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What are LHINs?

In April 2007 the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care revamped the way health-care services are delivered, devolving the power to plan, fund and integrate health care services to 14 Local Health Integration Networks, better known as LHINs.

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ADMINISTRATIVE ZONES
Ontarios 14 LHINs

1. Erie St. Clair 2. South West 3. Waterloo Wellington 4. Hamilton-NiagaraHaldimand-Brant 5. Central West 6. Mississauga Halton

Toronto Central Central Central East South East Champlain

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12. North SimcoeMuskoka 13. North East 14. North West

WHAT IS A LHIN?
In 2006, Ontario introduced legislation creating a regional system of 14 Local Health Integration Networks. LHINs replaced the existing system of District Health Councils, which were minimally funded, largely toothless and limited to providing advice to the health ministry. LHINs were invested with far more power, at least in theory. They were given the authority to plan, integrate and fund local health services, including hospitals, Community Care Access Centres, community support services, long-term care, mental health and addictions services and community health centres. LHINs are responsible for handling just under half of Ontarios $45 billion health budget, with the province retaining control of physicians, public health, ambulance services and laboratories. Integration of health services and community engagement are two key mandates. Health service providers are required to comply with LHIN decisions on integration of services, and LHINs also have the power to move services from one provider to another. But LHINs dont have the authority to force the amalgamation of service providers, close a provider or force a hospital corporation, for example, to move services across its sites. Each LHIN has approximately 30 employees, and salaries for the 14 CEOs last year ranged from approximately $200,000 to $400,000. Each LHIN has nine board members, including a chairperson. Board chairs collect $350 for each day of LHIN business, the vice-chair receives $250 per day and remaining board members earn $200 per day. The Hamilton-Niagara-HaldimandBrant LHIN has approximately 1.4 million people and 250 health service providers within its borders, which stretch from Burlington to Brantford to Port Dover to Fort Erie. Its the second-largest LHIN in terms of population, with an annual budget of $2.2 billion.

SOURCE: ONTARIO LOCAL HEALTH INTEGRATION NETWORKS Dean Tweed, Steve Buist / THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR

An overview of LHIN finances


WHOS SPENDING THE MOST?
General and administration expenses per LHIN, 2010 HAMILTON-NIAGARAHALDIMAND-BRANT

$6,431,533 $6,102,387 $5,269,071 $5,227,563 $4,752,093 $4,679,829 $4,664,979 $4,657,862 $4,619,051 $4,536,973 $4,527,733 $4,398,066 $4,386,320 $4,176,716

Toronto Central South West Champlain North West North East Central East South East Erie St. Clair Central Central West North Simcoe Muskoka Mississauga-Halton Waterloo Wellington

TOTAL EXPENSES
For all 14 Ontario LHINs, 2010

TOP EARNERS
Consulting: $3.6 million (5.3%)
Number of LHIN personnel on Ontario's Public Sector Salary Disclosure list (earning $100,000 or more):

Salaries: $42.5 million (62.1%)

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Other: $19.5 million (28.5%)

Board expenses / per diems: $2.8 million (4.1%)

2009

2010

YEAR-TO-YEAR
2009 vs. 2010 expenses, all LHINs

General/adminstration expenses 2009: $67,413,210 2010: $68,430,176 Board per diems 2009: $962,850 2010: $879,569

Salaries 2009: $38,978,190 2010: $42,523,172 Board expenses 2009: $1,454,840 2010: $1,124,067

Board chair per diems 2009: $892,159 2010: $806,693 Consulting 2009: $6,154,825 2010: $3,573,612

SOURCE: ONTARIO LOCAL HEALTH INTEGRATION NETWORKS Dean Tweed, Steve Buist / THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR