oh, the first grasshopper jumped right over the second grasshopper¶s back. They were only playing leapfrog. They were only playing leapfrog. They were only playing leapfrog.
When the first grasshopper jumped right over the second grasshopper·s back.
(Tune: ´Battle Hymn of the Republicµ)

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Unit Vocabulary
Please note the following:

y These words are suggested vocabulary words. Please continue to make instructional decisions about vocabulary words you feel your students may or may not need. y At the bottom of each vocabulary card is coded. U3I1 stands for Unit 3 Investigation 1. U3SC stands for Unit 3 State Curriculum. y Vocabulary should be reviewed at the end of each investigation and identified in the content/inquiry chart. y Science vocabulary may be added to the Word Wall. Have your students help you determine at the end of the module what words should be displayed on the Word Wall. y If you choose not to add the vocabulary words to your Word Wall, be sure these words are displayed where they are visible to all students during the time the unit is being taught.

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mealworm air
U3I1

U3I1

water food
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U3I1

U3I1

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space

U3I1

segment antenna
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U3I1

U3I1

droppings

U3I1

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leg

U3I1

molt larva pupa
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U3I1

U3I1

U3I1

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adult head
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U3I1

darkling beetle
U3I1

U3I1

thorax

U3I1

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abdomen wing egg
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U3I1 U3I1

U3I1

life cycle

U3I1

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living dead

U3I1

U3I1

insect
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U3I3

milkweed bugs

U3I3

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water fountain hatch nymph
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U3I3

U3I3

U3I3

habitat

U3I3

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molting male
U3I3

U3I3

female mating
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U3I3

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proboscis bug
U3I3

U3I3

caterpillar
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U3I5

painted lady

U3I5

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waste

U3I5

butterfly nectar cricket
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U3I5

U3I6

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chirping ant
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U3I6

ovipositor
U3I6

U3I6

tunnel

U3I6

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mosquito diving
U3I6

U3I6

swimming floating
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Ongoing Vocabulary From the State Curriculum

organisms food
U3SC

U3SC

matter
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energy

U3SC

observe

U3SC

investigation
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mealworm air
1

1

mealworm air
1

1

water food space
1

1

water food
1

1

1

space
1

1

segment antenna
1

segment antenna
1 1

1

droppings leg
1

droppings leg
1

1

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molt larva pupa adult

1

molt
1

1

larva pupa

1

1

1

1

adult
1

1

darkling beetle head
1

darkling beetle head
1

1

thorax

1

thorax
1

1

abdomen wing
1

abdomen wing
1

1

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egg

1

egg
1

1

life cycle living dead insect
1

life cycle living dead
1

1

1

1

3

insect
3

3

milkweed bugs water fountain hatch nymph
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3

milkweed bugs water fountain hatch
3

3

3

3

3

nymph

3

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habitat molting male
3

3

habitat
3

3

molting male
3

3

female mating
3

3

female mating
3 3

3

proboscis bug
3

proboscis bug
3

3

caterpillar

5

caterpillar
5

5

painted lady
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painted lady

5

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proboscis waste
5

5

proboscis waste
5

5

butterfly nectar cricket
5

5

butterfly nectar
5

5

6

cricket
6

6

chirping

chirping
6

6

ovipositor ant
6

ovipositor ant
6

6

tunnel
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tunnel

6

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mosquito diving
6

6

mosquito diving
6

6

swimming floating
6

6

swimming floating
6

6

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Careers in Life Science

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Physiology

What is Physiology? Check out the APS Careers web site find out about physiology and what physiologists do. http://www.the-aps.org/careers/careers1/index.htm

Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry

Learn more from the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology http://www.sicb.org/divisions/dcpb.php3

All Kinds of Scientists!

Careers of real people doing science on the job. Check out this site at NIH, for interviews with scientists of all areas of study, from immunology to neuropathology to oncology to genetics. http://science-education.nih.gov/snapshots.nsf/Titles?openform&pds~

Agricultural Science

Agricultural scientists study farm crops and animals and develop ways of improving their quantity and quality - and use principles of biology, chemistry, physics, math, and other sciences in their jobs. Visit this site to find out more about careers in agriculture. http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos046.htm#nature

Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of human behavior. Work in a museum, out in the field or in forensics! http://anthropology.nku.edu/ http://www.medicalandnursing-training.com/medic/careers-in-anthropology.html

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Astrobiology

What is Astrobiologist - and how do I become one? http://www.astrobiology.com/how.to.html

Biology

What kinds of jobs do biologists have? http://www.aibs.org/careers/index.html You can also check out this web site for careers in neurobiology, ecology, vertebrate morphology, biochemistry, endocrinology, and lots more! http://www.sicb.org/divisions/ What do you need to succeed in biomedical research? Brains? Hard work? Luck? Some of the world's most prominent biomedical researchers may surprise you with their answers. http://www.hhmi.org/scientist/index.html

Biomedical Research

Browse for information on more than 100 medical science and health careers by title, education required, interest area, or median salary. Also, check out the "Career Finder" to generate a customized list of careers especially suited for your skills and interests. http://science.education.nih.gov/LifeWorks Meet Dr. Barry Bloom - Medical Researcher/Immunologist, Howard Hughes Medical Institute http://www.accessexcellence.org/AB/CC/bloom.html Meet a Biotechology Science Writer - Stephen Hall http://www.accessexcellence.org/AB/CC/hall.html Nobel laureate in physics, and leading advocate for reform of science education - Leon Lederman http://www.accessexcellence.org/AB/CC/lederman.html Meet Dr. Maxine Singer, President of the Carnegie Institution in Washington and active researcher at the National Institutes of Health http://www.accessexcellence.org/AB/CC/singer.html

Biotechnology

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Botany

What is Botany? Why Choose a Career in Botany? How to Prepare for a Career in Botany. http://www.botany.org/bsa/careers/

Chemistry

What kinds of jobs does a chemist do? What education do I need to be a chemist? http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos049.htm

Ecology

Ecology is the branch of science studying interactions and relationships between organisms and their environment. Check out this web site for Career & Funding Opportunities in Ecology http://www.esa.org/careers_certification/employment.php

Endocrinology
http://www.sicb.org/divisions/dce.php3

Entomology

If you like to study bugs, then check out these web sites! http://www.entsoc.org/resources/education/index.htm

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Careers in Genetics and the Biosciences http://www.ornl.gov/hgmis/education/careers.html What is genetics? Check out this site for profiles of scientists working in the genetics field http://www.faseb.org/genetics/gsa/careers/bro-menu.htm Meet James Watson, Ph.D. - co-discoverer of the structure of DNA with Francis Crick http://www.accessexcellence.org/AB/CC/watson.html

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Genetics

Meet Eric Lander - Associate Professor of Biology & Director, Center for Genome Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts. http://www.accessexcellence.org/AB/CC/lander.html Meet a Geneticist - Neil Holtzman, M.D., M.P.H. http://www.accessexcellence.org/AB/CC/holtzman.html Find Your Future in Genetics and Genomics http://www.genome.gov/GenomicCareers/ From the National Human Genome Research Institute Microbiologists study living organisms, called microbes, that are so small they must be viewed with a microscope. Microbiologists explore, investigate and discover how these organisms exist - and how they affect our lives. http://www.microbe.org/pages/split5.htm http://www.microbe.org/pages/split2.htm Stalking the Mysterious Microbe! Find out all about microbiology - and what microbiologists do! http://www.microbe.org/ From this site students can access a variety of career resources - including a student planning guide to grad school and beyond. http://www.asm.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=369&Itemid=287

Microbiology

Molecular Biology with the study of DNA to the study of how different chemicals form together to make cells, and
how those cells work together to build large organisms. http://www.asbmb.org/ then click on "Publications" - then click on "career brochure"

The study of molecules - from bacteria and yeast, to plants, amphibians and mammals. Beginning

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Vertebrate Morphology

http://www.sicb.org/divisions/dvm.php3

Oncology is an area of medicine that deals with the study and treatment of cancer.

Oncology

Career profile of an Oncology Nurse http://www.stjohn.org/CareerProfiles/oncnur/ Two articles from the UK publication, BMJ Career Focus: Training in Clinical Oncology http://careers.bmj.com/careers/advice/view-article.html?id=725 A career in oncology http://careers.bmj.com/careers/advice/advice-overview.html

Neurobiology

http://www.sicb.org/careers/neuro.php3 From the "Neuroscience for Kids" web site http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/csem.html

Paleontology

Advice for students and parents and the high school background needed are some of the career and informational brochures available from this web site. http://www.priweb.org/ed/lol/careers.html

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Parasitology

The study of parasites as viruses, bacteria, protists, worms, insects, http://asp.unl.edu.

Photobiology

Photobiology is that branch of biological science which studies the interactions of light with living organisms. http://www.pol-us.net/ASP_Home/index.html

Plant Pathology & Plant Taxonomists

What is a Plant Pathologist? A plant pathologist specializes in plant health and requires an understanding of the organisms that cause disease. Plant Pathologists learn how plants grow and are affected by disease. Taxonomists study of the kinds of organisms of the past and living today, and of the relationships among these organisms. http://www.apsnet.org/careers/careers.asp

Space Scientists Not all Space Scientists are astronomers!

Check out this site to find out what kinds of scientists work and conduct research in space science! http://science.nasa.gov/spacescience.htm

Veterinary Science

http://www.aavmc.org/ http://netvet.wustl.edu/vcareer.htm http://www.aavmc.org/VetProfilessplash.htm

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Invertebrate Zoology

htthttp://www.sicb.org/divisions/diz.php3p://www.sicb.org/divisions/diz.php3

Resource:http://www.the-aps.org/education/k-12misc/careers.htm

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Sorts (Also known as concept attainment)

Students can use sorting mats to categorize pictures and words. Students identify characteristics that match the categories and their discussions about their sorts demonstrate a deeper understanding of the content. How do you do sorts? Cut out each picture or word. Pose the question from the top of the page. Sort the pictures and/or words into the yes or no column on the sorting mat.

For Example:

What are foods we can eat?

Yes

No

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Yes

No

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Where Do Insects Live?

Under Water

In Fields

In Ponds

Near Rivers

In Desks

On Shoes

Under Ground On Other Animals

In Computers

At the Beach

In the Jungle

In Houses

In Books

In Plants

In Homes They Have Made

In Coffee Pots

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Which are insects?

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How do insects move?
Walk Run Skip Fly

Gallop Flip Jump

Swim

Crawl

Slither

Dance

Hop

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What do insects eat?
Trash Dead Animals Tires Other Insects

Books Blood Fruit Plants

Wood

Rocks

Seeds

Nails

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How do insects protect themselves?
Hide Bite Sting Covered with Spines

Stink

Smile

Scream

Scare their Enemies

Hard Body

Fly Away or Jump

Karate

Taste Bad

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Investigation 1 Part 1 1. Mealworms need air, water, food, heat, and space. 2. Live insects should be handed with respect and care.

Investigation 1 Part 2 1. Mealworms molt as they grow. 2. Mealworms stay the same as they molt and grow. 3. Mealworms go through stages ~ larva, pupa, adult.

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Investigation 3 Part 3 1. Milkweed bugs need air, water, space, and sunflower seeds to grow. 2. Milkweed bugs molt so they can eat. 3. Bugs eat with a tongue-like mouth. 4. Females lay many small eggs.

Investigation 5 Part 1 1. Caterpillars need air, water, food, and space. 2. Caterpillars have segments, a head, 4 legs, and prolegs. 3. Caterpillars make silk. 4. Caterpillars have bristles and colors.
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Investigation 5 Part 3

1. Painted lady caterpillars pupate in a chrysalis. 2. Butterflies drink sugar water from the fountain the same way bugs drink water. 3. Butterflies have complete metamorphosis: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

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Literature in the Science Classroom
³The use of literature in the science classroom enhances student understanding of scientific concepts. Literature can expose students to lives of real and fictitious people who were instrumental in scientific discovery or who have applied scientific ideas to real-life situations.´ Resource: Fossweb.com

³Children should be encouraged to use many different books to learn about science. A book can be the expert to refer to for an answer or clarification, or a book can spark an interest or an investigation. More often, however, books, simply serve to deepen a child¶s understanding of some familiar topic, helping them to make increasing sense of the world and function more confidently in it.´ Resource: Science and Language Links, Johanna Scott

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Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle

100 Things you should know about insects and spiders by Steve Parker

The Diary of A Fly by Doreen Cronin

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The Napping House by Audrey Woods

Fireflies by Julie Brinkloe

The Very Lonely Firefly by Eric Carle

Ten Little Ladybugs by Melanie Gerth

The Very Quiet Cricket by Eric Carle

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One Hundred Hungry Ants by Elinor J. Pinzzes

Prilla and the Butterfly Lie by Kitty Richards

Good Night Sweet Butterflies: A Color Dreamland by Dawn Bentley

Hey, Little Ant by Phillip M. Hoose

Oh Beyond Bugs, All About Insects by Dr. Suess WCPS 2010-2011 Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

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I Saw an Ant on the Railroad Track by Joshua Prince

Are You a Ladybug? By Judy Allen

From Caterpillar to Butterfly by Deborah Heiligman

Buzz-Buzz, Busy Bees by Dawn Bentley

Ant Cities by Arthur Dorros

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Bugs! By David T. Greenberg

The Bee Tree by Patricia Polacco

Monarch Butterfly by Gail Gibbons

Are you a Butterfly? By Judy Allen

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A Fly Went By by Mike McClintock

Ladybug¶s Birthday by Steve Metzger

The Big Honey Hunt by Stan Berenstain

The Magic School Bus Inside A Beehive: (Magic School Bus Series)by Joanna Cole

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What Do Insects Do? By Susan Canizaras

The Ant Elephant by Bill Peet

Charlie the Caterpillar by Dom Deluise

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Book List Provided By FOSSweb.com
Ants Author: Cheryl Coughlan Description: Simple text and photographs present the features of this insect. Related books and Internet sites are listed in the back of each book. Ants Author: Margaret Hall Description: Simple text and photographs describe the physical characteristics and habits of ants. Ants Author: Deirdre A. Prischmann Description: A brief introduction to ants, discussing their characteristics, habitat, life cycle, and predators. Includes a range map, life cycle illustration, and amazing facts. Beetles Author: Cheryl Coughlan Description: Simple text and photographs present the features of this insect. Related books and Internet sites are listed in the back of each book. Beetles Author: Deirdre A. Prischmann Description: A brief introduction to beetles, discussing their characteristics, habitat, life cycle, and predators. Includes a range map, life-cycle illustration, and facts. Bug Faces Author: Darlyne A. Murawski escription: The full-page photographs in this book introduce the physical structures that are unique to certain bugs. Bugs For Lunch Author: Margery Facklam Description: Children learn about insectivorous creatures, presented in simple verse and close-up double-page color illustrations. WCPS 2010-2011 Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education Bumble Bee Author: Fran Howard Description: Simple text and photographs describe the physical characteristics of bumble bees. Bumble Bees Author: Cheryl Coughlan Description: Simple text and photographs present the features of this insect. Related books and Internet sites are listed in the back of each book.

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Butterflies Author: Gail Saunders-Smith Description: Part of the Animal series, Butterflies describes the life cycle of the butterfly, using simple text and photographs. Related books and Internet sites are listed in the back. Butterflies Author: Fran Howard Description: Simple text and photographs describe the physical characteristics of butterflies Butterflies and Moths Author: James P. Rowan Description: Discusses the characteristics and natural history of the scaly-winged insects of the order Lepidoptra Crickets Author: Cheryl Coughlan Description: Simple text and photographs present the features of this insect. Related books and Internet sites are listed in the back of each book. Crickets Author: Margaret Hall Description: Simple text and photographs describe the physical characteristics and habits of crickets. The Handy Bug Answer Book Author: Gilbert Waldbauer Description: Answers to nearly 1000 frequently asked questions about insects, arachnids, and other arthropods. Questions are grouped into 19 topical chapters.

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Office of Elementary Education P a g e 187 How To Hide A Butterfly And Other Insects Author: Ruth Heller Description: Discover a beautiful butterfly, a feeding praying mantis, and a variety of other intriguing insects as they play a clever game of hide-and-seek. The Icky Bug Alphabet Book Author: Jerry Pallotta Description: Describes characteristics and activities of insects and other crawly creatures from A to Z, beginning with ants and ended with zebra butterflies. The Icky Bug Counting Book Author: Jerry Pallotta Description: This book helps children discover intriguing facts about the world of bugs and insects. The lighthearted text and vivid illustrations make this alphabetical and counting exploration of small animal life both informative and entertaining. Full color. Insects Author: Robin Bernard Description: Close-up photographs of a variety of insects introduce the body parts and other characteristics that are common to many kinds of insects. Insects Author: Adele Richardson Description: Discusses the characteristics, eating habits, and offspring of insects. The Ladybug And Other Insects Author: Gallimard Jeunesse, Pascale de Bourgoing Description: Colorful illustrations and overlays show a ladybug laying eggs on a leaf, larvae turning into mature insects, and more. Lifetimes: A Beautiful Way To Explain Death To Children Author: Bryan Mellonie, Robert Ingpen Description: Explains life and death in a sensitive and caring way. Mealworms Author: Donna Schaffer Description: Describes the physical characteristics, habitats, and stages of development of mealworms. Includes table of contents, index, glossary and more resources. Simple, engaging format that hooks the reader with close-ups images. WCPS 2010-2011 Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Office of Elementary Education P a g e 188 Milkweed Bugs Author: Donna Schaffer Description: Describes the physical characteristics, habitats, and stages of development of large milkweed bugs. Includes table of contents, index, glossary and more resources. Simple, engaging format that hooks the reader with close-ups images. Monarch Butterfly Author: Gail Gibbons Description: Describes the life cycle, body parts, and behavior of the monarch butterfly. Includes instructions on how to raise a monarch. Moths Author: Fran Howard Description: Simple text and photographs describe the physical characteristic of moths. Painted Lady Butterflies Author: Donna Schaffer Description: Describes the physical characteristics, habitats, and stages of development of painted lady butterflies. Includes table of contents, index, glossary and more resources. Simple, engaging format that hooks the reader with close-ups images. Thinking About Ants Author: Barbara Brenner Description: This book enco Under One Rock: Bugs, Slugs, and Other Ughs Author: Anthony D. Fredericks Description: A little boy discovers a whole new environment of animals under a rock. The story is told in cumulative, rhyming text and weaves in scientific facts. Once There Was A Tree Author: Natalia Romanova Description: This Russian story explores how life continues in the stump of a tree as it attracts a variety of insects, plants, and animals (including humans).

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Office of Elementary Education P a g e 189 The Very Clumsy Click Beetle Author: Eric Carle Description: This popular series introduces children to the world of insects through simple tales of struggle and unique illustrations. The very clumsy click beetle has no trouble with the clicking and flipping part, but it does have trouble landing on its feet. The young beetle tries and tries again, encouraged by an ambling turtle, a slithering snail, and a scurrying mouse. Finally, when a curious boy approaches, the beetle takes coaching from a wise old click beetle The Very Hungry Caterpillar Author: Eric Carle Description: Describes the life cycle of a voracious caterpillar. It eats fruits and vegetables through the days of the week and in the end emerges as a beautiful butterfly. The Very Quiet Cricket Author: Eric Carle Description: This popular series introduces children to the world of insects through simple tales of struggle and unique illustrations. A cricket is born who cannot talk! A bigger cricket welcomes him to the world, then a locust, a cicada, and many other insects, but each time the tiny cricket rubs his wings together in vain: no sound emerges. In the end, however, he meets another quiet cricket, and manages to find his "voice." Familiar Insects And Spiders: North America Author: John Farrand, Jr., National Audubon Society Description: Photographs illustrate this guidebook to familiar insects and spiders. Animal Defenses Author: Jean C. Echols Description: Beginning with an imaginary defenseless animal, this highly visual unit teaches children about defensive adaptations in the animal world. Like Hide a Butterfly, this is an excellent way to introduce biological concepts of predator/prey and help youngsters distinguish between defensive structures and behaviors Ant Homes Under The Ground Author: Jean C. Echols, Kimi Hosoume, Jaine Kopp Description: These delightful science- and math-integrated activities introduce young children to ant behavior using role-play, cooperative exercises, and close observation of live ants. A large poster is assembled in stages to highlight ant tunnels, food, social structure, and life cycle.

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Hide A Butterfly Author: Jean C. Echols Description: This guide introduces children to the basic concepts of protective coloration as they learn to identify parts of a flower, create a nature-scene mural, learn about butterflies, and talk about animals they may have seen in the wild. Insects Author: Bettina Bird, Joan Short Description: There are more insects in the world than all other species of animals put together. How have they managed to survive and thrive? This book explains why, plus much more about these fascinating creatures. Animal Behavior (OBIS) Description: A collection of outdoor activities designed to supplement the basic classroom science curriculum. Some activities include: The Old White Sheet Trick: By attracting night-flying insects to a brightly lit surface and conducting other light-related experiments, the youngsters discover how light affects insects' behavior. Ants: The children investigate the behavior of ants. Butterflies Author: Lynn M. Stone Description: Text and photographs provide an introduction to the characteristics, habits, and behaviors of butterflies. Young students may enjoy looking at the photographs. Animals In The Classroom: Selection, Care, And Observations Author: David C. Kramer Description: A sourcebook for teachers who are interested in keeping small animals in the classroom. Includes information about the animal's natural history, obtaining the animal, housing and diet, handling, and more. Butterfly and Moth Author: Paul Whalley Description: Explores the behavior and life cycles of butterflies and moths.

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Websites

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netTrekker What is netTrekker?
netTrekker is an educational search tool for K-12 that brings digital resources into the classroom in a safe, relevant and engaging way, making it faster and easier to provide a more personalized and productive learning experience for every student.

How do I access suggested sites for this unit of instruction?

1. Login on netTrekker. (See next page for directions.) 2. On the far right side select My Portfolio under My Tools.

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3. Select District: Washington County Schools District Portfolio.

4.

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4. Select Elementary.

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5. Select Science.

6. Select your grade level. (example: Grade 1) 7. Select the folder identified by the unit of study. (example: Life (Unit 3)) 8. Select the site you wish to visit. You may select (more) to learn more about the site before leaving the Portfolio. 9. See below for special features once the site you have selected is opened. 10. To close a site, close the window the site is opened on. The Portfolio will still remain in an opened window.

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Special features for entering websites through net Trekker
y Read Aloud ~ Select the Read Aloud tab at the top of the page. Highlight any text you wish to have read aloud. The text highlighted will be read aloud. Make sure that the speaker volume is turned on through your computer settings. y Dictionary ~ Select the Dictionary tab at the top of the page. Select any word in the text. A window with definitions and translations will appear. If Read Aloud is on, the word selected will be read aloud. y Vote if you Dislike or Like the website.

See the netTrekker Quick Reference Guide for More Information

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Entomology on the World Wide Web http://entowww.tamu.edu/entoweb/ (list and gateway to many entomological sites geared towards teachers) Entomology Index of Internet Resources - Web Sites Iowa State University http://www.ent.iastate.edu/list/ (huge list and gateway to the majority of entomology resources on the internet - very comprehensive, great links - connects to almost all other major entomological sites) Entomology on the WWW http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/Entomology/ (list and gateway to many entomological sites on the internet. Not as colorful or complete as Iowa State) Fon's Bug World http://www.sirius.com/~fonzilla/insect.htm (many links to other entomological sites and to insect pictures - the homepage is strange but information and pictures are worth the stop) Iowa State University http://www.public.iastate.edu/~entomology/ (main features pertain to the Entomology Dept.'s programs, but there is a link to the use of insects as food that includes recipes) University of Kentucky - Entomology Youth Facts http://www.uky.edu/Agriculture/Entomology/ythfacts/entyouth.htm (a site designed for teachers, 4-H'ers and anyone interested in insects that has great information and ideas on insects) University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign http://www.life.uiuc.edu/Entomology/home.html (insect drawings and links to other entomology related resources and information) Web Lift to any Taxon of Organism http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/help/taxaform.html (web lift to information on any organism by scientific name and common name) Yahoo List of Entomology Sites http://www.yahoo.com/Science/Biology/Zoology/Animals__Insects__and_Pets/Insects/ (assorted list of entomological sites on the internet)
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Ants: Myrmecology http://members.aol.com/dinarda/ant/index.html (information on ants, references, and links to other sites) Entomology on the Internet http://members.aol.com/dinarda/ant/ento.htm (a good site for colorful information on entomology with an emphasis on ants and contains great links and pictures) Ant Exhibition: Living with Ants http://133.25.20.32/Harvard/ANT_MC2.html (a tour through the Harvard University Museum of Natural History including pictures and detailed descriptions of the life history of ants) Ant Lions and Lacewings The Antlion Pit - a doodlebug anthology www.antlionpit.com (everything you would want to know about antlions including culture, art, mythology, and more) Neuroweb http://entowww.tamu.edu/research/nruropterida/neuroweb.html (information on the order Neuroptera and links to other sites) Bees Gears - Bee Information http://gears.tucson.ars.ag.gov/ (contains information on current research at the Carl Haden Bee Research Center and a variety of information and pictures on many species of bees) Beekeeping http://weber.u.washington.edu/~jlks/bee.html (information an keeping bees from the University of Washington) Beetles Glowworms http://www.rfhsm.ac.uk:81/golly/glowworm.html (pictures and description of firefly larvae and adults)

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Butterflies: Monarch Watch http://www.MonarchWatch.org (a network of students, teachers, and researchers interested in investigating and monitoring the annual migration of Monarch butterflies. E-mail: monarch@falcon.cc.ukans.edu) Butterflies of the United States http://www.npsc.nbs.gov/resource/distr/lepid/bflyusa/bflyusa.htm (information and distribution maps of American butterflies) The Butterfly Web Site http://mgfx.com/butterfly (information on butterflies and butterfly gardening) Crickets and Grasshoppers The Orthopterists Society http://www.viceroy.eeb.uconn/OS_Homepage (information on the society and Orthroptera, great links to more entomology on the www) Cockroaches Cockroach World http://www.nj.com/yucky/roaches/index.html (a fun site with a wide range of information on cockroaches) Hissers/Blattodea Culture Group http://www.ex.ac.uk/~gjlramel/roach.html (general information, rearing instructions, pictures and links to other roach sites) Dragonflies British Dragonfly Society http://www.rfhsm.ac.uk:81/golly/bds.html (information on dragonflies and links to many organizations and clubs) Dragonflies http://www.ex.ac.uk/~gjlramel/odonata.html (information on dragonflies and damselflies and links to other related sites on the web)

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Flies http://www.ex.ac.uk/~gjlramel/diptera.html (great information on all of the major fly families with many links to other sites with more information) Mantis Mantis Home Page http://ns9000.furman.edu/~dksargen/PM.htm (great pictures of mantis, rearing information, good leads for general information, and insect stories and facts) Mosquitoes New Jersey Mosquitoes http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~insects/njmos.htm (wonderful section on mosquito biology and sections on diseases vectored by mosquitoes) Insects as Food Fun Insect Ideas http://www.uky.edu/Agriculture/Entomology/ythfacts/bugfood1.htm (creative cooking to simulate eating insects i.e. using raisins or nuts in food) Dr. Frog's Recipe Page http://frog.simplenet.com/froggy/recipes.shtml (cultural foods from around the world that use insects) Insect Recipes http://www.ent.iastate.edu/Misc/insectsasfood.html (collection of insect recipes) Archi McPhee Edibles http://www.mcphee.com/edibles/index.html (a fun site with insect candies and other interesting things sold through the McPhee catalog) More Insect Recipes http://www.uky.edu/Agriculture/Entomology/ythfacts/bugfood2.htm (more insect recipes)

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General Insect Information Amazing Insect Project http://www.minnetonka.k12.mn.us/SCHOOLS/groveland/insect.proj/insects.html (networking among K-12 classes, lesson plans, and activities) Book of Insect Records http://gnv.ifas.ufl.edu/~tjw/recbk.htm (detailed facts on insect feats and records) Creepy Crawlies Bibliography http://www.eduplace.com/rdg/itl/1/creepy/index.html (a bibliography of entomology books for a variety of ages compiled by H. Mifflin) Cultural Entomology Digest http://www.insects.org (a collection of current projects and educational materials with lots of articles on insects in human culture including a bibliography) Entomation http://members.aol.com/entomation/entomation.html (entomation clip art for the computer) Insect Drawings http://www.life.uiuc.edu/Entomology/insectgifs.html (excellent pictures and drawings of insects that were used as teaching tools at the University of Illinois Department of entomology 50-60 years ago, historical and great for teaching about insects) Popular Classics in Entomology http://www.Colostate.edu/Depts/Entomology/readings.html (a bibliography of nontechnical books on the natural history of insects and the personal experiences of the entomologists who work on them) Young Entomologists' Society, Inc. http://insects.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/YES/YES.html (includes information about the club as well as interesting ideas and links to other sites). Address: 1915 Peggy Place, Lansing MI 48910-2553; Phone/fax: 517-8870499 E-mail: YESbugs@aol.com

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Arthropods American Tarantula Society Home Page http://concentric.net/~Dmartin/ats/index.shtml (information on ATS and basic care for tarantulas) Scorpion du jour http://wrbu.si.edu/www/stockwell/du_jour/scorpion_du_jourt.html (information and pictures of scorpions; scorpion-enthusiast mailing list) Sonoran Arthropod Studies Institute http://www.azstarnet.com/~sasi/ (information on SASI and arthropods of the Sonoran Desert detailed with lots of pictures and a nature trail)

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Formative Assessments ³Formative assessments are used to gain information that improves instruction and advances student learning.
Formative assessment entails both ³gathering information about children¶s ongoing development of ideas and skills and using this in modifying activities and the teacher¶s interventions to meet the children¶s needs´ (Harlen 2001, p. 64) This process of gathering and using information about student understanding is thus ongoing and cyclical.´

Resource: Science and Learning, March 2007, ³Assessing for Science Learning´, Michele H. Lee and Sandra K. Abell 

Administering the formative assessments is optional and the scores are NOT reported.  Formative assessments provide an opportunity to informally assess students after each investigation for instructional purposes.  The formative assessments do not serve as a ³practice´ for the end of the unit assessment.  A formative assessment is provided for each unit investigation.  A key is provided for each formative assessment.

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Name ____________________________________________ Investigation 1: Mealworms Formative Assessment

1. Mealworms need space, air, water, and A. food B. dirt C. wings

2. The stages of a mealworm are egg, larva, ________ and adult. A. molt B. pupa C. thorax
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3. What is the adult stage of the mealworm? A. fly B. worm C. beetle

4. Draw a mealworm.

Write one thing you know about mealworms.

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Investigation 1: Mealworms Formative Assessment Key

Item 1

Indicator 2.3.F.1.b

Scoring Tool 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Performance Criteria/Answer Food

2. 2.3.C.1.d

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Pupa

3. 2.3.C.1.d

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Beetle

4. 2.3.C.1.d

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Students can draw a mealworm and write one thing they have learned about mealworms. Example: They are not real worms. They molt their skin. They get water from their food. Etc.

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Name _______________________________________

Investigation 3: Milkweed Bugs Formative Assessment

1. Baby milkweed bugs are called A. worms B. ladybugs C. nymphs

2. What seeds do milkweed bugs eat? A. sunflowers B. peanuts C. apple
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3. When a milkweed sheds its own skin it is called

A. dressing B. climbing C. molting

4. Draw a milkweed bug.

Write one thing you know about milkweed bugs.

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Investigation 3: Mealworms Formative Assessment Key

Item

Indicator

Scoring Tool 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Performance Criteria/Answer Nymphs

1. 1.3.B.1.a

2. 2.3.F.1.b

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Sunflower

3. 1.3.B.2.d

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Molting

4. 2.3.C.1.d

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Students can draw a milkweed bug and write one thing they have learned about a milkweed bug.. Example: They are an insect. They molt their skin. They start out as an egg. Etc.

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Name _________________________________

Investigation 5: Butterflies Formative Assessment

1. What are the 3 parts of an adult insect? A. hair, foot, hand B. head, thorax, abdomen C. head, shoulder, toes

2. Where is the painted lady larva during its pupa stage? A. on the bottom of a cage B. in bed C. in a chrysalis
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3. A caterpillar metamorphosis (changes) in to a A. mealworm B. butterfly C. cricket 4. Draw a butterfly.

Write one thing you know about butterflies.

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Investigation 5: Butterflies Formative Assessment Key

Item

Indicator

Scoring Tool 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Performance Criteria/Answer Head, thorax, abdomen

1. 1.3.B.1.a

2. 2.3.C.1.d

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

In a chrysalis

3. 2.3.C.1.d

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Butterfly

4. 2.3.C.1.d

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Students can draw a butterfly and write one thing they have learned about a butterfly. Example: They start as an egg. They are in a chrysalis. The caterpillar eats a lot. The butterfly has orange and black wings. Etc.

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Name _____________________________________

Investigation 6: Other Insects Formative Assessment

1. Do crickets have wings? A. Yes B. No

2. Ants have ______ legs. A. two B. eight C. six

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3. Where do ants live? A. underground B. in a shoe C. in a house

4. Draw an ant.

Write one thing you know about ants.

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Investigation 6: Other Insect Formative Assessment Key

Item

Indicator

Scoring Tool 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Performance Criteria/Answer Yes

1. 3.A.1.a

2. 3.A.1.a

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Six

3. 3.A.1.c

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Underground

4. 3.A.1.a

1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer

Students can draw an ant and write one thing they have learned about an ant. Example: They live underground. They can carry more than their weight. They can be red or black. Some ants have wings. Ants have different jobs. Etc

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Science Assessment Collection Windows 

Teachers should determine the most appropriate date to administer the end of the module assessment, keeping in mind the dates they are due to Central Office.  End of the module assessment must be completed, scantrons bubbled, and received at Central Office by the dates listed below.

Unit Assessment Due Dates Unit 1 November 19, 2010 Unit 2 February 25, 2011 Unit 3 Last Day of School

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Unit Assessment Teacher Directions

To assist students in doing the best possible, you may read any text information to students as necessary. Remind students to read the directions for each task carefully. After completing each activity, students should self-evaluate their work by checking for completeness and making changes if necessary. Students should understand that if they use these strategies, they will achieve higher success.

Please remember that students should receive appropriate accommodations as mandated by their IEP and/or 504 Plan.

Time Consideration: This assessment can be administered in approximately one 60-minute session or two-30 minute sessions.

Materials and Handouts: General supplies such as pencils and erasers

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Science Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science

Student·s Name___________________________________ Teacher_________________________________________ School__________________________________________ Date____________________________________________
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1. All living things needs food, water, space, and

A. air

B. dirt

C. sun

2. What are the main parts of an insect? A. ears, nose, mouth

B. head, thorax, abdomen

C. head, shoulders, knees
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3. Which has the same number of legs as a butterfly?

A. fly B. dog C. mouse

4. A beetle has a hard covering on its body. Which of the following also has a hard covering on its body?

A. butterfly B. turtle C. snake
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5. Why would an animal have a hard covering on its body?

A. for storing food B. for balancing C. for protection

6. How can a scientist tell that a living thing is like its parent?

A. check their temperature B. look at their color, size, and parts

C. see how fast it moves

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7. If a bird has a broken wing, its offspring will

A. have a broken wing B. be missing a wing C. have both wings

8. Metamorphosis means to

A. jump

B. run

C. change
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9. The life cycle of an insect is

A. the same as other animals B. different from other animals C. the same amount of time for all insects

10. A ladybug is an insect because

A. it has 6 legs and 3 body parts

B. it flies or hops C. it is small
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11. Why are insects important to the food chain?

A. They can live anywhere.

B. Other animals eat them.

C. They don·t take much space.

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12. Which tool would you use to take a closer look at an ant?

A. thermometer

B. ruler

C. magnifier

13. What is one way you can help the environment?

A. litter

B. recycle C. cut down trees
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14. Why should you take care of the environment?

A. The environment is our home.

B. The environment needs less plants and animals. C. The environment won·t change.

15. Describe two ways living things protect themselves.

1.______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ 2.______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________

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16. Draw and label the lifecycle of a butterfly.

Word Box
Be sure to include all 4 stages.

adult

egg

larva

pupa

1

2

3

4

____________

_____________

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Insect Assessment Key 20 Points Possible
Item 1. Indicator 3.E.1.a Scoring Tool 1 Correct Answer 0 Incorrect Answer 2. 3.A.1.a 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer 3. 3.A.1.a 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer 4. 3.A.1.d 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer 5. 3.A.1d 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer 6. 3.C.2.b 1- Correct Answer 0 Incorrect Answer 7. 3.C.2.a 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer 8. 3.C.1.a 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer WCPS 2010-2011 Grade 1 Standard 3: Life Science C. C. B. C. B. A. B Performance Criteria/Answer A.

Office of Elementary Education 9. 3.A.1.a 1 - Correct answer B. 0 Incorrect answer 10. 3.A.1.d 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer 11. 3.C.1.a 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer 12. 3.B.1.a 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer 13. 6.B.1.a 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer 14. 6.B.1.c 1 - Correct answer 0 Incorrect answer 15. 3.B.2.b 2 2 Correct Answers 1 1 Correct Answer 0 Incorrect Answer 16. 3.A.1.a 4 4 Correct Stages 2 2 Correct Stages 1 1 Correct Stage 0 Completely incorrect Response may include but not limited to movement, taste bad, smell, shape, sound, camouflage, hard covering, sting, poison, and size. Stage 1: egg Stage 2: larva Stage 3: pupa Stage 4: adult A. B. C. B. A.

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